Summary of “What to Know About Money in Your Late 30s and 40s”

You can also read about what you should know before you’re 20 and how to manage your money in your 20s and 30s. Stay tuned for more tips for your 50s, 60s and beyond.
Here’s what to know about money as you leave you enter into the second half of your career.
Really consider what you’ll want to do in that time, and what skills you’ll need to do it.
You don’t want to go into retirement with debt hanging over your head, although an increasing number of people do.
This is one of two potentially uncomfortable financial tasks you’ll want to get a handle on before it’s too late.
“Sometimes parents just need a little time to think about it.”.How to Talk to Your Parents About Money Without Being a Jerk.
Whom do you want to name as guardians for your children in the event that you and their other parent dies?
Whom do you want handling your financial affairs if you’re ever incapacitated? Whom do you want making medical decisions for you if you become unable to make them yourself?.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Google Struggles to Contain Employee Uproar Over China Censorship Plans”

Google bosses were scrambling to contain leaks and internal anger on Wednesday after the company’s confidential plan to launch a censored version of its search engine in China was revealed by The Intercept.
Company managers responded by swiftly trying to shut down employees’ access to any documents that contained information about the China censorship project, according to Google insiders who witnessed the backlash.
On a message board forum for Google employees, one staff member posted a link to The Intercept’s story alongside a note saying that they and two other members of their team had been asked to work on the Chinese censorship project, code-named Dragonfly.
Google previously launched a censored search engine in China in 2006, but pulled the service out of the country in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech, block websites, and hack Google’s computer systems.
A spokesperson for the New York-based group Human Rights in China said that Google had shown willingness to “Trade principles and values for access to the Chinese market.” The spokesperson added: “If Google wants to be a credible global technology leader and demonstrate its commitment to core values and responsible corporate citizenship, it has to do better than kneeling before an authoritarian party-state. In the long run, Google will lose more than its own principled employees who refuse to be complicit.”
Maya Wang, China researcher at Human Rights Watch, said Google’s plans risked abetting Chinese government abuses.
Some analysts have drawn comparisons between the censorship project and Project Maven, a Google initiative to develop artificial intelligence for U.S. military drones.
“Hopefully the outrage from Google employees will be enough to convince Google execs that they should not return to China, at least not like this.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Death to the Open Floor Plan. Long Live Separate Rooms.”

If someone asked me five years ago whether or not I thought the open floor plan would still be popular, I would have said no.
The open concepts from the oversized houses of the pre-recession era have only gotten more open.
The open floor plan as we currently understand it-an entry-kitchen-dining-living combination that avoids any kind of structural separation between uses-is only a few decades old.
I will refer to the latter from now on as an “Open concept,” in order to differentiate it from a traditional open floor plan.
Wealthy families in the 18th and 19th centuries had homes with several rooms for specific purposes, such as parlors, libraries, drawing rooms, smoking rooms, and servants’ quarters.
The reason why the first door to be omitted was frequently that between the living and dining rooms was because those rooms were considered “Public” spaces, a holdover from the hall-and-parlor Victorian times.
The closed floor plan, especially the closed kitchen, can help save energy by the simple principle of not heating and cooling rooms that are not currently in use, as well as by isolating rooms we want to keep warm or cool.
Instead of these-space-wasting, specialized rooms that are used relatively sparingly-why not just build common rooms with walls and doors? If you want to escape something unpleasant, you can do so without feeling banished or isolating yourself from everyone else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You’ve Got the Dreams but are You Doing the Work?”

Your dreams are as realistic as the work you’re willing to put in.
They’re asking us, “How bad do you want it? How much work will you still put in?”.
I have to give you fair warning: there is actually one thing that can stop you from doing your daily work.
If you don’t have a plan, if you don’t have realistic and actionable goals to pursue, you will not follow through with your dreams.
So how much work are you putting in? How often are you planning?
Because if you pick just one task, that’s going to be the most important task you could pick, right? Limiting your goals forces you to choose smarter, more significant goals.
If you commit to your one daily goal this week, and if you plan out that goal and check it off every day, and use that one daily goal as the foundation for a lifelong planning practice that you consistently perfect, you will get consistent, positive results.
So how much work are you putting in? How much are you planning?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s the final nail in the coffin of open plan offices”

Open plan offices have taken off because of a desire to increase interaction and collaboration among workers.
An innovative new study has found that employees in open plan offices spend 73% less time in face-to-face interactions.
The findings build on previous research, which has found open plan work environments compromise employees’ ability to focus and concentrate on their work.
The design of the workplace significantly influences this, by supporting or detracting from interdependent work.
Despite the pursuit of collaboration in workplaces, the need for concentration and focused individual work is also increasing.
Knowledge work requires employees to attend to specific tasks by gathering, analyzing, and making decisions using multiple sources of information.
Rather than a one-size-fits-all approach, as is traditional in open plan design, work environments should provide various options that support employees working effectively.
Evolving models of workplace design are seeking to achieve this, by providing different zones for different types of work and different needs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sky-High Deductibles Broke the U.S. Health Insurance System”

When Carla Jordan and her husband were hit with a cascade of serious medical issues, she knew that at least her family had health insurance through her job.
Health plans similar to the Jordans’ that put patients on the hook for many thousands of dollars are widespread and growing, but some employers are beginning to have second thoughts.
“Why did we design a health plan that has the ability to deliver a $1,000 surprise to employees?” Shawn Leavitt, a senior human resources executive at Comcast Corp., said at a conference in May. “That’s kind of stupid.” A handful of companies, including JPMorgan Chase & Co. and CVS Health Corp., have recently announced plans to reduce deductibles or cover more care before workers are exposed to the cost.
Half of all workers now have health insurance with a deductible of at least $1,000 for an individual, up from 22 percent in 2009, according to data from the Kaiser Family Foundation.
Carla’s job teaching computer science classes at a local high school gave them steady income and health benefits.
“I had one friend who was bankrupted with a health plan,” Gawande said at the Spotlight Health event in Aspen, Colorado, on Saturday.
About five years ago, CVS switched all of its 200,000 employees and their families to health-insurance plans with high deductibles.
She pointed out that health insurance companies’ stock prices, not to mention industry executive salaries, were both soaring, while the thousands of dollars in premiums she paid protected neither her family’s health nor its finances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tomorrow’s cities: Google’s Toronto city built ‘from the internet up'”

On Toronto’s Eastern waterfront, a new digital city is being built by Sidewalk Labs – a firm owned by Google’s parent Alphabet.
Sidewalk Labs promises to transform the disused waterfront area into a bustling mini metropolis, one built “From the internet up”, although there is no timetable for when the city will actually be built.
“Writing on news website The Conversation, Mariana Valverde, urban law researcher at the University of Toronto, said:”The Google folks have not approached the city in the usual, highly-regulated manner, but have been negotiating, in secret, with the arms-length Waterfront Toronto.
For its part, Sidewalk insists that this year will be all about consultation – with city leaders, local policymakers and the wider community, to ensure what is achieved in Toronto is something that “Meaningfully improves lives”.
As part of the planning process of bidding to develop the waterside location, the firm looked at 150 examples of smart cities, including those built from the ground up such as Masdar, in Abu Dhabi and Songdo in South Korea.
“One of the mistakes that previous cities have made is the idea that you can plan something from the top. That is not how cities work – they evolve organically.”
Mr Doctoroff is a big fan of Jane Jacobs, an urbanist who fled New York to live in Toronto and spent her life encouraging cities to improve their shared spaces.
Whether the Google firm’s city experiment will fulfil this promise is one many will be watching with interest.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tomorrow’s cities: Google’s Toronto city built ‘from the internet up'”

On Toronto’s Eastern waterfront, a new digital city is being built by Sidewalk Labs – a firm owned by Google’s parent Alphabet.
Sidewalk Labs promises to transform the disused waterfront area into a bustling mini metropolis, one built “From the internet up”, although there is no timetable for when the city will actually be built.
“Writing on news website The Conversation, Mariana Valverde, urban law researcher at the University of Toronto, said:”The Google folks have not approached the city in the usual, highly-regulated manner, but have been negotiating, in secret, with the arms-length Waterfront Toronto.
For its part, Sidewalk insists that this year will be all about consultation – with city leaders, local policymakers and the wider community, to ensure what is achieved in Toronto is something that “Meaningfully improves lives”.
As part of the planning process of bidding to develop the waterside location, the firm looked at 150 examples of smart cities, including those built from the ground up such as Masdar, in Abu Dhabi and Songdo in South Korea.
“One of the mistakes that previous cities have made is the idea that you can plan something from the top. That is not how cities work – they evolve organically.”
Mr Doctoroff is a big fan of Jane Jacobs, an urbanist who fled New York to live in Toronto and spent her life encouraging cities to improve their shared spaces.
Whether the Google firm’s city experiment will fulfil this promise is one many will be watching with interest.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Star Wars’ Plans, Ranked”

As a heist movie, Solo continues the Star Wars franchise’s long-cherished tradition of centering the movies’ final acts on elaborate plans.
The Death Star raid in A New Hope, the battle to destroy the new Death Star in Return of the Jedi, the plan hatched by the Resistance to destroy the Death Star-like Starkiller Base in The Force Awakens-you get the picture; there have been a lot of plans, many of which involve battle stations that can destroy planets.
Not all Star Wars plans are equal-some are low-key genius, and some are astonishingly short-sighted.
In honor of Solo’s release Friday, let’s revisit all of the plans from the Star Wars films over the years-even the small ones!-to determine which of them were somewhat realistic and/or well executed, and which ones probably could’ve used a second opinion.
Destroying the Death Star The Plan, Basically: Destroy the Death Star by nailing the equivalent of a full-court shot while wearing a blindfold; pray the Death Star doesn’t blow up the Rebel Base on Yavin 4 Pros: Wiping out the Empire’s biggest weapon; Luke becomes a Rebel legend; shoot your shot Cons: It all could have gone so terribly wrong.
The Rescue of Obi-Wan on Geonosis The Plan, Basically: Travel to Geonosis from Tatooine; rescue Obi-Wan Kenobi from Count Dooku prior to execution; somehow escape an actively hostile planet of droids and bug-like soldiers Pros: STAR WARS GLADIATOR PIT Cons: Oh, that wasn’t part of the plan?
Dumping R2-D2 on Tatooine The Plan, Basically: Hide the Death Star plans in the droid R2-D2; ship R2-D2 to Tatooine; hope R2-D2 finds Obi-Wan Kenobi, who is the only hope Pros: Meeting Luke Skywalker; “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope” Cons: Logistics; indentured servitude.
As far as Star Wars plans go, this is one of the simplest and most effective.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Disney World Travel Tips From Our Readers”

This week we hacked a theme park instead of a city, with a frankly intimidating 275 comments full of tips on visiting Disney World.
Save money”Bring your own food and drinks. Disney allows coolers and bags up to a certain size into the park but you are free to bring food and drinks into the park. Also, anywhere you can get fountain soft drinks will give you free cups of water.”-gatorbait28.
“If you’re going for more than 10 days over a 1 year period, the annual pass is the best deal. Annual passholders receive free parking at the parks. You also receive a discount at some dining locations and on some merchandise.”-PurpleWaterBottle.
It’s for guaranteeing spots at the best restaurants, and saving yourself the time and decision-making process once you get into the park.
Plan ahead”Make sure to book your 3 fast passes before going to the park. If you are staying at a resort on property, you can book fast passes up to 60 days in advance. If you are not staying on property, you can book fast passes up to 30 days in advance.”-gatorbait28.
“Once you decide to go on a trip, if you have a Target Red card, start buying Disney gift cards. You will get 5% off the face value. You can use the gift cards for anything in the parks, including food. We think of the cards as the Disney ‘savings’ account.”-Ron Jones.
“Animal Kingdom is notorious for having rare characters standing outside of their park entrance. We always make sure to pay attention to the right side when entering or leaving the park because you never know who you’ll see.”-Mel.”At Magic Kingdom, one great way to pass up the time when it’s crowded is to do the Sorcerers of the Magic Kingdom card game. It’s fun for kids and adults alike and you get some souvenir cards for free. You can get a pack of cards per person per day.”-echo125488.
“There are a ton of incredibly designed and themed resorts that are a treat just to explore. You can spend a whole day hopping from one resort to the next. If they ask why you’re there, tell them you’re eating at their full service restaurant. You can take buses either from the parks or Disney Springs. The best resorts are on the monorail in front of Magic Kingdom: The Grand Floridian, the Polynesian, and the Contemporary.”-mouseclicker.

The orginal article.