Summary of “The Men Who Have Taken Wiffle Ball to a Crazy, Competitive Place”

By the next spring he had begun work on a documentary about the sport, called “Yard Work,” and had made himself the commissioner of the Palisades Wiffle Ball League, which he now describes, on its Web site, as “The most recognized Wiffle league on the planet.”
Not yet in uniform, wore T-shirts with printed messages such as “A backyard game taken way too far” and “The 8th Annual Greenwich Wiffle Ball Tournament.” A couple of others, I gathered, responded not to their given names but to Wiffman and Johnny Wiffs, respectively.
A sidearm relief pitcher for the Chowan University baseball team, in North Carolina, he said that he prefers Wiffle ball because it allows him to deploy a more varied repertoire.
There are forces moving both around and inside the ball simultaneously as it travels; Bevelacqua told me that, as far as he understood it, once the ball reaches highway-speed-limit velocity, the swirling air inside begins to dominate and actually provides a boost of about ten per cent over the trajectory of a solid baseball.
In general an “Uncut” Wiffle ball is thought to be too inconsistent-too vulnerable to imbalances among the forces acting on the respective hemispheres of the ball-and therefore a recipe for endless walks.
“If you don’t use the yellow bat, Wiffle Ball will have very little to do with you,” Bevelacqua said.
“I started in the Hudson Valley Wiffle Ball League,” he told me.
His real-estate work was suffering, not only from all the weekends when he couldn’t show houses but from long nights editing his popular video series “This Month in Wiffleball,” and from tweeting at David Cone, the former big-league pitcher, every time Cone mentioned Wiffle ball during his YES Network commentary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: what sports have taught me about race in America”

As the Guardian’s series on race and sports starts today – and we mark two years since Colin Kaepernick first knelt during the national anthem – I am reminded that whenever an NBA player comes close to shattering one of my dusty old records, eager journalists contact me to ask how I feel.
Sports is the most popular form of entertainment, with Americans spending about $56bn on sports events last year, compared to about $11bn on movies.
For African Americans, sports has all those values – but it also has some extra implications.
For people of color, professional sports has always been a mirror of America’s attitude toward race: as long as black players were restricted from taking the field, then the rest of black Americans would never truly be considered equal, meaning they would not be given equal educational or employment opportunities.
Sports may be the best hope for change regarding racial disparity because it has the best chance of informing white Americans of that disparity and motivating them to act.
To white America, the history of US sports is a rising graph of remarkable achievements of physical and mental strength.
Some see sports as a path for their children to escape the endless cycle of poverty.
We can’t promote professional sports as a real hope any more than we can endorse the lottery as a career strategy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Twenty-Five-Year Journey of Magic: The Gathering”

“You spend a lot of time on your own.” Magic gave her nerdy friends something to talk about in the schoolyard, a “Common language.” The next year, Mirage, a set of Magic cards with African fantasy elements, came out.
For especially dedicated players, Channel Fireball, a Magic event organizer that takes its name from a devastating two-card attack, puts on some sixty “Grand Prix” tournaments every year in countries across the planet, from Japan and Poland to Australia and Brazil.
A number of Magic fans I spoke to told me that top-level players like Williams, Jon Finkel, Melissa DeTora, and Reid Duke, known as the Gentleman of Magic, brought them into the game in the way that middle schoolers join Little League to be like the Astros’ José Altuve or Mookie Betts of the Red Sox.
A couple of hours later, at the birthday dinner Magic threw for its twenty-fifth anniversary, Josh Lee Kwai, a Magic YouTube personality, introduced me to the N.F.L. defensive end Cassius Marsh, a frequent guest of Lee Kwai’s popular video series “Game Knights.” Lee Kwai wanted to show me that Magic players come in all shapes and sizes.
In a Tumblr post recently resurfaced by two Magic players, Rosewater told fans dismayed by these gender disparities that, although Wizards wanted its player base to change, Magic was male-dominated, and the art simply followed “The current natural gender skew of the game.”
Eventually, he came to realize that he wanted the Magic world to reflect not just the Magic community but the world at large, and he and his colleagues began to insure that the cards had a more equitable gender split.
Despite the existence of digital platforms like Magic Online and the soon-to-be-released Magic Arena, many of them said, it was, at heart, a game done with paper cards at a table in physical space.
In Las Vegas, on the final day of the tournament, I watched Rosewater, the new de-facto face of the game, holding a microphone and standing in shorts and a vintage Magic T-shirt beneath a statue of Serra Angel, a sword-wielding winged woman who has been illustrated and re-illustrated on different cards since the dawn of Magic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jackie MacMullan on OCD ADHD medication and marijuana in NBA mental health”

The state of mental health in the NBA Mental health in the NBA’s black community To medicate or not? A difficult decision Behind the anxiety and anger of an NBA ref The future of mental health in the NBA. Eight times.
By middle school, Larkin’s symptoms were worsening, so his mother found him a mental health professional, who recommended an antidepressant medication to help him cope.
“I’m not depressed,” Larkin said to his mother.”Am I?”. He tried the pills. They helped alleviate some of his OCD symptoms, but he says they also robbed him of his drive and his energy, qualities that separated him as a budding basketball star.”The medication flat-lined me,” Larkin says.
The stigma of mental health is one thing; that stigma increases tenfold when their peers discover they’re on “Meds.” It’s a gamble that some players don’t believe is worth taking, because it could affect their ability to be employed by a skeptical coach or general manager.”I’ve been on and off medication my whole life,” explains one NBA star, who debated identifying himself for this story but ultimately chose to remain anonymous.
“I’d like to think it doesn’t matter, but I’m not sure that’s true when free agency comes around. I’m choosing to keep my life private because I don’t need the s– on social media. It’s hard enough already.”.”DR. WILLIAM PARHAM, the Los Angeles-based psychologist who was hired by the players’ union to oversee the growing mental health crisis in the NBA, acknowledges some mental health issues may require medication.
“But too often, medication is treating the symptoms, not the real issues,” Parham says. While the population of NBA players with OCD is minuscule, the debate over medication also pertains to anxiety, depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, which, according to John Lucas, the Houston Rockets assistant coach who runs a wellness and aftercare substance-abuse recovery program for athletes, is rampant in the NBA.”I have so many guys from the NBA who were put on ADHD medication, and they didn’t want to be on it,” Lucas says.
Since Sanders’ suspension, the NBA has shored up its mental health policy and sent an internal memo to all of its teams on May 31 with suggested guidelines that include: securing the player’s privacy regarding his mental health; retaining a professional with experience in clinical mental health issues; identifying a psychiatrist who will be readily available to players; and providing mental health awareness materials to the team.
“We need to create a nonjudgmental space where there is no place for the opinion that your way of thinking is better than everyone else’s. If a player is self-medicating because that’s what makes them feel better, or at least that’s what they think, we have to find a way to provide them alternatives that are collaborative and confidential.”. Lucas says it’s imperative for NBA personnel to do a better job of identifying players with mental health issues sooner and to be more proactive in convincing them to seek counseling.”The guy who’s on a road trip and isolates himself is the one suffering from depression,” Lucas says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Listen to the Kids’: How Atlanta Became the Black Soccer Capital of America”

The city, in collaboration with Soccer in the Streets, a local organization whose mission is empowering and engaging local youth with football programming, refashioned the space as a field, primarily for the enjoyment of idle inner-city kids.
“Niggas always want what’s next,” says Aaron Dolores, owner of Black Arrow, a lifestyle brand dedicated to the intersection of soccer and black culture.
Melissa Franco, Best Buy Soccer’s assistant manager for both the Atlanta and Marietta locations, says that since the 2014 World Cup, youth interest in soccer has “More than doubled” business.
While many young, black ATLiens are finding themselves anew, outside city limits, soccer has long been life.
Generations before the A had an MLS club, before there was a pitch atop the MARTA station, the soccer capital of Atlanta was located in the northeast corner of the metropolitan area in a small suburb called Clarkston.
Jeremiah’s team still gets the W. Clarkston may be the mecca of black Atlanta’s soccer scene, but the city’s relationship to the sport hasn’t always been so warm.
According to Lauren Glancy, director of youth programs at Soccer in the Streets, Atlanta’s youth soccer landscape has a high barrier to entry, which removes the focus from a child’s talent and places it on the economic class of their home.
The future of Atlanta soccer is also the future of American soccer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The education of Derek Jeter, baseball CEO”

MIAMI – FOR TWO DECADES as New York Yankees shortstop, Derek Jeter distinguished himself with his impeccable work habits and mind-numbing consistency.
“Amid numerous reports that Jeter wants to rid Marlins Park of the”Homer” sculpture in center field, Jeter refuses to be pinned down publicly.
DEREK JETER THE PLAYER developed a great comfort level over 25 years in uniform.
“I’m a frustrated game watcher,” Jeter says.”Over the years, I heard people say, ‘He doesn’t like to watch baseball.
“In my mind, baseball needs to cater to the younger demographic,” Jeter says.”It’s not always about who wins, but the experience you have.
“That’s one of my goals during the season – to pick his brain and talk to him about how he prepared to play 162 games at shortstop,” Rojas says.”I feel like it’s a blessing that we have Derek Jeter around and we can take advantage of that.
It’s all part of the balance Jeter must strike as a new team owner and baseball icon.
He’s the best, most persuasive advocate for the Marlins franchise, but he wants it to be less the Derek Jeter Show and more a long-range team effort to build something that lasts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Latest News, Videos and Highlights”

Cambage can’t afford it personally either-not playing in the WNBA, where salaries range from a minimum of $41,202 to maximum of $115,500.
Cambage leads the league in scoring and is second in rebounding in her first season back in the United States after playing for the Tulsa Shock in 2011 and 2013.
Cambage is already looking ahead, as she signed to play in China.
As Cambage moved on to play in Zhejiang, China, her depression deepened.
After 48 hours of being on suicide watch, back in December 2016, Cambage decided to move back home with her mom.
“You gotta give your respect when you see somebody like Liz going hard, hard, hard, never backing down,” says Sylvia Fowles of the Minnesota Lynx, who is often matched up against Cambage.
Sometimes Cambage thinks about the fans on sidelines at road games in Minnesota and Phoenix screaming at her, “We hate that you’re on the other team, but we love having you back!” The parts of her that are hard, that are rough, soften.
Cambage missed two games because of the neck injury she suffered against the Sun.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a 32-year-old basketball player plans to play professionally with one arm”

Whitaker sees this and fakes a spin move back to his left, which sends his opponent barreling into a screen set by a hulk of a man, freeing Whitaker Jr. He doesn’t finish the play with a step-back jumper or body-contorting reverse layup, as to not ruin the play with his own missed shot.
For the past three years, Whitaker, 32, has been hooping across the globe, working to become a professional basketball player, possibly the first to do it while missing an arm.
The elder Whitaker was a good shooter, but he’s most responsible for teaching his son how to dribble, preaching that Whitaker Jr. keep the ball on the tips of his fingers while handling it.
What helped Whitaker Jr. in basketball was that he was always energetic, whether on the court or off.
As the family waited for the first responders to arrive, Whitaker Jr. lay on the ground, the poison slowly creeping up his arm.
Watching Whitaker Jr. play basketball is like viewing a magician’s trick.
Michael “Troy” Hamlett, a youth basketball coach in Jacksonville, was the only coach who wanted Whitaker Jr. on his recreational league team after the accident.
In the early years after the accident, defenders would play off Whitaker Jr., at times blatantly leaving him wide open on possessions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The true story of how a mystery football injury inspired a community”

It would be ignorant to suggest football had nothing to do with what happened to Bailey, but it’s equally true that no obvious event could have either foretold it or prevented it.
Lewis delivered a final message: “If we’re going to play for Bailey, then we’re going to play like Bailey.”
“If we’re going to play for Bailey, then we’re going to play like Bailey.”
Bailey and Sage would watch every possible football game from Thursday night through Monday night.
Every Friday, Tara would post a photo on Facebook of Bailey holding up a sign that read “Go Huskies.” The student body voted Bailey homecoming king, and the mounted jersey rode through town in the parade and took the field at halftime with Haley Benbow, the homecoming queen.
It’s remarkable how closely Bailey’s recovery paralleled the Huskies’ run through the playoffs.
What if the friend didn’t persuade Bailey to complete the summer credits? What if the dad didn’t instill a love for football in his son?
Benbow lets go of Bailey’s elbow and walks ahead. Bailey climbs the stairs alone, slowly but with determination, his body listing a bit to the left.

The orginal article.

Summary of “UNC football player Tommy Hatton’s life after concussions”

One year has passed since Tommy Hatton took his final hit on a football field, the one to the side of his head that resulted in his fourth concussion – the one that made him decide, after months of headaches, dizziness, light sensitivity and pain, that he could no longer risk his future.
Hatton had been perhaps the most respected member of The University of North Carolina football team’s offensive line, a player who took great pride, in his words, in “Just physically dominating dudes for four quarters.” He’d been a freshman All-American, a leader among his teammates.
After his fourth concussion Hatton rode the bus for about two weeks, until his father pulled him out of the team hotel and cared for Hatton at the off-campus house Hatton shared with three teammates.
With his symptoms cleared, at last, Hatton sequestered himself inside of a film room in the UNC football offices.
Hatton saw a team of doctors, starting with Dr. Mario Ciocca, UNC’s football team’s physician who has practiced for more than 20 years at UNC. When he began working with the football team in the 1990s, treatments to concussions were crude relative to today’s standard.
His mother has wondered whether its severity could be traced to how quickly Hatton returned from his third concussion, which happened during his first preseason training camp at UNC. By then, Hatton had already been diagnosed with two concussions – the first when he was in seventh grade, and the second during his sophomore year of high school.
The medical staff at UNC was aware that Hatton had suffered two concussions before he arrived on campus.
Hatton asked about players who’d experienced a high number of concussions and played on anyway, like Steve Young and Merril Hoge, and then asked about Luke Kuechly, the Carolina Panthers linebacker whom Sports Illustrated described last year as “The poster child of the concussion problem in the NFL.” That prompted a brief cost-benefit analysis that Hatton could still recite months later: “Kuechly’s playing for $20 million a year. You’re playing for nothing.”

The orginal article.