Summary of “Baker Mayfield on the Haters, that Ohio State Flag Apology, and Winning”

After leading the Browns to a 28-16 victory, Mayfield is asked by a reporter what clicked for him on that particular afternoon.
The night after enjoying my Baker Mayfield steak at Hyde Park, I was able to sample a Feeling Dangerous beer downtown.
For the first time in a long time, Mayfield had the Cleveland Browns feeling dangerous.
Coming out of high school in Austin, Mayfield received only a handful of scholarship offers.
With some encouragement from his dad, Mayfield turned down his scholarship offers.
Mind you: Oklahoma wasn’t exactly in need of Baker Mayfield.
He wasted no time seeking out head coach Bob Stoops, providing the coach with an early introduction to that Mayfield moxie.
Baker Mayfield says and does what he believes to be true: “Quarterbacks, by the textbook, are supposed to be reserved, cool, calm, and collected,” he tells me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is ‘pink for girls and blue for boys’ biology or conditioning?”

From a fairly young age, possibly as young as 12 months, it appears that boys and girls show preferences for different kinds of toys.
If gendered toy preference is an expression of a biology, then the interpretation tends to be that it is inevitable and shouldn’t be interfered with, and that those who challenge it should be sent away with the mantra ‘Let boys be boys and girls be girls’ ringing in their ears.
Do children agree with these ratings? Do all boys choose boy toys, all girls choose girl toys? Brenda Todd, a psychologist from City, University of London, researches children’s play, and decided to study their behaviour with toys from dolls to cars.
The study revealed an element of self-fulfilling prophecy: boys played longer with the toys that had been labelled ‘boy toys’, and the girls with the ‘girl toys’.
Although the younger girls appeared to be more interested in girl toys than boys were in boy toys, this interest wasn’t sustained in the middle group, where there was actually a drop in the amount of time they spent with girl toys.
The overall conclusion was that boys played with male-typed toys more than girls, and girls with female-typed toys more than boys.
Girls were much more gender-label compliant at one level, quite strongly rejecting the blue boy toys and approving of the pink girl toys.
Why might the same not be true for boys – why would they not be equally enthused by a ‘girly’ melon baller if they could have it in blue? Could it be that, while girls are generally not discouraged from playing with boy toys, and might occasionally be given permission to pick up the odd hammer, the reverse is not the case, with evidence of active intervention, particularly from fathers, if boys appear to be choosing to play with girl toys?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mario Maker II is a whole language.”

It’s the latest in a long line of creativity tools from the Mario multiverse, dating back all the way to Mario Paint for the Super NES. In Super Mario Maker 2, as in original Super Mario Maker for the Wii U, players create and share their own levels based off classic Mario games.
Released on June 28, Mario Maker 2 has now gives players new ways to make levels in the style of classic Mario titles.
Mario Maker always prominently featured a list of the most popular user-made levels, but a new addition to Mario Maker 2, tags, help narrow things down to the types of levels an individual wants to play.
Another tag is for music levels, which are similarly easy and visually busy, but instead of moving Mario through dangers, there’s a space to walk serenely along the bottom of the screen while the level puts on a music-accompanied show for the ears and eyes.
As you gain experience in Mario Maker, it becomes easier to tell at a glance a good level from the many terrible ones that exist.
Poorly created levels tend to use less of the screen-having Mario move in either the bottom or middle third with the remaining space unused.
Whether you’re watching an auto-Mario play itself or attempting a crazy-hard Kaizo level, the most exciting thing about the language of Mario Maker 2’s makers is that the creator’s actual language doesn’t seem to matter at all.
Unlike any other multiplayer, creative, or collaborative game I can think of, there’s no point in a Mario level when you’re called upon to read or converse in the language the level creator speaks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the Gamer Grandpas: The Seniors Who Spend Retirement Playing ‘Fortnite'”

“I had an online friend who I knew was a serious gamer – she’d even reviewed games for a magazine for a time – and I asked her to recommend a game and teach me how to play it,” he tells me.
“If I’m really into a game, I’ll play during weekdays as well.” And while Star Wars: The Old Republic is still his favorite – “It’s like comfort food; I’ve played all factions, characters and expansions, sometimes several times” – he also enjoys trying new games.
Obviously, it’s probably inevitable that younger generations who have grown up with video games will wheel a cart full of controllers and game systems into retirement homes.
In retirement Michael plays almost every night, “After supper and time with the wife, for about two hours. I try to limit it to that so it won’t get out of hand. It’s a great way to spend time, and it’s fundamentally good to challenge your brain with puzzles and hand-eye difficulties. People, especially us males, need archetypal hero stories and the means to strive to be that hero. Games are a safe place to achieve those needs.”
“It always bugged me that people will sit and watch eight hours of television, but then say playing video games is a waste of time,” adds John, a 60-year-old in San Francisco who dedicates roughly three hours a day to gaming.
“Loneliness is a growing issue with seniors, but gaming grandpas are able to find community in their favorite video games – whether that’s literally in video games, or simply having something in common with younger generations. John, for example,”spent a lot of time playing World of Warcraft and was in a guild, had a real-life meetup with all of the members in San Francisco to see the Warcraft movie.
“I plan to game for as long as I can,” Michael responds when I ask him if he’ll eventually bring his games to a retirement home.
“Well, my generation invented the internet and all the technologies that go along with it. So for those of us seniors who have been using computers for years, gaming provides a wonderful way to structure our time and to have fun. Honestly, gaming has been nothing less than a great boon to seniors.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “For Women Musicians, Maybelle Carter Set The Standard And Broke The Mold”

For Women Musicians, Maybelle Carter Set The Standard And Broke The Mold One of the most indispensable guitarists of all time, Carter was a quiet revolutionary.
So why doesn’t Maybelle make any of these lists? This glaring oversight, that so few women are credited for their contributions to the guitar, sends a cold chill through my body.
Are we still fighting in a man’s game as we try to build viable careers? If Maybelle Carter – mother of country music, without whom country and rock and roll guitar would not exist – can’t make the great guitar player list, how can women musicians expect to be seen at all?
A woman of craft rather than of spectacle, Maybelle Carter was more than a great guitar player: She was a perfect bandmate.
If the Carter family is the bloodline of country music, Mother Maybelle is the very backbone.
Today, decades later, many, many more women are on the road; I imagine that would make Maybelle deeply happy.
Women managers, women running production, sound and lights, women booking venues, women playing bass, women drummers, women rocking, women raising children on the road: We are Maybelle’s spiritual granddaughters.
My little daughter runs through the room; Maybelle the innovator, my own grandmother and the invisible emotional work of women throughout history lay just beneath the surface of whoever she is becoming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Flagrant Foul: Benching Teen Moms Before Title IX”

After Christoffer got married, taking the last name Rubel, and gave birth to a daughter in 1970, the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union denied her eligibility to play basketball her senior year.
As Rubel told the Des Moines Register soon after she filed her lawsuit, “A Russian girl who is married and the mother of three took gold medals at the last Olympics – that proves something.”
Ever since the sport took hold in Iowa in the early 1900s, the state has had a strong tradition of girls’ basketball – it was even once referred to as the “Capital of women’s basketball.” Prior to the passing of Title IX in 1972, of the nearly 300,000 American girls that played high school sports, 20 percent were Iowans, of whom almost half played basketball.
If Rubel – a married student with a 1-month-old at home – was allowed to play, the entire school would lose its athletic certification, which would effectively disquality all of Ruthven’s girls’ teams from being able to compete in any sports.
According to a story in the Register, “It’s hard to find anyone here who doesn’t think Jane Rubel should play basketball if she wants to.” Hackett – Rubel’s friend and teammate – told the paper that all the young people she’d talked to in surrounding towns supported Rubel’s desire to play, calling the lawsuit the topic of discussion at Friday night high school football game.
Cooley “Actually believed I would’ve been a really bad influence for the image of girls’ basketball,” Rubel says.
Ruthven led by nine points after the first quarter when, according to Rubel, “The refs just started calling fouls and just whatever else they could to even out the game. And there was like five out of the six of us in foul trouble before the game closed.” And though no Ruthven player fouled out, Everly still attempted 28 free throws to Ruthven’s 15, a glaring disparity.
Several players in northern Iowa had been waiting for a ruling on Rubel’s case before deciding whether to challenge the IGHSAU’s policy – Cooley specifically cited a “Girl in Gruver” named Kaylynn Reinhardt Anderson that “Was preparing to file a suit of her own” – and their eligibilities were reinstated.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Oh my God, how can we do this?'”

STEPHEN VOGT: My brother Danny, who was 13, we were avid Giants fans, avid baseball fans, always playing baseball, pretending to be the Giants, playing video games.
The biggest thing for us, as kids, was we didn’t understand the difference between the players and the owners, it was, “Why would they lock out? Why would they strike? Why would they stop playing baseball?”.
Our club president, Claude Brochu, was a promoter of playing with replacement players.
How we had pieced that team together, how the people fit, Don Mattingly would have been a shoo-in Hall of Famer if that season had been played.
The strike started careers, but mostly, it ended careers: 57 players played their final major league game in August 1994, 19 played their final game on Aug. 11, 1994.
We did a study of how much money the players would otherwise have gotten paid, and what they did get paid, if we had taken the clubs’ proposal.
We all knew that the game was bigger than the players who played it.
If any big league player has a problem with it, I’ll take the heat, I made you play.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kids aren’t playing enough sports. The culprit? Cost”

The Aspen Institute, through its Project Play initiative, looked at research from the Sports & Fitness Industry Association that found that in 2018, only 38% of kids aged 6 to 12 played team sports on a regular basis – down from 45% a decade earlier – and it decided to find out why.
The Aspen Institute found that travel is now the costliest element of youth sports and that on average across all sports, parents spent $196 per sport and per child annually to travel.
A staff of coaches and volunteers who know the sports and care about what they are teaching the kids helps, too, he said.
“It’s not like a panic button. Kids are always going to be interested in sport. The whole idea is, how do we get a lot of kids playing and have really good experiences?” Dan Gould, director of the Institute for the Study of Youth Sports at Michigan State University, told ESPN. “If every youth sports coach in America’s goal was to have kids fall in love with sport, they’re going to be more active, healthy, safe and get the benefits. We better keep our eye on the ball and take care of it.”
Gould said the drop in participation in youth sports is due to a “Multifactor” reason, with cost definitely at the top.
“People forget the true purpose of sports for kids is a developmental experience to help each kid fall in love with physical activity, become healthy, learn some things about themselves,” he said.
“How do we make sports more for kids and less about the professional model? The professional model is cool, but you don’t give kids a college textbook when they’re in kindergarten.”
Currently, HHS is developing a National Youth Sports Strategy, as directed by an executive order by President Donald Trump in early 2018 that aims to motivate more kids to play team sports.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The hottest new board games from Gen Con 2019”

INDIANAPOLIS-If it’s early August, you can count on one thing: we’re gonna be in downtown Indianapolis with 70,000 other board gamers, forgoing sleep, food, and general wellbeing to play a truly ridiculous amount of new tabletop games at Gen Con, the self-described “Best Four Days in Gaming.” Gen Con is America’s largest and longest-running tabletop games convention.
Then there are the games-more games than you could play in a lifetime, all being released at once.
Roleplaying games were sadly outside the scope of this article, so be sure to check out our coverage of perhaps the most anticipated roleplaying title at this year’s Gen Con: Pathfinder.
Pandemic: Rapid Response, a new Target-exclusive game, puts a “Real-time” spin on the co-op classic, trading Pandemic’s globetrotting card collecting for frantic, desperate dice rolling.
When I first heard that Fantasy Flight Games was releasing a new Marvel living card game, I was instantly bored.
Co-op CCG-type games are few and far between, and the ones that FFG has released in the past have been generally excellent and a nice change of pace from the countless two-player card battlers choking the market.
Marvel Champions seems to take inspiration from both of those earlier FFG games while injecting some Marvel thematic flair into the mix.
The game looks like it might be a bit lighter than some of the other FFG card games we’re used to but we’re hoping it will still be a fun, continuously updated co-op romp.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Escape rooms are very big business”

Brands like HBO and Ford have been creating promotional escape rooms for years now; Red Bull runs a whole Escape Room World Championship.
Pop culture is so saturated with escape rooms that this past January, Columbia Pictures released the pulpy horror flick Escape Room, which should not be confused with either of the other two recent horror movies about escape rooms also called Escape Room.
That’s a common misconception, Scott Nicholson, a professor at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario and the world’s leading scholar of escape rooms, tells me, “Not all escape rooms are about escaping a room.” The name, he agrees, is a problem, mostly because it does not connote “Collaborative adventure!” so much as “Claustrophobia!” or “Panic!” and that’s just such a limited understanding of what an escape room can be.
The Spiras, who are in their early 30s and live in Weehawken, New Jersey, write Room Escape Artist, the blog of record for escape rooms.
For Nicholson, the escape room scholar, that was part of what drew him in: Creating escape rooms requires a wide-ranging skill set, and so does playing them.
“The Unbelievably Lucrative Business of Escape Rooms” didn’t exactly say you should open an escape room, but it did suggest that maybe you could open an escape room, and maybe, if you did, it wouldn’t be that hard to get rich quick.
“We wouldn’t be able to make such a game for that anymore. Now that’s around half of what you’d need.” As the line between immersive theater performance and escape room gets blurrier, more escape rooms are hiring actors, and the trouble with actors is they have to be paid.
“The future of escape rooms,” says Chris Lattner bluntly, “Will be that only the very good escape room companies will survive. And the others will just die out.” Which, from his perspective, is just fine, because he is bored.

The orginal article.