Summary of “A star flutist has sued the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Her case could change how orchestras pay men and women.”

BOSTON – On a winter day 14 years ago, the Boston Symphony Orchestra announced that it had finally found a new principal flutist.
“You look at the number of women that graduate from conservatories and then you look at the number of women in the top leadership positions in orchestras, and it’s not 50-50 still. Women need to see equality, and they need to see fairness in order to believe that that’s possible.”
Elizabeth Rowe, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s principal flute player, at her home in Boston in November.
Symphony Hall, the home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra.
A Post analysis of tax records and orchestra rosters shows that although women make up nearly 40 percent of the country’s top orchestras, when it comes to the principal, or titled, slots, 240 of 305 – or 79 percent – are men.
The Chicago orchestra is one of the country’s “Big five,” which also includes the orchestras in Boston, Cleveland, Philadelphia and New York.
Orchestra managers interviewed by The Post stressed that they do not like that there is a pay gap and concede that women are underrepresented in titled positions.
St. Louis Symphony Orchestra flute player Mark Sparks earned $166,191 in 2016, according to the most recent tax documents; principal oboist Jelena Dirks doesn’t rank high enough to be listed on tax returns.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My life with ‘Super Smash Bros.'”

If gamers must insist on being taken seriously, their arguments dissolve when talking about Super Smash Bros.
The original Super Smash Bros., released in 1999 for the Nintendo 64, featured 12 playable characters; Ultimate, released last Friday for the Nintendo Switch, and the fifth game in the series, features 76 for now.
Franchise has remained the most prominent game throughout my life.
Unlike more sprightly video game protagonists, Arthur moves sluggishly, forcing you to appreciate the game’s thousands of interlocking ambient details.
In the same way one buys new books even though they have a stack of unfinished ones on the nightstand, I’m sure to distract myself with other games – for example, Super Smash Bros.
Exploring the massive fictional world of a game like Red Dead Redemption 2 can be fun, in a sense, but many of these labyrinthine games, several of which are released every year, lack the narrative propulsion required to keep going instead of meandering and crapping out.
The same randomly generated, repeatable element fuels the success of online games like Call of Duty and Fortnite, but unlike those Smash Bros.
Though it’s fundamentally a kid’s game – again, Mega Man vs. Pikachu – these inherent traits make it an ideal fit for the unpredictable schedule and winnowing time slots of adult life, as well as a reassuring presence considered how wildly unforgiving some newer games can feel to those who aren’t willing to log the dozens of hours required to learn the mechanics.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Next Great Chess Boom Is Here”

Unlike some countries that have made chess a part of every child’s education, or supported chess players the way we support artists or athletes, or even used international chess competitions as a source of national pride, Americans treat chess as a mild curiosity.
How should they present chess to their audience? Should they treat chess like a sport? The St. Louis Chess Club and Chess.com seemed to believe they should, as their streams and commentators closely mimicked those of televised sporting events, with constant chatter, colorful banter, and onscreen graphics.
While chess officials puzzle over how to ignite the game’s next boom, some players say it may already be here.
“It depends on what your content is and who your subscribers are. If you make videos about cats and your audience are people who like funny cat videos, they will be served ads about cat food. Those ads generate less revenue. The people who like chess are doctors or lawyers and they will browse about car insurance or real estate. The ads are customized for the viewer. People think because I have a chess channel it’s harder for me to be self-sustaining. Not really. My 300,000 viewers on a chess channel may equal 3 million on a cat channel.”
There is broad acknowledgement that what is being created in a chess game has some aesthetic value, even if only to the chess faithful who know enough about chess to appreciate it.
“This is what Duchamp said - not all artists are chess players, but all chess players are artists,” he said, referring to an oft-quoted remark from the artist Marcel Duchamp, who at one point considered giving up the visual arts to focus on playing chess full time.
“Everyone who loves chess really loves it. There’s a barrier to entry, but people who get over it are passionate about chess.” Shahade coauthored a book about Duchamp and has lectured on his chess games, and she is an artist herself.
“Until you know a good bit about chess, you don’t even possess the illusion of understanding it. Most other activities are not like this. I know nearly nothing about poker, opera, football, piano, and surrealist art, but this doesn’t stop me from enjoying them occasionally. By contrast, someone who does not play chess will never enjoy looking at a great chess game.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Carmelo Anthony is the last great American ball hog”

Simply put, Anthony looked like the most-skilled big man in a generational draft class, and he’d just shown his championship credentials on college basketball’s biggest stage.
The problem: Anthony embraces an analytically incorrect style.
Russell Westbrook drained two quick 3s and cut the lead. The Jazz called timeout, and Billy Donovan subbed out Anthony for Jerami Grant.
After the Jazz targeted Anthony on a pick-and-roll that ended with Donovan Mitchell torching Anthony on a basic switch, Donovan had no choice.
In 194 minutes with Anthony on the court, the Jazz outscored the Thunder by 58 points and the Thunder had a net rating of minus-12.6.
In the 94 minutes with Anthony on the bench, the Thunder outscored the Jazz by 32 points and had a net rating of plus-18.1.
It wouldn’t matter if Carmelo Anthony and Kobe Bryant were more gifted shooters than James Harden.
Like MJ and Kobe, Carmelo Anthony loves to shoot from those blue areas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Expectations and Realities of Six-Man Football in Small-Town Texas”

On the afternoon of August 31, New Home School football players had just rallied to edge out the cheerleaders in a team hula-hoop competition when junior Riley Stokes-dressed as a leopard-grabbed a cordless microphone.
For more than three decades, the town of a little more than 350-located about 20 miles south of Lubbock-has been represented by a six-man football team, the University Interscholastic League’s special concession to its smallest schools.
Mayor Harry Schneemann, who played football for Leakey in the early 1960s, noted the lack of a true industry in the 410-person town.
Despite qualifying for six-man football, Leakey has played eleven-man ever since.
Donnie Dutton, who served as the school’s athletic director for the past four years, said Leakey’s motivation for playing up for so long was primarily convenience-there was a dearth of six-man opponents located within a reasonable distance, which meant away games could be hard to navigate.
Six-man is played on a smaller field, requires fifteen yards for a first down instead of ten, allows all offensive players to catch a pass, and requires an additional exchange of the ball following the snap from center for an offensive player to run past the line of scrimmage.
Last winter, Leakey hired Shannon Williams, a football coach with a strong background in six-man play.
“There’s a lot of kids, a lot of hungry kids. Everything that will be taught to them will be my program, so that’s all they will know about six-man. You’re not going into a town that will press for spread offense or tight, anything like that. Everything is new and they’re eager for it.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Home Field Disadvantage”

According to data gathered by Baseball for All, approximately 100,000 girls play baseball at the junior level making up about 2 percent of total players.
Not to play baseball in the major leagues, but to play professionally.
The two most prominent former AAGPL players to attend were Maybelle Blair, who played for the Peoria Redwings, and Shirley Burkovich, who played for the Rockford Peaches, the team popularized in A League of Their Own.
Before the United States played Canada on the second night of the Super Round, Blair and Burkovich made their way down to the field.
“Women have played baseball forever. Girls are playing now.” On August 19, 2014, Mo’ne Davis was on the cover of Sports Illustrated.
Instead of playing on the world tournament-size field set by WBSC’s own regulations, the World Cup was played on a field 325 feet in every direction.
At the same time, no one seemed to know the tournament was happening despite the fact that the professional women’s softball team, which normally plays in that stadium, average around 2,500 fans at each of their 25 home games every year.
There is a village of people fighting for women’s baseball in America: the Rockford Peaches, the players, the parents of players, the fans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why My Young Daughter Is So Much Better at Learning Chess Than I Am”

Magnus Carlsen, the world’s current top-ranked player, was the youngest player to reach number one, at age 19.
Charness notes that “Younger players are getting skilled faster than they used to,” thanks, in part, to better tools and better feedback: Sophisticated computer engines, databases, the ability to play players of any level at any time of the day.
“If you’re talking about two novices,” Charness said, when I asked him about my daughter, me, and chess, “Your daughter would probably pick things up about twice as fast as you could.” My daughter is, in effect, learning chess like a first language, whereas I am learning it like a second language.
Was it just age, or was my daughter just an inherently better player?
Even if I was only learning chess for the first time, I had a lifetime of play behind me.
As Daniel King, a London-based retired professional chess player who now analyzes and commentates chess matches, tells me, “Children just kind of go for it-that kind of confidence can be very disconcerting for the opponent.” Lacking larger representational “Schema,” the psychologist Dianne Horgan has noted, children players rely more on simple heuristics and “Satisficing,” choosing the first good-looking move.
She played, in those games, as if I were just some lower-level chess engine making haplessly random moves.
For whatever the games had taught me about brains young and old, about the different ways we learn and deploy our cognitive resources, they also taught me that the only thing harder than losing to your daughter in chess is winning against her.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Chicago Bulls Soundtracked Michael Jordan’s Dynasty”

Among the Bulls faithful, no introduction custom was more sacred than the goosebump-inducing announcement of their basketball god: “From North Carolina, at guard, 6-6, Michael Jordan!” With His Airness’s star in perpetual Jumpman-like ascent and national TV broadcasting the intro as the Bulls hoarded six championships in the ’90s, “Sirius” became a bona fide cultural phenomenon-not simply the soundtrack to one of the NBA’s most dominant dynasties, but a kind of sonic surrogate for sports triumph writ large.
David Brenner: The Bulls of the early ’80s had been, more often than not, one of the worst teams in the NBA. Then, of course, they drafted Michael Jordan and the team’s fortunes changed dramatically.
I told Bulls management, “People come out to see the stars-both the guys who play for the Bulls and the great players on the opposing team, like Dr. J, Magic, and Kareem. I want to make sure there’s a certain amount of respect given to these guys when I introduce them.” The Bulls said, “That’s all well and good, but make sure the big-time energy comes when you introduce the Bulls players.” I said, “Oh, absolutely.” So I started using the Pink Floyd instrumental “On the Run” from Dark Side of the Moon, which I had used at the radio station as a music bed for call-in contests.
My wife said, “That’d be a neat job. Why don’t you call the Bulls and see if they’re interested in giving you an audition?” I said, “I’d never get a job like that. But I’ll call.” A guy I happened to know at the Bulls said, “Send in a tape.” At that time, I worked as the campus recreation director at the University of Illinois at Chicago.
So the lights went out, the music started, the guy gave me a nudge and said, “Go.” I blurted out, “Aaaand now, the starting lineup for your Chicago Bulls!” The Bulls were touting Chicago Stadium as the noisiest arena in the NBA at that time, so I figured that I needed to give a good yell.
Edwards, speaking to the Chicago Sun-Times in 1992: Any time we’ve gotten a Bulls home game on TV out here , whether it’s NBC or cable, just as the Bulls introduction sequence starts, I make some lame excuse to my wife and kids and leave the family room until the intros are over.
Telander: Michael Jordan once told me Chicago Stadium gave the Bulls a five- to 10-point advantage.
J.A. Adande asked me, “How are you going to introduce him?” I said, “I assume the Bulls are gonna announce Michael Jordan how they always announce Michael Jordan.” But I hadn’t heard anything official.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Three Feet From God: An Oral History of Nirvana ‘Unplugged'”

We were out on tour for a few days and started to get to know the guys, started to get to know Kurt, and then one evening he said they were gonna do the Unplugged thing.
We had told the camera guys and everyone, “Don’t approach the band. If you have any questions come to us and we’ll talk to them. One person can talk to Kurt. No one else can talk to Kurt.” And Juan got off the camera and I’m in the control room, and all of the sudden I see Juan walking up to Kurt and I was like, “What is he doing? What is he doing?” And he just asked him a question about something camera-related, and Kurt politely answered him, and he went back to his camera.
Cross: Kurt is leading every moment and every gesture in a way that you don’t observe when you watch a Nirvana show that’s electric.
It’s not like every single moment is focused on Kurt at a live Nirvana concert.
Coletti: Nothing about the show, minus the fact that Kurt died shortly thereafter, has a funeral vibe.
McCarthy-Miller: After the show they had Kurt come into the control room and look at some songs.
Finnerty: After the show, Courtney [Love] was out of town, and so we went back to the hotel, and we were just hanging at the bar, and Kurt was like, “I want to go upstairs and call Courtney.” And he’s like, “I’m really bummed. I feel like nobody liked it. It was really bad.” I was like, “Oh my God, you’re out of your mind.” I walked him up to the room.
If there’s an entry point to who Kurt Cobain was as a songwriter and a singer, Unplugged is that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The video game that helped me understand my grandma’s dementia”

A video game about a middle-aged woman suffering from early-onset dementia.
Before I Forget began two years ago at a Game Jam where developers create video games – sketches really – in short periods of time.
Wetting yourself isn’t a common video game experience.
Which is, of course, perfect in a game that’s simulating dementia.
Dementia Australia has its own game, a VR simulation of dementia.
It’s less of a video game and more of an educational tool.
EDIE has helped inspire empathy in potentially drained caregivers who have spent decades in the sector, but Dementia Australia has also used EDIE to inspire action in decision makers with the potential to transform the lives of sufferers of dementia.
Petrovic believes the game has helped change the conversation: “It forces us to ask: ‘How can we make things better?'”.

The orginal article.