Summary of “What the NBA Is Discussing About Its Restart”

If the entire regular season needs to be canceled, the NBA would begin with the postseason, and only 16 teams would need to play.
“It’s the responsibility of the league to explore all of our options for a return to play this season,” NBA chief communications officer Mike Bass said in a statement to The Ringer when asked about Silver’s contingency plans.
“I want the year to come back. I’m not gonna act like I know if we will, but I just really hope we do.” But one front office executive on a Western Conference lottery team said that while the NBA isn’t messaging that their seasons are finished, the thought is that the league won’t have the time or resources to bring all 30 teams to one location and play out the regular season.
Where will games be played? Nothing has been determined yet, and many pitches have been made to the NBA by venues to host games, but Disney World appears to have an edge because it’s a private property with thousands of hotel rooms, which means it could create a “Bubble” to keep players safe.
MGM Grand recently made a proposal to the NBA and numerous other sports leagues to host a return to play.
Will players prefer for the cap to go down this offseason so there will be more money in the pot for the 2021 offseason? The 2020 class is weak, and many players who could have earned big paydays, like Andre Drummond and Gordon Hayward, could opt in to the final year of their contracts anyway.
Sources say the NBA is hoping that all players, coaches, and staffers will be in their respective teams’ cities by early-to-mid-June in order to begin training camp.
Waiting will allow the NBA to avoid the bad optics of being the first league to reopen, and give it more information about what worked, what didn’t work, and whether resuming play is even possible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Casino Card Shark’s First Time Getting Caught”

A floorman will instruct the dealer to shuffle when a certain player raises his bets, or restrict every wager to the table minimum.
Along with Carlo, the other two players in our session had been approached and “Backed off”-meaning they were informed by management that they could no longer play blackjack at this casino.
There wasn’t a single TV in the house, but every room had a blackjack table with three to five players hovered around it, practicing.
As a Spotter, I’d keep a low profile, betting the table minimum while counting cards until I pinpointed the moment when the deck became favorable, and then I’d signal for the Big Player to join my game and he would vary his bets from a few hundred to a few thousand per hand.
All available players provided a stream of random distractions for every test, trying to replicate the noise and chaos of the casino.
When I finally passed the test, I barely had time to celebrate the milestone-it was time to play for real.
Because the best surveillance teams look out for the one quality that separates card counters from other gamblers: we play to win.
“Yourstyle of play isunprofitableto the casino.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Offensive Linemen Have to Do to Add, Maintain, and Lose Weight”

“I ran downstairs, I had sweats on, I ran down to the weight room and I grabbed two 10-pound weights and I put them in the back of my pants. You couldn’t see them because I had big sweats on. I walked over to the thing and I weighed 275 pounds, but I had two 10-pound weights in the back of my pants.”
Like a lot of teams, Pittsburgh installed individualized maximum weight limits for its linemen.
In the run-up to last month’s NFL draft, I spoke with scores of former and prospective professional offensive linemen about that tradeoff-the lengths they’ll go to get that big, what happens when they try to take the weight off, and the often-twisted relationship they have with food.
“I knew a lot of guys that struggled to keep weight on. They’d have to eat ungodly amounts of food. You’d see them the night before the weigh-ins, we’d go out as a group, as an O-line, and some guys would flat out come just to go and they wouldn’t eat to avoid a fine. And then there were guys who are eating lasagna, steaks, salads, appetizers, drinks. And you’re like, ‘My God, how are these guys able to do this?'”.
Maybe a big plate of spaghetti, a mound of meatballs, three or four breadsticks, and salad-because, as Thomas said, you “Gotta get your ruffage.” But all that was part of Thomas’s diet when he was merely trying to maintain his weight.
Runyan remembered when Kearse-an undersized defensive end coming out of college-came to the offensive line looking for help in gaining weight.
Independent of his height, Hardwick’s back doesn’t bother him anymore-something Runyan, Greco, and Thomas have noticed about their own bodies when they’ve lost weight.
” After he retired, Thomas’s doctors told him the best way to alleviate the pain and swelling was to lose weight.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Being James Brown: Inside the Private World of the Baddest Man Who Ever Lived”

The statue’s back is to what was in 1993 renamed James Brown Boulevard, which cuts from Broad Street for a mile, deep into the neighborhood where James Brown was raised from age six, by his aunts, in a Twiggs Street house that was a den of what James Brown himself calls “Gambling, moonshine liquor and prostitution.” The neighborhood around Twiggs is still devastatingly sunk in poverty’s ruin.
“Sounds good,” James Brown says, “But it sounds canned. We got to get some James Brown in there.” Here it is, the crux of the matter: He wasn’t in the room; ipso facto, it isn’t James Brown music.
Suddenly, James Brown is possessed by an instant of Kabuki insecurity: “I’m recording myself out of a group.” This brings a spontaneous response from several players, a collective murmur of sympathy and allegiance, most audibly saxophonist Jeff’s “We’re not going anywhere, sir.” Reassured, James Brown paradoxically regales the band with another example of his imperious command, telling the story of a drummer, a man named Nat Kendrick, who left the room to go to the bathroom during the recording of “Night Train.” James Brown, too impatient to wait, played the drum part himself, and the recording was completed by the time Nat Kendrick returned.
For my part as a witness, if I could convey only one thing about James Brown it would be this: James Brown is, like Billy Pilgrim in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five, a man unstuck in time.
James Brown then tells of playing craps on the road. “I won enough from the Moonglows to buy myself a Cadillac. Them cats was so mad they stole my shoes. Wilson Pickett, all these guys, I look so clean, they don’t think I can play. I was a street man even though I had a suit on.” But his stake in being thought of as the luckiest man alive is compromised by an eagerness to divulge his secret: “Shaved dice,” which always came up the way he wanted them to.
It is the nature of traveling with James Brown that everyone treats him like a god: “The people that show up in every city, they all fall back into their old jobs, like they never stopped. The doormen stand by the door, the hairdressers start dressing his hair.” R.J. is being modest, since his responsibilities have grown to a performing role, as the second voice in a variety of James Brown’s call-and-response numbers, replacing the legendary founding member of the Famous Flames – James Brown’s first band – Bobby Byrd.
Also on the scene is another son, whose name I don’t catch, a shy man who appears to be in his early fifties, and with two sons of his own in attendance – James Brown’s grandsons, older than James Brown II. These different versions of “Family,” with all their tangible contradictions, mingle politely, deferentially with one another in the overcrowded playback room, where James Brown and Fred Wesley are seated together in the leather chairs.
Damon, while not critical of the previous week’s shows, says, “He needs to warm up on tour, too. Think of all the bits he has to remember. If he screws up, you notice.” Damon recalls for me a night when the floor was slick and James Brown missed his first move, and as a result “Lost confidence.” Lost confidence? I try not to say, “But he’s James Brown!” It is somehow true that despite my days in his presence, my tabulation of his foibles, nothing has eroded my certainty that James Brown should be beyond ordinary mortal deficits of confidence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Casino Card Shark’s First Time Getting Caught”

A floorman will instruct the dealer to shuffle when a certain player raises his bets, or restrict every wager to the table minimum.
Along with Carlo, the other two players in our session had been approached and “Backed off”-meaning they were informed by management that they could no longer play blackjack at this casino.
There wasn’t a single TV in the house, but every room had a blackjack table with three to five players hovered around it, practicing.
As a Spotter, I’d keep a low profile, betting the table minimum while counting cards until I pinpointed the moment when the deck became favorable, and then I’d signal for the Big Player to join my game and he would vary his bets from a few hundred to a few thousand per hand.
All available players provided a stream of random distractions for every test, trying to replicate the noise and chaos of the casino.
When I finally passed the test, I barely had time to celebrate the milestone-it was time to play for real.
Because the best surveillance teams look out for the one quality that separates card counters from other gamblers: we play to win.
“Yourstyle of play isunprofitableto the casino.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 40 Greatest Family Games”

No matter where you are on this continuum, Slate’s list of the 40 best family games is for you.
The past two decades have seen a renaissance in family-friendly tabletop gaming, with new games taking the best elements of the classics, then reimagining and improving them.
“Educational” games are often boring, but some of the most entertaining games offer either implicit or explicit lessons about reasoning, sportsmanship, math, ethics, and teamwork.
We’ve arranged our 40 games by the ideal age for a kid to play them, from 4 to 16.
We’re also celebrating the fun of family games by publishing Slate writers’ odes to the games they love the most-and their defenses of the truly bad ones.
The timer adds excitement too, eliminating the tedious deliberation that can sap the fun out of some family games and replacing it with panicked glances back and forth between the tray of letters and the rapidly slipping sand.
Give credit to the ’60s game show Password for popularizing a whole genre of party games in which players try to get teammates to guess a word by rattling off other words-like Charades, with speech instead of gestures.
What makes Pictionary one of the greatest of all party games is that winning doesn’t demand any polished artistic skill.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Benefits of Playing Music Help Your Brain More Than Any Other Activity”

If these brain games don’t work, then what will keep your brain sharp? The answer? Learning to play a musical instrument.
Science has shown that musical training can change brain structure and function for the better.
Unlike brain games, playing an instrument is a rich and complex experience.
Brain scans have been able to identify the difference in brain structure between musicians and non-musicians.
Ultimately, longitudinal studies showed that children who do 14 months of musical training displayed more powerful structural and functional brain changes.
These studies prove that learning a musical instrument increases gray matter volume in various brain regions, It also strengthens the long-range connections between them.
“It’s a strong cognitive stimulus that grows the brain in a way that nothing else does, and the evidence that musical training enhances things like working memory and language is very robust.”
Studies have found that short bursts of musical training increase the blood flow to the left hemisphere of the brain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Rise of the Ambient Video Game”

To step into such video game worlds was to stabilise oneself within the frenetic noise and anonymity of the expanding urban spaces.
The Famicom allowed players to experience video games from the comfort of their home while Yoshimura, alongside other ambient artists of the era such as Satoshi Ashikawa, designed their records for public spaces whose mood they attempted to subtly augment.
It’s a relaxation activity that slips nebulously into self-care, the video game equivalent of putting an ambient record on.
In Brian Eno’s liner notes to Ambient 1: Music For Airports, regarded as one of the first significant ambient works, the artist said he composed the music to “Accommodate many levels of listening attention without enforcing one in particular; it must be as ignorable as it is interesting.” And while Eno crafted Music For Airports to defuse the atmosphere of the airport terminal, to make it more hospitable, ambient video games lighten moods.
In his notes on 2017’s Reflections, Eno refers to the music as “Generative” – i.e. it is self-creating, a process commonly applied to video game environments capable of replication.
Flower becomes the video game equivalent of a whale noises CD, a new-age remedy for the ills of modern living.
Ambient video games have also made the jump to cellular devices, tailoring them perfectly for modern life.
Breathe is a distillation of the ambient video game, furthering its minimalist design principles with the stripping away of paraphernalia until only essential components remain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a few tense hours changed everything”

Warriors players felt it was important to play music in the empty arena to maintain some semblance of atmosphere, after a bad experience at a music-and-sound-free game against the New York Knicks in 2017.
Playing NBA games with no fans was a staggering idea with wide-ranging consequences across the sports world, where other leagues were wrestling with the same questions.
UNBEKNOWNST TO 29 other teams, the Utah Jazz had contacted local health officials in Oklahoma City on Wednesday morning to request assistance with a player – later identified as center Rudy Gobert – who was showing symptoms consistent with COVID-19.
The rest of the league was still getting its head around the prospect of playing games without fans starting on Thursday.
Ball boys chased down long rebounds and fed passes to players warming up on both teams.
The five teams that had played the Jazz over the past 10 days – the Washington Wizards, Cleveland Cavaliers, New York Knicks, Boston Celtics, Detroit Pistons and Toronto Raptors – were also told to self-isolate.
No players from those teams have reported symptoms or tested positive for the coronavirus.
“It’s remarkable to be here talking to you guys tonight about this hiatus,” Silver said on TNT late Thursday, evening, 24 hours and seemingly a lifetime after making the decision to suspend the season, “When it was only yesterday that the NCAA made the decision to play without fans – which seemed unprecedented – and was a historic decision.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Prince’s Epic ‘Purple Rain’ Tour: An Oral History”

Photo by Liu Heung Shing/AP. On July 27th, 1984, Prince and the Revolution were confronted with their first hint of how their lives were about to change when they attended the Hollywood premiere of Prince’s first movie, Purple Rain.
Four months later, at the Joe Louis Arena in Detroit, Prince and the Revolution launched the Purple Rain tour.
In the confines of those tightly structured shows, Prince reveled in special effects and over-the-top staging – doing splits or somersaults, playing his famous ejaculating guitar or pretending to talk to the Lord during the “Purple Rain” B side “God.” Yet the tour impacted on him in ways he and the Revolution never expected.
Fink: We were at Rudolphs Bar-B-Que one late night and I remember Prince saying to me, “Do you think it would be cool if Bobby was standing up playing drums?” And I said, “How does a drummer stand up?” He wanted so badly for Bobby to stand up and play drums.
The first time they tried using the tub, which was very lightweight and made out of fiberglass, Prince got into it and they had not nailed it down into the platform.
Melvoin: If Prince was doing any kind of bad behavior – if he was mean or just straight-up wrong about something he said he was straight-up right about – he always said something bad would happen to him.
Melvoin: One of the things that Prince would tell us before going on tour, especially at the beginning of Purple Rain, was, “If you feel yourself rushing and playing too fast, cut your body’s heart rhythm in half and move your body in half-time, and you will play behind the beat.” We were religious about it.
Coleman: Prince wanted always be as good as the film.

The orginal article.