Summary of “Why Does No One Remember Joe Kapp, the NFL’s First Mexican-American Super Bowl Quarterback?”

A decade before Plunkett and Flores won their first Super Bowl in 1980, there was another Mexican-American quarterback who guided the Minnesota Vikings to a Super Bowl: Joe Kapp.
Kapp’s athletic talents led him to the University of California in Berkeley where, besides playing on the basketball team, he quarterbacked the team to a Rose Bowl appearance.
In their minds, the reason for this was because Kapp learned to pass by “Heaving lettuce heads in Salinas, and there are no laces on lettuce.” He is also the only quarterback to have played in the Rose Bowl, Super Bowl, and the Grey Cup-the Canadian Football League’s championship-though he lost two out of the three, including the Super Bowl.
“Do you know what happens when you lose the Super Bowl?” Kapp asked rhetorically.
After the Super Bowl loss, Kapp never played with the Minnesota Vikings again.
Before Super Bowl XLVII, Complex compiled a list of the 15 worst quarterbacks to play for the NFL’s championship; they listed Joe Kapp as the worst.
Joe Kapp played only 4 seasons in the NFL. He is not as deserving of the Pro Football Hall of Fame as Jim Plunkett or Tom Flores are-who remain outside of serious consideration despite their clear qualifications-but Kapp was a pioneer.
Long before the NFL celebrated Hispanic Heritage Month and before built themselves a Hispanic fan base in the tens of millions, Joe Kapp became the first Latino quarterback to lead his team to the Super Bowl, and perhaps more importantly, he help spark the fight against the NFL’s ever-present control of players.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Hollywood’s Blockbuster Obsession Hurting Broadway? – Variety”

There’s no doubt that proliferation of big-money, long-running smashes is responsible for driving Broadway to new heights, with the rise of dynamic pricing leading to unprecedented profits for the most in-demand hits.
The seemingly endless revenue streams of Disney Theatrical’s “The Lion King” and “Wicked” are precisely what got other Hollywood studios – not to mention new independent producers and investors, eager for their own hits – into the Broadway game.
The rise of decades-long runs, starting with “The Phantom of the Opera”, has cemented Broadway’s landmark status, making it a powerful draw for the international tourists who play a major role in keeping those hits going.
Talk to the industry about the challenges it sees ahead, and it’s clear that as popular and profitable as Broadway has become, its blockbuster mentality has also given rise to, or exacerbated, some of its biggest problems.
The ongoing increase in ticket prices has long been a concern for Broadway, and while the advent of dynamic pricing has made growing numbers of tickets available at the lower end of the cost spectrum, it’s the premium price tags that get all the press.
The new normal is also responsible for a logjam in Broadway real estate.
There are only 40 Broadway theaters in total, and to give just one example, the unprecedented life span of “Phantom” means that the Majestic Theater hasn’t had a new show in it for three decades.
Talk to people in the industry, and more than one will tell you that a new, industry-wide solution to the problem will have to be found, and soon, for the Broadway play to survive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gregg Popovich Is the Real Zen Master of Basketball”

If there were ever a sign that the America of my youth no longer exists, it’s that I remember a time when Phil Jackson was regarded as an unassailable genius - and not just within the realm of basketball.
In just a few years, Jackson has tarnished his reputation as a beautiful basketball mind to the point that it’s impossible to consider him in those terms today.
Jackson’s aura of infallibility was partly due to his employing the Triangle offense, a scheme as esoteric as Jackson himself.
What’s important is that the Triangle is complicated, and that alone gave Jackson gravitas.
For years, Jackson’s unconventional methods were heralded as superior - and it was hard to argue against the results.
As Pixar founder Ed Catmull is fond of saying, “Success hides problems.” And as the veneer of success has faded in recent years, Jackson has started to look more like an out-of-touch assclown than some mystical sage.
Jackson forced the team to use the Triangle and stubbornly refused to let them stop doing so, even when it became apparent that the Triangle was a poor fit for today’s game, and despite its being an especially poor fit for Kristaps Porzingis.
Jackson responded to Porzingis’ inspired play by dragging him in the media and saying he’d like to trade the young Latvian phenom for reasons that remain unclear to anyone who’s seen Porzingis play.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Error in Baseball and the Moral Dimension to American Life”

To enter the world of baseball’s official rulings on the error is to place yourself at the center of sprawling garden labyrinth; it can take days to think your way out.
The official scorer shall charge an error against any fielder:Notice how the rule, even in its simplest iteration, contains an immediate exception to itself: the fielder who deliberately permits a foul ball.
“What we would have to look at is-is it a single or is it a double? Or is it a single and advance on an error or on the throw?” The way that the scorer determines whether that bobble is an error or not has less to do with the action of the fielder than with the action of the runner.
So far we have really only approached the most basic aspects of the error rule.
The official scorer shall charge an error against any fielder whose throw takes an unnatural bounce, touches a base or the pitcher’s plate, or touches a runner, a fielder or an umpire, thereby permitting any runner to advance.
Rule 9.12(a)(7) means that it is entirely possible to make an error even though you have made the correct play.
Making an error can be evidence of the right decision.
The vision of justice is absolute; the error records an imagined baseball utopia, not some mere assessment of accomplishment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Oral history of breakout game, 10 years after death”

Taylor, only 24, was maturing into a dominant player.
Five Fort Myers-area men were charged with Taylor’s death after they broke into his house looking to steal cash.
Ten years later, players and coaches remember perhaps Taylor’s most dominant performance.
Taylor played in the Pro Bowl after the 2006 season.
Williams: “When his daughter was born, he and I had a conversation, and he said to me, ‘Now I have someone else to play for and take care of.’ She meant so much. He was more talkative that year. He did smile more or laugh more around others. In the first couple years, he was almost like a mute. He didn’t say anything. He wasn’t socializing with a lot of people. He was an individual on a mission in life. But now it was more a family. When he brought her around the players, there was a constant smile on his face. You can’t fake the smile on his face. He couldn’t hide the joy.”
On Taylor’s first interception, Green Bay faced a second-and-4 at its own 37-yard line with 11 minutes, 54 seconds to play in the third quarter.
Green Bay coach Mike McCarthy: “That game, they primarily played Cover 2, so he’s making big plays in the back half of the field. He was a Hall of Fame-caliber player. Especially in a game like that with the weather, you know you can’t let the ball hang in the air that long. That was evident that day.”
Pedro Taylor, Sean’s dad: “Sean was always hard on himself after games. We’d talk and he’d say, ‘I messed up.’ I’d say, ‘Think about the good things you’ve done.’ And he’d say, ‘Yeah, but that play I should have had.’ I said, ‘Move on to the next play.’ He tried to do that and wanted to do that. But he knew that you’ve got to make the plays you’ve got because they could change a season or change a game.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Analytics And Statcast Will Play A Role In Determining This Year’s American League MVP”

The votes are in, beginning the waiting game until the middle of November when the Baseball Writers’ Association of America will announce the winner of this year’s American League Most Valuable Player Award.
Since 1931, the BBWAA has been the guardian of the process, and the voting rules have basically remained unchanged since the group selected Philadelphia Athletics pitcher Lefty Grove as its first American League Most Valuable Player.
In total, 66 players representing American League ball clubs have won this award, with 15 multiple-time recipients of the award.
Only three players who have won the American League award have played for teams with losing records: Cal Ripken, Jr., Alex Rodriguez and Mike Trout.
On 21 occasions, the American League’s MVP came from a club that didn’t qualify for postseason play.
Judge’s home runs traveled approximately four miles in total, and Statcast reveals that the average exit velocity on Judge’s home runs this season was 109.9 miles per hour, with the fastest at 121.1 mph.
Is the third rookie in major league history with at least 100 runs, 100 runs batted in and 100 walks, after Williams and Al Rosen.
He is seeking to become the third American League player to win the MVP and Rookie of the Year Awards in the same season, after Fred Lynn and Ichiro Suzuki.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is This the End of the Kobe Generation in L.A?”

In L.A., battle lines were drawn thusly: Kobe was the living embodiment of hard work and dedication, a player whose ease of aesthetic is fortified by his fanatical mastery of the game’s fundamentals and a legendary gluttony for punishment; LeBron is a player spoiled by all his god-given talents, a player whose greatness was bestowed upon him, not seized for himself- all that, and he’s a fucking crybaby.
Around the time Chan ran his first marathon, Kobe, who was only about 22 at the time, began experiencing severe knee tendinitis.
There has been plenty of debate over whether he was the best NBA star of my generation, but it seems undeniable to me that Kobe was the most important.
In 1996, the Lakers traded Divac for the draft rights to Kobe Bryant.
Ball told Kobe he could, but based on how the exchange was depicted by Bleacher Report’s Kevin Ding, Kobe’s vision of the game didn’t correlate with Lonzo’s.
Of the 12 players on Team USA’s 2017 U19 men’s junior national team, only one listed Kobe as his favorite player of all time.
Of the 35 invitees that had a favorite player of all time listed in their team bio, seven chose Kobe.
Kyrie Irving has distilled it all into a near-perfect replica of the Kobe Bryant arc-everything from spouting out obtuse notions of greatness to breaking from the league’s most dominant player in an effort to self-actualize his potential.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sports Has a Fake News Problem”

Last fall, a bit of fake news made Jones into a studlier kind of patriot.
Fake sports news, like fake political news, doesn’t just set out honey traps for conservatives.
One-in the words of writer Alex Reimer-is that “There’s a greater appetite for facts in sports than politics.” The Washington Post’s Dave Weigel suggested that fake sports news was easier to debunk.
Really, what’s weirder: the fake news that had Jerry Jones waxing about “Patriotic superheroes”? Or the real news-reported by Van Natta and Wickersham-that one NFL official thought players should wear uniform patches that said “Team America”?
Some fake sports news probably owes less to politics than prankery.
Their contribution to fake news was to simultaneously pose as Putinites and American antifascists-it’s like a Russian nesting doll made out of Adam Schefters.
Fake sports news will flourish as long as Trump keeps talking sports and probably long after he moves on to other subjects.
The new wave of fake sports news also highlights a question once asked by former Raiders executive Amy Trask: Why do otherwise skeptical news consumers believe whatever they read about sports? With junk like the Bennett story filling their social media feeds, they probably won’t anymore.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Will Ben Stiller’s Characters Ever Grow Up?”

Over the past two decades or so, Ben Stiller has created a body of work that often centers on his characters’ inability to handle adulthood and overcome their adolescent neuroses.
Part of the fun of those movies lies in watching Ben Stiller regress.
In Ben Stiller movies, childhood is almost always a source of endless trauma.
Will Ben Stiller ever manage to grow up? Can he? Should he?
That makes him an ideal Everyman: Does any grown-up ever really feel like a grown-up? Don’t we all feel like if you scratch our surfaces enough we’ll reveal just how secretly unprepared we are for the real world? That’s the secret of Ben Stiller’s success: He connects with a universal sense of inadequacy within us all.
It didn’t work for a number of reasons, but one of them was the fact that Ben Stiller is way too interesting and complicated an onscreen presence to play an innocent dreamer.
There’s another fold to all this, of course, which is that Stiller’s characters usually have to defeat their insufficiency and fear of adulthood.
He seems to be the kind of person Ben Stiller characters usually wind up resenting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “2017 NFL season’s biggest surprises through four games, and what could come next”

We’re essentially one quarter of the way through the 2017 NFL season.
Twenty-eight of the league’s 32 teams have played four games, with the Buccaneers and Dolphins taking an unexpected Week 1 bye as a result of Hurricane Irma, and the Chiefs and Washington finishing Week 4 on Monday Night Football.
Four games doesn’t seem like much, but when you consider that the typical team will line up for about 500 plays from scrimmage over a typical four-week period, we’re getting plenty of data points on how they’re going to play this season.
Buffalo has allowed a league-low 13.5 points per game through four weeks, and while it helped that they played a dysfunctional Jets offense in the opener, the Bills re-established their bona fides on Sunday with a 23-17 win at the previously undefeated Falcons.
Through four games, the extra weapons haven’t helped.
The biggest surprise of the first quarter of the season has to be the rehab of the Rams and the sudden improvement of both Goff and Gurley, who looked like different human beings last season under the Jeff Fisher administration.
The former Georgia star has 106 touches through four games, which would be tied with Lamar Miller’s run in Houston last season for the 11th-largest workload over the first four games of the season since 2002.
They proceeded to win their next three games by four, five and six points, with the most notable victory coming over the Seahawks.

The orginal article.