Summary of “Who Would Tavi Gevinson Be Without Instagram?”

The biggest discrepancy between Instagram reality and reality-reality was my and Rookie’s visibility versus our financial state.
Although we still had a steady readership who came straight to the site every day, Rookie’s Instagram became both crucial to directing existing readers to the site and a destination in its place.
Our Instagram presence still benefited Rookie but not as much as engagement on Rookie’s site would have.
In these conversations with media companies and potential investors, we were continually told that Rookie had a much better chance of survival and even financial success if I committed more fully to being its face in the style of Gwyneth or Girlboss or Oprah, which partly meant using Instagram a lot more.
Building my personal brand on Instagram also meant I could support myself more through sponsored content, which meant I could continue not taking a salary from Rookie, as I had since its inception.
Brands our publisher had secured for Rookie partnerships wanted a post on my Instagram as part of the deal, too.
They were divided on whether that was because Instagram explicitly favors certain types of data or because Instagram prioritizes, for each user, content similar to other content they’ve liked.
Not one to let a joke die without bludgeoning it, I spent a couple of hours walking around Times Square, filming myself searching for the algorithm – as in, backdrops that would perform well on Instagram.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Welcome to Lake Duck Pond, a fake town of 82,000 people”

A friend tried to cover for him, saying he was texting while driving, but everyone in town knows Lenny has a drinking problem, a problem that’s only gotten worse since he lost his side gig as a gravedigger.
There are now enough figments to fill an entire town, dubbed Lake Duck Pond.
“I used to spend an unbelievable amount of time on Reddit,” Devuluh says, “And would often passively come up with ideas for subreddits in my head.” After noticing a number of threads where people posted comments like “It’s me ur brother,” Devuluh became curious about whether a community existed where users pretended to know one another.
Two years later, Lake Duck Pond counts 82,200 members, roughly the same population of Sioux City, Iowa.
At the start, it was a fun experiment where people would post once, maybe twice, and then forget about their role.
Weatherman John Levee, one of the most prominent posters in the sub, said he’s drawn to the sense of camaraderie in the town.
“It’s interesting to see how people interact when you aren’t given a backstory, or a character, only the post, and the knowledge that it’s happening in a small town where everybody knows everybody.”
Levee compares it to listening to community radio as a child in the UK, getting broadcasts from a tiny town in the Midwestern US. “I live in the UK, where the idea of having a radio station for a single town was strange,” he told me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Talk To Boomers And Other Older People In Your Life About Fake News”

Costales sat next to his friend and fellow tutor, Mareson Suresh, 15, to discuss the online behavior of the older people in their lives.
Boomers and older generations are by no means the only people having trouble in our new and chaotic information environment, although research suggests they have the most pressing challenges.
Younger people also face difficulty, which is why so many news literacy programs target K-12 and college students.
Caulfield said his students see the need for older people in their lives to learn the skills he’s teaching.
Caulfield said it’s common for older people to unwittingly share things that have extremist messages or iconography.
One of its first programs was Senior Connects, which helps older people get online and gain basic internet skills.
Even if some of the adults in your life struggle with what they share, they’re still people with a wealth of knowledge, experience, and love to offer.
“I feel like one of the biggest things about this program is having a reason to talk to elders, because as teens you don’t have that many opportunities to talk to some of the smartest people in your community, and especially people who have all those life experiences,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Private Groups Might Be The Last Good Thing About Facebook”

Back in 2017, still reeling from the revelations about Facebook’s role in spreading misinformation around the presidential campaign, Facebook realized that these groups were the one truly good thing going for the platform – and announced its new mission.
Facebook was attempting to “Make the world more open and connected.” Now, the aim was “To give people the power to build community and bring the world closer together.” There would be a new focus on increasing the number of people in “Meaningful” groups, defined as “The most important part of someone’s experience on Facebook.” In 2017, 100 million people were involved in meaningful groups.
As Facebook evolved and expanded, so too did the types of collectives: First, there were pages; then came joinable groups.
Today, groups can be public; private; and “Secret” – the type you can only find if someone in the group invites you.
Like so much else on the internet, they are affinity groups – either geographically or culturally – and when a group gets too big, or too broad, it’ll divide itself into something that feels more intimate.
As this same woman points out, “Most mom groups are toxic garbage, so the fact that these AREN’T like that is precisely what makes them special.” Keeping a group secret is the most efficient way to keep a group “In line,” whatever that might mean for a particular set of people.
Of course, there are hundreds of thousands of Facebook groups out there that don’t work this way.
Part of the reason women who’ve been on Jeopardy need a Facebook support group, after all, is because Facebook itself made it so easy for abusers to find them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook’s most shared story of 2019 is a 119-word local crime brief from Central Texas.”

Ten minutes later, he had written and published what would become Facebook’s most-shared story of 2019 so far.
It’s a 119-word local crime brief about a wanted suspect, and the man who wrote it never intended for it to reach a national audience, let alone amass more than 800,000 Facebook shares in the six weeks following its publication-nearly twice as many as any other piece of English-language content this year.
It beat out, among other extremely viral stories, TMZ’s report of Luke Perry’s death, CNBC’s breaking story about the end of the U.S. government shutdown, and an aggressively SEO-optimized Daily Mirror story about the viral “Momo challenge.” The original news brief that Savage’s post was based on, by KWTX 10’s weekend anchor Ke’Sha Lopez, was nowhere on the list.
In 2018, Facebook announced a set of major algorithm changes designed to prioritize news from “Trusted” and “Local” sources, and to boost content shared by users’ friends and family over content published by professional Facebook pages.
According to CrowdTangle data provided by Facebook, Savage’s story on the suspected child predator racked up more than 50,000 shares on the original US 105 FM post alone-even though the station’s Facebook page has only about 7,000 followers.
While Facebook couldn’t confirm exactly what aspects of its algorithm helped the story on its way, Savage’s crime brief appears to have ticked nearly every box that the social network is trying to prioritize.
While it was clear from reading the story that it was about Waco and Central Texas, the headline just said the predator was in “Our area.” Anyone who read the headline without reading the story might reasonably have thought the story was about their area, even if they were far from Texas.
For all the handwringing around Facebook stepping back from the news in 2018, NewsWhip’s analysis found that engagement levels for web content on Facebook so far in 2019 have bounced back to 2017 levels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Instagram Is Full of Conspiracy Theories and Extremism”

The top of my Instagram Explore page also featured a racist caricature of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, exaggerating her features and darkening her skin; a post about Hillary Clinton being a pedophile; a 4chan screenshot talking about a “Beta Jew”; and yet another Christchurch false-flag post.
Given the velocity of the recommendation algorithm, the power of hashtagging, and the nature of the posts, it’s easy to see how Instagram can serve as an entry point into the internet’s darkest corners.
Instagram “Memes pages and humor is a really effective way to introduce people to extremist content,” says Becca Lewis, a doctoral student at Stanford and a research affiliate at the Data and Society Research Institute.
344,000 Instagram posts currently include the hashtag #QAnon.
As of Tuesday afternoon, three of the top 12 Instagram posts featuring the hashtag #vaccines were promoting anti-vaccine messages-after Facebook announced last week that it would diminish the reach of anti-vaccine information on Facebook and Instagram.
In December, Wired reported that Instagram had become the “Go-to” social network for the Internet Research Agency, a Russian troll farm notorious for meddling in U.S. elections.
J?nathan AIbright October 25, 2018Meme pages aren’t the only types of accounts bent on leveraging Instagram to radicalize young people.
As The Daily Beast reported last fall, Instagram has become a haven for far-right figures such as Alex Jones, who has found a home on Instagram.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”I didn’t have control”: A 14-year-old on why she quit social media”

Social media has been significant to my sister’s social life since she was 13, and she has constantly posted on Twitter and Facebook for nearly a decade.
My parents had long ago made the rule that my siblings and I weren’t allowed to use social media until we turned 13, which was late, compared to many of my friends who started using Instagram, Wattpad, and Tumblr when we were 10 years old.
Teens get a lot of warnings that we aren’t mature enough to understand that everything we post online is permanent, but parents should also reflect about their use of social media and how it could potentially impact their children’s lives as we become young adults.
In the months since I discovered my unauthorized social media presence, I became more active on Facebook and Twitter.
It wasn’t until I’d been on social media for around nine months that I thought seriously about my digital footprint.
I do plan to use my social media accounts sometime in the future, possibly not until after I graduate high school.
My friends are active social media users, but I think they are more cautious than they were before.
Probably most importantly, it made me more aware of how I want to use social media now and in the future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Every Influencer Has a Discord”

“Now with social media, everyone wants numbers, virality, to be popular. Discord takes that and does the opposite,” Dietschy said.
“The reason so many people are adopting Discord is because there’s nothing else out there like it,” he said.
If influencers want to announce that they have a new video out, or promote a merch sale, they can post a message to everyone in the #announcements channel of their Discord server instead of posting about it on Instagram and hoping the post gets served to a wide enough portion of their audience.
Many of the top YouTuber Discord servers include dozens of channels that have nothing to do with the YouTubers themselves.
The Discord group for one star-themed Instagram page has channels for users to talk about animals, share writing, compare Subway orders, and post pictures of their hands.
Discord doesn’t provide an age breakdown on its user base, but several moderators say non-gaming Discord servers are dominated by the type of people who follow YouTubers and meme pages on Instagram: teenagers.
Of course, as on any booming network, people are already trying to figure out how to make money on Discord.
Users in one popular podcaster’s Discord community even designate roles by how much money each user gives each month.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The secret lives of Facebook moderators in America”

All had signed non-disclosure agreements with Cognizant in which they pledged not to discuss their work for Facebook – or even acknowledge that Facebook is Cognizant’s client.
The moderators include some full-time employees, but Facebook relies heavily on contract labor to do the job.
Ellen Silver, Facebook’s vice president of operations, said in a blog post last year that the use of contract labor allowed Facebook to “Scale globally” – to have content moderators working around the clock, evaluating posts in more than 50 languages, at more than 20 sites around the world.
Facebook also worked to build what Davidson calls “State-of-the-art facilities, so they replicated a Facebook office and had that Facebook look and feel to them. That was important because there’s also a perception out there in the market sometimes that our people sit in very dark, dingy basements, lit only by a green screen. That’s really not the case.”
Security personnel keep watch over the entrance, on the lookout for disgruntled ex-employees and Facebook users who might confront moderators over removed posts.
In January, Facebook distributes a policy update stating that moderators should take into account recent romantic upheaval when evaluating posts that express hatred toward a gender.
Last year, a former Facebook moderator in California sued the company, saying her job as a contractor with the firm Pro Unlimited had left her with PTSD. In the complaint, her lawyers said she “Seeks to protect herself from the dangers of psychological trauma resulting from Facebook’s failure to provide a safe workplace for the thousands of contractors who are entrusted to provide the safest possible environment for Facebook users.”
Last week, Davidson told me, Facebook began surveying a test group of moderators to measure what the company calls their “Resiliency” – their ability to bounce back from seeing traumatic content and continue doing their jobs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Instagram influencers are selling you drugs and medical devices”

These Instagram ads, for which influencers can be paid an estimated $1,000 per 100,000 followers, are selling not just a product but an entire lifestyle.
With respect to Instagram advertising, this can be problematic because a consumer might associate a product with an influencer’s entire feed rather than the information presented in a single ad. To add insult to injury, some patient influencers – who have every financial incentive to promote their products “Authentically” – may omit critical health information, thus deceiving potential patients.
The reality star’s Instagram post about the technique received almost 11,500 likes, giving ReSensation considerable exposure, yet Murphy omits disclosures required by both the FTC and FDA. She uses the term #partner to disclose that she is a compensated influencer, but the term is considered too vague, even for the FTC, for a user to clearly understand the relationship.
Before referring Vox to the FTC guidelines, an FDA spokesperson said the agency “Has not issued guidance regarding disclosure of the financial interests of spokespeople in prescription drug or medical device promotion, including disclosures by social media influencers acting on behalf of a medical product manufacturer.”
Most companies provide their influencers with guidelines for each post but don’t write or review the copy in advance, in order to give the content a genuine voice.
Although the FDA and FTC are regulatory agencies, they “Do not attempt to survey all influencers or influencer posts, either alone or with social media platforms,” according to the FTC Advertising Practices Division.
Using influencers to sell products to the sick can be a particularly insidious form of marketing in large part because of the vague parameters set by the FTC and FDA. With today’s ambiguous regulations, health care sponcon will continue to saturate our feeds with posts that appear sincere but end up being misleading.
For consumers to protect themselves in ways regulatory agencies cannot, they must be reminded that influencing is a job – one that only can only be done effectively if the stories influencers tell are relatable to the average user.

The orginal article.