Summary of “From Passion To Profit: How To Make Money Doing What You Love”

“People no longer think of business as the antithesis of art, but as an opportunity to express their vision.”
As of 2015, the brand currently has 14 staff members working in San Diego who specialize in things like inventory management and human resources, which are aspects of the business Thall did not feel equipped to handle himself.
“It’s about whether you want to learn all the tech skills you need from scratch or hire an agency to help you. We’ve chosen to focus on doing what we really enjoy, and I think this is why we still love managing our business.”
When you launch your own business, one of the earliest challenges is managing your startup costs when you don’t yet know how big your customer base is or how big your inventory needs to be, if you’re selling products.
For Annie Lin, who recently left a marketing position to start her own business, a solution to this problem arrived in the form of a subscription business from which customers purchase a product on a recurring basis, rather than on a one-off basis.
While consumers are drawn to subscriptions because they like receiving a monthly or quarterly delivery of curated products in the mail, this model is also a boon to small business owners because it allows them to accurately assess how much inventory they need each month.
“But with 500 subscribers, my business suddenly becomes sustainable. You don’t need to be as big as Birchbox or a Barkbox to be successful.” Given that her profit margins are currently between 30 and 40 percent, she’s been able to live comfortably on her earnings.
“Ten years ago, when people thought the Internet was the Wild West, I saw that millennials were already consuming content on YouTube and I realized that I should be building influence here.” Phan worked hard to consistently upload high-quality videos, but at the time, there was still no way for her to immediately monetize the content-so even though she knew YouTube had business potential, the videos were still very much a side project for her.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Your Local Costco Says About You”

A few years ago, Michelle Matsunaga made a stop at Costco on her way to a cousin’s house in Honolulu from the airport to pick up some snacks.
To the people who buy the $60 annual memberships, a trip to Costco is about much more than picking up a few necessities.
At the Costco in New Orleans, shoppers have spotted Camellia beans, andouille sausage, and even the very specific stand that connects to a gas canister to start a crawfish boil.
Costco’s sweeping success across the country feels inextricably linked with its ability to play a dual role to its loyal customers-as both the “Everything” store and the local market.
In response to an inquiry about how Costco sources local products, a representative for Costco management wrote: “Our buyers research the marketplace, determine which products offer the quality, and then negotiate the best possible value for members.” A variety of factors go into these decisions-buyers evaluate trends, forecast seasonal goods, and pay close attention to what members are asking for.
There is a portal on the Costco website called OpinionLab, which allows members to provide product suggestions that are shared with each regional buying office; individual stores also enter product suggestions that they receive from members.
Amit Runchal, who works at a start-up in Los Angeles, says that whenever he travels for work, he tries to visit the local Costco.
The ubiquitous Costco food court-stands set up just beyond the register-doesn’t stray too far beyond its hot-dog-and-pizza standards, no matter where you are.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Art of the Elevator Pitch”

A winning pitch starts with a winning logline – a valuable lesson for innovators in any field.
All this starts with the logline – an art that screenwriters have mastered.
A logline will help you paint the big picture for your audience.
Business leaders can use loglines in a similar manner to clearly explain a complex idea.
A sales professional for a large tech company recently told me a logline that he uses to address the needs of his audience – IT buyers: “Our product will reduce your company’s cell phone bill by 80%.” With one sentence, his customers want to know more because his logline solves a specific problem and will make them look like heroes to their bosses.
Every person who speaks on behalf of your company or sells your product should deliver the same logline.
As the conference concluded, the first financial blog post that appeared carried the headline: “Flash will be bigger than you think.” Loglines attract attention; consistent loglines are memorable and repeatable.
Once you master the logline, you will be able to easily clarify your ideas and help the audience retain, remember, and act on them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Side Hustles You Can Start From Your Couch”

Excited yet? Here are seven side hustles you can start from your couch.
They’re often hired by the hour, which means you can work as many or few hours per week as you’d like.
As the website’s audience grows over months and years, and more readers begin to purchase items through the website’s affiliate links, the website owner can begin to earn hundreds and even thousands of dollars per month.
The passive income blog Income School expects a well-built niche site to earn an average of 2.5¢ per page view, per month, and bring in an average of 30,000 monthly page views by the end of the first year.
If you have a knack for finding mistakes in your native language, you could get paid to proofread. Freelancing websites like Upwork and Fiverr have a steady stream of proofreading jobs, or you can start asking your friends and business connections to help them eliminate errors in their writing.
Proofreaders who charge per word can command rates from 2¢ to 7¢ per word, or anywhere from $10 to $90 per hour.
Translators generally charge between 10¢ and 25¢ per word or $30 to $50 per hour.
Cambly pays $10 per hour, VIPKID, Qkids, and Englishunt pay between $13 and $22 per hour, and iTalki allows teachers to set their own price.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Appliances Have Their Own Jingles?”

These companies believe that bespoke sounds deepen customer loyalty: If you like what you hear, Satanek explained, you will develop brand allegiance, replacing a Whirlpool with a Whirlpool, and seeking out other members of its product family.
Sound is more visceral than sight, Daniel Levitin, the celebrated neuroscientist and author of This Is Your Brain on Music, told me.
We’re more easily startled by sound because, unlike vision, it’s processed directly in the brain stem.
Sound waves cause our eardrums to vibrate.
“That’s very intimate.” In the 1990s, Levitin researched how sound might be built into Microsoft’s operating systems, which were trying to keep up with Apple’s earcons-the intuitive crumple of an emptying trash can, the pleasing whoosh of outgoing email.
A wealth of studies in consumer psychology attests to the power of sound to affect our decision making.
In one famous experiment from the ’90s, British wine shoppers bought five times as many French bottles as German bottles when French accordions played in the store; when an oompah band sounded, German wine outsold the French.
Can a well-considered score really make consumers more likely to buy a Whirlpool over a GE? Will the sock washer still feel heroic the 50th time he runs the machine-or merely annoyed? Audio UX, an audio-branding studio based in New York, recently commissioned a study that found that custom-made “Premium” sounds, as opposed to “Generic” ones, were likelier to be associated with the correct action by test users, most of whom also said they’d prefer to own the brand that offered the customized cues.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Inventor’s Handbook”

Because barriers to entry are practically nonexistent, these days anyone can be an inventor.
“You don’t have to be an expert in a field in order to make an original contribution,” says Steve Sasson, inventor of the digital camera and a 2011 National Inventors Hall of Fame inductee.
“You can become an inventor simply by having an idea, working on it, and refining it.”
Where should inventors go looking for that spark of inspiration? We asked successful entrepreneurs and invention experts for their advice.
Eric Hintz: Historian, Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian”In historical studies of inventors, we’ve discovered that they often find the world to be irritating, and they want to fix it.”
Inventors, like artists, start with representations before they attempt to make something.
Similar invention challenges are hosted by Netflix, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and-for young inventors-the National Inventors Hall of Fame and Georgia Tech.
The challenges of scaling up production often catch inventors off-guard, so the earlier you begin thinking about manufacturing and introducing yourself to manufacturers, the better equipped you will be for the future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Skin Care Became an At-Home Science Experiment”

Sometimes there may be nothing wrong, per se, but one’s skin could always be a little more even, a little softer, a little glowier, couldn’t it? There’s also a certain amount of care needed to maintain the status quo-to stay clean, moisturized, and protected from the sun.
“Everybody’s obsessed with skin care right now,” Ashley Weatherford writes in the The Cut.
In The Outline, Krithika Varagur writes that “Perfect skin has become the thinking woman’s quest.” She goes on to say that skin care is a consumerist scam, but she’s touched on something with her emphasis on “Thinking.” Confronted with the multitudinous choices and absent good information about the efficacy of different products, many skin-care fans have become citizen scientists-educating themselves and each other about what works and experimenting on their own faces.
Because there are so many products out there, and because there are so many good reasons to be skeptical of brands’ claims about them, word of mouth often feels like the most trustworthy resource for information on over-the-counter skin care.
This forum is the most visible repository of the apparently growing interest in the science of skin care.
Wong also runs the popular blog Lab Muffin, where she writes about the science of skin care-explaining how the molecules in micellar water remove makeup, or why hyaluronic acid is such a good moisturizer.
Even though there is some good research on skin care out there, it’s understandably skewed toward prescription drugs and the treatment of medical skin conditions like acne and eczema.
Another issue with many topical skin products, Sachs says, is that “They have to penetrate the very strong stratum corneum, which is the top layer of the skin.” The skin is a barrier, after all, designed to keep things out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Plastics: What’s Recyclable, What Becomes Trash”

Like flexible packaging, these containers challenge the recycling system because they’re made of several different types of plastic: the shiny adhesive labels are one plastic, the protective cap another, and a twistable gear can be yet another.
The containers are firm, they don’t flatten out like paper and they’re made from a kind of plastic that manufacturers can easily sell for making products such as carpet, fleece clothing or even more plastic bottles.
Plastic bags – like those used for bread, newspapers and as cereal box liners, as well as sandwich bags, dry cleaning bags and grocery bags – create similar problems for recycling machinery as thin plastic film.
The plastics you put in your recycling bin are brought here to the material recovery facility.
Sometimes it’s cheaper for packagers to make things out of raw, virgin plastic than it is to buy recycled plastic.
One reason so much plastic packaging ends up in incinerators, landfills and oceans is that it isn’t designed to be recycled.
Plastic bottles are a highly desirable product for recyclers, but just about a third find their way into a recycling bin.
In 2018, China stopped taking most plastic waste from the U.S. So now the whole plastics industrial chain – from the oil industry to recyclers – is under pressure to figure out what to do with it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Untold Story of the Vegetable Peeler That Changed the World”

Created by Smart Design, in conjunction with OXO International’s launch in 1990, it raised the bar for accessible consumer products, and changed the way kitchen tools were designed forever.
Nearly three decades after its release, it maintains 4.8 stars out of 5 on Amazon yet still costs under $10. How many consumer products are truly that lasting? It’s why the peeler won our inaugural Timeless Design award as part of Innovation by Design 2018.
Over the years, abridged versions of the peeler’s origin story have been shared in design museums and even business schools.
We couldn’t design something for people just with special needs, because it would have to be in a special catalog, and no one is able to have access to those products.
We had to design a handle that would work for various uses.
Manufacturing the Peeler The design was on the right track, but it was extremely difficult to be made.
We’ve been living this for so long-but the OXO line was universal design, or inclusive design, long before either had a name.
We put the endorsement onto the package, but we took that off later because we realized, one of the things that’s really important for inclusive design is that the product isn’t stigmatizing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Vitamins and supplements for dogs and cats are a huge business”

The American pet product industry, which is reportedly worth $75 billion, has become such a gold rush that there’s even a summit for venture capitalists and corporate buyers to connect with pet product startups pitching “Smart” litterboxes that measure how frequently your cat pees, “Blue Apron for dogs,” and depression-soothing television programming for pets.
The category of pet supplements – from fish oil to probiotics to Jerry’s special breakfast treat – has grown year over year for the past five years, according to Packaged Facts.
Their nearly 200-page analysis was compiled from surveying pet owners of all ages, but according to the data, dog owners age 25-34 skew particularly high for buying supplements for their animals.
On the spectrum of pet healthcare, there’s a pretty wide gap between “Not great but probably fine” and “Needs to go to the vet right now.” Supplements and other products of not-quite-mainstream “Wellness,” both canine and human, attempt to fill this gap; to circumvent the barriers and costs of mainstream healthcare while still proactively protecting your pet’s health.
Pet supplements share another attribute with the wellness bubble, and that’s a lack of regulation.
Just as Hairfinity, Hum, or Ritual aren’t forced to conduct clinical trials to prove whether their vitamins really do give you thicker hair or glowier skin, it’s largely up to pet supplement brands to ensure their own products are safe and their marketing claims are honest.
“If a pet has a specific problem, then supplements may help,” says Bartges.
“But in general, most healthy pets do not need supplements if they are eating a good quality diet. If you feel the need to supplement a diet, then consider changing their diets.” Maybe I should look into Blue Apron for dogs after all.

The orginal article.