Summary of “Why Time Management Is Ruining Our Lives”

Arguably the first time management guru – the progenitor of the notion that personal productivity might be the answer to the problem of time pressure – was Frederick Winslow Taylor, an engineer hired in 1898 by the Bethlehem Steel Works, in Pennsylvania, with a mandate to improve the firm’s efficiency.
The story goes that when Lee told Schwab to test it for three months, then pay him what he thought it was worth, the steel magnate wrote him a cheque worth more than $400,000 in today’s money – and the time management industry was up and running.
Especially at the higher-paid end of the employment spectrum, time management whispers of the possibility of something even more desirable: true peace of mind.
Then there’s the matter of self-consciousness: virtually every time management expert’s first piece of advice is to keep a detailed log of your time use, but doing so just heightens your awareness of the minutes ticking by, then lost for ever.
The members of Take Back Your Time were calling for something more radical than merely more time off.
One of the sneakier pitfalls of an efficiency-based attitude to time is that we start to feel pressured to use our leisure time “Productively”, too – an attitude which implies that enjoying leisure for its own sake, which you might have assumed was the whole point of leisure, is somehow not quite enough.
“Maybe they used pressure from time to time, as a sort of amusing side-effect. But it was never a constant. Because you don’t get creativity for free. You need people to be able to sit back, put their feet up, and think.” Manual work can be speeded up, at least to a certain extent, by increasing the time pressure on workers.
All participants were given the same time in which to complete the task – but some were told that time would probably be sufficient, while others were warned it would be tight.

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Summary of “How to Stop Wasting Time and Improve Your Personal Effectiveness”

Many of the books, articles, productivity tools, and productivity apps you see these days are all in a way influenced by Drucker, who essentially invented the term personal effectiveness.
Step 1: Know Thy Time I often hear people saying: “I don’t know what’s wrong with me. I keep procrastinating.”
If you don’t measure your time, it’s tough to stop procrastination or improve your productivity.
Because if you want to manage your time better, you have to know where it goes first.
I just keep a pen and a notepad on my desk and every hour I write down the time and what I’ve done during the past hour.
If you want to be a super effective person, you regularly keep a log.
That’s enough to keep track of your time and identify new time-wasters.
Darius Foroux writes about productivity, habits, decision making, and personal finance.

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Summary of “What Makes Some People More Productive Than Others”

We’ve learned a lot about personal productivity and what makes some people more productive than others.
Second, age and seniority were highly correlated with personal productivity – older and more senior professionals recorded higher scores than younger and more junior colleagues.
More specifically, we found that professionals with the highest productivity scores tended to do well on the same clusters of habits.
The North American score was significantly lower than the average productivity scores for respondents from Europe, Asia, and Australia.
While our survey turned up significant differences in productivity scores by continent, it showed minimal differences between the average scores of male and female respondents.
Women tended to score particularly high when it came to running effective meetings – women were more likely than men to send out an agenda in advance, keep meetings to less than 90 minutes, and finish meetings with an agreement on next steps.
The drivers of these higher productivity scores for respondents in older age brackets were their stronger habits in four areas: developing routines for low-value activities, managing message flow, running effective meetings, and delegating tasks to others.
The left tail comprised those with the lowest scores; the right tail had the highest scores.

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Summary of “Four-day week trial: study finds lower stress but no cut in output”

Analysis of one of the biggest trials yet of the four-day working week has revealed no fall in output, decreases in stress and increased staff engagement, fuelling hopes that a better work-life-balance for millions could finally be in sight.
Perpetual Guardian, a New Zealand financial services company, switched its 240 staff from a five-day week to a four-day week last November and maintained their pay.
Productivity increased in the four days they worked so there was no drop in the total amount of work done, a study of the trial released on Tuesday has revealed.
Staff stress levels were down from 45% to 38%. Work-life balance scores increased from 54% to 78%. “We’ve been treated like adults and I think as a result everyone is behaving like adults,” said Tammy Barker, a branch manager who was part of the trial that cut the working week from from 37.5 hours to 30.
The Labour party has commissioned a study of the possibilities of a four-day week.
In the UK, average working hours have been increasing since the financial crisis, and questions have been raised about how far people working in frontline occupations such as nursing or the police could cut their hours without reducing the public service they provide.
“I did find that my productivity increased purely by being more aware of my work processes and thinking about how I was doing things and why I was doing them. At the same time, I didn’t feel any more stressed at work probably because I was really focussing on the tasks at hand and because I had the extra day off to compensate for the increased work rate.”
“It involved them finding solutions to doing their work in four days, so this reflected well. Importantly, they rated their teams as giving better customer service – they were more engaging and focussed when clients and customers called.”

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Summary of “How to be More Productive and Eliminate Time Wasting Activities by Using the “Eisenhower Box””

Dwight Eisenhower lived one of the most productive lives you can imagine.
His most famous productivity strategy is known as the Eisenhower Box and it’s a simple decision-making tool that you can use right now.
Let’s talk about how to be more productive and how Eisenhower’s strategy works.
Here is an example of what my Eisenhower Box looks like for today.
Too often, we use productivity, time management, and optimization as an excuse to avoid the really difficult question: “Do I actually need to be doing this?” It is much easier to remain busy and tell yourself that you just need to be a little more efficient or to “Work a little later tonight” than to endure the pain of eliminating a task that you are comfortable with doing, but that isn’t the highest and best use of your time.
To be honest, if you simply eliminated all of the things you waste time on each day then you probably wouldn’t need any tips on how to be more productive at the things that matter.
In my experience, there are two questions that can help clarify the entire process behind the Eisenhower Box.
The Eisenhower Matrix isn’t a perfect strategy, but I have found it to be a useful decision-making tool for increasing my productivity and eliminating the behaviors that take up mental energy, waste time, and rarely move me toward my goals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Be Productive According To Ancient Philosophy”

Productivity has been a topic of discussion ever since ancient eastern and western philosophy started.
It’s time to say “No” to wasting time on useless things that do not bring you anything but short-term pleasure.
It’s time to say “Yes” to a life of productivity that will bring you a better health, wealth, and more inner satisfaction.
Who else could give this monumental piece of advice other than Socrates? The founder of Western philosophy realized that it’s easy to fill your life with meaningless tasks.
That’s why the most important productivity lesson is to understand that it’s not about doing more-it’s about doing the same in less time.
Never underestimate how difficult it is to live a productive life.
The first thing you do when you wake up, what you do when you start working, how much you work, where you work, what you eat, whether you work out or not, and so forth.
Will you get good or bad outcomes? The latter requires wasting your time, the former requires productive action-every day.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 Best Books on Productivity and Time Management: 2018”

Here, a selection of books to help boost your productivity and improve your time-management skills.
So for this reading list on the best productivity books and books on time management, I reached out to a broad range of experts from academia, business, journalism, and tech.
Fm; Justin Kerr, author, most recently of How to Be Great at Your Job; Aishwarya Iyer, CEO and founder of Brightland; Jake Knapp, author of Make Time and Sprint; Candace Nelson, co-founder and pastry chef of Sprinkles Cupcakes and Pizzana; Robert Pozen, senior lecturer at MIT Sloan School of Management and author of Extreme Productivity; Gretchen Rubin, author and host of the podcast Happier With Gretchen Rubin; Jane Stoller, life coach and author of Organizing Your Lifestyle; Laura Vanderkam, author of several books about time management and productivity, including Off the Clock and Juliet’s School of Possibilities; and Heidi Zak, co-founder and co-CEO of ThirdLove.
These are seven of our panelists’ most-recommended titles on productivity and time management, along with a few Strategist-approved honorable mentions.
Fm, likes the way Allen’s book “Outlines three simple steps to a productivity system adaptable to anyone.” Those steps include using “a ‘collection bucket’ to store things outside your mind and stay focused and creating a ‘next actions’ list for all your projects to avoid thinking in the moment,” says Clark, who adds that his favorite quote from the book is, “Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.” However, the advice can get a little nitty-gritty.
Though productivity books might seem like a modern phenomenon, they have a long history that can be traced all the way back to the 18th century, with the publication of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography.
“Benjamin Franklin managed to be not only one of the Founding Fathers, but also to start a public library, discover electricity, negotiate with France, invent bifocals, and write an American classic. He’s a productivity model for all of us,” says writer and podcast host Gretchen Rubin, who notes that even though this book was written centuries ago, it’s still “Fascinating, stimulating, and also quite funny.”
It’s a good reminder that one of the best things you can do to improve your productivity is to put down your phone, turn off your notifications, and simply focus on the work that needs to get done.

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Summary of “Is the secret of productivity really just doing what you enjoy?”

The problem with the genre of “Life lessons from the world’s most successful entrepreneurs” is one of causal direction: just because Elon Musk works 120 hours a week, it doesn’t follow that if you work 120 hours a week, you’ll experience Musk’s success.
“Write every day” won’t work unless you want to write.
How did Luhmann publish 58 books and hundreds of articles – plus, impressively, several more books after his 1998 death, thanks to manuscripts he left behind? Because, said Luhmann, “I never force myself to do anything I don’t like. Whenever I am stuck, I do something else.” That sounds scandalously self-indulgent – except that, as Ahrens writes, “Doesn’t it make much more sense that the impressive body of work was produced not in spite of the fact he never made himself do anything he didn’t feel like, but because of it?”.
The secret of productivity is simple: just do what you enjoy.
There’s some limited truth to this: when you’re just beginning a session of challenging work, you often need to give yourself a push, reminding yourself you don’t need to “Feel like” starting in order to start.
It’s enjoyment that’ll sustain your motivation, not productivity techniques.
It’s not a problem with Luhmann’s enjoyment-based approach to productivity.
It’s a problem with society – the kind of problem, in other words, that no productivity technique is ever going to fix.

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Summary of “When to work: How to optimize your daily schedule for energy, motivation, and focus”

This make it incredibly difficult to know when to work and how to optimize your time throughout the day.
Our energy, focus, and motivation follow their own path throughout the day-what I like to call a “Productivity curve.” It’s great when our natural levels align with our work schedule and we get in a state of flow.
Higher-stress work for when you need a boost in energy and motivation.
The problem is, when you work when your body wants to rest, it uses our reserve stores of energy to keep up.
Instead, understanding and working with your Circadian and Ultradian rhythms, means you have the most energy and focus when you’re doing your most demanding work.
While still optimizing the rest of your day for focus on meaningful work.
Like most knowledge workers, I do my most productive work when I’m energized and motivated.
How to use this information: See how I start with high productivity levels at 9am that slowly decline until a big drop at 1-3pm? This gives me a pretty good idea of when I’ve historically had more energy each day and will want to schedule my most important work.

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Summary of “Darius Foroux on making time for useful work”

How does he do it? With a time management technique he read about in college that he has since expanded on and made his own.
During my final exams, I read about the Pomodoro technique in some magazine I picked up at school.
I think that’s what made readers follow my work.
What have some of the most memorable questions been?One reader asked me why I always start my podcast with “How’s it going?” He said that listeners can’t answer that question.
If you run into a good article, you don’t immediately have to read it.
Save the article and read it when you make time for reading.
What have you been discovering, saving, or spending time with recently in Pocket?I’ve been reading a lot about investing and investors.
If you had the chance to escape and read all of your current Pocket saves where would you go to do it?CuraƧao.

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