Summary of “Harvard Business Review”

How do you know it’s ripe for a breakthrough question? It’s probably a good candidate if it “Makes your heart beat fast,” as Intuit’s chairman and CEO, Brad Smith, put it to me.
The question burst methodology, by design, reverses many of those destructive dynamics by prompting people to depart from their usual habits of social interaction.
Not All Questions Are Created Equal Often, as I’m outlining the rules for a question burst, people ask what kinds of questions they should contribute-or how they can be confident that a question is a good one for further pursuit.
The more surprising and provocative the questions are, the better.
Is there some magic about precisely four minutes and 15 questions? No, but the time pressure helps participants stick to the “Questions only” rule.
After poring over survey data from more than 1,500 global leaders, I’m convinced that part of the power of the question burst lies in its ability to alter a person’s view of the challenge, by dislodging-for most-that feeling of being stuck.
Of course, many business leaders, recognizing the imperative for constant innovation, do try to encourage questions.
In a recent interview he said: “When you’re a student, you’re judged by how well you answer questions. Somebody else asks the questions, and if you give good answers, you’ll get a good grade. But in life, you’re judged by how good your questions are.” As he mentors people, he explicitly focuses their attention on making this all-important transition, knowing “They’ll become great professors, great entrepreneurs-great something-if they ask good questions.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Minutes It Takes To Read This Will Improve Your Conversations Forever”

Following are the simplest tips I can give you to ask better questions, which will make your conversations more valuable to you and the people you engage with.
“Do you like movies?” You’ll get a more interesting answer if you ask, “Why do you like movies?”.
Example: If you ask a person why they like movies and they answer because it’s a good escape, you can follow up with, “Why do you feel like you need an escape?” If they answer because their job is stressful, you can follow up with “Why is your job stressful?” Repeated “Why” questions can turn a simple question about movies into a much deeper conversation.
When you ask a question, pay attention to the answer and ask a follow-up question about it to dig deeper.
If your goal is to learn from somebody, the easiest shortcut to do that is to ask them what they’ve learned.
The most interesting information is found in stories, so ask people to tell you one.
If you don’t fully understand something and want more clarity, ask a person how they would explain it to a kid or somebody with no experience on the subject.
“Am I missing anything? What’s the question nobody ever asks you but you wish they would?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “from practical primers to sci-fi short stories”

Experts are already building a future world brimming with artificial intelligence, but here in the present most of us are still trying to figure out what AI even is.
Questions like, “What is the nature of creativity?” and “How do we define consciousness?” Posing the question “How can I understand AI?” is nearly as daunting as asking “What is the meaning of life?”.
In order to help, The Verge has assembled a reading list: a brief but diverse compendium of books, short stories, and blogs, all chosen by leading figures in the AI world to help you better understand artificial intelligence.
It’s an eclectic selection that ranges from practical primers to Golden Age sci-fi, and while reading everything listed below won’t get you a job at Google, it will give you much-needed context for this confusing and exciting time.
Superintelligence is the book about the threat posed by artificial general intelligence, or AGI, written by Oxford philosophy professor Bostrom.
It’s inspired some questionable pronouncements from tech leaders on the threat from killer robots, but is the best introduction I’ve read to the problem of making smart machines safe; a problem which applies whether they’re super-smart or actually quite dumb.
Despite the gloomy topic, this non-fiction book is a surprisingly fun read, feeling closer to science fiction at times.
The Master Algorithm is a broader read that provides an excellent introduction to the technical aspects of AI. It walks you through all the basic components and concepts, from evolutionary algorithms to Bayesian probability, while showing how machine learning as a field cross-pollinates with disciplines like neuroscience and psychology.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leo Tolstoy on Finding Meaning in a Meaningless World”

In the delusion of my pride of intellect it seemed to me so indubitable that I and Solomon and Schopenhauer had stated the question so truly and exactly that nothing else was possible – so indubitable did it seem that all those milliards consisted of men who had not yet arrived at an apprehension of all the profundity of the question – that I sought for the meaning of my life without it once occurring to me to ask: “But what meaning is and has been given to their lives by all the milliards of common folk who live and have lived in the world?”.
Thanks either to the strange physical affection I have for the real laboring people, which compelled me to understand them and to see that they are not so stupid as we suppose, or thanks to the sincerity of my conviction that I could know nothing beyond the fact that the best I could do was to hang myself, at any rate I instinctively felt that if I wished to live and understand the meaning of life, I must seek this meaning not among those who have lost it and wish to kill themselves, but among those milliards of the past and the present who make life and who support the burden of their own lives and of ours also.
Rational knowledge presented by the learned and wise, denies the meaning of life, but the enormous masses of men, the whole of mankind receive that meaning in irrational knowledge.
I asked: “What is the meaning of my life, beyond time, cause, and space?” And I replied to quite another question: “What is the meaning of my life within time, cause, and space?” With the result that, after long efforts of thought, the answer I reached was: “None.”.
Is not a revelation; it is not only agreement with what has been told one, but faith is a knowledge of the meaning of human life in consequence of which man does not destroy himself but lives.
For man to be able to live he must either not see the infinite, or have such an explanation of the meaning of life as will connect the finite with the infinite.
In contradistinction to us, who the wiser we are the less we understand the meaning of life, and see some evil irony in the fact that we suffer and die, these folk live and suffer, and they approach death and suffering with tranquility and in most cases gladly.
In complete contrast to my ignorance, [they] knew the meaning of life and death, labored quietly, endured deprivations and sufferings, and lived and died seeing therein not vanity but good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Better Brainstorming”

Brainstorming for questions, not answers, wasn’t something I’d tried before.
Brainstorming for questions rather than answers makes it easier to push past cognitive biases and venture into uncharted territory.
Over the years I have tested variations of this brainstorming process-I now call it a “Question burst”-and collected and analyzed participant data and feedback to gauge what works best.
Brainstorming for questions makes it easier to venture into uncharted territory.
The more surprising and provocative the questions are, the better.
In a recent interview he said: “When you’re a student, you’re judged by how well you answer questions. Somebody else asks the questions, and if you give good answers, you’ll get a good grade. But in life, you’re judged by how good your questions are.” As he mentors people, he explicitly focuses their attention on making this all-important transition, knowing “They’ll become great professors, great entrepreneurs-great something-if they ask good questions.”
In my field experience, I’ve found that people become better questioners in environments where they’re encouraged to value creative friction in everyday work.
Research by management professors Andrew Hargadon of UC Davis and Beth Bechky of NYU shows that those volunteering ideas in such companies do not mindlessly spit back answers to the questions posed; they respectfully build on the comments and actions of others, considering “Not only the original question but also whether there is a better question to be asked.” As they do this over and over, new solutions emerge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Minutes It Takes To Read This Will Improve Your Conversations Forever”

Following are the simplest tips I can give you to ask better questions, which will make your conversations more valuable to you and the people you engage with.
“Do you like movies?” You’ll get a more interesting answer if you ask, “Why do you like movies?”.
Example: If you ask a person why they like movies and they answer because it’s a good escape, you can follow up with, “Why do you feel like you need an escape?” If they answer because their job is stressful, you can follow up with “Why is your job stressful?” Repeated “Why” questions can turn a simple question about movies into a much deeper conversation.
When you ask a question, pay attention to the answer and ask a follow-up question about it to dig deeper.
If your goal is to learn from somebody, the easiest shortcut to do that is to ask them what they’ve learned.
The most interesting information is found in stories, so ask people to tell you one.
If you don’t fully understand something and want more clarity, ask a person how they would explain it to a kid or somebody with no experience on the subject.
“Am I missing anything? What’s the question nobody ever asks you but you wish they would?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 21 Most Important Questions Of Your Life”

One of the most important lessons I’ve learned from reading books, interviewing smart people, and having conversations with my mentors is that questions are more important than answers.
“Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers.”
The right question at the right time can spark the right answer that changes your life.
In this article, I want to share 21 questions across four areas that have the potential to change everything about what you do.
Life In General Let’s start with a few yes/no questions to assess how you feel.
I have simply made a note in my note-taking app with these 21 questions.
The reason why these quick questions are important is that you want to adjust your strategy if you answer no to any one of them.
What questions am I not asking myself? There are a lot of things in the universe that we don’t know that we don’t know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Impressive Questions to Ask in an Interview 2018”

As someone who has interviewed probably thousands of job candidates in my career, I’ve long been surprised by how many people don’t ask good questions when their interviewer gives them the opportunity.
A surprising number of candidates don’t have many questions at all, or simply use the time to try to further pitch themselves for the job.
So here are the ten best questions to ask in an interview when it’s your turn to ask the questions – to both impress your potential employer and help you get useful insights into whether or not this is the right job for you.
Initially, you might think that the job description already laid this out, but it’s not uncommon for a job description to be the same one an employer has been using for the last ten years, despite the job having changed significantly during that time.
You might find out that while the job posting listed 12 different responsibilities, your success really just hinges on 2 of them, or that the posting dramatically understated the importance of 1 of them, or that the hiring manager is battling with her own boss about expectations for the role, or even that the manager has no idea what success would look like in the job.
A job candidate asked me this question years ago, and it might be the strongest question I’ve ever been asked in an interview.
Sometimes people use their turn to ask questions in an interview solely as an additional chance to try to impress their interviewer – asking questions designed to reflect well on them rather than questions designed to help them figure out if the job is even right for them in the first place.
If you’re just focused on getting the job and not on whether it’s the right job for you, you’re in danger of ending up in a job where you’re struggling or miserable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to figure out what job interviewers really want to know”

“That information qualifies you to find out more. Other questions are designed to find out how you do what you do, and how you’ve done in the past. It’s more than just the experience you have in the field.”
Most questions will have one of three main types of motivation, and each one requires a different response, says Pyle, a former U.S. Army human intelligence training instructor who taught Department of Defense interrogators and debriefers how to ask questions.
The first is a non-pertinent question not related to the task at hand.
The fourth type of belonging question is about the choices you’ve made.
The second type of motivation is finding out how your presence and contributions could build the interviewer’s self-esteem.
Esteem questions are a way to determine trust, but don’t embellish too much in an attempt to sell yourself.
The final motivation behind questions is when someone is looking for legacy or affiliation.
Answering this question can involve research or asking questions in response to get more information.

The orginal article.

Summary of “4 networking strategies for introverts”

Research published in Harvard Business Review revealed that contrary to popular belief, there are circumstances where introverts make better leaders than extroverts.
Professional events may seem like an extrovert’s domain, but introverts have superpowers that make them phenomenal networkers.
I’d argue that both introverts and extroverts should stop using the term “Networking,” and start using the term “Relationship building.” For introverts specifically, this term leans toward your strengths.
“It’s useful before an event to learn a little bit about the people who will be there,” says Susan Cain, author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking and founder of Quiet Revolution, a website and consulting firm for introverts.
“For everyone you meet, you’ll get beyond basic small talk faster.” Because crowds of people tend to drain energy from introverts, they’ll spend less time at an event and need to make the most of every conversation.
” I always advise people when they go into a classic networking situation to look for what I call the kindred spirits,” says Cain.
For me, the most interesting people are not the people at the center of the room, so I look for people who are standing on the fringes, not the ones pushing themselves into a circle of conversation.
“Extroverts get so energized about sharing ideas that they sometimes forget to ask about the other person. Introverts like to ask questions, but not all questions are created equal. For starters,”What do you do?” and Where are you from?” probably won’t prompt great conversations.

The orginal article.