Summary of “26 Favorite Books of High Achievers”

The most successful people often are serious about self-improvement, which can come in the form of a good book.
“It may not be the newest shiny object on the shelf, but it certainly remains one of the best books for teams I have ever read. You don’t have to have a creative-based business in order to appreciate the fact that Catmull just knows how to work better with people, and how to make those people thrive. It’s an inspiration to me to see the meticulous detail and passion by which he continuously achieved this, even through failure, and how humble he was in the process. It’s a must-read for every entrepreneur and leader of people and at every level of business from startup to Fortune 500.”.
“Influence explains the psychology of why people say yes, and how readers can apply this understanding to their personal and professional lives. Dr. Cialdini is a world-renowned expert in persuasion who brings 35 years of experience researching why people are moved to change behavior. The book includes six universal principles, with direction on how to use these guidelines to master the art of persuasion. I’ve used these principles to accomplish goals in my personal and professional lives, including everything from helping my employees reach their career goals to helping our global technology consulting company close new business. I recommend this book for anyone in a leadership position.”
“Today, hyper-adaptability is more important than economies of scale and corporate process efficiency. Companies need to organize in autonomous teams and align them toward the most important goals. They need to be more agile. This is the best book I have read describing this shift toward a new normal in organizations and how to build and lead them.”
“A lot of the people I meet or that I’ve worked with complain and ask why they are not getting anywhere in their career or why they’re not a director after just two years. I believe all of us need to understand that input correlates to output. This book is a fabulous read to understand that exceptional talent is a function of hard work over time. There are no shortcuts in life: 10,000 hours of practice or 10 years. This book is the starting point and a blueprint you can follow to be successful.”
“After reading hundreds of personal development and business books, this one is my all-time favorite. To succeed in business, and in life, it’s important to first establish strong fundamentals. This book provides the tools and guidance to easily understand the power of setting goals, advancing personal development, seeking knowledge, controlling finances, mastering time management, and building a winning team. Almost anyone can get value from it, regardless of the person’s age, experience, business, or stage in his or her chosen journey. The late Jim Rohn was a master teacher and business mentor. He has truly helped shape who I am today, and significantly influenced my approach to business.”
“Cognitive dissonance is one of the most powerful forces in our personal and professional lives. It helps explain why we often unnecessarily repeat mistakes and defend entrenched positions. As this book explains, our brain wants to insulate us from making mistakes, so it allows us to rationally justify contradictions in our mind. So rather than learning from our mistakes, we tend to double down and get further entrenched in our position as a defense mechanism. This book is essential for leaders of companies to read, as it can help increase self-awareness, both in ourselves and our teams. The ability to detect and act on cognitive dissonance is a competitive advantage in all aspects of our life.”
“In his latest book, Sanborn inspires others to unlock their true potential. He emphasizes that the only limitation we have is that which we place upon ourselves. This book provides a framework and insights for how to be the best version of you. Thank you, Mark Sanborn, for encouraging continuous improvement. You inspire us to embrace the journey.”

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Summary of “Attempt to Read a Book Every Week”

I started reading a new book every week two months ago.
I share the books I read with my Postanly Newsletter subscribers every Friday.
“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time to write. Simple as that.” says Stephen King.Reading opens your heart to new ideas, new cultures, and new worldviews.
You don’t have to spend a whole month reading a single book.
Even insanely busy and succesful people like Warren Buffet, Elon Musk, Bill Gates, Tim Ferriss, Ryan Holiday MAKE time to read. “I just sit in my office and read all day” says Warren Buffet.
Life is too short to read books you don’t really want to read.Tim Ferriss, New York Times Best-Selling Author says, he reads 1-4 books per week.
“If I’m going for speed, I’ll use the following, which can help you 2-3x your word-per-minute rate in 15-20 minutes without sacrificing comprehension: Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes It takes some practice, but it works when time is of the essence.”It’s now 80/20 for me - what you read is much more important than how much or how quickly you read.” says Tim.Why One a Week?First, figure out why: why one books a week?
Don’t just read a book a week because you want to crush a goal or embrace successful people’s habits.

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Summary of “Passing Over: How Reading Lets Us Live a Thousand Lives”

Someone once asked the great short story writer Jorge Luis Borges “Don’t you regret spending more of your life reading than living?”.
“There are many ways of living, and reading is one of them When you are reading, you are living, and when you are dreaming, you are living also.”What does Borges mean? Isn’t living, well, living?
“Looking back into your own past, among the landmarks of your life, you will find that great readings occupy a place no less significant than actual happenings - for instance, a long and adventurous journey through strange lands, which you undertook in a certain year, may in retrospect appear no less memorable than your first exploration of A la recherche du temps perdu; or again, you might realize that your encounter with Anna Karenina, or with Julien Sorel proved more momentous than meeting most of your past acquaintances. Who is to assess the relative significance, the specific weight that should be ascribed to these diverse experiences in the shaping of your personality?”Our memories are not so different from the stories we find in books.
One time, an older girl I did not know came up to me and said, “Why are you reading books? It’s a beautiful day. Go out live a little!”.
Even as an adult, someone will occasionally tell me to put my books away and go live.
Reading is not living, and every moment spent in a book is a life less well-lived.
Here’s something else to think about - what if reading makes you live more?
“Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom realize the enormous extension of our being that we owe to authors. We realize it best when we talk with an unliterary friend. He may be full of goodness and good sense, but he inhabits a tiny world. In it, we should be suffocated. My own eyes are not enough for me. in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself. Like the night sky in the Greek poem, I see with a myriad of eyes, but it is still I who see. Here, as in worship, in love, in moral action, and in knowing, I transcend myself; and am never more myself than when I do.”The cat has nine lives as a boy who read, I guess I had a thousand.

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Summary of “Email-etiquette rules every professional should know”

Despite the fact that we’re glued to our reply buttons, career coach Barbara Pachter says plenty of professionals still don’t know how to use email appropriately.
Pachter says to pay careful attention when typing a name from your address book on the email’s “To” line.
“It’s easy to select the wrong name, which can be embarrassing to you and to the person who receives the email by mistake,” Pachter says.
“My name is Barbara. I don’t like receiving emails addressed as ‘Hi Barb,'” Pachter says.
In a professional exchange, it’s better to leave humor out of emails unless you know the recipient well.
The cardinal rule: Your emails should be easy for other people to read. “Generally, it is best to use 10- or 12-point type and an easy-to-read font such as Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman,” Pachter advises.
As the endless string of email hacks prove, every electronic message leaves a trail.
Whether you’re cc’ing a client on an email where your boss said something about them or including a coworker on an email chain where another coworker shares personal information, “No one likes to have someone else decide to cc someone without being asked first,” Rosalinda Oropeza Randall, an etiquette and civility expert and the author of “Don’t Burp in the Boardroom,” tells Business Insider.

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Summary of “Your Best Tips for Beating Procrastination”

My trick is to imagine my future self and to do things for this future self – “Connie of the Future.” I picture how grateful Connie of the Future will be if I’ve laid out work clothes for next week, or done food prep for that night in the morning, or answered an email that Connie of the Present doesn’t feel like doing.
Tim.Best of Smarter Living How to Survive a Lavish Wedding: One of the main ways to survive a lavish wedding is to let any embarrassing moments slide off you like good caviar.
How to Find the Right Therapist: To find The One, the author needed to date around and swipe her way through therapists.
How Well Do You Know The World?: These photos are all selected from spots that made our Places to Go in 2017 list.
How to Raise a Reader: From the moment you’re expecting your first child, you are bombarded with messages about the importance of reading.
Aid a grieving friend by offering specific ways you can help.
How to Survive a Lavish Wedding: One of the main ways to survive a lavish wedding is to let any embarrassing moments slide off you like good caviar.
Here are some ways to reduce your impact when you fly.5 Cheap(ish) Things That Could Disproportionately Improve Your Life: You don’t always have to spend big to see a big impact.

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Summary of “Elon Musk mastered ‘learning transfer'”

Based on my review of Musk’s life and the academic literature related to learning and expertise, I’m convinced that we should ALL learn across multiple fields in order to increase our odds of breakthrough success.
Learning across multiple fields provides an information advantage because most people focus on just one field.
Musk’s ‘learning transfer’ superpower Starting from his early teenage years, Musk would read through two books per day in various disciplines according to his brother, Kimbal Musk.
Elon Musk is also good at a very specific type of learning that most others aren’t even aware of - learning transfer.
Learning transfer is taking what we learn in one context and applying it to another.
At the deepest level, what we can learn from Elon Musk’s story is that we shouldn’t accept the dogma that specialization is the best or only path toward career success and impact.
As we build up a reservoir of “First principles” and associate those principles with different fields, we suddenly gain the superpower of being able to go into a new field we’ve never learned before, and quickly make unique contributions.
Want to take to learn like Musk? I created a free learning how to learn webinar you might like.

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Summary of “44 Favorite Books of High Achievers”

The people who accomplish the most in life are serious about self-improvement, which often comes in the form of a good book.
“Edgar Schein is one of the seminal researchers and authors of organizational culture. In his final series of books as an elder he shows how our leadership mindset needs to change from doing and telling to more of a humble mindset of listening, asking questions, and creating environments that are adaptive and collaborative. This is the first of three books along the humble inquiry theme, in addition to Humble Consulting and his future book Humble Leadership.”
“Empowering and reinforcing perspectives for modern times. The former provides an encouraging account of people who take control of their lives and empower themselves in the face of challenging health issues. The second looks at the workings of the brain that control our behavior. Both are useful for choice and perspective with illness, relationships, deaths of loved ones, and work-life balance stress. These books provide a chance to recalibrate, rethink, and reassess our interpretation of degree of happiness and stress in our lives-and may leave us feeling more connected in the process.”
“This book has been a favorite of mine since I was a child. The notion of taking charge of your own destiny and not being stuck or complacent has resonated throughout my career in the hospitality industry. To be successful in any endeavor, you can’t be afraid to go places and take risks, and I think the essence of this book can be applied to many goals in business.”
I come from a lineage of physicians and so I had to rely on books such as Rich Dad Poor Dad to teach me the value and strategy of growing my business and maintaining successful cash flow and having positive debt.
“While running a business you’re bound to run into obstacles and frustrations that can become quite exhausting. This book helped me define necessary goals within the business and accomplish them through simple yet powerful techniques that transpired into a stronger team, exponential growth, and a more enjoyable working environment. This book is perfect for any entrepreneur who’s looking to make positive changes within their business and accomplish goals in a more efficient manner.”
“The Art of Thinking Clearly helped me improve my decision-making abilities, recognize possible mistakes preemptively, and provided me with the skills to avoid them. The book is all about slowing down and avoiding rushed decisions while applying rational thinking to every choice-from major business decisions to interactions with individuals that trigger emotional responses. The Art of Thinking Clearly provides a realistic, logical, and pragmatic approach to strategic thinking for life.”
“Ben Horowitz is one of the most prolific Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs and one of the most successful VCs in the past decade. His book, The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers, provides uniquely applied advice and perspective on the realities of building a high-growth startup. I found it to be a must read for me and my team-as we meet the same challenges that Ben successfully navigated again and again.”

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Summary of “The death of reading is threatening the soul”

I am reading many fewer books these days, and even fewer of the kinds of books that require hard work.
Soon I’m over at CNN.com reading Donald Trump’s latest tweets and details of the latest terrorist attack, or perhaps checking tomorrow’s weather.
Nicholas Carr’s book “The Shallows” analyzes the phenomenon, and its subtitle says it all: “What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains.” Carr spells out that most Americans, and young people especially, are showing a precipitous decline in the amount of time spent reading.
After an hour of contemplation, or deep reading, a person ends up less tired and less neurochemically depleted, thus more able to tackle mental challenges.
If we can’t reach Buffett’s high reading bar, what is a realistic goal? Charles Chu calculates that at an average reading speed of 400 words per minute, it would take 417 hours in a year to read 200 books-less than the 608 hours the average American spends on social media, or the 1,642 hours watching TV. “Here’s the simple truth behind reading a lot of books,” says Quartz: “It’s not that hard. We have all the time we need. The scary part-the part we all ignore-is that we are too addicted, too weak, and too distracted to do what we all know is important.”
We have to build a fortress with walls strong enough to withstand the temptations of that powerful dopamine rush while also providing shelter for an environment that allows deep reading to flourish.
For deep reading, I’m searching for an hour a day when mental energy is at a peak, not a scrap of time salvaged from other tasks.
I’m still working on that fortress of habit, trying to resurrect the rich nourishment that reading has long provided for me.

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Summary of “Emma Watson interviews Margaret Atwood about ‘The Handmaid’s Tale'”

Don’t forget to subscribe for more exclusive interviews and photos, only in EW. Many celebrities have book clubs, but none share the clout of Emma Watson’s “Our Shared Shelf,” which has picked up nearly 200,000 members since it launched on Goodreads in 2016.
As Watson wrote when she made The Handmaid’s Tale her May/June selection, “It is a book that has never stopped fascinating readers because it articulates so vividly what it feels like for a woman to lose power over her own body.” Thanks to the recent Hulu series, Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel has again soared to the top of the best-seller lists.
First, what right wing people were already saying in 1980.
Recently, someone said, “Religion doesn’t radicalize people, people radicalize religion.” So you can use any religion as an excuse for being repressive, and you can use any religion as an excuse for resisting repression; it works both ways, as it does in the book.
So that’s one reason: People know that I wasn’t just making up horrors to be entertaining.
Another thing is, if offered a position of power within a relatively powerless position, some people will take that.
People say, “Why do you have Aunt Lydia?” “Why do you have the female aunt being so controlling to women?” And I say because they would be! That’s how such a power structure would operate, that’s how they’ve operated in the past: You give somebody a bit more power over the others, and they will take it.
I’ve just done a film called The Circle which is about how easy it is and would be to control huge groups of people with the amount of data that’s been collected.

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Summary of “12 Books That Will Improve Your Self-Knowledge”

So I’ve made a list of 12 books that have helped me to know myself.
HBR’s 10 Must Reads on Managing Yourself The book’s description starts with, “The path to your professional success starts with a critical look in the mirror.” I can’t agree more.
Ego Is The Enemy by Ryan Holiday This is one of my favorite books of the past year.
I Like Myself! by Karen Beaumont I usually stick to books for grown-ups.
One of my friends bought this book for his daughter a while back.
The Gifts of Imperfection by Brené Brown I only recently read Brené Brown’s book.
Notes To Myself by Hugh Prather This book was recommended to me last year by a reader.
This is one of my all-time favorite books because it’s the most honest book I’ve read. As you can see, there are no books about self-knowledge or self-awareness on this list.

The orginal article.