Summary of “Scientific Speed Reading: How to Read 300% Faster in 20 Minutes”

While on an airplane in China two weeks ago, I helped Glenn McElhose increase his reading speed 34% in less than 5 minutes.
The PX ProjectThe PX Project, a single 3-hour cognitive experiment, produced an average increase in reading speed of 386%.It was tested with speakers of five languages, and even dyslexics were conditioned to read technical material at more than 3,000 words-per-minute, or 10 pages per minute.
As a general rule, you will need to practice technique at 3x the speed of your ultimate target reading speed.
Thus, if you currently read at 300 wpm and your target reading speed is 900 wpm, you will need to practice technique at 1,800 words-per-minute, or 6 pages per minute.
Mark your first line and read with a timer for 1 minute exactly-do not read faster than normal, and read for comprehension.
To illustrate, let us take the hypothetical one line: “Once upon a time, students enjoyed reading four hours a day.” If you were able to begin your reading at “Time” and finish the line at “Four”, you would eliminate 6 of 11 words, more than doubling your reading speed.
Fourth - Calculate New WPM Reading SpeedMark your first line and read with a timer for 1 minute exactly- Read at your fastest comprehension rate.
Final recommendations: If used for study, it is recommended that you not read 3 assignments in the time it would take you to read one, but rather, read the same assignment 3 times for exposure and recall improvement, depending on relevancy to testing.

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Summary of “Why Reading Books Should be Your Priority, According to Science”

More than a quarter-26 percent-of American adults admit to not having read even part of a book within the last year.
If you’re part of this group, know that science supports the idea that reading is good for you on several levels.
Reading fiction can help you be more open-minded and creative.
According to research conducted at the University of Toronto, study participants who read short story fiction experienced far less need for “Cognitive closure” compared with counterparts who read non-fiction essays.
“Although nonfiction reading allows students to learn the subject matter, it may not always help them in thinking about it,” the authors write.
That’s according to Yale researchers who studied 3,635 people older than 50 and found that those who read books for 30 minutes daily lived an average of 23 months longer than non-readers or magazine readers.
Apparently, the practice of reading books creates cognitive engagement which improves lots of things, including vocabulary, thinking skills and concentration.
Reading 50 books a year is something you can actually accomplish.

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Summary of “How to Retain More of Every Book You Read”

For most people, the ultimate goal of reading a nonfiction book is to actually improve your life by learning a new skill, understanding an important problem, or looking at the world in a new way.
It’s important to read books, but it is just as important to remember what you read and put it to good use.
Having searchable book notes is essential for returning to ideas easily.
Typing notes while reading a print book can be annoying because you are always putting the book down and picking it back up.
I like to place the book on a book stand, which makes it much easier to type out a long quote or keep my hands free while reading.
As I read Mastery by George Leonard, I realized that while this book was about the process of improvement, it also shed some light on the connection between genetics and performance.
How would I describe the book to a friend? What are the main ideas? If I was going to implement one idea from the book right now, which one would it be?
In many cases, I find that I can usually get just as much useful information from reading my one-paragraph summary and reviewing my notes as I would if I read the entire book again.

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Summary of “Homeownership is still a bad investment”

Home must be where the heart is, because my Feb. 19 column on homeownership being a lousy investment annoyed readers mightily.
Readers’ biggest gripe: What about rent? Overwhelmingly, folks believe owning is cheaper than renting.
The U.S. Census Bureau reports national and local costs for renting and owning homes at www.
Nationwide, from 2012 to 2016, the average median monthly gross rent was $949. That’s rent plus utilities and fuels.
In every state owning costs more than comparable renting.
A Cleveland renter who took the savings from cheaper rent and invested them in stocks through a 401(k) would have accumulated more than $45,000.
If you won’t, that still doesn’t make homeownership a great investment.
Owning means never worrying about eviction, rent increases or many fears readers cited.

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Summary of “Stop reading the latest news if you want to be better informed”

What’s more, Watson doesn’t really follow the news in any conventional way.
Watson’s scale is grand and includes all of human history and its possible futures.
Such remarkable characters are called “Tall poppies” in some companies, and Watson believes collecting these human blooms drives success.
Hit the road. “Travel. But again take the path untrodden,” Watson urges.
Watson especially recommends perusing weekend editions of quality newspapers.
“The important news will find you. It will.” Watson is confident that relevant information makes its way to us, and that much of what we fuss over daily is just stuff that will soon be forgotten.
“Have a think week every year,” Watson says.
“Learn how to look and listen deeply,” Watson recommends.

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Summary of “For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.”

Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our broken digital news environment.
During the 2016 election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their least important source.
Though I have closely followed the news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at the touch of a button.
Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news feels backward, and dangerously so.
It is exactly our fealty to the crowd – to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself – that makes us susceptible to misinformation.
As news organizations evolved to a digital landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure to push news out faster.
You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with the news.

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Summary of “How to Read More Books”

When people ask me how I read so many books, they’re usually fishing for a speed reading technique that will allow their brains to swallow books whole.
Being amazed at how many books I read in a year would be like being amazed at how many leaky faucets a plumber fixed in a year.
With that said, in addition to the books I read specifically for the Art of Manliness last year, I also managed to read 2-3 books every month for pleasure.
So the #1 secret to reading more is to spend more time reading.
What’s more, studies suggest that reading comprehension increases when you read an analog book compared to reading on digital devices.
As mentioned above, when people ask me how I read so many books, they often assume I’m speed reading.
If you’ve read one personal development book you’ve read them all.
I know a lot about WWII history because I’ve read a lot of books about WWII. I know a lot about Theodore Roosevelt because I’ve read a lot of books about Theodore Roosevelt.

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Summary of “Is the E-Reader Dead?”

After 10 years of uncertainty, it seems that we finally live in a world where readers of both print and digital books can live in peace with each other.
“The Kindle device is purpose-built for reading, so you can fully immerse yourself in an author’s story. Kindle doesn’t distract a reader with social media, emails and text messages,” an Amazon representative told Tom’s Guide.
More than one-quarter of U.S. adults read no books.
In 2016; of the 74 percent who did, some read a single book “In part.” The average U.S. reader finishes from four to 12 books per year, depending on whether you want to go with the median or the mean.
The number of people who read, and the amount that they read, have both been steadily decreasing.
“It’s very difficult to have escapist reading when you have to keep up with political reading,” continued Kudisch.
“We are spending so much time fighting, it’s difficult to spend time reading. If readership is declining, blame politics. Blame the climate that makes us feel like we have to be plugged into Twitter during our reading time.”
One could argue that a smartphone or tablet would provide just as many opportunities for genre writers and readers to find one another, but remember: Kudisch’s readers don’t generally buy her books on smartphones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Live your best life with the help of Tim Herrera of “

The Smarter Living section of the New York Times was created to help its readers live their best life and its editor, Tim Herrera, practices what the section preaches.
We caught up with Tim to ask him about the inspiration behind the new Times section, where he sees it going in the future, and what he’s been reading and saving to Pocket lately.
You are the editor of Smarter Living, the service journalism section of The New York Times that aims to help its readers understand the world and make the most of it.
People expect a lot from The Times, and we do our best to live up to those expectations.
You also write the weekly Smarter Living newsletter, which is a recap of The Times’ best advice for living a more fulfilling life.
How do you decide what Smarter Living is going to cover next?We’re lucky that we’re defined more thematically than topically, so our main driving force behind stories is just anything that helps readers live better lives.
What type of impact do you hope Smarter Living has on its readers? And where would you like to see the section go in the future?We have a pretty simple mandate: Help readers live better lives.
We’re really excited to develop more products and “Things” that help readers do that, so definitely something to keep an eye out for this year.

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Summary of “12 Books That Made Me Think”

Though there is no objective best book or most-thought provoking book, I do think there is a best book for you, right now.
The best rule of thumb to discover these books is to find people with similar reading tastes to you, and then ask them for the best books they read when they were in a spot in their lives similar to what you’re currently going through.
I’ll assume, since you clicked on an article called “12 books that made me think,” you are asking which books impacted me.
In that vein, below are a compilation of the books that made me smarter at different points in my life.
I don’t agree with all the points made in these books and often the book forced me to do the valuable work of understanding and articulating why I disagreed.
If you haven’t read any of them, then I think starting with whichever book seems most interesting is the best way to go.
Get a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including the best books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.
If you liked this article, you might want to download a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including my favorite books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.

The orginal article.