Summary of “How to Read More Books”

When people ask me how I read so many books, they’re usually fishing for a speed reading technique that will allow their brains to swallow books whole.
Being amazed at how many books I read in a year would be like being amazed at how many leaky faucets a plumber fixed in a year.
With that said, in addition to the books I read specifically for the Art of Manliness last year, I also managed to read 2-3 books every month for pleasure.
So the #1 secret to reading more is to spend more time reading.
What’s more, studies suggest that reading comprehension increases when you read an analog book compared to reading on digital devices.
As mentioned above, when people ask me how I read so many books, they often assume I’m speed reading.
If you’ve read one personal development book you’ve read them all.
I know a lot about WWII history because I’ve read a lot of books about WWII. I know a lot about Theodore Roosevelt because I’ve read a lot of books about Theodore Roosevelt.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is the E-Reader Dead?”

After 10 years of uncertainty, it seems that we finally live in a world where readers of both print and digital books can live in peace with each other.
“The Kindle device is purpose-built for reading, so you can fully immerse yourself in an author’s story. Kindle doesn’t distract a reader with social media, emails and text messages,” an Amazon representative told Tom’s Guide.
More than one-quarter of U.S. adults read no books.
In 2016; of the 74 percent who did, some read a single book “In part.” The average U.S. reader finishes from four to 12 books per year, depending on whether you want to go with the median or the mean.
The number of people who read, and the amount that they read, have both been steadily decreasing.
“It’s very difficult to have escapist reading when you have to keep up with political reading,” continued Kudisch.
“We are spending so much time fighting, it’s difficult to spend time reading. If readership is declining, blame politics. Blame the climate that makes us feel like we have to be plugged into Twitter during our reading time.”
One could argue that a smartphone or tablet would provide just as many opportunities for genre writers and readers to find one another, but remember: Kudisch’s readers don’t generally buy her books on smartphones.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Live your best life with the help of Tim Herrera of “

The Smarter Living section of the New York Times was created to help its readers live their best life and its editor, Tim Herrera, practices what the section preaches.
We caught up with Tim to ask him about the inspiration behind the new Times section, where he sees it going in the future, and what he’s been reading and saving to Pocket lately.
You are the editor of Smarter Living, the service journalism section of The New York Times that aims to help its readers understand the world and make the most of it.
People expect a lot from The Times, and we do our best to live up to those expectations.
You also write the weekly Smarter Living newsletter, which is a recap of The Times’ best advice for living a more fulfilling life.
How do you decide what Smarter Living is going to cover next?We’re lucky that we’re defined more thematically than topically, so our main driving force behind stories is just anything that helps readers live better lives.
What type of impact do you hope Smarter Living has on its readers? And where would you like to see the section go in the future?We have a pretty simple mandate: Help readers live better lives.
We’re really excited to develop more products and “Things” that help readers do that, so definitely something to keep an eye out for this year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 Books That Made Me Think”

Though there is no objective best book or most-thought provoking book, I do think there is a best book for you, right now.
The best rule of thumb to discover these books is to find people with similar reading tastes to you, and then ask them for the best books they read when they were in a spot in their lives similar to what you’re currently going through.
I’ll assume, since you clicked on an article called “12 books that made me think,” you are asking which books impacted me.
In that vein, below are a compilation of the books that made me smarter at different points in my life.
I don’t agree with all the points made in these books and often the book forced me to do the valuable work of understanding and articulating why I disagreed.
If you haven’t read any of them, then I think starting with whichever book seems most interesting is the best way to go.
Get a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including the best books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.
If you liked this article, you might want to download a free guide of the 8 strategies I use to read 60 books a year, and 67 must-read books for entrepreneurs - including my favorite books on business, life, and the philosophy of work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Free Speech and the Necessity of Discomfort”

Intelligent coverage requires intelligent readers, viewers and listeners.
In sum, we cannot be the keepers of what you might call liberal civilization – I’m using the word liberal in its broad, philosophical sense, not the narrowly American ideological one – if our readers have illiberal instincts, incurious minds, short attention spans and even shorter fuses.
Nate Silver, the Times’s former polling guru, said the article did “More to normalize neo-Nazism than anything I’ve read in long time.” An editor at The Washington Post accused us of producing “Long, glowing profiles of Nazis” when we should have focused on the “Victims of their ideologies.” The Times followed up with an explanatory, and somewhat apologetic, note from the national editor.
Just what do these readers think a newspaper is supposed to do?
How can we get our readers to understand that the purpose of The Times is not to be a tacit partner in the so-called Resistance, which would only validate the administration’s charge that the paper is engaged in veiled partisanship rather than straight-up fact-finding and truth telling?
Again, do these readers comprehend that we are in the business of news, not public relations? And does it not also occur to them that perhaps the real problem was coverage that was not aggressive enough, allowing Mrs. Clinton to dominate the Democratic field in 2016 despite her serious, and only belatedly apparent, shortcomings as a candidate?
The word “Modest” might have been a tip-off to modestly educated readers that I was not proposing to ban Jews at all.
How many people bother to read before they condemn? Are people genuinely offended, or are they looking for a pretext to be offended – because taking offense is now the shortest route to political empowerment? Am I, as a columnist, no longer allowed to use irony as a rhetorical device because there’s always a risk that bigots and dimwits might take it the wrong way? Can I rely on context to make my point clear, or must I write in fear that any sentence can be ripped out of context and pasted on Twitter to be used against me? Is a plodding, Pravda-like earnestness of tone and substance the only safe way going forward?

The orginal article.

Summary of “I have forgotten how to read”

Out for dinner with another writer, I said, “I think I’ve forgotten how to read.”.
It’s been unnerving to realize: I have forgotten how to read – really read – and I’ve been refusing to talk about it out of pride.
To read was to disappear, become enrobed in something beyond my own jittery ego.
When we become cynical readers – when we read in the disjointed, goal-oriented way that online life encourages – we stop exercising our attention.
What’s at stake is not whether we read. It’s how we read. And that’s something we’ll have to each judge for ourselves; it can’t be tallied by Statistics Canada.
We should, instead, marvel at the fact we ever read books at all.
Do they grab; do they anger? Can this be read without care? Are the sentences brief enough? And the thoughts? It’s tempting to let myself become so cynical a writer because I’m already such a cynical reader.
So maybe that change into a cynical writer can be forestalled – if I can first correct my reading diet, remember how to read the way I once did.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brainjunk and the killing of the internet mind”

Today, we eat a rich and decadent buffet of brainjunk – of useless tweets, of photos of people we don’t know, of articles that were written in ten minutes to stoke the content boiler.
The internet and its disruption of traditional print business models has now reached the watershed of publications like Newsweek and the Los Angeles Times, household names with large – paying – subscriber bases who loved their Pulitzer Prizes.
Frankly, nothing is enough in a world in which readers crave brainjunk at the expense of all other quality content.
More articles, more videos, all cheaply made and distributed through the purveyors of brainjunk like Facebook and Twitter.
People will gladly spend hours a day reading brainjunk, to avoid even the slightest expense that might improve the quality of what they are reading.
Even storied publications are going to fall by the wayside so we can read about “7 Tips on How To Improve Media.”
If you want to read whatever LinkedIn calls news, go right ahead. But if you actually want to learn, to improve your mind, to improve your awareness and understanding of the world, you have to shell out.
If you’re about to read articles for an hour or two, start thinking about what that time is worth and whether you can spend more to maximize the quality of what you are reading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Science Says This Is the Simplest Way to Remember More of What You Read”

Whether it’s Facebook content, Bill Gates’s favorite book, or the latest critical business report, most of us enjoy reading or have to do quite a bit of it through the day.
Just go back and give yourself a little time to reflect on what you just read. Now, when I say “Reflect,” I don’t mean sit there pondering for an hour.
Because the brain is wired to respond to emotions quickly and efficiently, connecting them to memory formation and the interpretation of facts and rational thought, if you can allow yourself to really acknowledge and respond to what you feel during your reading reflections, you stand a better chance of the new memories being more powerful and easier to retrieve.
To really get the most out of your reading and reading reflection, there are a few other add-on tricks you can try.
Read some of the content aloud or draw images for the main ideas.
Fatigue can negatively influence your ability to focus, so pick a reading time where you feel energized.
Knowing the purpose behind what you’re reading can make it easier to feel motivated and engaged with the content.
No matter how long your reflection time might happen to last, just read. Read anything.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alexander Hamilton’s Deep Advice”

Ten will be his hour of going to bed throughout the year.
From the time he is dressed in the morning till nine o clock he is to read Law.
At nine he goes to the office & continues there till dinner time-he will be occupied partly in the writing and partly in reading law.
After Dinner he reads law at home till five o’clock.
From this hour till seven he disposes of his time as he pleases.
From seven to ten he reads and studies what ever he pleases.
Who along with Jefferson and Madison, was one our most intellectual founder fathers, had learned through experience that doing anything worthwhile with your brain requires a foundation built on thousands of hours of deep work.
If you want to make a difference, you can’t avoid the necessity of waking up at six to read law before breakfast.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most of what you’re going to read today is pointless.”

We spend hours consuming news because we want to be well informed.
We used to have to wait to get a newspaper or gossip with people in our town to get our news, but not anymore.
Second, the costs to produce news have dropped significantly.
Third, producers of news attempt to hijack our brains.
News producers perpetuate a culture of “Tune in, don’t miss out, follow this or you’ll be misinformed, oh wait, look at this!” As you consume more and more of that kind of news, you have less and less time for what matters.
In part, because there is a lot of competition, most news outlets feel compelled to offer free news.
For a lot of people who create news, the more page views they get, the more they are compensated.
So why spend so much time on stuff that will be irrelevant in a few days? Learn to read the right way, this will help you remember what you read. Read what stands the test of time.

The orginal article.