Summary of “How to get Oprah to say your name, and other life lessons from writer-comedian H. Alan Scott”

A series of interesting conversations with interesting people.
H. Alan Scott’s goal is to tell people stories, make them laugh, and to leave them with a perspective they hadn’t considered before.
We caught up with H. Alan to chat about all of the above, when he’s able to take a break for Bar Mitzvah planning, and what he’s been finding interesting on the web lately.
How did you get into comedy and writing in the first place?I was always a funny kid, and obsessed with Johnny Carson and funny daytime talk shows like The Rosie O’Donnell.
Before the show they let me do a weird set where I got the audience to say my name, “H.” So when I stood up to ask my question, the audience went, “H.” Shirley asked, “What’s H?” I said, “H. Alan Scott,” which promoted Oprah to say, “H. Alan Scott,” which prompted me to die right there on the spot.
Of course I choose how much I share, but I use my life as the basis for my work.
How do you decide what to write about next? And what impression do you hope to leave with your readers and the internet as a whole?My goal with everything I write is for the reader to be left with a perspective they maybe haven’t thought about before, or a fresh take on something.
If you had the chance to escape and read all of your current Pocket saves where would you go to do it?Palm Springs, on a couch, looking at people from the AC.Who would you want to see us interview next?Zach Stafford is the editor-in-chief of Grindr’s new magazine, INTO, and he’s the smartest most brilliant writer I know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “JK Rowling’s 8 Rules of Writing”

Last month, I brought to your attention Neil Gaiman’s rules of writing.
He’s not the only accomplished writer who ascribes to a set of rules.
Today, I want to introduce you to JK Rowling’s rules of writing.
She’s shared a lot of terrific writing wisdom, but in my opinion, these are her eight best rules.
The funny thing is that, although writing has been my actual job for several years now, I still seem to have to fight for time in which to do it.
Write what you know: your own interests, feelings, beliefs, friends, family and even pets will be your raw materials when you start writing.
Your writing clarifies, corrects, and often reveals your beliefs, experiences, and feelings.
There are things you know that you have no idea you know-but your subconscious does, and that stuff will filter into your writing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How And Why To Keep A “Commonplace Book””

Well, the commonplace book is a thread that runs through all those ideas.
What is a Commonplace book?A commonplace book is a central resource or depository for ideas, quotes, anecdotes, observations and information you come across during your life and didactic pursuits.
Some people have gone as far as to claim that Pinterest is a modern iteration of the commonplace book.
What’s the point of that? Your commonplace book, over a lifetime, can accumulate a mass of true wisdom-that you can turn to in times of crisis, opportunity, depression or job.
A commonplace book is a way to keep our learning priorities in order.
Try a Google Books search for “Commonplace Book”-there is great stuff there.
Use them!Look, my commonplace book is easily justified.
I’ve been keeping my commonplace books in variety of forms for 6 or 7 years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Adam Braun believes in a future that’s free from student debt”

We caught up with Adam to find out more about MissionU, what impact he hopes to make on the world, and what he’s been reading and finding interesting lately.
You are CEO and Co-Founder of MissionU, a brand-new, year-long educational program that charges no tuition until the student lands a job.
What inspired you to create MissionU and how did you get it off the ground?Before MissionU, I created the global education organization, Pencils of Promise, and as the organization grew I wrote a book, The Promise of a Pencil, which became a #1 national bestseller and is used as the Common Read at colleges around the country.
After learning student debt is the only debt in the country that can’t be discharged through bankruptcy, my co-founder and CPO, Mike Adams, and I were determined to create a debt-free alternative that embedded real-world job experience and prepared students for today’s careers.
MissionU completely aligns with students from Day One and is only successful when our students are.
MissionU believes a college should invest in their students, rather than vice versa.
What type of student, in your opinion, would thrive in the MissionU environment?Instead of focusing on SAT / ACT or GPA numbers, we hone in on identifying future potential over past test scores.
We believe ambitious, driven, results-oriented students who are looking to make a mark on the world would thrive at MissionU.In addition to MissionU, you founded Pencils of Promise, a non-profit that has built 400 + schools and served more than 70,000 children throughout the developing world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Students learn more effectively from print textbooks than screens, study says”

We’ve seen more investment in classroom technologies, with students now equipped with school-issued iPads and access to e-textbooks.
While new forms of classroom technology like digital textbooks are more accessible and portable, it would be wrong to assume that students will automatically be better served by digital reading simply because they prefer it.
From our review of research done since 1992, we found that students were able to better comprehend information in print for texts that were more than a page in length.
After reading two passages, one online and one in print, these students then completed three tasks: Describe the main idea of the texts, list key points covered in the readings and provide any other relevant content they could recall.
Students judged their comprehension as better online than in print.
If all students are being asked to do is to understand and remember the big idea or gist of what they’re reading, there’s no benefit in selecting one medium over another.
When the reading assignment demands more engagement or deeper comprehension, students may be better off reading print.
In our third experiment, we were able to create meaningful profiles of college students based on the way they read and comprehended from printed and digital texts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “John Green Tells a Story of Emotional Pain and Crippling Anxiety. His Own.”

“Turtles All the Way Down” is an emotionally fraught project for Mr. Green, whose young adult novels are beloved for their quirky humor and sharp, sensitive teenage protagonists.
Mr. Green, 40, who lives in Indianapolis with his wife, Sarah Urist Green, and their two children, Henry, 7, and Alice, 4, is one of the publishing industry’s biggest stars, and over the past decade, he and his brother Hank have built an online video business with 16 educational shows that have collectively drawn more than two billion views on YouTube.
With “Turtles All the Way Down,” Mr. Green tried to bridge the language barrier by bringing readers inside Aza’s consciousness, subjecting them to her anguished obsessions.
On Monday, Mr. Green started his book tour with an event in Manhattan, where more than 100 fans gathered to see him and his brother put on a variety show of sorts.
Mr. Green apologized for the slapdash quality of the performance – it was a rehearsal – then read passages from his novel that describe Aza’s debilitating fear about the wound on her finger.
Mr. Green started and abandoned several novels.
Hank Green said that when he first read the novel, he felt like he understood for the first time what it must feel like to live with obsessive compulsive disorder: “Even having a brother who deals with OCD, I never really got it until I read the book.”
In the book’s acknowledgments, Mr. Green thanks his doctors and notes how fortunate he is to have a supportive family and mental health care that many don’t have access to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Recommended Books That Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, and Warren Buffett Think You Should Read”

Bill Gates reads about 50 books every year, Mark Cuban reads three hours every day, Mark Zuckerberg resolved to read 24 books in a year, and Warren Buffett spends 80 percent of his day reading.
Having said that, perhaps like you, I like to learn and improve my skills as a leader, so I’m always curious about what the most successful entrepreneurs on the planet are currently reading or recommending for reading.
BookAuthority provides endless recommendations from hundreds of leaders such as Gates, Branson, Buffet, Musk, Bezos, Zuckerberg, Cook and company, giving voracious readers a personalized reading list tailored just for them.
Here are 3 top recommendations by Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and Jeff Bezos, straight from BookAuthority.
As president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and then as President Barack Obama’s secretary of the Treasury, Geithner takes readers behind the scenes of the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression, explaining the hard choices and politically unpalatable decisions he made to repair a broken financial system and prevent the collapse of the Main Street economy.
Named one of 100 Leadership & Success Books to Read in a Lifetime by Amazon Editors, this is considered an innovation classic.
Listed #1 on Buffett’s recommended reading list, this book details the extraordinary success of eight individualistic CEOs who took a radically different approach to corporate management.
After four decades spent ascending to the top of the investment management profession, Marks distills the investing insight of his celebrated client memos into a single volume and, for the first time, made his time-tested philosophy available to general readers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Exploring the Necessity and Virtue of Sleep”

Dickens’s first, “The Pickwick Papers,” features a character, Joe, who suffers from a form of sleep apnea, “a fat and red faced boy in a state of somnolency who divided his time into small allotments of sleeping and eating.”
Walker is in love with sleep and wants us to fall in love with sleep, too.
He presides over Berkeley’s Sleep and Neuroimaging Lab, where he and his team, along with their peers at other institutions, have made significant strides over the last 20 years in understanding the restorative powers of sleep, and, correspondingly, the dire consequences of not getting enough of it.
A healthy night’s sleep lasts about eight hours, and is divided between REM sleep, in which the brain is as active as it is when its owner is awake, and NREM sleep, a deeper sleep state that predominates in the first half of the night.
REM sleep plays a role in our abilities to overcome negative feelings, read other people’s emotions and solve problems.
Like McGirr, Walker observes that the last 100-odd years of industrialization, urbanization and purported progress have been hell on sleep.
Then there are the deleterious effects that sleep deprivation has on such physiological functions as the brain’s regulation of blood pressure; per Walker, adults aged 45 and older who get fewer than six hours of sleep a night are 200 percent more likely to suffer a heart attack or a stroke than those who get their full sleep allotment.
Generally, “Why We Sleep” mounts a persuasive, exuberant case for addressing our societal sleep deficit and for the virtues of sleep itself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t press send The new rules for good writing in the 21st century”

I’ve been let off parking tickets by writing politely and apologetically to the council to explain the circumstances.
In London Fields, Martin Amis offered the best postcard-writing advice I’ve ever read: “The letter with the foreign postmark that tells of good weather, pleasant food and comfortable accommodation,” he warned, “Isn’t nearly as much fun to read, or to write, as the letter that tells of rotting chalets, dysentery and drizzle. Who else but Tolstoy has made happiness really swing on the page?”.
There is little that paralyses the average person more than writing a letter of condolence.
So digital writing is about getting and retaining attention.
A lot of style guides, with good reason, tell their readers to write Plain English.
Whatever you call it, the basic style for non-literary writing wants to put clarity, which usually means simplicity, first.
If you’re not writing “Little Gidding”, do it the other way.
The formally learned skills of reading and writing come from the informally learned skills of speaking and hearing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Louis L’Amour’s Library and Reading List”

The Western writer had a library of over 10,000 books, and averaged reading 100-120 books per year – “Reading approximately thirty books a year on the West in its many aspects” both for pleasure and in order to stay on top of his writing game.
As a child, his family had a modest collection of books, but it was at the library that his love of reading really came to life.
Details about his family life are not easily found, but Louis kept up his torrid reading and writing pace until he died in 1988.
For Louis, his reading was largely determined by what was available wherever he was working.
“For those who have not been readers, my advice is to read what entertains you. Reading is fun. Reading is adventure. It is not important what you read at first, only that you read.”.
“I have enjoyed digging into the reading habits of many great men and women and have tried where possible to get a list of the books in their libraries…. I hoped that by understanding the books these men and women read I might grasp at the basic sources of some of their ideas.”
What makes the reading list below unique is that for many of them we get not just a title, but what L’Amour thought of and took away from that title.
By Arnold Zweig – “The best novel to come out of World War I, although Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front. attracted more attention and was a good book also.” Lives by Plutarch – “In several of my western novels I have had characters reading Plutarch. I believe more great men have read his Lives. than any other book, except possibly the Bible. In reviewing the reading histories or libraries of great men, I have come upon him again and again, and justly so. His is a sophisticated, urbane mind dealing with aspects of leadership.” The Prince.

The orginal article.