Summary of “A 100-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor on How Books Save Lives”

Only on the rarest of occasions, in the most extreme of circumstances, do books become lifelines in the realest sense.
One such occasion is immortalized in A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader – the collection I spent eight years putting together in the hope of showing young people how essential reading is to an inspired and inspiring life.
There are original illustrated letters about the transformative and transcendent power of reading from some immensely inspiring humans – scientists like Jane Goodall and Janna Levin, artists like Marina Abramović and Debbie Millman, musicians like Yo-Yo Ma, Amanda Palmer, and David Byrne, entrepreneurs like Richard Branson and Tim Ferriss, poets like Mary Oliver, Elizabeth Alexander, and Sarah Kay, media pioneers like Kevin Kelly, Jad Abumrad, and Shonda Rhimes, beloved writers of literature for young people like Jacqueline Woodson, Judy Blume, and Neil Gaiman, and a great many celebrated authors of books for so-called grownups.
One day over dinner, having just visited her in Florida, a very animated Neil told me the incredible story of how a book – a particular book – became a lifeline for the teenage girls at the secret school Helen had set up in the Warsaw Ghetto as an antidote to the innumerable assaults against dignity to which the Nazis subjected these Jewish youths: the denial of basic education.
To celebrate the publication of the book, which Helen sees as an invaluable part of her legacy, I asked her to read her letter for the New York Public Library launch event.
Could you imagine a world without access to reading, to learning, to books?
I had spent the previous night reading Gone with the Wind – one of a few smuggled books circulated among trustworthy people via an underground channel, on their word of honor to read only at night, in secret.
To read a book and surrender to a story is to keep our very humanity alive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Derren Brown Remade Mind Reading for Skeptics”

Brown spent the next two and a half hours performing a series of increasingly inconceivable set pieces, organized around the theme of how susceptible we are to hidden influence.
Off the clock, Brown neither reads anyone’s mind nor, despite being a world-class card magician, performs tricks of any kind.
Over time, Brown found himself more and more drawn to mentalism and started developing his credo of letting audiences see what the process of mind reading looked like in action.
Brown no longer does cold reading and, in his shows, has ridiculed psychics and discredited their techniques.
After introducing us to her dog and showing us framed photos of its two predecessors, which, she told us, “Are in spirit now,” she led Brown upstairs for his reading.
“Yeah, it’s hypnosis and suggestion and mind reading and so on,” Brown explained.
“I’m interested in how it sort of blurs into other things and other people’s take on it,” Brown said.
As soon as we were outside, Brown started analyzing Chrissy’s reading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Science Says the Most Successful Kids Have Parents Who Do These 9 Things”

If you’re a parent, a more compelling question may be: “What can I do to make sure my kids succeed in life?” Here’s what researchers say.1.
According to a nonprofit organization operating out of Harvard University, kids who eat with their families roughly five days a week exhibit lower levels of substance abuse, teen pregnancy, obesity, and depression.
Researchers have found that the brains of little kids can be permanently altered when they spend too much time using tablets and smartphones.
For kids ages two to five, it recommends limiting screen time to one hour a day.
To help kids build this skill, train them to have habits that must be accomplished every day-even when they don’t feel like doing them.
Researchers at the New York University School of Medicine have found that babies whose parents read to them have better language, literacy, and early reading skills four years later before starting elementary school.
Kids who like books when they’re little grow into people who read for fun later on, which has its own set of benefits.
According to Dr. Stephanie O’Leary, a clinical psychologist specializing in neuropsychology and author of Parenting in the Real World: The Rules Have Changed, failure is good for kids on several levels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 7 Best Books I’ve Ever Read About Writing”

I’ve made a list of the best books I’ve read on writing.
If you write, and you haven’t read On Writing, it’s time to stop everything you do and get that book.
On Writing Well by William Zinsser A solid book with solid advice about writing non-fiction.
Zinsser, a respected writer and teacher, talks about the principles and methods of writing in this book.
Ernest Hemingway on Writing by Larry W. Phillips There’s no point in denying it; Hemingway is one of the best writers in modern history.
Hemingway believed that there’s no pride in writing about writing.
Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit by Steven Pressfield Pressfield is one of my favorite writers.
If you don’t know how to sell your writing, no one will ever read it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The cult books that lost their cool”

What exactly defines a cult book? Its qualities are subjective, often intangible and niche, though we all know one when we see it.
Underexamined, feature of the cult book is this: in contrast to the examples above, it can sometimes age really badly.
Don’t rush to empty your home of anything that doesn’t ‘spark joy’ at the behest of a book that may yet turn out to be our own era’s Jonathan Livingston Seagull.
As with so many books on this list, its flaws have been magnified by the passage of time.
A few years back, a spate of books and films inspired only a flicker of revived interest in his legacy.
In 2013, the book was updated for the era of internet dating and sexting, but it still seems positively Victorian in the context of a cultural marker like Lena Dunham’s Girls.
Yes, Jonathan Livingston Seagull really is a seagull, but he’s a seagull with aspirations, a non-conformist who yearns to soar above the flock and up into the heavens, just as the book itself conquered the bestseller charts back in the day.
The hero worship has rendered books like Infinite Jest – whose physical heft makes it big enough to be used as a weapon – symbols of ‘bro-lit’.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Oprah, Reese, And Jenna Bush Hager Are Making America Read Again”

For a book club that only started in March – when Jenna Bush Hager was named the Today show’s new fourth-hour cohost with Hoda Kotb – Read With Jenna has proven to be a force in the world of publishing.
“Then fast-forward to the Today show, where I got invited to be on the show with these incredible women. Oh my god.” Kwok noted that Hager was an especially astute interviewer with a real knowledge and love of the book: “She’s reading all these books by herself. She got my book because her sister said that she loved it, and was like, ‘You gotta read this.'”.
So how did Crawdads become a breakout novel? Credit certainly goes to the nascent power of the celebrity book club in the age of social media: Reese Witherspoon picked Crawdads for her book club in September 2018, and it received an immediate boost in sales.
On Sept. 17, 1996, Oprah announced the first edition of Oprah’s Book Club on her eponymous talk show: “I want to get the whole country reading again; those of you who haven’t been reading, books are important.” She raved about her pick of the month, Jacquelyn Mitchard’s novel The Deep End of the Ocean, “Y’all are going to have to buy it – I have no [financial] interest in it, but I like the book.” She told her audience that questions could be asked via a PO box address and AOL. She promised to have Mitchard on to discuss the book the following month.
In the July 2012 issue of O magazine, Oprah enthused over Wild: “I love this book. I want to shout it from the mountaintop. I want to shout it from the Web. In fact, I love this book so much and want to talk about it so much, I knew I had to reinvent my book club.” This 2.0 version of Oprah’s Book Club was revived for the internet with exclusive reading questions available online, conversations on Twitter and Facebook, and Oprah writing about her favorite passages.
“And when someone like Oprah comes along, a lot of people who wouldn’t have necessarily heard of your book get it in their hands, and then they tell their friends, and they tell their friends – it’s how a book spreads.”
In November 2019, expect to see the Oprah Book Club “On steroids,” according to O magazine’s books editor, Leigh Haber.
At the same time, with the explosion of social media, book clubs have been able to move online, finding a niche on Instagram and Facebook with homegrown communities like Well-Read Black Girl and Girls’ Night In. When it comes to sales and influence in the book industry that rival Oprah’s picks, Reese Witherspoon and Jenna Bush Hager are the breakout stars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Read The News”

How it should be produced, and how it should be read. A flashback: In Sister Carrie, Theodore Dreiser’s runaway 1900 bestseller about a pretty woman who uses men on her way to becoming a Broadway star, there’s a vivid account of how to read a newspaper.
To treat reading the news as a duty is to treat ice cream like mustard greens-to believe readers must be tricked into eating it, and thus guarantee that they rarely will.
I’m going to propose that we should read news sites as ice cream-not as an obligation, but for stimulation, escapism, and even righteousness.
This is how newspapers have been read in their many heydays, and how they are meant to be read. At the same time we must admit to ourselves that-far from being a duty-news in heated times can often represent a full-tilt compulsion, and thus a habit to be judiciously managed.
What lines would Rosa Parks and other great Americans protesting segregation cross? What about a hundred years earlier, in the lines drawn between the Union and the Confederacy? When a person read a newspaper in the 1860s or 1960s, everything from the celebrity news to the want ads could seem like an entry in a holy war.
So we read the news the way Hurstwood did-not only for diversion, but as scorekeepers.
You didn’t have to force yourself to read the news.
In the trending stories that play on Apple News, the ones about Trump or his administration read as skirmishes in the broader war, while the ones that ignore him-Time’s recent “Why Spring is the Perfect Time to Take Your Workout Outdoors,” for example-seem like manipulative denial and distraction.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hemingway’s Advice on Writing, Ambition, and the Art of Revision”

Hemingway and Samuelson fishing and talking in Key West.”As a writer you should not judge. You should understand,” Ernest Hemingway counseled in his 1935 Esquire compendium of writing advice, addressed to an archetypal young correspondent but based on a real-life encounter that had taken place a year earlier.
In 1934, a 22-year-old aspiring writer named Arnold Samuelson set out to meet his literary hero, hoping to steal a few moments with Hemingway to talk about writing.
Alongside these edifying essentials, Hemingway offered young Samuelson some concrete writing advice.
The most important thing I’ve learned about writing is never write too much at a time Never pump yourself dry.
Don’t get discouraged because there’s a lot of mechanical work to writing.
Sometimes you can go on writing for years before it shows.
The only thing I can advise you is to keep on writing but it’s a damned tough racket.
The only way you can ever stay on top is by writing good stuff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Books That Will Change How You See The World”

My favorite moments reading non-fiction are when a book bitchslaps my brain and reconfigures my entire understanding of reality and my place within it.
I never know what the hell to say because so many of the books that have influenced me have done so not because they’re so good or brilliant, but mostly because they addressed the issues I was going through at the time I was reading them.
So instead of divulging what my favorite books are, I’ll leave you with something better: seven of the most mind-fucking, reality-reshaping, Keanu Reeves “Whoa” inspiring books that I’ve ever read. In no particular order.
Bonus Points For: Being perhaps the wittiest and best-written psychology book you’ll ever read.If This Book Could Be Summarized in An Image, That Image Would Be: A dog named “Humanity” endlessly chasing its own tail with a big slobbery smile on its face.
You want to read a book that explains happiness without mythologizing it or worshipping it.
If he’s trolling the world with his writing style, he’s doing a good job, because some passages are almost impossible to get through without either rolling your eyes at him or shoving the book through a paper shredder.
You want to have your conception of “Success” and “Progress” completely flipped on its head. you want to read a book that while consisting of maybe 60% bullshit, will have you still thinking about the ideas years later.
Bonus Points For: It was apparently one of President Eisenhower’s favorite books.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Do Some People Love Reading?”

“Every society has some group of people-somewhere between a minuscule amount and half the adults-that read a lot in their leisure time,” says Wendy Griswold, a sociologist at Northwestern University who studies reading.
Griswold refers to this group as “The reading class,” and-adding up the NEA’s “Frequents” and “Avids,” and considering rates of serious reading in other similarly wealthy countries-reckons that about 20 percent of adults belong to the U.S.’s reading class.
Some people are much more likely than others to become members of the reading class.
“Introverts seem to be a little bit more likely to do a lot of leisure-time reading,” Daniel Willingham, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia, told me.
“Almost certainly the answer is, not a lot. So what is it? Either what are people doing with those books, or is this sort of a temperature read of a much broader complex of attitudes and behaviors and priorities that you find in that home?”.
It is almost tautological to observe that being a reader sets a child up for academic success, since so much of school is reading.
Even though plenty of people simply don’t enjoy reading, it’s a vital skill.
It may be dispiriting that people have little, if any, say over many of the predictors of whether they or their children will be readers, but thankfully, there are also a number of other factors that are within people’s control.

The orginal article.