Summary of “Don’t press send The new rules for good writing in the 21st century”

I’ve been let off parking tickets by writing politely and apologetically to the council to explain the circumstances.
In London Fields, Martin Amis offered the best postcard-writing advice I’ve ever read: “The letter with the foreign postmark that tells of good weather, pleasant food and comfortable accommodation,” he warned, “Isn’t nearly as much fun to read, or to write, as the letter that tells of rotting chalets, dysentery and drizzle. Who else but Tolstoy has made happiness really swing on the page?”.
There is little that paralyses the average person more than writing a letter of condolence.
So digital writing is about getting and retaining attention.
A lot of style guides, with good reason, tell their readers to write Plain English.
Whatever you call it, the basic style for non-literary writing wants to put clarity, which usually means simplicity, first.
If you’re not writing “Little Gidding”, do it the other way.
The formally learned skills of reading and writing come from the informally learned skills of speaking and hearing.

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Summary of “Louis L’Amour’s Library and Reading List”

The Western writer had a library of over 10,000 books, and averaged reading 100-120 books per year – “Reading approximately thirty books a year on the West in its many aspects” both for pleasure and in order to stay on top of his writing game.
As a child, his family had a modest collection of books, but it was at the library that his love of reading really came to life.
Details about his family life are not easily found, but Louis kept up his torrid reading and writing pace until he died in 1988.
For Louis, his reading was largely determined by what was available wherever he was working.
“For those who have not been readers, my advice is to read what entertains you. Reading is fun. Reading is adventure. It is not important what you read at first, only that you read.”.
“I have enjoyed digging into the reading habits of many great men and women and have tried where possible to get a list of the books in their libraries…. I hoped that by understanding the books these men and women read I might grasp at the basic sources of some of their ideas.”
What makes the reading list below unique is that for many of them we get not just a title, but what L’Amour thought of and took away from that title.
By Arnold Zweig – “The best novel to come out of World War I, although Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front. attracted more attention and was a good book also.” Lives by Plutarch – “In several of my western novels I have had characters reading Plutarch. I believe more great men have read his Lives. than any other book, except possibly the Bible. In reviewing the reading histories or libraries of great men, I have come upon him again and again, and justly so. His is a sophisticated, urbane mind dealing with aspects of leadership.” The Prince.

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Summary of “10 Timeless Books Every Entrepreneur Should Read”

To me, reading business books is the best use of my time.
The last thing you want is to read a book that’s useless next year.
The book comes down to this: Want to reach 100K people with your products? Focus on 1.000.000 instead. Btw, get the audiobook, which is read by Grant himself.
Carol Dweck’s book is one of my favorite books about developing the mindset you need to succeed in life.
I’ve read a bunch of books about public speaking.
Even though reading is one of the most necessary things to me as an entrepreneur, I understand that you might not have time to read all these books.
If you read these books, you’ll know more than 99% of all other entrepreneurs.
Like books but don’t have time to read them all? Why not listen to some of these books instead?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Science Says the Most Successful Kids Have Parents Who Do These 9 Things”

If you’re a parent, a more compelling question may be: “What can I do to make sure my kids succeed in life?” Here’s what researchers say.
According to a nonprofit organization operating out of Harvard University, kids who eat with their families roughly five days a week exhibit lower levels of substance abuse, teen pregnancy, obesity, and depression.
Researchers have found that the brains of little kids can be permanently altered when they spend too much time using tablets and smartphones.
There are certainly familial benefits to having a stay-at-home mother, but researchers at Harvard Business School have found that when moms work outside the home, their daughters are more likely to be employed themselves, hold supervisory roles, and make more money than peers whose mothers did not have careers.
“Top performers in every field-athletes, musicians, CEOs, artists-are all more consistent than their peers,” writes James Clear, an author and speaker who studies the habits of successful people.
Researchers at the New York University School of Medicine have found that babies whose parents read to them have better language, literacy, and early reading skills four years later before starting elementary school.
Kids who like books when they’re little grow into people who read for fun later on, which has its own set of benefits.
Desire to travel more Increased tolerance of other cultures and ethnicities Increased willingness to know/learn/explore Increased willingness to try different foods Increased independence, self-esteem, and confidence More intellectual curiosity Increased tolerance and respectfulness Better adaptability and sensitivity Being more outgoing Better self-expression Increased attractiveness to college admissions.

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Summary of “The smart, honest sphere of Jared Dubin”

Jared Dubin is a freelance sports writer and lawyer based out of New York City.
We caught up with Jared to chat about his path to becoming a full-time writer, how he decides what topics to write about, why the Knicks are such a mess, and what he’s been reading and finding interesting lately.
What came first? And how have you managed to combine the two?I started writing while I was in law school.
The impetus for my actually starting to write about sports was the NBA lockout that took place the summer between my 1L and 2L years.
None of my friends wanted to talk to me about basketball while it was going on, so I started my own site to write about what I was thinking.
You primarily write about sports, but have you ever considered writing about another topic or area of interest? If so, what would it be?I’ve always wanted to write about TV and movies, but there are so many good pop culture writers out there right now that it’s a little intimidating.
If there’s a topic of national discussion that I have a different spin on than the one that’s being thrown around, that’s worth writing as well.
A lot of it really boils down to something along the lines of, “What do I want to read about right now that I haven’t yet seen anyone else write the definitive take on?”.

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Summary of “Elaine Welteroth, Teen Vogue’s Refashionista”

Could Elaine Welteroth really lead the #Resistance and make a glossy magazine at the same time?
After graduating from college in 2007, Welteroth interned for Harriette Cole, then Ebony’s creative director, whom Welteroth calls the ”original #influencer.
Welteroth interviewed with Amy Astley, then Teen Vogue’s editor in chief; the two women talked about Gabby Douglas, the teenage American gymnast who was being pilloried in the news for her ”unkempt” appearance, and how often black hair was read as messy.
Last year, Anna Wintour announced that Welteroth, Phillip Picardi and Marie Suter would take charge of the Teen Vogue brand: Welteroth would oversee the print magazine, Picardi would run the website and Suter would be in charge of the design for both.
Welteroth’s guiding instinct was that Teen Vogue needed to widen its scope beyond beauty and fashion.
When Welteroth appeared on ”The Daily Show” with Picardi, Trevor Noah asked them a question that, presumably, most of his audience was thinking: How had Teen Vogue established itself as a formidable source of politiĀ­cal commentary? ”If you guys have haters who say, ‘What do you guys know about journalism?’ how do you respond?” Noah asked.
” And, in a way, in Teen Vogue’s best interest too, because Welteroth is catering to a generation that demands inclusivity and is increasingly sensitive to issues of diversity and representation and expects the same of its influencers.
It’s impossible to know what Teen Vogue would have looked like under a Hillary Clinton administration, but it’s noteworthy that Welteroth began reimagining the magazine long before the election.

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Summary of “The Philip K Dick book I love most”

You couldn’t really call me a bona fide Dickhead because I haven’t read everything Philip K Dick wrote.
Dick himself claimed “The core of my writing is not art, but truth”, and – still more perplexingly: “I am a fictionalising philosopher, not a novelist.” To a majority of his contemporaries Dick was, for the most part, considered “a drug-addled nut”.
Early on in his writing career Dick wrote a series of straight novels.
Time Out of Joint is not the first Philip K Dick novel to explore his now-familiar ideas, neither is it the best, but it was the first story I read of his and it made me an admirer.
The American SF author Tom Disch founded the Philip K Dick award and “Only discovered after Phil’s death that I was under investigation by the FBI thanks to Phil”.
Nothing could be further from the truth: Phil Dick turned pulp into art, and couldn’t write un-entertainingly if he tried.
Selections of this home-brew theology have been published under the title The Exegesis of Philip K Dick, and they make for wild reading, equal measures bonkers and astonishing.
Dick, the anti-Descartes, at least suggests it might be so.

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Summary of “Tips for Aspiring Op-Ed Writers”

5) Younger writers with no particular expertise or name recognition are likelier to get published by following an 80-20 rule: 80 percent new information; 20 percent opinion.
Doing so will sharpen your own case and earn the respect of your reader.
Read over each sentence – read it aloud – and ask yourself: Is this true? Can I defend every single word of it? Did I get the facts, quotes, dates and spellings exactly right? Yes, sometimes those spellings are hard: the president of Turkmenistan is Gurbanguly Malikguliyevich Berdymukhammedov.
11) A newspaper has a running conversation with its readers.
13) If you find writing easy, you’re doing it wrong.
One useful tip for aspiring writers comes from the film “A River Runs Through It,” in which the character played by Tom Skerritt, a Presbyterian minister with a literary bent, receives essays from his children and instructs them to make each successive draft “Half as long.” If you want to write a successful 700-word op-ed, start with a longer draft, then cut and cut again.
“The art of writing,” believed the minister, “Lay in thrift.”
15) I’d wish you luck, but good writing depends on conscious choices, not luck.

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Summary of “Malcolm Gladwell favorite books”

Malcolm Gladwell isn’t shy about sharing his enthusiasm for what he reads.
“One of my favorite books of the year,” Gladwell tweeted when this book launched in 2017.
Gladwell gushed in his review of the book: “As if to prove his point, Adam Alter has written a truly addictive book about the rise of addiction.”
In July 2013, Gladwell tweet-declared this book his favorite of the summer.
Gladwell told the Guardian it was his favorite book of 2013, and he picked it up “Entirely randomly, in an airport bookstore.”
“One of the loveliest, most insightful books about social psychology that I ever read,” Gladwell said of this book on an episode of the Tim Ferriss show.
Gladwell considers Janet Malcolm to be his other role model as a nonfiction writer.
In a New Yorker profile of Taleb, Gladwell said that Taleb’s first book, “Fooled by Randomness,” is “To conventional Wall Street wisdom approximately what Martin Luther’s ninety-five theses were to the Catholic Church.”

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Summary of “Why George Guidall Is the Undisputed King of Audiobooks”

A list of phonetic spellings for words that might be challenging to pronounce is provided, but while he read a book about Lincoln’s war secretary Edwin Stanton, who was a lawyer in Pittsburgh, the Monongahela River required a few tries.
“With a book that’s over 700 pages, the pace is important – otherwise it would take two years to listen,” Mr. Guidall said.
Mr. Guidall scans it beforehand but does not meet the author, occasionally adding an interview afterward.
“There are people out there who expect a certain quality and respect,” he said, “Although I did a book called ‘Small Town’ by Lawrence Block, which has the kinkiest sex imaginable, but it was totally justifiable.”
Writers should want to have their books heard as well as read, according to Mr. Guidall.
Occasionally, a devoted fan will ask: What do I tell my friends who say they don’t like to hear a book read to them? “Someone performing the book for you can make it clearer,” Mr. Guidall said.
“One guy told me that he’d been trying to read ‘Don Quixote’ for years and couldn’t get through it. He wrote, ‘Thank you because now the book is mine.’ Originally we were wired for sound, not reading. The hunter would come back having killed the behemoth, and he became the storyteller in the cave. The cave that I’m speaking to is the car or the truck. People write and say, ‘Thank you for being with me in the traffic jam,’ or ‘My wife sits in the garage with the frozen food melting because she has to finish the chapter.’ These are my cave people.”
An earlier version of this article misstated the surname of a sound engineer who works with George Guidall.

The orginal article.