Summary of “Agile learning: how to build a brain like a gymnast”

Learning agility is swift, continuous learning from experience.
Agile learners take knowledge from one concept and apply it to another.
Learning smarter, learning faster, learning wider - and forgetting the rest.
Make learning deliberateThere are many ways to learn.
Learn to learnStudies show that agile learners are made, not born.
Learn from someonePeople think of learning as a solitary process.
It’s a widely-held assumption that spreading yourself across multiple disciplines means you’re spreading yourself too thin: you’ll dilute your learning and only absorb information superficially.
Learning becomes agile when it forges connections across boundaries; transfers knowledge from one task, memory or field to another; and cross-fertilizes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “100 Things I Learned Reading The Same Book 100 Times Over 10 Years”

I would also become what Stephen Marche has referred to as a “Centireader,” reading Marcus Aurelius well over 100 times across multiple editions and copies.
In Book Four, Marcus reminds himself to think about all the doctors who “Died, after furrowing their brows over how many deathbeds, how many astrologers, after pompous forecasts about other’s ends.” In black pen - somewhat recently it looks like - I added “Or plotters, schemers and strategists, outsmarted, outmaneuvered and destroyed.” I suppose that was a dig at myself and other smart people.
Marcus writes “Mastery of reading and writing requires a master. Still, more so life.” I wrote “Tucker, R.G” in the margins next to that passage.
Marcus reminded himself: “Don’t await the perfection of Plato’s Republic.” He wasn’t expecting the world to be exactly the way he wanted it to be, but Marcus knew instinctively, as the Catholic philosopher Josef Pieper would later write, that “He alone can do good who knows what things are like and what their situation is.”
One of the most practical things I’ve learned from the Stoics is an exercise I’ve come to call “Contemptuous expressions.” I love how Marcus would take fancy things and describe them in almost cynical, dismissive language - roasted meat is a dead animal and vintage wine is old, fermented grapes.
In his excellent book The Inner Citadel about Marcus Aurelius and Stoicism, Hadot did original translations for the passages he quotes - but sadly he died without publishing a full translation of Marcus for wider consumption.
Years later, one of my readers created and sent me two 3D printed busts of both Marcus and Seneca which sit in my library.
In Book Six we find one of the strongest encouragements that Marcus gives himself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Skim reading is the new normal. The effect on society is profound”

My research depicts how the present reading brain enables the development of some of our most important intellectual and affective processes: internalized knowledge, analogical reasoning, and inference; perspective-taking and empathy; critical analysis and the generation of insight.
Research surfacing in many parts of the world now cautions that each of these essential “Deep reading” processes may be under threat as we move into digital-based modes of reading.
In this hinge moment between print and digital cultures, society needs to confront what is diminishing in the expert reading circuit, what our children and older students are not developing, and what we can do about it.
If the dominant medium advantages processes that are fast, multi-task oriented and well-suited for large volumes of information, like the current digital medium, so will the reading circuit.
Many readers now use an F or Z pattern when reading in which they sample the first line and then word-spot through the rest of the text.
When the reading brain skims like this, it reduces time allocated to deep reading processes.
The possibility that critical analysis, empathy and other deep reading processes could become the unintended “Collateral damage” of our digital culture is not a simple binary issue about print vs digital reading.
We need to cultivate a new kind of brain: a “Bi-literate” reading brain capable of the deepest forms of thought in either digital or traditional mediums.

The orginal article.

Summary of “100 Best Horror Novels And Stories”

100 Best Horror Novels And Stories In honor of Frankenstein’s 200th birthday, this year’s summer reader poll is all about horror – from classics like Mary Shelley’s monster to new favorites, we’ve got something to scare everyone.
Who doesn’t love a good scary story, something to send a chill across your skin in the middle of summer’s heat? And this year, we’re celebrating the 200th birthday of one of the most famous scary stories of all time: Frankenstein – so a few months ago, we asked you to nominate your favorite horror novels and stories, and then we assembled an expert panel of judges to take your 7000 nominations and turn them into a final, curated list of 100 spine-tingling favorites for all kinds of readers.
Want to dig into the dark, slimy roots of horror? We’ve got you covered.
As with our other reader polls, this isn’t meant to be a ranked or comprehensive list – there are a few books you won’t see on it despite their popularity – some didn’t stand the test of time, some just didn’t catch our readers’ interest, and in some cases our judges would prefer you see the movie instead. And there are a few titles that aren’t strictly horror, but at least have a toe in the dark water, or are commenting about horrific things, so our judges felt they deserved a place on the list.
One thing you won’t see on the list is any work from this year’s judges, Stephen Graham Jones, Ruthanna Emrys, Tananarive Due and Grady Hendrix.
Readers did nominate them, but the judges felt uncomfortable debating the inclusion of their own work – so it’s up to me to tell you to find and read their excellent books! I personally, as a gigantic horror wuss, owe a debt of gratitude to this year’s judges, particularly Hendrix, for their help writing summaries for all the list entries.
A word about Stephen King: Out of almost 7000 nominations you sent in, 1023 of them were for the modern master of horror.
That’s a lot of Stephen King! In past years, we’ve resisted giving authors more than one slot on the list In the end, we decided that since so much classic horror is in short story format, we would allow authors one novel and one short story if necessary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On Not Being Able to Read”

There’s a specific mechanism by which legal culture, especially within the law school, transforms these sacrifices into virtue.
Early in the program, law students are introduced to the case method, the cornerstone of legal pedagogy.
Any legal argument is bound by law’s incremental development: you cannot make a point without citing its precedent in previous cases.
Though students have to take a certain number of black-letter law courses to fulfill the dictates of the degree, I skated by on the bare minimum, loading my plate instead with ones that took law itself as an object of study: Law and Literature, Racial Politics and the Law, Statutes and Statutory Interpretation.
In the first year of law school, students are enrolled in a mandatory course on Legal Research and Writing.
If you’ve abandoned the idea of legal practice, you’re left with a mix of skills and affects that the profession will tell you is bad currency; among lawyers, common sense is that you don’t go to law school if you don’t want to become one of them.
In adopting the law’s structure but refusing its closure, Williams steals the law’s own resources to produce a vicious critique of its logic.
In collaboration with a like-minded professor, I developed the Race and Law reading group, an interdisciplinary gathering based in the Faculty of Law.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Does Immersing Yourself in a Book Do To Your Brain?”

Drama makes more visible what each of us does when we pass over in our deepest, most immersive forms of reading.
These are the learned capacities that help us become more human over time, whether as a child when reading Frog and Toad and learning what Toad does when Frog is sick or as an adult when reading Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Colson Whitehead’s Underground Railroad, or James Baldwin’s I Am Not Your Negro, and experiencing the soul-stealing depravity of slavery and the desperation of those condemned to it or to its legacy.
What will happen to young readers who never meet and begin to understand the thoughts and feelings of someone totally different? What will happen to older readers who begin to lose touch with that feeling of empathy for people outside their ken or kin? It is a formula for unwitting ignorance, fear and misunderstanding, that can lead to the belligerent forms of intolerance that are the opposite of America’s original goals for its citizens of many cultures.
“What will happen to young readers who never meet and begin to understand the thoughts and feelings of someone totally different? What will happen to older readers who begin to lose touch with that feeling of empathy for people outside their ken or kin?”.
In what is surely one of the more intriguingly titled articles in this research, “Your Brain on Jane Austen,” the scholar of 18th-century literature Natalie Phillips teamed with Stanford neuroscientists to study what happens when we read fiction in different ways: that is, with and without “Close attention.” Phillips and her colleagues found that when we read a piece of fiction “Closely,” we activate regions of the brain that are aligned to what the characters are both feeling and doing.
In related work, neuroscientists from Emory University and from York University have shown how networks in the areas responsible for touch, called the somatosensory cortex, are activated when we read metaphors about texture, and also how motor neurons are activated when we read about movement.
Oatley and his York University colleague Raymond Mar suggest that the process of taking on another’s consciousness in reading fiction and the nature of fiction’s content-where the great emotions and conflicts of life are regularly played out-not only contribute to our empathy, but represent what the social scientist Frank Hakemulder called our “Moral laboratory.” In this sense, when we read fiction, the brain actively simulates the consciousness of another person, including those whom we would never otherwise even imagine knowing.
This emerging work on empathy in the reading brain illustrates physiologically, cognitively, politically, and culturally how important it is that feeling and thought be connected in the reading circuit in every person.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Practical Answers To 10 Powerful Questions”

The other day I received an email from a reader with 10 questions she wanted me to answer.
As I read the questions more carefully, I thought, “I can turn this into an article.” I was truly impressed by the quality of the questions of my reader, Mary.
What’s the one book you suggest everyone to read?
Preferably, you want to read it for at least two hours a day.
Don’t read anything else during the time you read this book.
You’ll never forget the period that you were reading it.
What’s one powerful piece of advice for living a fulfilling life?
Working out, reading, taking classes, spending time with people who matter to you-it’s all investing because these activities have a return.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 5-Hour Rule Used by Bill Gates, Jack Ma and Elon Musk”

The most successful people on the planet are also the people likeliest to devote an hour a day to reading and learning.
Productivity expert Choncé Maddox writes, “It’s no secret that successful people read. The average millionaire is said to read two or more books per month.” As such, she suggests everyone “Read blogs, news sites, fiction and non-fiction during downtime so you can soak in more knowledge.” If you’re frequently on the go, listen to audiobooks or podcasts.
As Gates told The New York Times, reading “Is one of the chief ways that I learn, and has been since I was a kid.”
So how do they find the time to read daily? They adhere to the five-hour rule.
Read: Self-made millionaires including Mark Cuban and Dan Gilbert, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, read between one and three hours daily.
Elon Musk learned how to build rockets, which lead to SpaceX, by reading.
Besides expanding your knowledge, Jack Ma, co-founder of Alibaba, says that “Reading can give you a good head start; this is often what your peers cannot obtain. Compared to others, readers are more likely to know other industries’ strategies and tactics.”
Even if you can’t commit to an hour or more of reading every day, start with 20 to 30 minutes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tsundoku: The art of buying books and never reading them”

Do you have a habit of picking up books that you never quite get around to reading?
So when put together, “Tsundoku” has the meaning of buying reading material and piling it up.
“Which is likely to be satirical, about a teacher who has lots of books but doesn’t read them.”
While this might sound like tsundoku is being used as an insult, Prof Gerstle said the word does not carry any stigma in Japan.
Hands up if you regularly used the word “Bibliomania” before reading this article.
While the two words may have similar meanings, there is one key difference: Bibliomania describes the intention to create a book collection, tsundoku describes the intention to read books and their eventual, accidental collection.
Strictly speaking, the word doku does mean reading, so tsundoku should probably only be used when discussing literature.
Some people even joked the service should rename their annual week of discounting the “Steam Tsundoku Sale”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “No, you probably don’t have a book in you”

When people talk about “Having a book in them,” or when people tell others they should write a book, what they really mean is I bet someone, but probably not me because I already heard it, would pay money to hear this story.
A book has a beginning, middle, and an end that keeps the reader invested for the five, six, ten hours it can take to read a book, because if it gets boring in the middle, most people stop reading.
Writing a book that people will pay money for or take a trip to the library to read, requires an awareness few storytellers have.
A publisher doesn’t really want book two until they see how book number one is selling.
Publishers take a financial risk on a book, because no one knows how a book is going to sell until it’s on shelves, and very successful authors help pay the bills for the less successful books.
No one deserves to be published just because they completed a book.
Writing a book that someone else wants to read is running your fastest marathon.
Just be careful when well-meaning, though wholly uninformed, people say you should write a book.

The orginal article.