Summary of “Why you should quit reading paper books”

According to Pew Internet, 65% of American adults read a print book in the previous twelve months, while only 28% had read an e-book.
I believe everyone should quit reading print books almost entirely.
The smell, the feel, and the touch of a print book is something I adore, but what I can’t stand is to spend countless hours reading only to have it slowly leak away into irretrievable oblivion.
When you read on Kindle and highlight passages that you find beautiful, interesting, or challenging, you’re sending your future self a hell of a gift, but it doesn’t feel that way until way later.
Dan Simmons, Hyperion Cantos, Book 1″Mark Twain once opined in his homey way:”The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and the lightning bug.
During those long months of beginning my Cantos on Heaven’s Gate, I discovered that the difference between finding the right word as opposed to accepting the almost right word was the difference between being struck by lightning and merely watching a lightning display.
“I have thousands of highlights like this. I periodically review a book’s highlights via Kindle’s”notes and highlights” page, but I love to export them to Evernote where I can search my notes.
Books and the knowledge they contain are some of the most remarkable creations of humanity, but we pay more attention to our Instagram than our favorite ideas - all in favor of our love for feeling paper.

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Summary of “How to consume news”

News makes people feel that something they had no idea about till 5 minutes ago is responsible for every single problem in the history of human affairs.
Let me help you consume news in a responsible fashion.
Waking up to the news is 100% guaranteed to put you in a bad mood.
Don’t confuse news with reactions to the news.
Amitabh Bachchan’s reaction to this news is not news.
There is almost no value in consuming the reactions that random people have to news.
The Reserve Bank of India governor’s reaction to inflation is news.
If you consume the news as a conscientious action of some social value, then I am afraid the vast majority of news you consume does not help towards that cause.

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Summary of “Fill up your ebook reader with beautifully formatted free classics”

I’ve long been meaning to get around to finally reading some classic must-read books by the likes of Jules Verne, HG Wells and Anton Chekov, and I’m glad that I’ve finally run out of excuses.
You’ve probably heard of Project Gutenberg, an incredible initiative that’s turned over 54,000 books whose copyrights have expired into freely downloadable ebooks.
They aren’t formatted as well as most ebooks you’d pay for, and issues with justification, odd spaces and inconsistent typography can distract from the reading experience.
This volunteer-driven project beautifies Project Gutenberg ebooks by fixing typesetting, making minor corrections in punctuation and grammar, adding covers and enhancing metadata.
The result is a more enjoyable ebook that looks better on your device.
Of the 54,000 ebooks available from Project Gutenberg, Standard Ebooks has tackled about 100 titles that you can grab for free and read on your phone, Kindle, Kobo or desktop.
I’m getting started today with Philip Francis Nowlan’s forward-looking Armageddon 2419 A.D., which seems like one I can get through quickly on my phone by uploading the EPUB file to Google Play Books, and Standard Ebooks’ version is a fair bit nicer than the Project Gutenberg one.

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Summary of “101 books to dive into this summer: A reading list |”

Here’s a huge list of TED speaker-recommended books, with all the diversity of titles and topics you might expect.
L’Engle is best known for her award-winning children’s literature, but I enjoy all of her books.
In the tradition of books like Alive and In Cold Blood, Deep Down Dark is a nonfiction account that reads like a novel.
This is one of those books that will hang onto you, long after you finish reading.
Before reading this book, I had an intellectual sense of how institutionalized racism manifests itself in criminal justice, but reading this book really opened my eyes not only to the pervasiveness of the problem but also to concrete and tragic examples of the real lives that have been destroyed by injustice.
If you want to dive into how change happens in cities, this book has a lot of great and useful stories.
It’s really a tossup which of the Barefoot Contessa books I’d most like to recommend, because I cherish them all.
Some books are a great summer read. Some books can save your life.

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Summary of “deadspin-quote-carrot-aligned-w-bgr-2”

I’m always trying to save a few bucks when stocking up on books for my beat-up Kindle or my iPad. I’m not a big ebook reader, but I do use it to crank through classic books I should have already read-books too unwieldy to carry during my morning and evening commute.
Luckily for me, there are thousands of free books available from places like Project Gutenberg.
You, like me, probably want properly formatted ebooks for your devices, or books with covers that aren’t white text on a blue background.
Each book’s page has its word count, reading score, and a synopsis of the title, along with a changelog for the book itself.
The differences between your average book from Project Gutenberg and Standard Ebooks are pretty substantial.
First off, all Standard Ebooks books are presented with aesthetically pleasing front covers rather than sparse text covers.
Typographical quirks like curly quotes and em dashes are addressed, so ebooks look like books and not text documents.
Each book has an epub, Kindle, Kobo, and new “Epub3” format for download. On my iPad, opening an epub file in Chrome forced me to download the file before opening it, while Safari gave me the option to read it in iBooks straightaway.

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Summary of “What does it mean for a journalist today to be a Serious Reader?”

Love of reading was, if not innate, second nature: his mother, a linguistics professor; father, an English professor; brother, an art critic; and four sisters, all Ph.Ds. The labor of writing, as he’s put it, “Is, if not uniquely hard work, then uniquely draining.” Reading afterward is emotionally and intellectually replenishing.
Journalists would seem to have a professional responsibility, maybe even a public duty, to self-educate with greater strategy and intensity-to be Serious Readers.
My reporting was bound to overlook brilliant, worthy readers, but to help identify which journalists exemplify lifestyles of Serious Reading, it was useful to follow chains of admiration.
As he once explained, “I spend half my day writing about television, and the other half writing about books, and I read instead of sleep.” One way or another, Serious Readers must overcome a basic problem: There are only so many hours in a day.
There may not be an entrance exam for journalists, but is there a threshold of reading necessary to earn credibility covering a topic-some quantity of books read, or some familiarity with seminal works? On a basic level, sure, but that also misses the lesson of Traister’s childhood.
Her work reading aligns almost perfectly with what she’d read for pleasure.
As a teen, Christopher Hitchens was a voracious but directionless reader, later recalling, “I was too brittle to decide among so many possible treats.” If only he had a Serious Reading Pyramid, right?
“To be a good reader, paradoxically, doesn’t mean being a discriminating reader, it means being an omnivorous reader,” he explains.

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Summary of “How To Retain More From The Books You Read In 5 Simple Steps”

Here’s the thing: It’s not about how many books you read, it’s about how much you retain from what you read. Most people I talk to don’t have a reading strategy.
I’m often asked: “How do you remember information you read in books?” In this post, I’ll explain my system.
Have A Purpose Before I even think about which books I’m going to read, I think about what I’m trying to achieve.
That’s why you need a purpose to read. What’s going on in your life? Are you building a business? Going through a divorce? Looking for a job? Trying to take the next step in your career? Do you want to get more things done?
Only read books that teach you how to overcome your current challenges.
If you think books are sacred and shouldn’t be highlighted and written on, you will never retain a lot from books.
If you read digitally, you only need your finger-just don’t forget to highlight interesting passages.
I remember vividly when I read How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie for the first time.

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Summary of “The Rambling Glory of Bob Dylan’s Nobel Speech”

As you’ll recall, Bob Dylan won the prize in Literature last October to officially collect the title-plus the roughly nine-hundred-thousand-dollar bundle of cash that comes with it-winners must deliver a lecture within six months of the Swedish Academy’s official awards ceremony in December, which Dylan skipped.
Dylan was grateful for the Nobel; he said as much in the brief remarks that he submitted to be read in absentia at the December ceremony.
Dylan submitted his lecture, four thousand and eight words long, to the Swedes on June 5th. You can read it here, and listen, too; Dylan made a recording of his text, speaking for twenty-seven minutes over a smoky, meditative jazz-piano arrangement.
If Dylan got all that from listening to music, Robert Zimmerman had got it first, from reading books: ” ‘Don Quixote,’ ‘Ivanhoe,’ ‘Robinson Crusoe,’ ‘Gulliver’s Travels,’ ‘Tale of Two Cities,’ all the rest-typical grammar-school reading that gave you a way of looking at life, an understanding of human nature, and a standard to measure things by,” he says.
The language is almost entirely descriptive, mind-bogglingly so; it is as if Dylan is writing for an audience that has never heard of the books he names.
Don’t tell me Dylan can’t write like the best of them.
We feel their work in our brains and in our guts, in the blood coursing in our veins and the adrenaline swelling our necks, in the way our hearts contract with pain or swell with joy as we read. That is clearly what great literature has done for Dylan, and he makes us feel it, too, in the way that he writes about the books he loves, with a passion stripped of any pretense.
“That’s what songs are, too. Our songs are alive in the land of the living.” Dylan never needed to make that trade.

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Summary of “How Elon Musk Learns Faster And Better Than Everyone Else”

Based on my review of Musk’s life and the academic literature related to learning and expertise, I’m convinced that we should ALL learn across multiple fields in order to increase our odds of breakthrough success.
Elon Musk is also good at a very specific type of learning that most others aren’t even aware of - learning transfer.
Learning transfer is taking what we learn in one context and applying it to another.
At the deepest level, what we can learn from Elon Musk’s story is that we shouldn’t accept the dogma that specialization is the best or only path toward career success and impact.
If we put in the time and learn core concepts across fields and always relate those concepts back to our life and the world, transferring between areas becomes much easier and faster.
As we build up a reservoir of “First principles” and associate those principles with different fields, we suddenly gain the superpower of being able to go into a new field we’ve never learned before, and quickly make unique contributions.
Understanding Elon’s learning superpowers helps us gain some insight into how he could go into an industry that has been around for more than 100 years and change the whole basis of how the field competes.
Want to take to learn like Musk? I created a free learning how to learn webinar you might like.

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Summary of “General James Mattis: Arm Yourself With Books”

How many situations will you face that have not already been experienced by someone else? Billions of people, thousands of years probably not too many.
Thanks to my reading, I have never been caught flat-footed by any situation, never at a loss for how any problem has been addressed before.
130 years later, with Napoleon’s experience to draw from, it’s staggering that Hitler went down the same path.
Ask yourself, what body of knowledge would I benefit from having deep in my bones? Unless you’re trying to make discoveries in fundamental physics or advanced technology, someone else has probably already gained the knowledge that you seek, and they likely have put it in a book to share with you.
Learning how to read for wisdom is simple, but not easy.
You will react, not as a neophyte, but as someone whose instincts have been honed by the experiences of others, rather than just your own.
Knowledge comes from experience, but it doesn’t have to be your experience.
If you’re interested in military matters, you might even start with Mattis’ reading list itself.

The orginal article.