Summary of “Tsundoku: The art of buying books and never reading them”

Do you have a habit of picking up books that you never quite get around to reading?
So when put together, “Tsundoku” has the meaning of buying reading material and piling it up.
“Which is likely to be satirical, about a teacher who has lots of books but doesn’t read them.”
While this might sound like tsundoku is being used as an insult, Prof Gerstle said the word does not carry any stigma in Japan.
Hands up if you regularly used the word “Bibliomania” before reading this article.
While the two words may have similar meanings, there is one key difference: Bibliomania describes the intention to create a book collection, tsundoku describes the intention to read books and their eventual, accidental collection.
Strictly speaking, the word doku does mean reading, so tsundoku should probably only be used when discussing literature.
Some people even joked the service should rename their annual week of discounting the “Steam Tsundoku Sale”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “No, you probably don’t have a book in you”

When people talk about “Having a book in them,” or when people tell others they should write a book, what they really mean is I bet someone, but probably not me because I already heard it, would pay money to hear this story.
A book has a beginning, middle, and an end that keeps the reader invested for the five, six, ten hours it can take to read a book, because if it gets boring in the middle, most people stop reading.
Writing a book that people will pay money for or take a trip to the library to read, requires an awareness few storytellers have.
A publisher doesn’t really want book two until they see how book number one is selling.
Publishers take a financial risk on a book, because no one knows how a book is going to sell until it’s on shelves, and very successful authors help pay the bills for the less successful books.
No one deserves to be published just because they completed a book.
Writing a book that someone else wants to read is running your fastest marathon.
Just be careful when well-meaning, though wholly uninformed, people say you should write a book.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 self-made millionaires and the books that changed their finances”

Millionaires come from all walks of life, but research shows they share some key habits that helped them climb at the top of their financial games.
Upping their financial IQs and reading are two big ones-so it’s no surprise many millionaires credit books with helping them shape their money mind-set.
Want a few suggestions to add to your summer reading list? Here, seven self-made millionaires share the one book that changed their finances for the better.
Tanja Hester, 38, early retiree in Lake Tahoe, Calif., who hit millionaire status in her mid-30s with calculated goal-setting, saving and investing.
“Because of the lessons I learned from ‘The Millionaire Next Door,’ my husband and I were able to stop wasting money on stuff and start saving for things we valued: paying off our mortgage, funding our children’s education and consistently investing for retirement.”
Clare Dubé, 51, financial therapist in Madison, Conn., who joined the millionaires’ club in 2000 through values-led budgeting, targeted retirement planning and real-estate investing.
Ordinary people can become millionaires by doing relatively simple things-like using tax-advantaged retirement accounts and pushing yourself to save a little extra each month-over a long period of time.
“‘The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing,’ based on the philosophies of Vanguard founder John Bogle, completely changed my financial outlook.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kurt Vonnegut Offers 8 Tips on How to Write Good Short Stories”

You can’t talk about American literature in the second half of the 20th century without talking about Kurt Vonnegut.
He worked wonders with the short story, a form in whose heyday he began his writing career, but he also had a knack for what would become the most social media-friendly of all forms, the list.
Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
In the short lecture above Vonnegut gets more technical, sketching out the shapes that stories, short or long, can take.
In one possible story the protagonist begins slightly happier than average, gets into trouble, and then gets out of it again.
Vonnegut first explored the idea of story shapes in his master’s thesis, rejected by the University of Chicago “Because it was so simple and looked like too much fun.” Clearly that didn’t stop him from continuing to think about and experiment with those shapes all throughout his career.
He assigned term papers that can still teach you how to read like a writer, he appeared on television dispensing advice to aspirants to the craft, and he even published articles on how to write with style.
Nobody could, or should try to, write just like Kurt Vonnegut, but all of us who write at all could do well to give our craft the kind of thought he did.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The billionaire who bought the LA Times: ‘Hipsters will want paper soon'”

A bright, restless mind, Soon-Shiong is now seeking to remedy a very different source of malignant metastasis: news.
Fake news, superficial news, clickbait news, shrill, shouty, polarising news, he plans to tackle all these ailments in his latest incarnation as a media mogul.
“I’m a news junkie number one, a complete news junkie,” he told the Guardian in an interview at the LA Times’s new home, a still-under construction 10-acre campus in El Segundo, 20miles south of downtown.
Can we compete with the New York Times and the Washington Post? Not can, we must.
65, wants to turn his flagship daily into a multimedia leviathan of independent, innovative journalism in the Trump era – a font of essential reading, viewing and listening to rival the Washington Post and New York Times.
The doctor-turned tycoon has an ambitious agenda to redress not only fake news – the “Cancer of our time” – but also short-attention spans and hyper-partisan discourse.
A version of the LA Times’s masthead adorned the roof, the Gothic-style lettering visible from the 105 freeway and, staff said, from planes landing at adjacent LAX. After trying in vain to lure Dean Baquet from the New York Times and Martin Baron from the Post, Soon-Shiong hired Norman Pearlstine, a 75-year-old veteran of Bloomberg, Time and the Wall Street Journal, to be the paper’s editor-in-chief.
A solid choice to stabilise the LA Times and chart a new course, Ken Doctor, a media analyst, noted in a NiemanLab article.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Improve Your Kids’ Reading Comprehension”

If you’re like me, you dive into book after book with abandon.
It turns out that by plowing through stories, we may be missing a key step: prediction.
When your kid takes the time to contemplate what he’s about to read, making predictions based on what he already knows, he’ll be more invested in the story and more likely to understand and retain the material.
Show them the cover and ask, “What do you think this book will be about? Why?”.Take a “Picture walk,” as Kriegel suggests.
Flip through the pages of illustrated book, and without reading any words, let them to form their own ideas about the story.
Use Post-Its to cover important words in the story, and see if they can guess what those words are when they land upon them.
In the middle of a story, stop and ask them what they think is going to happen on the next page.
After the final page, ask, “If you could write the next chapter, what would happen?” It helps them to stay curious even after the story ends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I’m Very Into These Travel Posters Based On Famous Novels”

With its recently announced The Great American Read program, PBS has published a list of 100 beloved novels, based on titles named by ~7200 survey respondents in the US. They also designed travel posters for some of the most fantastical or evocative worlds within these novels – and honestly I am very into it.
“The 100 books nominated for The Great American Read span multiple genres, periods in history, and places – both real and fictional – taking readers to new places and on new adventures,” Lori Dicker, senior director of digital marketing at PBS, told BuzzFeed News via email.
“We wanted to bring these journeys to life.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a cabal of romance writers cashed in on Amazon Kindle Unlimited”

Shortly thereafter, Amazon rolled out the next iteration of Kindle Unlimited – authors would now be paid per page read. Many self-publishers, says Gaughran, moved on to producing books that were thousands of pages long.
Either way, book stuffing plagues the romance genre on Kindle Unlimited, with titles that come in at 2000 or even 3000 pages.
It’s not clear to what extent Valderrama was involved in book stuffing or other techniques, or how many of her other clients engaged in the kind of marketing strategies Willink says she told her about at RWA. Her current roster of clients includes multiple authors whom sources in the romance community named as prolific book-stuffers and who have regularly published books clocking in at a thousand pages or more, including Cassandra Dee.
There are over 5 million books available via Kindle, with over a million books available on the Kindle Unlimited system.
As described earlier, Carter’s books were removed from Amazon in June, for reasons that Amazon declines to explain.
In the Kindle Unlimited program – where readers pay a $9.99 monthly subscription to “Check out” as many books in the program as they want – a reader can indulge any passing impulse to peek behind a cover.
Scattered throughout the top featured titles in the Romance category for Kindle Unlimited are books labeled “Compilation,” “Anthology,” “Collection,” or “Box Set,” running thousands of pages long.
In June, one of the top books in romance was Cassandra Dee’s Pregnant By My Boss: A Romance Compilation, clocking in at over a thousand pages.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Best summer books 2018, as picked by writers”

It’s one of the best evocations of the grieving process I’ve read and is written in a fluid engaging style that draws you in to the protagonist Holly’s world.
Ashleigh Young’s collection of smart, funny, insightful and unexpected essays, Can You Tolerate This?, has a bright yellow cover, making it perfect summer reading.
Three Poems by Hannah Sullivan is the best first collection I’ve read for a long time: moving, technically adroit, clever in all the right ways, and full of brilliant small-scale effects as well as large achievements.
It reminded me of what it was like to lie reading by torchlight late at night, when camping in the summer.
The book brings both city and period to colourful life and is a joy to read. It’s a collaboration between seasoned novelist Chris Brookmyre and his wife, consultant anaesthetist Marisa Haetzman.
Published in translation last year, it’s an admirably slim book – you could read it in one sitting – and for me it conjured up a whole world.
In the world of children’s books, I can’t wait to read Hilary McKay’s The Skylarks’ War, set in the approaching shadow of the first world war.
I’ve already read Tishani Doshi’s poetry collection Girls Are Coming Out of the Woods but I know I’ll return to it many times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Only Read A Few Books In 2018, Read These”

If you don’t read the book, at least please read about it.
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell The book is spectacular.
Given the divisiveness that we are facing as a society - that became painfully clear in 2016 - this is one of the most urgent and important book you need to read next year.
It’s also easy to be disillusioned by politics right now but for me, getting lost in these Lyndon Johnson books has been a helpful and educational process.
Mr. Eternity by Aaron Thier / The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas These books really have nothing to do with the events of 2016 but they are long and entertaining and they will make you forget your problems for the next 12 months.
Because the actual book is a 1,200 page epic of some of the most brilliant, beautiful and complicated storytelling ever put to paper.
What a book! When I typed out my notes after finishing this book, it ran some 3,000 words.
Like to Read?I’ve created a list of 15 books you’ve never heard of that will alter your worldview and help you excel at your career.

The orginal article.