Summary of “Stephen King’s 20 Rules for Writers”

We’ve talked so much about the reader, but you can’t forget that the opening line is important to the writer, too.
Now King admits that he doesn’t think much about the opening line as he writes, in a first draft, at least.
Revision in the second draft, “One of them, anyway,” may “Necessitate some big changes” says King in his 2000 memoir slash writing guide On Writing.
It is an essential process, and one that “Hardly ever fails.” Below, we bring you King’s top twenty rules from On Writing.
“Timid writers like passive verbs for the same reason that timid lovers like passive partners. The passive voice is safe.”
Read, read, read. “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time to write.”
“One cannot imitate a writer’s approach to a particular genre, no matter how simple what that writer is doing may seem.”
“Writing isn’t about making money, getting famous, getting dates, getting laid or making friends. Writing is magic, as much as the water of life as any other creative art. The water is free. So drink.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Bookish Life by Joseph Epstein”

By the bookish life, I mean a life in which the reading of books has a central, even a dominating, place.
The first question is “How can one tell which books qualify as good, beautiful, important?” In an essay of 1978 called “On Reading Books: A Barbarian’s Cogitations,” Alexander ­Gerschenkron, a Harvard economist of wide learning, set out three criteria: A good book must be interesting, memorable, and rereadable.
Some of the best of all books are those one loved when young and finds even better in later life.
Reading may not be the same as conversation, but reading the right books, the best books, puts us in the company of men and women more intelligent than ourselves.
A precondition for reading good books is not reading bad ones: for life is short.
I’ve twice before made a run at Burton’s book, but it now begins to look as if I may have to finish finishing it in the next life.
In The Guermantes Way volume of his great novel, Proust has his narrator note a time when he knew “More books than people and literature better than life.” The best arrangement, like that between the head and the heart, is one of balance between life and reading.
You can get along without reading serious books-many extraordinary, large-hearted, highly intelligent people have-but why, given the chance, would you want to? Books make life so much richer, grander, more splendid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Top 5 Contemporary Software Engineering Books”

IntroIf you’ve been into software engineering for some time and enjoy reading books, you’ve probably come across some classics such as Code Complete, Refactoring, The Mythical Man-Month or Peopleware.
While they are still great, for this article I’ve put together a list of more recent books that I consider my current personal top 5.
There’s some recency bias, of course, so regard the list as snapshot for the time from 2017 to 2018.The books cover a mix of areas such as software design and management or “People topics”.
It’s one of the most substantial books I’ve ever read about software engineering.
After reading the book you might ask yourself: How do you best apply and integrate your new knowledge into your engineering process and how do you convince co-workers of the value of the approaches? Luckily, there’s tooling support, so start small and keep improving.
Why you should read itThe core topic of A Philosophy of Software Design is simplicity - consequently, the book itself is simple to understand.
It’s a pragmatic and authentic book about technical leadership, management, and people topics in tech companies - without much of the dramatizing and shallow advice that you often find in other “People” books.
Why you should read itAlthough mostly addressing engineering management, the book is certainly valuable for software engineers staying on the technical path.

The orginal article.

Summary of “30 Days to a Smarter Brain”

Everyone wants a better, and smarter brain to process information faster and have better memory recall.
In 30 days or less, you can adopt some of these habits to boost your brain power, improve your mental clarity and build a better brain.
“When you’re learning something new, and your brain is feeling like it wants to take a nap, that’s when you know you’re doing things that are growing your brain neurologically, not just maintaining it,” says Dr. Jennifer Jones, a psychologist, and expert in the science of success.
Michael Merzenich, a pioneer of plasticity research, and author of Soft-wired: How the New Science of Brain Plasticity Can Change Your Life says that going beyond the familiar is essential to brain health.
Your brain needs you to read every dayReading heightens brain connectivity.
The reading brain can be likened to the real-time collaborative effort of a symphony orchestra, with various parts of the brain working together, like sections of instruments, to maximize our ability to decode the written text in front of us.
Judy Willis MD, a neurologist, and former classroom teacher explains, “The practice of writing can enhance the brain’s intake, processing, retaining, and retrieving of information it promotes the brain’s attentive focus boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns, gives the brain time for reflection, and when well-guided, is a source of conceptual development and stimulus of the brain’s highest cognition.
“Don’t sit stillSitting still all day, every day is dangerous.Love it or hate it, physical activity can have potent effects on your brain and mood.The brain is often described as being”like a muscle”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Girls Are Better at Reading Than Boys”

It’s not just a phenomenon in the U.K.: These trends in girls’ dominance in reading can be found pretty much anywhere in the developed world.
In 2009, a global study of the academic performance of 15-year-olds found that, in all but one of the 65 participating countries, more girls than boys said they read for pleasure.
On average across the countries, only about half of boys said they read for enjoyment, compared to roughly three-quarters of girls.
Boys tend to be more vulnerable than girls to peer pressure, and that could discourage them from activities like reading that are perceived to be “Uncool.”
David Reilly, a psychologist and Ph.D. candidate at Australia’s Griffith University who co-authored a recent analysis on gender disparities in reading in the U.S., echoed these arguments, pointing to the stereotype that liking and excelling at reading is a feminine trait.
“Give boys the right literature, that appeals to their tastes and interests, and you can quickly see changes in reading attitudes,” he says, citing comic books as an example.
Understanding why girls are so much more inclined to read might help eradicate what is proving to be a stubborn gender gap both in the U.S. and around the world: the lagging educational outcomes of boys and men.
“If girls are reading more outside of school”-if they’re doing so out of an intrinsic motivation rather than because they have to-“This provides them with thousands of hours of additional reading over the course of their development.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I Re-Read My Favorite Books Multiple Times A Year”

About four years ago I decided to read 100 new books a year.
I stopped reading two new books a week because I forgot almost everything I learned more than a year earlier.
There’s no way you can remember even a quarter of a book you read three years ago.
What behaviors, characteristics, or skills do you want to make your own? What books are about those things? Keep those books close.
Every time someone tells me they are afraid to highlight books or that they don’t want to buy books, I question that person’s will to learn.
That’s also why you want to read good books more than once.
It’s better to re-read a good book several times a year, compared to reading a decent book only once or twice.
I don’t admire the person who has read 1,000 books, but I admire the person who has read one book 1,000 times.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to write the perfect sentence”

The sentence is our writing commons, the shared ground where all writers walk.
For James Baldwin, the only goal was “To write a sentence as clean as a bone”.
Some of this is true but none of it is a good way of learning how to write a sentence.
They fasten on content and forget about form – forgetting that content and form are the same thing, that what a sentence says is the same as how it says it.
Like every skilled writer Woolf starkly varies sentence length.
A good lesson for any writer: make each sentence worth reading, and something in it will lead the reader into the next one.
A decade ago the American writer Gary Lutz gave a lecture to Columbia University students titled “The sentence is a lonely place”.
Good writers write not just in sentences but with sentences.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you should read this article slowly”

Are we doomed to read distractedly in the digital age? Technology seems to deter slow, immersive reading.
The online reader’s put-down is TL;DR. Too long; didn’t read. The cognitive neuroscientist Maryanne Wolf argued recently that this “New norm” of skim reading is producing “An invisible, game-changing transformation” in how readers process words.
The neuronal circuit that underpins the brain’s capacity to read now favours the rapid ingestion of information, rather than skills fostered by deeper reading, like critical analysis and empathy.
Yet the internet has certainly changed the way we read. For a start, it means that there is more to read, because more people than ever are writing.
In the analogue era, writing was read much later than it was written.
I trace the margin with my finger as I read, like a learner-reader, so I can pause and think about what I have just read and not lose my place.
I often read aloud, or at least move my lips, even if that means getting some odd looks in public places.
Slow reading feels to me like a more generous, collegiate form of reading – rather as listening is a more generous act than speaking, and more difficult.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Small Habits That Have A Huge Return On Life”

Over the years, I’ve adopted many different “Positive” habits.
To me, a habit is positive when it improves the quality of my life.
How hard is? How long does it take? What’s the best way to break habits? How do we adopt new habits?
My experience is that everyone can adopt any habit they want.
After one of my friends recently asked me about my current habits, I decided to share them here-with a brief explanation of what the habits are good for.
You will only see the return it has on your life over time.
You must stick to these habits until your life gets better.
Get free articles/podcasts on productivity, habits, decision making, and personal finance in your inbox.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Agile learning: how to build a brain like a gymnast”

Learning agility is swift, continuous learning from experience.
Agile learners take knowledge from one concept and apply it to another.
Learning smarter, learning faster, learning wider - and forgetting the rest.
Make learning deliberateThere are many ways to learn.
Learn to learnStudies show that agile learners are made, not born.
Learn from someonePeople think of learning as a solitary process.
It’s a widely-held assumption that spreading yourself across multiple disciplines means you’re spreading yourself too thin: you’ll dilute your learning and only absorb information superficially.
Learning becomes agile when it forges connections across boundaries; transfers knowledge from one task, memory or field to another; and cross-fertilizes.

The orginal article.