Summary of “How to train yourself to become a speed reader”

Though the technique is traditionally thought of as a way to get through book-length tomes, Abby Marks Beale, a speed-reading expert and author, says that the active reading strategies used in speed reading works on all kinds of texts.
While speed reading to those that have never done it might seem like some kind of magic trick, Beale says in actuality, all it is “a set of active, mindful, and conscious strategies that allow a person to intentionally speed up or slow down based on certain conditions.”
These active reading strategies can be learned by anyone, and once mastered, the reader typically learns “How to double to triple their current reading speed while maintaining or improving their comprehension. This means they could read twice or three times as much in the same amount of time when they choose to read using faster strategies.”
Using a white index card is one of the first steps people can take towards becoming a speed reader, says Beale.
Now that you’ve set up an environment conducive to concentrating and have learned how to force your concentration on the line you’re reading using either variation of the index card trick, the last big beginners’ speed reading trick you need to master is the ability to use your peripheral vision to take in more than one word at a time.
“Both of these methods are active reading methods requiring the reader to really focus on what they are reading and how their eyes move on a page,” Beale explains.
At first, learning to speed read may make you feel like you’re actually reading slower, but over time you’ll pick up the techniques as second nature.
Just maybe if you learn to speed read through your work texts, you may gain just enough new free time in the day to settle down with a nice leisurely book in the evening.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Darius Foroux on making time for useful work”

How does he do it? With a time management technique he read about in college that he has since expanded on and made his own.
During my final exams, I read about the Pomodoro technique in some magazine I picked up at school.
I think that’s what made readers follow my work.
What have some of the most memorable questions been?One reader asked me why I always start my podcast with “How’s it going?” He said that listeners can’t answer that question.
If you run into a good article, you don’t immediately have to read it.
Save the article and read it when you make time for reading.
What have you been discovering, saving, or spending time with recently in Pocket?I’ve been reading a lot about investing and investors.
If you had the chance to escape and read all of your current Pocket saves where would you go to do it?Curaçao.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Books Every Manager Should Read to Become a Better Leader”

You can then take that knowledge to empower your employees to be better workers and people.
Part of being a top-notch manager is creating a culture in which your employees can shine.
It will give you the tools needed to better know and support those around you, including employees.
Carnegie’s ideas can help you get employees to open up and trust you, both very valuable leadership skills.
The idea is that Musk is able to warp his employees’ perspectives about how quickly they are able to get work done.
Reading The Hard Thing can make you a much better leader and manager as well as increase your empathy for running a company.
Reading about what others have learned and constantly improving yourself will yield benefits not only in the output of your employees but also in your personal happiness.
Work is less stressful and more rewarding when you see your employees thrive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Study: Two Spaces After a Period May Be Better Than One”

As Johnson told me, “Our data suggest that all readers benefit from having two spaces after periods.”
“Increased spacing has been shown to help facilitate processing in a number of other reading studies,” Johnson explained to me by email, using two spaces after each period.
In the Skidmore study, among people who write with two spaces after periods-“Two-spacers”-there was an increase in reading speed of 3 percent when reading text with two spaces following periods, as compared to one.
Nicholas Christakis, a professor at Yale University, wrote: “Hurray! Science vindicates my longstanding practice, learned at age 12, of using TWO SPACES after periods in text. NOT ONE SPACE. Text is easier to read that way. Of course, on Twitter, I use one space, given 280 characters.”
I find two spaces after a period unsettling, like seeing a person who never blinks or still has their phone’s keyboard sound effects on.
I plan to teach my kids never to reply to messages from people who put two spaces after a period.
The new American Psychological Association style guidelines came out recently, and they had changed from one space to two spaces following periods because they claimed it “Increased the readability of the text.” This galled Johnson: “Here we had a manual written to teach us how to write scientifically that was making claims that were not backed with empirical evidence!”.
In the current study, when text was presented with two spaces after periods, some readers’ eyes were more likely to jump over the “Punctuation region” and spend less unnecessary time fixated on it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Two spaces after period are better than one, except maybe they aren’t, study finds”

In what may be one of the most controversial studies of the year, researchers at Skidmore College-clearly triggered by a change in the American Psychological Association style book-sought to quantify the benefits of two spaces after a period at the end of a sentence.
After conducting an eye-tracking experiment with 60 Skidmore students, Rebecca L. Johnson, Becky Bui, and Lindsay L. Schmitt found that two spaces at the end of a period slightly improved the processing of text during reading.
While modern style, based on the fallacy that computer typography makes such double-spaces redundant and Paleolithic, has demanded the deprecation of the second tap of the space bar after a punctuation full-stop, many have openly resisted this heresy, believing that the extra space is a courtesy to the reader and enhances the legibility of the text.
Some research has suggested closer spacing of the beginning of a new sentence may allow a reader to capture more characters in their parafoveal vision-the area of the retina just outside the area of focus, or fovea-and thus start processing the information sooner.
Having identified subjects’ proclivities, the researchers then gave them 21 paragraphs to read on a computer screen and tracked their eye movement as they read using an Eyelink 1000 video-based eye tracking system.
Two spaces after periods, one space after commas; and.
The “One-spacers” were, as a group, slower readers across the board, and they showed statistically insignificant variation across all four spacing practices.
“Two-spacers” saw a three-percent increase in reading speed for paragraphs in their own favored spacing scheme.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One space between each sentence, they said. Science just proved them wrong.”

Letters of uniform width looked cramped without extra space after the period.
Anything more than a single space between sentences was too much.
The original printing of the U.S. Declaration of Independence used extra long spaces between sentences.
Reading speed only improved marginally, the paper found, and only for the 21 “Two-spacers,” who naturally typed with two spaces between sentences.
Everyone tended to spend fewer milliseconds staring at periods when a little extra blank space followed it.
The study’s authors concluded that two-spacers in the digital age actually have science on their side, and more research should be done to “Investigate why reading is facilitated when periods are followed by two spaces.”
No sooner did the paper publish than the researchers discovered that science doesn’t necessarily govern matters of the space bar.
Johnson told Lifehacker that she and her co-authors submitted the paper with two spaces after each period – as was proper.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A farewell to free journalism”

The open Internet literally gave me my career, and for years, I’ve repaid that gift by seeking out employers that kept my writing free to readers.
Traditional media can survive competition for readers just fine.
For more than a century, magazines and newspapers were what’s known as a “Two-sided market”: We sold subscriptions to you, our readers, and once you’d subscribed, we sold your eyeballs to our advertisers.
Some journalism can function as a sort of a loss leader for a conference business, or another associated product, like books or package tours.
Outside of the “Loss leader model,” there are a few other options: Some reporting can be financed by donors as a philanthropic project; some consumer product journalism can support itself through affiliate programs that provide rewards for selling merchandise; and some writing can be supported by “Native advertising” sprinkled among the journalism so that it’s hard to tell them apart.
Philanthropic journalism can take up some of that slack, but it will be narrow in another way: Donor-funded journalism tends to largely be ideological, with donors looking for stories that flatter their opinions and produce measurable political “Impact” beyond just keeping readers informed.
If you don’t like those options, then you, dear reader, are going to have to step up to the plate.
At the end of the day, however much information wants to be free, writers still want to get paid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Reading Aloud to Young Children Has Benefits for Behavior and Attention”

The children whose families had participated in the intervention when they were younger were still less likely to manifest those behavior problems – aggression, hyperactivity, difficulty with attention – that can so often make it hard for children to do well and learn and prosper when they get to school.
Some children were enrolled in a second stage of the project, and the books and toys and videotaping continued as they visited the clinic from age 3 to 5; they showed additional “Dose-response” effects; more exposure to the “Positive parenting” promotion meant stronger positive impacts on the children’s behavior.
“We may be helping some children so they don’t need to have certain kinds of evaluations.” Children who grow up in poverty are at much higher risk of behavior problems in school, so reducing the risk of those attention and behavior problems is one important strategy for reducing educational disparities – as is improving children’s language skills, another source of school problems for poor children.
All parents should appreciate the ways that reading and playing can shape cognitive as well as social and emotional development, and the power of parental attention to help children flourish.
Dr. Weisleder said that in reading and playing, children can encounter situations a little more challenging than what they usually come across in everyday life, and adults can help them think about how to manage those situations.
“We think when parents read with their children more, when they play with their children more, the children have an opportunity to think about characters, to think about the feelings of those characters,” he said.
“The key take-home message to me is that when parents read and play with their children when their children are very young – we’re talking about birth to 3 year olds – it has really large impacts on their children’s behavior,” Dr. Mendelsohn said.
“All families need to know when they read, when they play with their children, they’re helping them learn to control their own behavior,” he said, so that they will come to school able to manage the business of paying attention and learning.

The orginal article.

Summary of “21 books you should read this spring”

With so many great books coming out in 2018, it can be hard to figure out just which ones you should pick up.
This week on the MashReads Podcast, we are joined by Cristina Arreola, books editor at Bustle, to chat about spring reading.
Join us in the episode below as we talk about the books we’ve read recently, the books that’ve been on our spring reading wishlist, the classic books we’ve been revisiting, and the upcoming books you need to know about.
Here’s the podcast – read on for our list of 21 books you should check out this spring further down the page.
Be sure to check out more of Cristina’s work by checking out Bustle’s books coverage.
If you’re looking to revisit a book this spring, check out James Baldwin’s portrait of New Yorkers in the ’50s Another Country.
If you’re looking for a deep dive into love this spring, make sure to revisit Maggie Nelson’s 2015 book, The Argonauts.
Recommended by: MJ. “He has an essay called ‘After Peter,’ and it is easily one of the most affecting essays I’ve ever read in my life. I read this book a little while ago and I’ve just been waiting for it to come out so I can talk to people about it. It’s so good.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Schools Are Failing to Teach Kids How to Read”

On Tuesday, a panel of experts in Washington, D.C., convened by the federally appointed officials who oversee the NAEP concluded that the root of the problem is the way schools teach reading.
The statute required states to administer annual reading and math tests to students in grades three through eight and once in high school, and attached hefty consequences if schools failed to boost scores.
Since 2001, the curriculum in many elementary schools has narrowed to little more than a steady diet of reading and math.
Rarely do the topics connect: Students might read a book about bridges one day, zebras the next, and clouds the day after that.
A sixth-grader at one of his schools was frustrated that a passage on a reading test she’d taken kept repeating a word she didn’t understand: roog-bye.
The best way to boost students’ reading comprehension is to expand their knowledge and vocabulary by teaching them history, science, literature, and the arts, using curricula that that guide kids through a logical sequence from one year to the next: for example, Native Americans and Columbus in kindergarten; the colonial era and the American Revolution in first grade; the War of 1812 and the Civil War in second grade, and so on.
What struggling students need is guidance from a teacher in how to make sense of texts designed for kids at their respective grade levels-the kinds of texts those kids may otherwise see only on standardized tests, when they have to grapple with them on their own.
Poorer kids with less-educated parents tend to rely on school to acquire the kind of knowledge that is needed to succeed academically-and because their schools often focus exclusively on reading and math, in an effort to raise low test scores, they’re less likely to acquire it there.

The orginal article.