Summary of “The Sixth Sense 20th Anniversary: Oral History with M. Night Shyamalan – Variety”

“The Sixth Sense” was almost a serial killer film inspired by “The Silence of the Lambs.” In the original draft of the thriller by director and writer M. Night Shyamalan, Bruce Willis’ character was a crime photographer with a son who experienced visions of the victims.
Ten drafts later, Shyamalan morphed the script into what we know today: a psychological drama with a monumental twist ending that would launch the career of a young director with comparisons to Spielberg and Hitchcock.
Haley Joel Osment, who plays the young boy who utters the words “I see dead people,” told Variety that the cast knew intuitively that the script was “Something really special,” and they were right: “The Sixth Sense” earned six Oscar nominations including best picture, best director, best supporting actress for Toni Collette and best supporting actor for then 10-year-old Osment.
M. Night Shyamalan, who is now 48, spent nearly a year on the script, not sure where the story should go or what it should be.
The film landed at Disney’s Buena Vista Pictures, with Shyamalan set to direct his own script.
When thinking back to the scariest scene in “The Sixth Sense,” most will recall Barton writhing under a bed, trying to get Osment to realize her mother killed her.
It’s of Cole in a freezing cold bed saying the line, “I see dead people.” Shyamalan decided not to use CGI to facilitate the image of his breath; instead, he put Osment in a a real-life ice box.
Shyamalan: “The Sixth Sense” was the movie that didn’t have the legacy to deal with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Billie Eilish and the Triumph of the Weird: Rolling Stone Cover Story – Rolling Stone”

Unlike previous generations of pop idols – your Nickelodeon alums and Simon Cowell constructs – Eilish also got where she is more or less organically.
Eilish has always been afraid of things: the ocean and deep water; dark places like her closet or the garage at night.
Before she was born, her parents, Maggie Baird and Patrick O’Connell, saw a documentary about conjoined Irish twins, Katie and Eilish Holton, and decided if they ever had a daughter, they wanted to name her Eilish.
Eilish recorded her vocals on Finneas’ bed, singing into a mic while surrounded by flower pillows.
“When anyone else thinks about Billie Eilish at 14, they think of all the good things that happened. But all I can think of is how miserable I was. How completely distraught and confused. Thirteen to 16 was pretty rough.”
When they get to the front of the line, each girl hands Maggie her phone, and she films as Eilish doles out compliments and hugs: “You’re so pretty!” “Your hair is fire!” “That belt is sick!” “You look good as fuck!” As they leave, Eilish tells them she loves them and to take care of themselves.
For him, touring with Eilish is especially cool, because so many Gen X icons have kids who are just the right age to be Billie Eilish fans, and they’ve come backstage to say hi and be hero dads for a night: Dave Grohl, Billie Joe Armstrong, Thom Yorke.
Eilish is familiar with all these guys, but she’s not exactly star-struck.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Art of Saying No to Invites When You REALLY Don’t Want to Do Something”

Which is…kind of fucked up! Not wanting to do something optional and fairly low-stakes is a perfectly good reason to not do it! I don’t know about you, but I certainly don’t want to live in a world where anyone lacking the “Right” excuse is expected to participate in whatever activities other people deem important, their own needs and desires be damned.
Also frustrating: Hanging out with a person who doesn’t actually want to be there! If my options as the inviter are either to be momentarily disappointed before finding a buddy who will enjoy the activity I’m proposing, or to spend *my* valuable TME hanging out with someone who doesn’t want to be here and secretly-or not-so-secretly-resents me for it, I’m going to choose the former every time! Agreeing to do something you really don’t want to do isn’t necessarily kind; it can actually be pretty selfish.
Speaking of selfish, when I’m feeling really guilty about the idea of saying no in these situations, I find it’s helpful to think about whether my no is really going to break this person’s heart, or if I just think my presence is way more important than it really is.
So before you begrudgingly agree to go, you may want to step back and ask yourself if you’re perhaps overestimating how much your attendance really matters to your friend.
So remember: If someone declines your invitation, it’s really, really OK. It doesn’t necessarily mean they don’t like you, or that they don’t want to be your friend.
Look, if someone always declines your invitations and you do start to suspect they don’t really want to be friends, that is another matter.
Which is disappointing and stings, but is also fine-because you don’t actually want to be friends with people who don’t want to be friends with you, or who don’t share any of your interests.
I’ve also found it helpful to view a no not as a slight, but as a favor-because again there is nothing worse than knowing someone was dreading spending time with you, or regretted investing their TME in something you wanted to do.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The “SpongeBob Squarepants” cast dives deep: On their iconic roles and humanity under the sea”

Salon spoke with the cast of “SpongeBob Squarepants” to describe what makes this silly sea show so enduring.
The main characters of the hit TV show “SpongeBob Squarepants” may be a bunch of fish – technically a sea sponge, starfish, cephalopod, crustacean, phytoplankton and squirrel, to be exact – but the key to the show’s enduring success could very well be that, for all of their silly underwater antics, the population of Bikini Bottom is endearingly human.
There is a scene in “SpongeBob’s Big Birthday Blowout,” the 20th anniversary special for the show that premieres on Friday at 7 p.m. ET, which plays with the underlying humanity of SpongeBob, Patrick, Squidward, Sandy, Plankton and Mr. Krabs in a particularly clever way.
Rodger Bumpass, who voices the curmudgeonly Squidward Tentacles, observed how fans identify with the character’s existential malaise – how, in effect, they first identify with SpongeBob as children, and then with his cranky character as adults.
“There’s a passage of time that people go through coming into young adulthood – and that really is where people tell me, when I go to conventions and stuff – that when they were young they associated and identified with SpongeBob because of his youthful playfulness and innocence, and then as they get to be adults and learn what the real world is like, and for a lot of people, that’s a traumatic passage of time,” Bumpass told Salon, who speculated that a lot of young people struggle with “This adult thing” once they reach a certain age.
With 20 years under its belt, it’s difficult to imagine where SpongeBob Squarepants will go from here.
Of course, like other classic animated TV shows such as Looney Tunes, the likelihood is that “SpongeBob Squarepants” will stick with its floating timeline and allow things to remain in their status quo forever – with SpongeBob manning the grill at the Krusty Krab, Squidward muttering to himself behind the cash register, Mr. Krabs in the back counting his money, Plankton scheming and figuratively face-planting each time, Patrick sleeping under his rock, Sandy getting into adventures and saving the day.
“Some shows focus on the childlike aspect of SpongeBob and things they can do by fooling around in the back of the classroom or whatever, or getting bullied by Flats the Flounder. Or sometimes, like you said, it’s more about ‘Midlife Crustacean’ where it’s about other, more adult concerns.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Underworld of Online Content Moderation”

More than one hundred thousand people work as online content moderators, viewing and evaluating the most violent, disturbing, and exploitative content on social media.
Roberts, who conducted interviews with current and former content moderators, found that many work in Silicon Valley, but she also travelled as far as the Philippines, where some of the work has been outsourced.
From her research, we learn about the emotional toll, low wages, and poor working conditions of most content moderation.
During our conversation, which has been edited for length and clarity, we discussed why finding and deleting offensive content is so tricky, why the job is so psychologically taxing, and the fixes that could help these workers and make them better at their jobs.
I was looking at the rank-and-file people who would be fairly new to not only this particular work of commercial content moderation but also to the tech industry.
What these people were doing was really a front-line decision-making process, where they would sit in front of the screen and jack into a queue system that would serve up to them content that someone else, someone like you or me, might have encountered on the platform and had a problem with.
I think they cared enough that they had an entire apparatus devoted to the creating and designing and thinking through their policies, but what became clear to me through the course of this work was that the primary function of people doing commercial content moderation at these platforms was for brand management of the social-media platform itself.
The nature of the way the work has been designed has been for the work to be secret.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Playing Dungeons & Dragons Together for 30 Years”

Beck: Over the many years that you guys have been friends now, is D&D something that kind of serves as a structural support to make sure that you all get together regularly?
That’s always the most common email we have: When can we get together for the next game? We could just say, When are we going to get together to hang out again? But it’s an excuse for us to constantly keep in touch and not drift away.
Beck: Do you think you guys would have remained as close without the game?
The ones I really try to get together with are these guys.
I agree with Dennis that gaming, whether it be cards or D&D or whatnot, has really been a key framing factor for, Hey, let’s get together.
A lot of people are constantly in a state of flux, trying to find new players, or a new game to join.
Sometimes when we’re playing a game, there’ll be just a couple of words referring to something that happened 10 years ago.
Ken: Dennis, Dennis, Dennis, how about the thing with the sea hag?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dunkin’, Disney+, Impossible Burgers: Who comes up with brand names?”

I spoke to Rachel, who comes from a background in linguistics, on how companies land on names for everything from pants to pizza, how AI is changing the way we name stuff, and why becoming the “Kleenex” of a category is actually a kiss of death.
There are lots of people that you’ll find on LinkedIn that are namers and they’re just churning out big lists of names in their basement.
What’s a name that you’re really proud of coming up with?
A lot of them want to start with a design and then treat naming as an afterthought, and I think that’s one of the most significant pitfalls when it comes to naming.
A lot of times you would use a disruptive brand name to mitigate risk, so if the corporate company thinks it makes sense to go into this business but it’s maybe not aligned to what their corporation stands for, it’s almost the naming version of creating a shell company.
We used to have all of these really abstract names like Dasani or what Kraft did in becoming Mondelez and that’s 100 percent a tactic about overcoming trademark hurdles.
The other factor coming up a lot more is voice recognition and AI. Names that are spelled weird or might have a tough time pronouncing is not a trick you can use anymore.
Everybody read this marketing and branding book called Start With Why, which is about why you exist as a company, and [companies] took it literally, like naming your brand Method or Ethos or Impossible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘All The Rage’: Darcy Lockman Explores The Unequal Division Of Domestic Labor”

‘All The Rage’: Darcy Lockman Explores The Unequal Division Of Domestic Labor Psychologist Darcy Lockman says there’s been progress since the 1950s, but equal partnerships are a long way off.
Darcy Lockman conducted interviews with 50 women about the division of labor in their households, and she heard a lot of anger and a lot of gratitude.
Women would express legitimate grievances and then say: “But I know women who are in worse situations, so I don’t want to complain too much.”
In her new book, Lockman demonstrates why women have every right to complain.
Women told Lockman they were grateful their husbands weren’t as bad as other husbands.
Women’s “Equity point,” as they called it, was even more generous to men – women who were doing 66% of their household’s labor felt like they had the fairest arrangements of all the women in the study.
None of the women I spoke with had complaints about their husbands as fathers – it was more of a co-parenting issue.
So in male/female groups it’s the women who really step up to do that stuff.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Uninhabitable Earth: An Interview with David Wallace-Wells on How to Keep the Earth as Inhabitable as Possible”

It’s not happening slowly, there’s nowhere to hide from it, there’s no part of how we live our lives as humans that will be left untouched, and it’s not even something that’s barreling down on us-it’s already here.
A hotter world means a world with less food, and what food remains will be less nutrient-dense per calorie.
How we respond to those changes will only make the crisis worse.
Wallace-Wells starts his analysis with a bleak conclusion: We’ve been behind where we need to be for decades now, and the fact that we’ll be living in a hotter, less hospitable world is an inevitability.
The only uncertainty left is how quickly we respond and how much damage we’re going to be able to prevent.
The conventional wisdom around climate change is that the way we fight it is by making an individual choices, like flying and driving less.
One of the really big ones is that in order to stabilize the climate-at some temperature level that we would find tolerable globally-will require much more than just reducing our emissions.
Any additional emissions that we put into the atmosphere will continue to heat the planet, and so even if we cut our global emissions by 80 percent, we’re still going to be making the planet hotter.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Ideas Are the Ones That Make the Least Sense”

Think business is all about rational thought and logic? Think again – and to find the biggest, best ideas, start thinking way outside the box.
How would you respond? The first thing I would say, unless I were in a particularly mischievous mood, is something like this: “We need to produce a drink that tastes nicer than Coke, that costs less than Coke, and comes in a really big bottle so people get great value for money.” What I’m fairly sure nobody would say is this: “Hey, let’s try marketing a really expensive drink that comes in a tiny canand tastes kind of disgusting.” Yet that is exactly what one company did.
According to marketing lore, before Red Bull launched outside Thailand, where it had originated, the licensee approached a research agency to see what the international consumer reaction would be to the drink’s taste; the agency, a specialist in researching the flavoring of carbonated drinks, had never seen a worse reaction to any proposed new product.
Normally in consumer trials of new drinks, unenthusiastic respondents might phrase their dislike diffidently: “It’s not really my thing”; “It’s slightly cloying”; “It’s more a drink for kids” – that kind of thing.
Yet no one can deny that the drink has been wildly successful – after all, profits from the six billion cans sold annually are sufficient to fund a Formula 1 team on the side.
“Just watch as perfectly sane people pay $5 for a drink they can make at home for a few pennies.”
“And, best of all, the drink has a taste consumers say they hate.”
In the modern world, oversupplied as it is with economists, technocrats, managers, analysts, spreadsheet tweakers, and algorithm designers, it is becoming a more and more difficult place to practice magic – or even to experiment with it.

The orginal article.