Summary of “How the octopus got its smarts”

While the octopus has a large central brain in its head, it also has a unique network of smaller ‘brains’ within each of its arms.
Researchers are now gearing up with state-of-the-art tools such as the gene-editing technology CRISPR, new types of brain recorders and rigorous behavioural tests to see whether RNA editing is indeed the key to octopus intelligence.
Kuba, who is now based at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, hopes that a new kind of miniature brain logger that sits on the surface of the brain, hopefully out of reach of prying suckers, will kick-start the era of octopus brain-circuit mapping.
The irony is that the first insights into how the vertebrate brain sends signals came from a squid.
In the human, editing the glutamate receptor changed how much calcium could flow into brain cells.
Over in Chicago, Cliff Ragsdale, another frustrated octopus neuroscientist, was also turning his interest to octopus DNA. In 2015, working with Daniel Rokhsar and Oleg Simakov of OIST, the Ragsdale laboratory managed to read the genome of the California two-spot octopus.
The octopus has revealed three big clues as to how it generates brain complexity: it has multiplied its set of circuit-building protocadherin genes and its network-regulating zinc fingers.
Unravelling the details of how octopus and squid are using and abusing the genetic code is generating iconoclastic hypotheses about how they generate their complex brain circuitry.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make Your Own BBQ Sauce”

While a good BBQ spice rub is usually more important to achieving lip-smacking taste, many backyard grilling enthusiasts also love to slather a sauce on their fire-cooked meats.
Be it as a marinade or a sandwich topping, the right sauce can really enhance the flavor of just about any of your BBQ favorites.
Pre-bottled sauces are alright, but you can take your summer grilling up a notch by creating your own DIY sauce.
BBQ sauces begin with a tomato base – typically tomato paste or very often ketchup; it may seem a hair less “Pure” to use a condiment to make another condiment, but it’s common even amongst expert BBQ-ers, as ketchup already has some spices built in, as well as a high sugar content that helps turn the sauce into a nice sticky glaze.
I asked a buddy and sauce expert Michael McCord to come up with a classic sweet-style sauce that will please nearly any palate.
I asked Karl Engel, award-winning BBQ chef and mastermind behind our highly instructive summer grilling video series, for a BBQ sauce recipe; while he wouldn’t give me his personal secret recipe, he did share a good base that can be tweaked to your own specifications and taste.
The one thing I have learned about making your own BBQ sauce is that there are as many recipes and opinions on it as there are grains of sand on the beach.
Making and developing your own sauce is a fun thing to do and lets you develop something that you or your family specifically like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Turn Your Leftover Vegetables Into Dinner”

As a depressed person who sometimes struggles to feel worthy of not starving to death, I have not been the same since I found her recipe for yachaejon, or spring vegetable pancakes.
These aren’t fluffy hotcakes folded with leftover steamed broccoli or whatever-they’re crunchy, salty, fried goodness that happens to be mostly made of vegetables.
It bears repeating that you can use just about any vegetables you like so long as at least one of them is an onion.
Feel free to scale the vegetables and flour/water up and down to suit your needs; as long as you end up with a similar ratio of vegetable to batter, it’ll be fine.
Set a wide, heavy-bottomed skillet over low heat while you prepare the vegetables.
Shred, julienne, ribbon or otherwise very finely slice your vegetables into a large bowl.
Continue heating the oil until it’s shimmering and just barely smoking, then add the vegetable batter to the skillet by the handful, allowing any excess liquid to drip back into the mixing bowl.
Depending on the vegetables you’ve chosen, you can take these little pancakes in any culinary direction you can think of.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Chicken Tzatziki Bowls”

Smoky yogurt-marinated grilled chicken served over quinoa and Mediterranean-inspired tomatoes, cucumbers, and olives with tzatziki and Feta.
We crave Greek and Mediterranean food, and eat it at least once a week! Some recipes in my rotation are this Chicken Kebab Salad, Grilled Chicken Shawarma, Greek Turkey Meatballs, just to name a few!
Her book is gorgeous and filled with so many great recipes it was hard to pick which recipe I should try! I am glad I chose this dish, it will now be part of our rotation!! The seasoning and marinade are wonderful, and because it uses chicken thighs, the meat is tender and juicy.
Tommy said it’s better than any Greek take-out in my neighborhood, and I agree! I had mine in a bowl as pictured here, and Tommy skipped the quinoa and had it with a grilled pita instead. Cooks Notes: You’ll need eight wooden or metal skewers for this recipe.
Preheat an outdoor grill or grill pan to medium-low heat.
Thread the chicken pieces among 4 wooden or metal skewers, discarding the marinade in the bowl.
Grill the chicken, turning the skewers occasionally, until golden brown and cooked through in the center, about 15 minutes.
Add the cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, and red onion and toss to combine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Strange, Uplifting Tale of “Joy of Cooking” Versus the Food Scientist”

So it came as a shock, in 2009, when the prestigious scholarly journal Annals of Internal Medicine published a study under the pointed headline “The Joy of Cooking Too Much.” The study’s lead author, Brian Wansink, who runs Cornell University’s Food and Brand Lab, had made his reputation with a series of splashy studies on eating behavior-in 2005 his famous “Bottomless Bowls” study concluded that people will eat soup indefinitely if their supply is constantly replenished.
For “The Joy of Cooking Too Much,” Wansink and his frequent collaborator, the New Mexico State University professor Collin R. Payne, had examined the cookbook’s recipes in multiple “Joy” editions, beginning with the 1936 version, and determined that their calorie counts had increased over time by an average of forty-four per cent.
In an interview with the L.A. Times, Wansink said that he’d decided to analyze “Joy” because he was looking for culprits in the obesity epidemic beyond fast food and other unhealthy restaurant cooking.
With the help of Rombauer’s biographer, they posted a response on the “Joy” Web site criticizing some of Wansink’s methods and calling attention to his sample size-out of the approximately forty-five hundred recipes that appear in later editions, he’d chosen eighteen, a mere 0.004 per cent of the book’s content.
The study turned up again and again over the years, becoming part of the conventional wisdom on obesity-a “Stand-in,” as Becker puts it, for the “Sad American Diet.” A cartoon that was commissioned by Cornell’s Food and Brand Lab and published with the original study depicts a beefy newer edition of the book haranguing an older edition, jeering at its brother, “I have 44% more calories per serving than you do!” Wansink’s tiny sample set, especially, gnawed at the couple.
In his study report, Wansink explained the size as a methodological necessity, writing that “Since the first edition in 1936, only 18 recipes have been continuously published in each subsequent edition.” But, in researching the cookbook’s ninth edition, Becker and Scott had created an encyclopedic catalogue of thousands of legacy “Joy” recipes, and they counted several hundred recipes that had remained comparable from one edition to the next.
Lee’s article-which was based on interviews with Cornell Food and Brand Lab employees, and also private e-mails from within the lab, which were obtained through a public-records request-showed that Wansink regularly urged his staff to work the other way around: to manipulate sets of data in order to find patterns and then reverse-engineer hypotheses based on those conclusions.
Around the same time, Becker sent his own vast archive of material related to Wansink’s study-including a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet tracking the calorie count of hundreds of “Joy” recipes over time-to several academics, including to James Heathers, a behavioral scientist at Northeastern University.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Most Important Dishes in the US: History of Food That Changed America”

Scottsdale, ArizonaHow it happened: When Cali-based restaurateur Paul Fleming moved to Scottsdale, Arizona, he couldn’t find any Chinese food he liked, much to his chagrin.
When he told his close friend, professional food consultant, and Asian-food royalty Philip Chiang about his problem, they did the logical thing and opened up their own Chinese restaurant in a Scottsdale strip mall.
Using Chiang’s culinary chops, his mother’s recipes, and Fleming’s American business savvy, the restaurant was almost an immediate success, bringing a higher-end, Westernized Chinese-food experience to a mainstream audience.
Their signature lettuce wrap appetizer, a traditional recipe perfected by Cecilia complete with spicy, tangy chicken, is still the highlight of the menu, and indicative of their overall mission to expose a wider swath of America to the intricacies of traditional Asian cooking in a comfortable setting.
That lettuce wrap recipe made them famous, and continues to lure people past those iconic, Forbidden City horse statues, and through the mood-lit doors.
Why it’s important: “P.F. Chang’s lettuce wraps have been an approachable entry point for people to discover fresh, simple, scratch-made, and inspired Asian cooking, which is now one of the fastest-growing food segments worldwide,” said P.F. Chang’s chief marketing officer, Dwayne Chambers, who also notes that other restaurant concepts now offer versions of the dish.
Beyond just bringing an idiosyncratic Eastern appetizer to American tables, it proved that lettuce, in lieu of bread, is not just a healthier option, but can be decidedly delicious in its own right.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Truth About Queso”

Chipotle which bills itself as being somewhat health- and sustainability- conscious, announced its commitment to “Cracking the code” of queso made “With only real ingredients.” The cheese in its recipe was aged Cheddar, combined with both tomatoes and tomato paste, plus three kinds of chile peppers and more than a dozen other ingredients.
Who am I to judge Texas queso? I grew up on the other side of the country-in Connecticut, no less-and first became aware of queso relatively late in life, in college in New York, when a friend who was dating a girl from Austin spoke of it reverentially.
The book, “Queso! Regional Recipes for the World’s Favorite Chile-Cheese Dip,” is a fascinating little volume, as much a cultural history of the state of Texas as a collection of recipes, dedicated to showing that queso is not nearly as simple as one might think.
In the book’s introduction, Fain explains that she grew up eating queso but didn’t consider it deeply until she moved to New York, where she discovered that it was hard to find Velveeta and Ro-Tel in a store, let alone queso in a restaurant; if she wanted to eat the dip, she would need to get creative.
In the early twentieth century, recipes for “Mexican rarebit,” which added chiles to the cheese, began to pop up; one, in the 1914 edition of Boston Cooking-School Magazine, Fain writes, “Was very close to what most would consider American chile con queso today.” A recipe for Mexican rarebit in Fain’s book calls for yellow American cheese, which had become popular by the nineteen-twenties and melts easily, along with roasted Anaheim chiles, corn kernels, and Mexican lager.
In 1943, Ro-Tel tomatoes were born, and a few years later a Ro-Tel ad featured a recipe for making chile con queso with American cheese or a processed cheese such as Velveeta, which contains stabilizers that insure its consistency when melted.
While doing research for her book, Fain discovered quesos that use all kinds of cheese, from American to asadero, Muenster to Monterey Jack, queso fresco, and even panela, which doesn’t melt when heated, remaining in firm cubes for a dish called queso guisado, which is popular in parts of Mexico, Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, and Houston.
A chapter called “Quirky Quesos” includes two vegan recipes, an Indian queso, and a Greek queso from a restaurant in Houston, made with a very meltable Greek sheep’s-milk cheese and served with pita.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Keto Lunch Recipes That Will Help You Stick to Your Goals”

We want to help! Whether you’re going hardcore keto come January, want to clean up your eats, or simply feel like trying your hand at something new, here are 19 low-carb, high-flavor recipes that will make it easier than you ever thought to commit to your get-healthy goals.
Being keto and vegan may be an added challenge, but recipes like this prove that it’s far from impossible.
If you’re going keto, prepare to become best friends with cauliflower, since it makes meals like this possible.
Use your new keto lifestyle to up your veggie intake in creative ways, like this recipe.
The fermented cabbage can do wonders for your tummy-not to mention, when mixed with a bit of mayo, tuna, and avocado, it makes for a pretty awesome lunch.
Conventional pizza might be off-limits on the keto diet, but since life without pizza is never an option, here’s an alternative.
The crust is made not just with cauliflower, but also with ground beef for some more protein, while the avocado and cheddar toppings are all about healthy fats.
Just be sure to check that your tomato paste doesn’t have any added sugars-those are no-no’s on the keto diet!

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Unabashed Appreciation of Smitten Kitchen, the Ur-Food Blog”

One of them was Deb Perelman, a New Jersey native living in New York City, who, in 2003, started a blog to write about her bad dates.
Now, with the publication of Deb’s second cookbook-“Smitten Kitchen Every Day”-it is poised to take Deb into the realm of her lodestars, the Inas, Marthas, and Nigellas she jokingly writes about imagining herself to be.
Most of my disturbingly encyclopedic knowledge of everything S.K.-the way Deb’s recipe-making mind works, her family dynamics, her likes and dislikes-comes from being a longtime reader, and from having cooked and eaten probably hundreds of her recipes.
I’m not some outlier weirdo here! To prove it, I asked a friend who has also been an S.K. reader since the beginning to quickly list five things she knows about Deb’s palate.
I’d add another item, and probably list it first: the enduring backbone of the S.K. aesthetic is that Deb is a recovering vegetarian who sees meat as a form of seasoning.
Deb assumes, rightly, that almost everyone is on a budget, and builds frugality into her recipes in small but welcome ways.
Her at-home halal-cart chicken, complete with copious “White sauce,” provides all the primal satisfaction of the original, and she has unlocked the secret of the carrot-ginger dressing that comes on sushi-bar salads, which I will always think of as Dojo dressing, after the wallet-friendly restaurant near N.Y.U. I also can’t wait to try a few of the weirder-sounding dishes, like “Caramelized cabbage risotto.” Deb really, really loves cabbage.
Such is Deb’s power: I trust her when she tells me that something called “Sesame-peanut pesto” is worth getting out the Cuisinart for, and that I should serve “Loaded breakfast potato skins” at my next brunch.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lentil Recipes: 21 Ways to Cook the Legume Beyond Soup”

Full of protein and fiber, easy to prepare, a great alternative to meat, and super tasty if done right, lentils are actually a great go-to.
These 21 easy and delicious lentil recipes are the perfect way to add protein to breakfast, lunch, and dinner.
Let’s taco-bout how good these lentil tacos are.
Super quick, super easy, and super delicious, these spicy lentils are just what the doctor ordered on dreary mornings or weeknights when you simply can’t bother-to cook, that is.
Simply roast tomatoes with harissa, cook the lentils, soft boil eggs, roll the cooked eggs in dukka, and enjoy the best breakfast concoction ever.
This sprouted lentil wrap is as simple as spreading hummus onto a tortilla, topping it with all kinds of veggies, seasoning it with smoked paprika and salt, sprinkling a handful of sprouted lentils, and rolling the nutritious bad boy up and enjoying it’s fresh, light flavor.
If you don’t love the texture of lentils, opt for a recipe where they’re puréed, like this soup.
These lentil sloppy joes taste as good as they look-possibly better.

The orginal article.