Summary of “Why Red Dead Redemption is the greatest Western of all time”

The best I don’t want to be subtle about this, so: Red Dead Redemption is the greatest Western ever made.
I don’t mean that in the sense of the best Western video game ever made, or the best Western novel, or the best Western film.
Red Dead Redemption – more than any Western save Open Range – deals with the death of the West, and renders its demise under the sweeping tide of civilization as something just as savage and cruel as its birth.
The biggest reason Red Dead Redemption is the best Western ever made is because in order to play Red Dead Redemption, you have to get off a train and then ride a horse.
The groove Red Dead Redemption left in my brain was one where – for maybe the only time in my life playing video games – I didn’t feel like I needed to play the story too much, and often didn’t need to play it at all.
Red Dead Redemption, unlike every other video game I have ever played, made me want to go outside.
Red Dead Redemption’s status as the best superwestern comes from the experiential element of gaming.
It is the moment in Red Dead Redemption where – even on the second time through, a full lifetime away from the first time I played it – it fully declares its ambitions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Teach Your Kid Colors”

When my daughter was very young, we would read the toddler classic Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? In the story, the title character spots a red bird, a yellow duck, a blue horse, a green frog, a purple cat, a white dog, a black sheep and a goldfish.
It’s a lovely book, but now I know it’s probably not a great one for teaching a kid her colors.
We like to use color words “Prenominally,” meaning before nouns.
We’ll often say things like “The red balloon,” instead of using the postnominal construction, “The balloon is red.”
Say “The balloon is red,” for example, and you will have helped to narrow “Red-ness” to being an attribute of the balloon, and not some general property of the world at large.
This helps kids discern what about the balloon makes it red.
In her study, when kids heard the color words postnominally, their learning improved significantly.
The takeaway: Instead of saying “The red balloon,” say “The balloon is red.” Or change up the title of your favorite toddler book: “Brown Bear … oops, I mean bear who is brown.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Maraschino Mogul’s Secret Life”

His daughters Dana Mondella Bentz and Dominique Mondella, who run the company now, miss him every day.
People in the beekeeping community, or their bees, had crossed paths with Mondella in 2010, less than five years before he died.
The complications in Mondella’s life that led to his demise had a minor but significant bee component.
Though circumstances put Mondella and the bees on opposite sides of an issue, the beekeepers still speak admiringly of him, and express regret at his unhappy end.
Instead, the Mondellas used a secret recipe involving sugar, citric acid, red coloring, and a curing process that never subjected the fruit to hot water.
Mondella set about expanding that location into two adjacent buildings, and eventually the factory occupied a total floor space of thirty-eight thousand square feet.
The most commonly used news photo of Mondella shows him leaning into a cherry-processing machine, small and serious-looking behind the mass of bright-red cherries in the foreground.
Leon Perry, who began his job at the factory after his release from prison twenty years ago, told me how Mondella had loaned him money for rent when he started out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Where the Pope Gets His Socks”

On a recent cloudy afternoon in Rome, two young priests from Ireland, dressed in simple tab collars and black pants, stood with their noses pressed against the display window of Ditta Annibale Gammarelli, purveyors of ecclesiastical clothing and tailors to the Pope since 1798.
Gammarelli, nestled behind the Pantheon, is the oldest and most famous shop in a district that is to Roman Catholic clerical garb what the streets between the Via del Corso and the Spanish Steps are to la moda.
Lorenzo Gammarelli, tall, bearded, courteous, was fielding walk-ins as the phone rang off the hook.
Along one wall are small wooden drawers with labels like “Red skull caps” and “Braided cinctures.” Above the drawers is a row of photographs: Popes dressed by Gammarelli, from Pius IX to Francis.
Even before the conclave is convened, the Gammarellis are prepared to dress the Pope-elect for his first public appearance.
“The socks are thirteen euros, sir,” Massimiliano Gammarelli replied gently.
“Just after he was elected Prime Minister, an interviewer asked him as a question, ‘And where do you buy the fancy red socks?’ And he answered. ‘In a small shop in Rome, called Gammarelli.'”.
“Then some months ago with the movie ‘Ghost Thread’-I haven’t seen the movie yet-he’s wearing purple socks that he bought here,” Lorenzo said, referring to Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread” and to the main character, a fashion designer, played by Daniel Day-Lewis, who in one sequence draws on a pair of Gammarelli socks in bishop’s magenta.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Cult Brand Whisperer Behind Casper, Allbirds, And Birchbox”

It’s especially active in the burgeoning world of direct-to-consumer goods: Allbirds, Casper, and Birchbox all bear the marks of Red Antler in their laid-back but direct messaging and clean design.
By last November, Red Antler’s designers, under the direction of chief creative officer Endres, had developed an entire suite of brand components for Keeps, from packaging and a color scheme to a logo that was wry and just shy of cutesy and a full-service website.
Red Antler’s founders relish being able to develop a brand from the start.
Red Antler’s brand road maps often include big, ambitious transitions that unfold over years-such as brick-and-mortar plans for e-commerce companies whose websites haven’t even gone live.
“For every business we’re working with,” Osborne says, “We’re looking at, does this [brand] stretch? Is it going to work as the business grows and scales?” And because Red Antler often takes equity in exchange for services, it is invested in its clients’ long-term success.
The rewards can be great: Red Antler won’t reveal its stake in Casper, but the mattress company was last valued at $750 million.
“Sometimes you do projects, and later you look back and think, What the hell were we thinking? But Casper has really held up,” says Ben Lerer, founder of Thrillist and the venture-capital firm Lerer Hippeau, which backed Casper and a number of other Red Antler companies, including Allbirds and Birchbox.
Last year, Red Antler helped launch Brandless, a direct-to-consumer company that sells high-quality goods for $3 an item.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MLB Preview 2018: The Yankees Are Just a Better Version of the Red Sox”

We’re at a curious point in that rivalry right now because the Red Sox have had the upper hand over the past five years: three division titles and a World Series, while the Yankees ended a four-year division-series drought just last year.
That doesn’t mean the Red Sox, who won 93 games both years, weren’t very good themselves, but sometimes you run into a better or hotter team.
Last year’s Yankees won 91 games and finished with a plus-198 run differential: better than the Astros and Dodgers-and better than the Red Sox by 81 runs.
Even though they won fewer games, you could argue that the Yankees were better than the Red Sox last year.
The Red Sox ought to win 90-odd games for a third straight year.
Too, the Yankees: Their best two position players last year and best pitcher were all homegrown.
The Yankees have been either first or second in payroll every year since 2000, the first year for which Cot’s Contracts has data.
Once you factor that in, the Red Sox should be just as concerned about staying ahead of their wild-card rivals-distant though they may be-as they are with keeping up with the Yankees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jennifer Lawrence: the fascinating subversion of Hollywood’s sweetheart”

So proves Jennifer Lawrence’s laundry list of apparent provocations over the last two weeks, with unseemly acres of tweetage given over to the fact that she a) wore a dress outdoors; b) never finished watching Phantom Thread; and c) briskly rejected Bafta host Joanna Lumley’s claim that Lawrence is “The hottest actress on the planet”.
“More interested in women’s bodies than in their experiences,” scoffed Slate’s Inkoo Kang of the “Off the mark” film, while Uproxx’s Amy Nicholson defended what she saw as the film’s morally conscious perversity: “[It] refuses to let us leer at Jennifer Lawrence’s long legs without a jab of shame.
” Another sidebar of criticism questions Lawrence’s very autonomy in making the film to begin with, positing the actress as a kind of doll being bent into compromising positions by her male industry superiors.
“It’s hard not to think she is losing some battles here,” speculated Jonathan Dean for GQ, casting doubt on Lawrence’s repeated assertions in interviews that she chose to do the film as an act of self-empowerment, claiming control over her body and its exposure after a much-publicised leak of private nudes in 2014 left her feeling violated and powerless.
Has the sleek sleaze of Red Sparrow backfired on Lawrence’s feminist motivation for making it? You could argue the point either way, but it seems unconstructive to deny her full credit for consciously taking the risk to begin with – just as she did with last year’s aggressively polarising Mother!, her ex-boyfriend Darren Aronofsky’s baroquely metaphorical study of women cyclically tortured by the male creative ego.
Mother! is the gutsiest film she’s yet made, yet some of the film’s most virulent detractors described Lawrence as its victim – conflating the young actor with the brutally exploited ingenue she cannily played in it.
Lawrence’s social media rebuttal was curt: she chose the dress, she liked the dress, and if she wanted to be cold to look hot, that was entirely her prerogative.
If Lawrence’s contemporary and near-parallel in the music world is Taylor Swift, perhaps Red Sparrow is her showily abrasive Look What You Made Me Do. The old J-Law can’t come to the phone right now – she’s dead and loving it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet The “Young Saints” Of Bethel Who Go To College To Perform Miracles”

That still makes BSSM a cash cow for Bethel: It brings in around $7 million, almost 20% of the church’s revenue, according to figures in The Rise of Network Christianity, an academic book on Bethel and other similar churches.
This is the Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry’s real goal: creating spiritual warriors, young people who will go out into the world armed with just the kind of supernatural gifts that Bethel believes will bring people into the Kingdom of God.
There’s the worship services broadcast worldwide through Bethel TV, a subscription service that, for as little as $8 a month, streams Sunday sermons and testimonies of healings and miracles.
Bethel students who grow up as charismatic or Pentecostal Christians find Bethel through services and conferences that are streamed into their own churches.
Clark is astonished, he says, at how far and how quickly Bethel’s teachings have spread. “There are people all over the world who are espousing this stuff from Bethel, and they don’t even have ties to Bethel,” he says.
Stefan, who spent three years at Bethel before eventually leaving evangelicalism, felt for his first few weeks at Bethel like he was really seeing miracles: healings and prophecies that felt like they had come directly from God.
“I think, for me, Bethel was the beginning of realizing, like, this is all bullshit,” says Chris, who went to Bethel in the mid-2000s and asked that his last name not be used because he still has close friends in the church.
There’s a story about Bethel students swarming an elderly woman in a wheelchair in a parking lot and encouraging her to walk; massages, dental appointments, and shopping trips interrupted by Bethel students’ “Treasure hunts.” The biggest local tourist attraction, the Sundial Bridge, was briefly “Ruined,” residents complained, by students looking to practice their prophesy on the banks of the Sacramento River.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Boston Red Sox Used Apple Watches to Steal Signs Against Yankees”

The commissioner’s office then confronted the Red Sox, who admitted that their trainers had received signals from video replay personnel and then relayed that information to Red Sox players – an operation that had been in place for at least several weeks.
The Red Sox responded in kind on Tuesday, filing a complaint against the Yankees claiming that the team uses a camera from its YES television network exclusively to steal signs during games, an assertion the Yankees denied.
It is unclear what penalties, if any, Commissioner Rob Manfred will issue against the Red Sox and whether he will order a more expansive investigation to determine the extent of the Red Sox’ sign-stealing system.
As part of the inquiry, baseball investigators have interviewed the Red Sox team trainers and outfielder Chris Young, a former Yankees player.
The Red Sox told league investigators that Mr. Farrell; Boston’s president for baseball operations, Dave Dombrowski; and other front-office officials were not aware of the sign-stealing operation, the people said.
In the first game of the August series in question, the Red Sox prospered the first time they put a runner on second.
It occurred in the second inning, and Rafael Devers promptly hit a home run, giving the Red Sox a 2-0 lead. The Red Sox went 5 for 8 in that game when they had a man on second.
In the clips, the Red Sox assistant athletic trainer, Jon Jochim, is seen looking at his Apple Watch and then passing information to outfielder Brock Holt and second baseman Dustin Pedroia, who was injured at the time but in uniform.

The orginal article.