Summary of “Colin Kaepernick’s settlement with the NFL was a big win for the leader of the league’s protest movement.”

On Friday, the NFL and representatives for Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid announced that they had settled a grievance suit with the two players over alleged collusion to keep them out of the league because of their protests during the anthem.
“For the past several months, counsel for Mr. Kaepernick and Mr. Reid have engaged in an ongoing dialogue with representatives of the NFL. As a result of those discussions, the parties have decided to resolve the pending grievances,” the NFL and Kaepernick and Reid’s attorneys said in a joint announcement.
Bleacher Report’s Mike Freeman reported that NFL teams were speculating the settlement with Kaepernick alone could have been in the $60 million to $80 million range.
Kaepernick filed his grievance against the league in October 2017, alleging that one or more teams had colluded with each other and/or the league to keep him out of the NFL because of his decision to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016-17 season as a protest against police brutality and systemic racism.
Reid, who was the first player to join Kaepernick’s protest movement when they played together on the San Francisco 49ers, alleged in his grievance that he’d been blackballed for continuing to protest following Kaepernick’s exclusion from the NFL. Reid, who did not drop his grievance after signing a deal with the Carolina Panthers this season, recently re-signed with the team, getting a three-year contract worth more than $21 million.
The 31-year-old Kaepernick still does not have a job in the NFL after two seasons without a contract.
It’s unclear what will happen in the future on that front, but it seems as though that question will now be answered in negotiations between the league and the NFL Players Association and not unilaterally by Roger Goodell and the NFL’s owners.
It’s also unclear whether Kaepernick will ever get another chance to play in the NFL. If this settlement proves anything it’s that there was no good reason for him to be kept off NFL rosters in the first place-and there’s still no good reason for him to be kept from playing in the NFL going forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After son’s death, Chiefs’ Andy Reid finds success through second chances”

“If we have to do that, then we’re not being very efficient,” Holmgren told them probably a dozen times or more, but when Andy Reid walked into his office at 5 a.m. and found Jon Gruden already there, he started coming in at 4.
Marty Mornhinweg, Reid’s longtime assistant, used to walk past his boss’s office at all hours and see Reid still at his desk.
The years kept passing, and though Philadelphia made the playoffs five straight years and reached the Super Bowl after the 2004 season, Reid kept watching other coaches – sometimes his peers and former proteges – win it all: Gruden with Tampa Bay, John Harbaugh in Baltimore, eventually Doug Pederson in Reid’s old job.
In 2007, his two eldest sons – Andy and Tammy Reid had five children – were arrested six hours apart: Garrett on drug charges, Britt for pointing a gun at someone and having drugs in his car.
Dungy had been mentoring the former quarterback through his release in May 2009, and Reid had an idea.
Y Reid is in an office now, discussing the possibility that Kansas City has reached this point not because of what Reid has done but because of what he has not.
It’s why he’s still far more “Coach” than “Grandpa,” why he designs and calls Kansas City’s offensive plays, why – though he might well be as detached as he’s ever been – Andy Reid can’t go home.
“Two more,” Reid said, holding up his fingers, and that’s how many wins coach and franchise need to lift the Lombardi Trophy, the ultimate way to validate that meeting years ago in Philadelphia – and, as much as possible, erase what came before it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Living Colour Reignited Rock’s “Cult of Personality””

“The hair,” Reid said, “Was a different texture.” Despite having chops and a loyal following in the biggest city in the country, Living Colour for years couldn’t land a record deal.
“One of the most frustrating things,” Calhoun said, “Is the ignorance of people who will not admit or deal with the fact that black people invented rock ‘n’ roll.” By making songs about the perils of hero worship, racism, and gentrification, Living Colour forced listeners to reckon with uncomfortable truths.
Reid had spent the early part of the decade touring with jazz-funk drummer Ronald Shannon Jackson’s Decoding Society and originally formed Living Colour as a side project.
In 1985, seeking change, Reid, journalist Greg Tate, and producer Konda Mason cofounded the Black Rock Coalition, an organization with the stated mission of “Creating an atmosphere conducive to the maximum development, exposure, and acceptance of Black alternative music.”
In addition to Glover, the new Living Colour lineup was bolstered by fellow New Yorkers Calhoun, an award-winning Berklee College of Music grad, and Muzz Skillings, a bassist with rock and jazz experience.
In October 1989, before Living Colour’s four-night run with Guns N’ Roses and the Stones at the Los Angeles Coliseum, Reid and Calhoun gave a live radio interview.
Keith Richards came to Living Colour’s dressing room and shook Reid’s hand.
These days, Reid looks back on Living Colour’s rise with a mix of pride and incredulity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Colin Kaepernick’s movement endures, but its supporters are more fragmented than ever”

For Reid and other defecting players, the coalition had become the NFL’s hand-picked safe alternative to Kaepernick and the kneeling players; the league had lured them with promises of social commitment and big money to cover for the real purpose of sabotaging their movement and ending the protests.
Interviews over four months with multiple players, representatives and league insiders show how the cause Kaepernick started has been slowly fractured by frustrations, unreconciled resentments and missed opportunities to fight for real change – a potentially unifying movement that fell apart for reasons that to some observers seem inevitable in retrospect.
In 2016, along with Boldin, he formed the advocacy group that would become the Players Coalition, growing it to roughly 50 players over the following year and a half.
Along the way, they engaged Goodell and Vincent about ways the league and players could partner on issues important to the players.
The second meeting, in Washington a few weeks later, contained even more tension, according to multiple players and union members who were there.
“You’ve been fine with the players being out front on this issue,” he said at one point, “And you were happy with our players taking a beating from the right and being characterized as anti-cop, anti-America, anti-military, and that’s bulls – t.”.
As one of the only white players in professional sports taking a public and active stand in solidarity with the protesting players, the rifts were particularly painful to him.
“We’ll see if the league will keep its word or if the players got taken,” says a former player.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Pentagon’s Secret Search for UFOs”

The Advanced Aviation Threat Identification Program, whose existence was not classified but operated with the knowledge of an extremely limited number of officials, was the brainchild of then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who first secured the appropriation to begin the program in 2009 with the support of the late Senators Daniel Inouye and Ted Stevens, two World War II veterans who were similarly concerned about the potential national security implications, the sources involved in the effort said.
The origins of the program, the existence of which the Pentagon confirmed on Friday, are being revealed publicly for the first time by POLITICO and the New York Times in nearly simultaneous reports on Saturday.
One possible theory behind the unexplained incidents, according to a former congressional staffer who described the motivations behind the program, was that a foreign power-perhaps the Chinese or the Russians-had developed next-generation technologies that could threaten the United States.
The revelation of the program could give a credibility boost to UFO theorists, who have long pointed to public accounts by military pilots and others describing phenomena that defy obvious explanation, and could fuel demands for increased transparency about the scope and findings of the Pentagon effort, which focused some of its inquiries into sci-fi sounding concepts like “Wormholes” and “Warp drives.” The program also drafted a series of what the office referred to as “Queried unverified event under evaluation,” QUEU reports, in which pilots and other personnel who had reported encounters were interviewed about their experiences.
Reid initiated the program, which ultimately spent more than $20 million, through an earmark after he was persuaded in part by aerospace titan and hotel chain founder Bob Bigelow, a friend and fellow Nevadan who owns Bigelow Aerospace, a space technology company and government contractor.
In his resignation letter, addressed to Secretary of Defense James Mattis, Elizondo said the efforts of his program were not being taken sufficiently seriously.
The Pentagon’s AATIP program marked a 21st-century effort to replicate some of the decades of inconclusive research undertaken by the Pentagon in 1950s and 1960s to try to explain thousands of reported sightings of unidentified flying objects, or UFOs, by military and civilian pilots and average citizens-particularly an effort known as Project Bluebook that ran from 1947 to 1969 and is still a focus of intense interest for UFO researchers.
Some who were aware of the effort in its earliest days were uncomfortable with the aims of the program, unnerved by the implication that the incidents involved aircraft that were not made by humans.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Glowing Auras and ‘Black Money’: The Pentagon’s Mysterious U.F.O. Program”

Officials with the program have also studied videos of encounters between unknown objects and American military aircraft – including one released in August of a whitish oval object, about the size of a commercial plane, chased by two Navy F/A-18F fighter jets from the aircraft carrier Nimitz off the coast of San Diego in 2004.Mr. Reid, who retired from Congress this year, said he was proud of the program.
Mr. Reid said he met with agency officials shortly after his meeting with Mr. Bigelow and learned that they wanted to start a research program on U.F.O.s.
None of the three senators wanted a public debate on the Senate floor about the funding for the program, Mr. Reid said.
The funding went to Mr. Bigelow’s company, Bigelow Aerospace, which hired subcontractors and solicited research for the program.
Under Mr. Bigelow’s direction, the company modified buildings in Las Vegas for the storage of metal alloys and other materials that Mr. Elizondo and program contractors said had been recovered from unidentified aerial phenomena.
“We’re sort of in the position of what would happen if you gave Leonardo da Vinci a garage-door opener,” said Harold E. Puthoff, an engineer who has conducted research on extrasensory perception for the C.I.A. and later worked as a contractor for the program.
The program collected video and audio recordings of reported U.F.O. incidents, including footage from a Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet showing an aircraft surrounded by some kind of glowing aura traveling at high speed and rotating as it moves.
Mr. Elizondo, in his resignation letter of Oct. 4, said there was a need for more serious attention to “The many accounts from the Navy and other services of unusual aerial systems interfering with military weapon platforms and displaying beyond-next-generation capabilities.” He expressed his frustration with the limitations placed on the program, telling Mr. Mattis that “There remains a vital need to ascertain capability and intent of these phenomena for the benefit of the armed forces and the nation.”

The orginal article.