Summary of “11 Simple Ways to Improve Your Memory”

Whether you want to be a Jeopardy! champion or just need to remember where you parked your car, here are 11 things you can do right now to turn your mind from a sieve into a steel trap.1.
Studies have shown that 8 seconds is the minimum amount of time it takes for a piece of information to go from your short-term memory to your long-term memory.
A different study found that women who kept fit over six months significantly improved both their verbal and spatial memory.
Studies have found that the processes your brain goes through while you’re asleep actually help you remember information better the next day.
Large, bold fonts may actually hurt your ability to remember, as studies found that when asked to memorize a list of words, people predicted they would recall bold words easier than non-bold words, and therefore studied them less, leading to the opposite result.
Studies have found that people do better on both visual and audio memory tasks if they are chewing gum while they do them.
One of the weirdest and most effective ways to remember something is to associate it with a visual image.
In studies, people who were given a doodling task while listening to a boring phone message ended up remembering 29 percent more of what was on the tape than people who just sat still and listened.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Author and CEO Meik Wiking Shares 7 Tips for Creating Happier Travel Memories”

Happiness Research Institute CEO Meik Wiking shares how we can make the most of our time on the road. Meik Wiking is an author and the CEO of the Happiness Research Institute, a think tank based in Copenhagen.
“Travel is about being brought out of your routine,” Wiking says.
“It’s experiencing new things, new culture, new food, new people.And that’s the quick route to [making] memories: novel experiences. There’s nothing wrong with going back to the same place over and over again. But if we want a trip to stand out and be memorable, we have to seek out new experiences.”
The right kind of stress can help cement moments in our memories.
As Wiking explains, “People remember emotions. When they do something that frightens them a little bit, it gets the adrenaline pumping.”
“It’s good to ‘outsource’ some of our memories-the photos, the soundtrack,” Wiking says.
“So you might want to finish on a high,” Wiking says.
“Photos can trigger your memory five, 10, 20 years down the line. Pick the top photos-the happiest memories, the best experiences you had-and bring them into print.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Missy Elliott Talks New Album and How She Wants to Be Remembered”

Two weeks later, at a recording studio just outside Atlanta, where she’s working on a long-anticipated seventh album, I ask Elliott if she remembers standing there for those 20 seconds.
About two weeks before I sat down with Elliott, one of her fans tagged her in a tweet about how much she missed the singer-rapper-producer-icon and couldn’t wait for her to come back to the music industry.
With all the genuine humility the public has come to expect from her, Elliott responded that although she’d never left, she had hot new music on the way.
It’s just hard to believe anyone would ever dare sleep on Missy “Misdemeanor” Elliott.
” Elliott’s teacher, Mrs. Gardner, would admonish the class, insisting that if Elliott wanted to be a superstar, it was possible that’s exactly who she would become.
Elliott is a natural storyteller, but she’s also a bit shy.
Supporting her loved ones and developing other artists are the two realms where Elliott is most comfortable.
“I remember watching the way she played the guitar, and I said, ‘This is interesting. She’s not playing it upright; she’s playing it flat.’ But the reason is so she could see the strings because she taught herself how to play. And I was like, ‘This is amazing to me.'” Elliott wanted to work with the young woman immediately.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Art and Science of Remembering”

“Every time a memory is retrieved, that memory becomes more accessible in the future,” says Purdue University psychologist Jeffrey Karpicke, who adds that only in recent years has it become clear just how vital repeated retrieval is to forming solid memories.
Making memories stickKarpicke and colleagues have shown that practicing retrieval, such as taking multiple quizzes, is far superior in creating solid memories than doing rote memorization.
If you were to use the Memory Palace technique to remember your lines, you might take a walk through your home and associate the fridge with an unusually frigid winter storm.
Modern memory competitions, in which participants memorize entire poems or the order of several shuffled card decks, have resurrected the Memory Palace technique.
Joshua Foer, a science journalist, covered the United States Memory Championship in 2005.
“As bad as we are at remembering names and phone numbers and word-for-word instructions we have really exceptional visual and spatial memories,” Foer says.
“Great memories are learned. But if you want to live a memorable life, you have to be the kind of person who remembers to remember.”In his bestselling book Moonwalking with Einstein, Foer says all memory champions like himself will claim that they actually have average memories.
“Rather, we found that superior memorizers used a spatial learning strategy, engaging brain regions such as the hippocampus that are critical for memory and for spatial memory in particular.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read”

“I almost always remember where I was and I remember the book itself. I remember the physical object,” says Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review, who reads, it is fair to say, a lot of books.
“While I read that book, I knew not everything there was to know about Ben Franklin, but much of it, and I knew the general timeline of the American revolution,” she says.
Surely some people can read a book or watch a movie once and retain the plot perfectly.
“Reading is a nuanced word,” she writes, “But the most common kind of reading is likely reading as consumption: where we read, especially on the internet, merely to acquire information. Information that stands no chance of becoming knowledge unless it ‘sticks.'”.
I used to get irritated in school when an English-class syllabus would have us read only three chapters a week, but there was a good reason for that.
If you read a book all in one stretch-on an airplane, say-you’re just holding the story in your working memory that whole time.
People might do that when they study, or read something for work, but it seems unlikely that in their leisure time they’re going to take notes on Gilmore Girls to quiz themselves later.
In a piece for The New Yorker called “The Curse of Reading and Forgetting,” Ian Crouch writes, “Reading has many facets, one of which might be the rather indescribable, and naturally fleeting, mix of thought and emotion and sensory manipulations that happen in the moment and then fade. How much of reading is just a kind of narcissism-a marker of who you were and what you were thinking when you encountered a text?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read”

“I almost always remember where I was and I remember the book itself. I remember the physical object,” says Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review, who reads, it is fair to say, a lot of books.
“While I read that book, I knew not everything there was to know about Ben Franklin, but much of it, and I knew the general timeline of the American revolution,” she says.
Surely some people can read a book or watch a movie once and retain the plot perfectly.
“Reading is a nuanced word,” she writes, “But the most common kind of reading is likely reading as consumption: where we read, especially on the internet, merely to acquire information. Information that stands no chance of becoming knowledge unless it ‘sticks.'”.
I used to get irritated in school when an English-class syllabus would have us read only three chapters a week, but there was a good reason for that.
If you read a book all in one stretch-on an airplane, say-you’re just holding the story in your working memory that whole time.
People might do that when they study, or read something for work, but it seems unlikely that in their leisure time they’re going to take notes on Gilmore Girls to quiz themselves later.
In a piece for The New Yorker called “The Curse of Reading and Forgetting,” Ian Crouch writes, “Reading has many facets, one of which might be the rather indescribable, and naturally fleeting, mix of thought and emotion and sensory manipulations that happen in the moment and then fade. How much of reading is just a kind of narcissism-a marker of who you were and what you were thinking when you encountered a text?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The Care and Keeping of You,’ 20 Years Later”

“These are very difficult things for girls to talk about,” says Valorie Lee Schaefer, the book’s author, who had previously been a copywriter for the American Girl Doll catalog.
“We were thinking, ‘We can normalize this conversation. We can give girls words to use, we can tell them some of the things they’re thinking about are absolutely normal, all the things that make young girls feel like, I’m a freak.'”.
The company held focus groups, and found that tween girls were not only curious about their periods, but also about when they should start wearing a bra and how they should deal with pimples that popped up out of nowhere overnight.
Schaefer says the company took this feedback, as well as the letters, and used it to develop the book’s structure, targeting it explicitly toward younger girls about to experience puberty, not preteens already in its throes.
“A girl of 7 doesn’t wonder about the same things a girl of 12 or 14 does,” Schaefer says.
“So just meeting a girl right at that place-7, 8, 9-was what we tried to do.”
Jensen McRae, a 20-year-old student at the University of Southern California, first read the book as a 10-year-old, and, along with her friends, often flipped back to the breast-development page, which shows five illustrations of a topless girl standing in front of a sink.
In the first, the girl is flat-chested, and in the last, she has round, developed breasts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Improve Your Memory? Science Tells Us the Key”

It’s funny, the things our memory can dredge up.
A research study led by the University of Edinburgh explored the science behind the biological processes that drive the creation of our memories.
It’s called “Flashbulb memory,” and understanding this one little concept can help you improve your own ability to remember important information.
Surprise! The key to improving your memory is well, it’s surprise.
Professor Richard Morris, of the Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Little surprises happen all the time in subtle ways that reflect our personal lives and interests. Somehow, the novelty of surprise creates a halo of better memory for all the otherwise trivial events of one’s day that we ordinarily forget.”
We’ve long known that dopamine played a role in memory formation, but this study demonstrated the involvement of the hippocampus.
So how can you use this little tidbit to improve your own memory?
There you go - improving your memory doesn’t have to be boring and tedious.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A notorious mansion. An alleged assault by a Hollywood producer. A suicide. What happened to Brian Claflin?”

In his statement, Claflin said Goddard and a friend of the filmmaker persuaded him to inhale nitrous oxide one night, which was the first time he had used drugs.
He immediately felt dizzy and passed out, he wrote, and awoke to being further drugged while Goddard sexually assaulted him.
“I was in a delirious state and remember saying NO, NO, NO, several times but they persisted,” he wrote.
“I just sort of shut down and went somewhere else in my head. After a while I remember praying aloud to God to just make it/them stop.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read”

“I almost always remember where I was and I remember the book itself. I remember the physical object,” says Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review, who reads, it is fair to say, a lot of books.
“While I read that book, I knew not everything there was to know about Ben Franklin, but much of it, and I knew the general timeline of the American revolution,” she says.
Surely some people can read a book or watch a movie once and retain the plot perfectly.
“Reading is a nuanced word,” she writes, “But the most common kind of reading is likely reading as consumption: where we read, especially on the internet, merely to acquire information. Information that stands no chance of becoming knowledge unless it ‘sticks.'”.
The lesson from his binge-watching study is that if you want to remember the things you watch and read, space them out.
If you read a book all in one stretch-on an airplane, say-you’re just holding the story in your working memory that whole time.
People might do that when they study, or read something for work, but it seems unlikely that in their leisure time they’re going to take notes on Gilmore Girls to quiz themselves later.
In a piece for The New Yorker called “The Curse of Reading and Forgetting,” Ian Crouch writes, “Reading has many facets, one of which might be the rather indescribable, and naturally fleeting, mix of thought and emotion and sensory manipulations that happen in the moment and then fade. How much of reading is just a kind of narcissism-a marker of who you were and what you were thinking when you encountered a text?”.

The orginal article.