Summary of “The Most Important Album of 1968 Wasn’t The White Album. It Was Beggars Banquet.”

The Rolling Stones are now in their sixth decade of touring behind the slogan of the “World’s Greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll Band.” Beggars Banquet was the first work that rendered this claim credible.
The Rolling Stones of 1968 can’t really be understood without discussing the Rolling Stones of 1967.
Beggars Banquet arrived with the most diverse, searching, and deceptively ambitious collection of music the Stones had ever made.
On Beggars Banquet, the last album the Stones released during his lifetime, Jones plays guitar on only four of the album’s 10 tracks.
It’s fitting that it arrives less than three minutes into the album’s first track, as Beggars Banquet was also the first Stones record that sounded like it couldn’t have been made by anyone else in the world-not the Delta and Chicago bluesmen that the Stones worshipped, not the R&B virtuosi of Stax and Muscle Shoals, and certainly not the Beatles, whose shadow had loomed over the group since 1963.
If there is a song that, to my ears, epitomizes Beggars Banquet, one that feels so inimitably Stones and is also the most difficult to imagine them creating prior to this album, it’s “Factory Girl,” the penultimate track that clocks in at just a wink over two minutes.
Beggars Banquet was also the first Stones record that sounded like it couldn’t have been made by anyone else in the world.
On Dec. 6, 1969, exactly one year to the day after the release of Beggars Banquet, the Rolling Stones played a free concert at Altamont Speedway where teenage Stones fan Meredith Hunter was stabbed to death by a member of the Hells Angels.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the Engineers and Outlaw Orecchiette Masters That Make Your Favorite Pastas Possible”

Most dried pastas are extruded in this fashion, though the complexity increases exponentially when you move from linear spaghetti to torqued, frilly-edged mafalde.
Franca rolls out foot-long pasta ropes and Nunzia nimbly slices and drags segments of dough along a wooden surface using a dollar-store knife with a flimsy handle.
Handmade pastas have been sold on the street for years.
Nestled at the base of the Dolomites in the Valle di Fiemme, where the mountain air is thin and spring waters are immaculate, Pastificio Felicetti produces some of the country’s finest dried pastas.
About 10 years ago, Riccardo Felicetti, grandson of the company’s founder, started a new line of pastas called Monograno, or “Single grain.” While most pasta is made from an assortment of flours from all over, Riccardo sources single-origin grain varieties that have only been grown in Italy.
If pasta is extruded at the wrong speed or temperature, or with too much pressure, the elastic gluten nets in the dough will break and the pasta will dry with cracks and fissures, causing the pasta to be sticky when cooked.
Peek inside home kitchens throughout southern Italy and you’ll find locals dutifully rolling pasta dough using a needlelike ferretto, as they have been for nearly two centuries.
The resulting pasta shape goes by nearly as many names as there are villages that produce it: fusilli in Cilento, frizzuli in Matera, and carrati in the Campanian mountain village of Pietraroja, the home of Lucia Parente.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How 4 iconic American dishes evolved from foreign roots”

‘Cover the nation in queso’ Almost from the start, Ro-Tel seemed to grasp how customers would use its product.
Before the invention of chili powder in the late 1800s, queso dishes were typically limited to the hot summer months when chile peppers thrived.
Tokyo Kaikan in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo may not have been the first sushi restaurant in the United States, but it’s widely considered the place that served the first California roll, the eager-to-please maki roll that eased countless Americans into the then-rarefied world of Japanese sushi.
The year of the roll’s invention is murky, but at least two books peg its introduction to the 1960s, well ahead of a Japanese chef who claims to have created the famous hand roll in the 1970s – in Vancouver.
Whatever the reason, chefs Ichiro Mashita and Teruo Imaizumi ultimately landed on a maki roll stuffed with avocado, mayonnaise and king crab, a Japanese-American hybrid that would soon become the most recognizable dish in U.S. sushi restaurants.
Maki rolls in Japan were often thinner, with less filling than the thick bundle of lush ingredients that would become the California roll.
Always on the prowl for a good value, found other reasons to love the California roll: You can cram a lot into an inside-out hand roll, says Kazuhiro “Kaz” Okochi, chef and owner of Kaz Sushi Bistro in Washington.
These are just a few of the hundreds of fusion rolls that have come into existence since the introduction of the California roll.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make the Perfect Stuffed Pasta”

Then I heard about Evan Funke and his pasta-centric restaurant Felix on Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, with its pristine, glassed-in pasta laboratory, his arsenal of authentic tools, and his fiercely traditional, monklike dedication to the art and culture of handmade pasta.
Funke got his in Bologna and within minutes of my arrival, he’s deployed it to transform a springy ball of spinach dough into a sfoglia, or pasta sheet, as even, smooth, and soft as the felt on a pool table.
Funke did not come about his pasta proficiency easily-his now nimble fingers, lightning-fast kneading speed, and masterful shaping skills were developed over 10 years of study under many of Italy’s foremost traditional pasta makers.
“But stuffed pastas take attention and time.” How to tinker with dough hydration, meticulous shaping, maintaining even thickness, and keeping fillings contained-these come from patient practice and repetition.
After tasting his richly flavored doughs, and chomping through his stuffed pasta’s impossibly symmetrical exteriors to release a warm gush of creamy filling, you’ll never settle for just any random ravioli again.
“Fuck your pasta machine” is his hashtag and life mantra, but he says it’s not just braggadocio: “If you lovingly create a ball of light dough and smash it between a pasta machine’s metal rollers, you’re crushing everything in it and essentially degassing it. But if you take that ball and use the mattarello, you spread out the air pockets, creating a lighter waferlike dough.” Roll the sheet of dough firmly at first, then more and more gently as you get a larger, thinner sfoglia.
To prevent textural irregularities like extra-thick or crunchy spots in the finished cooked pastas, Funke focuses on the “Touch points”-the places where two pasta sheets must join together to seal in a filling.
Coltello per Pasta: “This pasta knife was handmade for me by the daughter of my maestro Alessandra Spisni.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Facility Where Kodak Brings Film Back to Life”

The elevators in Building 30, where Kodak blends film chemicals, help workers’ eyes get used to the conditions that light-sensitive compounds demand.
Learning to work with the fussy animal-derived material is what spurred Kodak founder George Eastman to create the film giant’s research arm in the late 1800s.
The 52-inch-wide film rolls pass through a coating waterfall, a cooler, and a dryer.
Kodak paints the airtight containers flat black on the inside, and seals them with collars to ensure no light can seep in and prematurely expose the film.
This device, which Kodak calls “The heart,” punches holes in the edges of the film so sprockets inside a camera can crank through exposures.
During production, Kodak uses night-vision cameras to monitor the film for irregularities such as uneven application or breaks.
The final film goes on to the packaging area, where a machine wraps it around plastic spools like these.
The machine at left funnels empty metal film cans via conveyor belt toward the last packaging step-inserting rolls into their canisters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Meet the Engineers and Outlaw Orecchiette Masters That Make Your Favorite Pastas Possible”

Most dried pastas are extruded in this fashion, though the complexity increases exponentially when you move from linear spaghetti to torqued, frilly-edged mafalde.
Franca rolls out foot-long pasta ropes and Nunzia nimbly slices and drags segments of dough along a wooden surface using a dollar-store knife with a flimsy handle.
Handmade pastas have been sold on the street for years.
Nestled at the base of the Dolomites in the Valle di Fiemme, where the mountain air is thin and spring waters are immaculate, Pastificio Felicetti produces some of the country’s finest dried pastas.
About 10 years ago, Riccardo Felicetti, grandson of the company’s founder, started a new line of pastas called Monograno, or “Single grain.” While most pasta is made from an assortment of flours from all over, Riccardo sources single-origin grain varieties that have only been grown in Italy.
If pasta is extruded at the wrong speed or temperature, or with too much pressure, the elastic gluten nets in the dough will break and the pasta will dry with cracks and fissures, causing the pasta to be sticky when cooked.
Pietraroja, 8:30 A.M.Peek inside home kitchens throughout southern Italy and you’ll find locals dutifully rolling pasta dough using a needlelike ferretto, as they have been for nearly two centuries.
The resulting pasta shape goes by nearly as many names as there are villages that produce it: fusilli in Cilento, frizzuli in Matera, and carrati in the Campanian mountain village of Pietraroja, the home of Lucia Parente.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Make the Perfect Stuffed Pasta”

Then I heard about Evan Funke and his pasta-centric restaurant Felix on Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, with its pristine, glassed-in pasta laboratory, his arsenal of authentic tools, and his fiercely traditional, monklike dedication to the art and culture of handmade pasta.
Funke got his in Bologna and within minutes of my arrival, he’s deployed it to transform a springy ball of spinach dough into a sfoglia, or pasta sheet, as even, smooth, and soft as the felt on a pool table.
Funke did not come about his pasta proficiency easily-his now nimble fingers, lightning-fast kneading speed, and masterful shaping skills were developed over 10 years of study under many of Italy’s foremost traditional pasta makers.
“But stuffed pastas take attention and time.” How to tinker with dough hydration, meticulous shaping, maintaining even thickness, and keeping fillings contained-these come from patient practice and repetition.
After tasting his richly flavored doughs, and chomping through his stuffed pasta’s impossibly symmetrical exteriors to release a warm gush of creamy filling, you’ll never settle for just any random ravioli again.
“Fuck your pasta machine” is his hashtag and life mantra, but he says it’s not just braggadocio: “If you lovingly create a ball of light dough and smash it between a pasta machine’s metal rollers, you’re crushing everything in it and essentially degassing it. But if you take that ball and use the mattarello, you spread out the air pockets, creating a lighter waferlike dough.” Roll the sheet of dough firmly at first, then more and more gently as you get a larger, thinner sfoglia.
To prevent textural irregularities like extra-thick or crunchy spots in the finished cooked pastas, Funke focuses on the “Touch points”-the places where two pasta sheets must join together to seal in a filling.
Coltello per Pasta: “This pasta knife was handmade for me by the daughter of my maestro Alessandra Spisni.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Art of Homemade Soba Noodles”

I’d been snarled in L.A. traffic, late on my way to meet Sonoko Sakai, the woman waiting to show me the way of soba, but there was one thing I already knew about the meditative culture of Japanese noodle making: Stressed out and road-ragey is not the way of soba.
A soba restaurant’s menu may include a tray of noodles served with tempura, or maybe a tangle bathed in a lean, coffee-dark duck broth, as austere as duck gets.
Use the cut soba noodles immediately or transfer to a parchment paper-lined sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for up to 3 days.
These tools, including a flour sifter and special knife for cutting and scooping are essential to making soba noodles from scratch.
Sakai sells a soba making kit including an authentic soba knife, rolling pin, and wooden cutting guide, available at *cooktellsastory.com.
Left: Sakai kneads soba dough in her Los Angeles studio; Right: Don’t salt your soba cooking water-the noodle will pick up all the flavor it needs from the accompanying dipping sauce.
Building a Sauce for Soba The dipping sauces that accompany homemade soba noodles employ two basic building blocks, used in different proportions.
Get the recipe for Soba Noodles with Two Dipping Sauces.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Art of Homemade Soba Noodles”

I’d been snarled in L.A. traffic, late on my way to meet Sonoko Sakai, the woman waiting to show me the way of soba, but there was one thing I already knew about the meditative culture of Japanese noodle making: Stressed out and road-ragey is not the way of soba.
A soba restaurant’s menu may include a tray of noodles served with tempura, or maybe a tangle bathed in a lean, coffee-dark duck broth, as austere as duck gets.
Use the cut soba noodles immediately or transfer to a parchment paper-lined sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for up to 3 days.
These tools, including a flour sifter and special knife for cutting and scooping are essential to making soba noodles from scratch.
Sakai sells a soba making kit including an authentic soba knife, rolling pin, and wooden cutting guide, available at *cooktellsastory.com.
Left: Sakai kneads soba dough in her Los Angeles studio; Right: Don’t salt your soba cooking water-the noodle will pick up all the flavor it needs from the accompanying dipping sauce.
Building a Sauce for Soba The dipping sauces that accompany homemade soba noodles employ two basic building blocks, used in different proportions.
Get the recipe for Soba Noodles with Two Dipping Sauces.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Facility Where Kodak Brings Film Back to Life”

The elevators in Building 30, where Kodak blends film chemicals, help workers’ eyes get used to the conditions that light-sensitive compounds demand.
Learning to work with the fussy animal-derived material is what spurred Kodak founder George Eastman to create the film giant’s research arm in the late 1800s.
The 52-inch-wide film rolls pass through a coating waterfall, a cooler, and a dryer.
Kodak paints the airtight containers flat black on the inside, and seals them with collars to ensure no light can seep in and prematurely expose the film.
This device, which Kodak calls “The heart,” punches holes in the edges of the film so sprockets inside a camera can crank through exposures.
During production, Kodak uses night-vision cameras to monitor the film for irregularities such as uneven application or breaks.
The final film goes on to the packaging area, where a machine wraps it around plastic spools like these.
The machine at left funnels empty metal film cans via conveyor belt toward the last packaging step-inserting rolls into their canisters.

The orginal article.