Summary of “After Years of Tumors, Growing a Baby Instead”

Any child I had would develop in my damaged abdomen, stretching its web of scars.
Time and again I wondered – is it fair, wise, or kind to bring a child into the world knowing I may not live long?
Was a child a selfish attempt to perpetuate my genes, a way to eclipse my own death? If my mothering time was cut short, would my child resent me?
Our child would join an ample clan of grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins and, of course, a father.
I imagined our child living without me, learning all I wanted to teach her – how to paint, to bargain shop, to prune blackberries, to heal a broken heart – from another.
To ensure our child had no unwelcome cancerous neighbors, I squeezed my bulging self into an MRI machine, the tech wedging in an extra pillow and wishing me luck.
Then he showed me what had never appeared on any of my other scans: The contour of a nose, the angle of a chin, the curve of a belly – the parts of my perfectly growing child, outlined in shades of gray on the screen.
Draped in blue, I waited to greet our child, staring at the striped towels arranged on the infant warmer nearby.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ted Bundy’s Living Victim Tells Her Story”

Kathy Kleiner was one of two women who survived a brutal attack by Ted Bundy in January 1978.
There are so many books about Ted Bundy that Kleiner has been able to dedicate an entire section of her library to them, and books are just the tip of the Bundy iceberg.
In 2018, Kleiner signed up for Twitter, and a Ted Bundy fan account responded to her first tweet: “Oh, there you are, Kathy.”
Ted Bundy may have lived and breathed, but Kathy Kleiner lived too – despite his best efforts – and she’d like to talk about it.
Kathy Kleiner learned to fight for her life long before Bundy ever opened her bedroom door.
Kleiner heard her say, “With such a brutal attack, what are the chances that he would put her underwear back on?” The friend stroked her hair, and for the first time that night, Kleiner felt her fear drain away.
This was the first taste of the peculiar loneliness Kleiner would feel as a Bundy victim in a world of Bundy news; she had just survived a brush with one of the most dangerous men in the country, and yet in some ways, she was on her own.
Even Ann Rule, who wrote the definitive book on Bundy, reached out to Kleiner and mailed her an autographed mousepad, but didn’t interview her for The Stranger Beside Me. So Kleiner moved forward alone.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside Trump’s First Pentagon Briefing”

The bizarre request was one of the first signs I had of the enormous rift between my boss at the time, Defense Secretary James Mattis, and the president.
Mattis, for whom I was working as chief speechwriter, had hoped the briefing would educate Trump on the United States’ longstanding commitment to the rest of the world.
The plan for the briefing was for Mattis to speak first, walking Trump through details on every U.S. military deployment abroad, demonstrating America’s return on investment.
Mattis made the point that America had been willing to accept unfair terms following World War II in order to get both countries back on their feet, but that now would be an opportune time to update our trade agreements should Trump desire to do so.
Mattis did not think Trump was a raving lunatic, as some were trying to portray the president.
Mattis had made a point of noting to us that America elected Trump for a reason.
Still Trump could tax Mattis’ patience, and the president’s view of the world was both simplistic and troublesome.
Despite the challenging environment that existed between the Pentagon and the White House, Mattis was able to score a succession of victories over the next eight months: releasing the nation’s first national defense strategy after going more than 10 years without one; working with coalition and Kurdish forces to bring ISIS to the edge of defeat in Syria; and working with Congress to restore funding to begin rebuilding a badly depleted military.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Semester With the Host Mom From Hell”

“Don’t let the door shut loudly if you come home late at night, Maribel is a light sleeper.”
We heard a knock on our door, and without waiting for a response, Maribel burst into our room.
“No! No! You, May-gan, go to your room! NO ENGLISH! You are not allowed to talk to each other, no more! NO MORE!” Maribel grabbed Megan by the shoulder, marched her roughly to our room, and shut the door.
Megan opened the door and there stood Maribel in her dressing gown and slippers.
For the subsequent months with my new host family, I felt a strange blankness when I thought about Maribel.
Waiting for takeoff, I chomped on a Spanish tea biscuit, the same brand that Maribel kept in her apartment.
Before our flights back to the U.S., Megan and I went to the market and loaded up on the biscuits, both of us agreeing that those cookies were the best thing to have ever come out of Maribel’s kitchen.
Would I mention Maribel? The move? Or would I just skate over the details and stick to pleasantries I knew people wanted to hear? It was the best semester of my life! It changed me.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Glamorous, Sexist History of the Women’s Restroom Lounge”

“Interestingly, ornate lounges for women preceded public restrooms by several decades,” Kogan explained, noting that there were parlors for women in public buildings many years prior to when most of America had indoor plumbing.
The gentlemen’s parlor, reading, and sitting room at the Willard, also shown during 1861’s inaugural celebrations, with no women visible.
In addition to hotels and theaters, department stores were early adopters of public restrooms and ladies’ lounges, primarily because the stores were designed to be daylong experiences, where women would spend hours shopping, getting their hair done at the on-site salon, eating at the restaurant, and resting when they needed a break.
Department store in Washington, D.C. Today, you can still find seating areas adjacent to the women’s restroom in many Nordstrom stores across the country, as well as at Bloomingdale’s and the St. Regis Hotel in New York City.
Women were now in public more, but they still might want somewhere to relax, take a smoking break, or put on makeup-which was now mainstream after being stigmatized.
Walikainen Rouleau says the seating areas for women were referred to as “Retiring rooms,” “Rest rooms”, and even “Emergency rooms.” The last term sounds bizarre today, but the rooms were partly intended as places where women could lie down if they were feeling sick or faint, or even wait for medical assistance to arrive.
Of course, euphemisms such as “Retiring room” avoided referring to the private physical activities of the women inside-not just going to the bathroom, but breastfeeding and menstruation.
The idea is no longer for women to hide out from the stresses of being in public-they don’t need an “Emergency room.” But as they prepare to go out and meet friends or give a presentation at work, they can still appreciate a touch of old-school glamour.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Facility Where Kodak Brings Film Back to Life”

The elevators in Building 30, where Kodak blends film chemicals, help workers’ eyes get used to the conditions that light-sensitive compounds demand.
Learning to work with the fussy animal-derived material is what spurred Kodak founder George Eastman to create the film giant’s research arm in the late 1800s.
The 52-inch-wide film rolls pass through a coating waterfall, a cooler, and a dryer.
Kodak paints the airtight containers flat black on the inside, and seals them with collars to ensure no light can seep in and prematurely expose the film.
This device, which Kodak calls “The heart,” punches holes in the edges of the film so sprockets inside a camera can crank through exposures.
During production, Kodak uses night-vision cameras to monitor the film for irregularities such as uneven application or breaks.
The final film goes on to the packaging area, where a machine wraps it around plastic spools like these.
The machine at left funnels empty metal film cans via conveyor belt toward the last packaging step-inserting rolls into their canisters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Cleaning Out My Hoarder Mother-in-Law’s Junk Caused My Own Marriage to Crumble”

There’s a snapshot Aiden took of me a few days after our wedding on Christmas Eve, 2009.
I wished so much that I could have met Ruth, my mother in law.
“That’s for the dogs,” Aiden explains, as if it makes perfect sense.
Back in the den I find Aiden crouched down, frowning at the heaps of crud that we’ve hacked out of the floor.
The whole process has been traumatic for Aiden, and to what end? We’ve filled one corner of the dumpster, which means we’ve thrown away the equivalent of about one closet’s worth of stuff.
“I’m remodeling, so everything’s kind of up in the air,” Aiden had told me months before, the first time I saw where he lived: before it became where we lived.
Aiden urges patience as he keeps accumulating tools and crates and building materials salvaged from neighborhood trash cans.
Without consulting me, Aiden adopts two dogs, which are never housebroken.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stressed out? Here are 10 science-backed design tips for bringing serenity to your home.”

Even though the research is in its early stages, a growing number of architects, designers, professional organizers and environmental psychologists believe the spaces we live in are as inextricably linked to our neurological well-being as sleep, diet and exercise.
“Homes have served the same purpose since the beginning of time,” said Sally Augustin, an environmental psychologist who runs the consulting firm Design With Science.
Toby Israel, an early expert in the field, says our feelings about design are rooted in our “Environmental autobiography,” or our personal history of place.
That said, if you’re looking for small ways to make your home feel more peaceful, here are 10 research-backed steps worth trying.
“That’s all you need to know. Just think meadow.” As for finish, “Glossy paint is generally more stimulating than flat paint,” Kopec said.
Embrace curves: Many environmental psychology experts say that sharp, right angles are more stimulating to the brain than round shapes or ovals, and that having too many rectilinear forms in a room can stress us out.
“The bigger the pile, the more you procrastinate, the more stressful it becomes,” says Stacy Thomes, a professional organizer in Calabasas, Calif. “Anxiety, ultimately, is about a loss of control, so I tell my clients: ‘You’re giving your stuff the control. You need to get control over your stuff.’‚ÄČ” Thomes recommends going room to room and setting up systems, whether it’s a designated spot in the entryway where you can drop your bags or labeled containers inside your refrigerator to keep grocery runs tight.
If you’re a more seasoned plant owner, Augustin recommends large, leafy green plants.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cool Your Home Without Air Conditioning”

Air conditioners Great for cooling air indoors…not so great for the environment.
Inside, you can do a lot to drive down the temperature before you flip on the AC.Heat and humidity When going without air conditioning, you need to consider two factors: the overall heat and the humidity.
A fan in the door will move air, and another in the window will do the same-but if you set them up strategically, the door fan can blow cool air onto you while the window fan pulls hot air away.
The condensers on the back of your air conditioner can indeed go below the dew point; if you see water dripping out of an air conditioner, that’s exactly what’s happening.
Time your AC use These techniques won’t cool down the house quite as much as a central air system or a few well-placed wall units, but they will make your house more comfortable.
If your home has a garage or breezeway, try to enter and leave your house through those locations instead of letting chill air escape when you open a door directly outside.
Just like hot air rises, cold air sinks-and you need to control this tendency.
Some of these will automatically shut off when the air reaches a goal temperature; others have timers you can configure so the units will leave the house at a warmer level or shut off entirely when no one’s home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Lesson on Parenting From the Kitchen Counter”

One evening, my 4-year-old daughter piped up, asking if she could do something to help with dinner.
Deeply satisfying, yet it was her pride that filled the room.
At the time, my wife, Lisa, was a medical resident, and suddenly evenings in the kitchen with our daughters, Tarpley and Yancey, were my business.
As a kid growing up in South Carolina, the kitchen was an avoided room.
As I found out with my girls, the kitchen is the best room in which to domesticate beastly primates and to teach, well, everything: learning to wield a dangerous tool, long-range planning, focusing on a task, discovery, invention, being the star of the moment, working the back bench.
She and her friend blocked the entrance to the kitchen with chairs-no adults allowed-as if putting on one of their self-written plays.
By middle school, the kitchen was the way all of us ordered our day-who’s cooking tonight?-with, at first, one of two answers and then four.
Fakesgiving dinner, as she calls it, is still how our family reconvenes.

The orginal article.