Summary of “Inside the Facility Where Kodak Brings Film Back to Life”

The elevators in Building 30, where Kodak blends film chemicals, help workers’ eyes get used to the conditions that light-sensitive compounds demand.
Learning to work with the fussy animal-derived material is what spurred Kodak founder George Eastman to create the film giant’s research arm in the late 1800s.
The 52-inch-wide film rolls pass through a coating waterfall, a cooler, and a dryer.
Kodak paints the airtight containers flat black on the inside, and seals them with collars to ensure no light can seep in and prematurely expose the film.
This device, which Kodak calls “The heart,” punches holes in the edges of the film so sprockets inside a camera can crank through exposures.
During production, Kodak uses night-vision cameras to monitor the film for irregularities such as uneven application or breaks.
The final film goes on to the packaging area, where a machine wraps it around plastic spools like these.
The machine at left funnels empty metal film cans via conveyor belt toward the last packaging step-inserting rolls into their canisters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Cleaning Out My Hoarder Mother-in-Law’s Junk Caused My Own Marriage to Crumble”

There’s a snapshot Aiden took of me a few days after our wedding on Christmas Eve, 2009.
I wished so much that I could have met Ruth, my mother in law.
“That’s for the dogs,” Aiden explains, as if it makes perfect sense.
Back in the den I find Aiden crouched down, frowning at the heaps of crud that we’ve hacked out of the floor.
The whole process has been traumatic for Aiden, and to what end? We’ve filled one corner of the dumpster, which means we’ve thrown away the equivalent of about one closet’s worth of stuff.
“I’m remodeling, so everything’s kind of up in the air,” Aiden had told me months before, the first time I saw where he lived: before it became where we lived.
Aiden urges patience as he keeps accumulating tools and crates and building materials salvaged from neighborhood trash cans.
Without consulting me, Aiden adopts two dogs, which are never housebroken.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stressed out? Here are 10 science-backed design tips for bringing serenity to your home.”

Even though the research is in its early stages, a growing number of architects, designers, professional organizers and environmental psychologists believe the spaces we live in are as inextricably linked to our neurological well-being as sleep, diet and exercise.
“Homes have served the same purpose since the beginning of time,” said Sally Augustin, an environmental psychologist who runs the consulting firm Design With Science.
Toby Israel, an early expert in the field, says our feelings about design are rooted in our “Environmental autobiography,” or our personal history of place.
That said, if you’re looking for small ways to make your home feel more peaceful, here are 10 research-backed steps worth trying.
“That’s all you need to know. Just think meadow.” As for finish, “Glossy paint is generally more stimulating than flat paint,” Kopec said.
Embrace curves: Many environmental psychology experts say that sharp, right angles are more stimulating to the brain than round shapes or ovals, and that having too many rectilinear forms in a room can stress us out.
“The bigger the pile, the more you procrastinate, the more stressful it becomes,” says Stacy Thomes, a professional organizer in Calabasas, Calif. “Anxiety, ultimately, is about a loss of control, so I tell my clients: ‘You’re giving your stuff the control. You need to get control over your stuff.’ ” Thomes recommends going room to room and setting up systems, whether it’s a designated spot in the entryway where you can drop your bags or labeled containers inside your refrigerator to keep grocery runs tight.
If you’re a more seasoned plant owner, Augustin recommends large, leafy green plants.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cool Your Home Without Air Conditioning”

Air conditioners Great for cooling air indoors…not so great for the environment.
Inside, you can do a lot to drive down the temperature before you flip on the AC.Heat and humidity When going without air conditioning, you need to consider two factors: the overall heat and the humidity.
A fan in the door will move air, and another in the window will do the same-but if you set them up strategically, the door fan can blow cool air onto you while the window fan pulls hot air away.
The condensers on the back of your air conditioner can indeed go below the dew point; if you see water dripping out of an air conditioner, that’s exactly what’s happening.
Time your AC use These techniques won’t cool down the house quite as much as a central air system or a few well-placed wall units, but they will make your house more comfortable.
If your home has a garage or breezeway, try to enter and leave your house through those locations instead of letting chill air escape when you open a door directly outside.
Just like hot air rises, cold air sinks-and you need to control this tendency.
Some of these will automatically shut off when the air reaches a goal temperature; others have timers you can configure so the units will leave the house at a warmer level or shut off entirely when no one’s home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Lesson on Parenting From the Kitchen Counter”

One evening, my 4-year-old daughter piped up, asking if she could do something to help with dinner.
Deeply satisfying, yet it was her pride that filled the room.
At the time, my wife, Lisa, was a medical resident, and suddenly evenings in the kitchen with our daughters, Tarpley and Yancey, were my business.
As a kid growing up in South Carolina, the kitchen was an avoided room.
As I found out with my girls, the kitchen is the best room in which to domesticate beastly primates and to teach, well, everything: learning to wield a dangerous tool, long-range planning, focusing on a task, discovery, invention, being the star of the moment, working the back bench.
She and her friend blocked the entrance to the kitchen with chairs-no adults allowed-as if putting on one of their self-written plays.
By middle school, the kitchen was the way all of us ordered our day-who’s cooking tonight?-with, at first, one of two answers and then four.
Fakesgiving dinner, as she calls it, is still how our family reconvenes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Going against the decluttering craze: the book hoarders who defy Marie Kondo”

Of course, there was a backlash to the backlash, with the expected explanation from Kondo that not all books gotta go.
On the coffee table at the moment are coffee table books: The History of Rap, the book Author: The Portraits of Beowulf Sheehan, which I’m thankfully featured in.
I’m still trying to figure out how she wrote a book that spans 25 years in only 25,000 words.
For 35 years, there was a bright pink bookstore in my town called Remarkable Book Shop.
I’m now able to get rid of books much more easily knowing they’re going to a good home.
If I’m writing about dinosaurs, I’ll have every single book about dinosaurs already in the same section – children’s books, history books, comic books.
It’s a book from a chef in Spain, from the 1890s.
What 30 books does Ms Kondo keep? Are they the same books or does she rotate them? I’d be fascinated to know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Lesson on Parenting From the Kitchen Counter”

One evening, my 4-year-old daughter piped up, asking if she could do something to help with dinner.
Deeply satisfying, yet it was her pride that filled the room.
At the time, my wife, Lisa, was a medical resident, and suddenly evenings in the kitchen with our daughters, Tarpley and Yancey, were my business.
As a kid growing up in South Carolina, the kitchen was an avoided room.
As I found out with my girls, the kitchen is the best room in which to domesticate beastly primates and to teach, well, everything: learning to wield a dangerous tool, long-range planning, focusing on a task, discovery, invention, being the star of the moment, working the back bench.
She and her friend blocked the entrance to the kitchen with chairs-no adults allowed-as if putting on one of their self-written plays.
By middle school, the kitchen was the way all of us ordered our day-who’s cooking tonight?-with, at first, one of two answers and then four.
Fakesgiving dinner, as she calls it, is still how our family reconvenes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Excerpt: ‘Generation Friends’ by Saul Austerlitz”

The Friends writers’ room was simultaneously a party room and a prison cell, a wild daily gathering whose participants, like the dinner guests in Luis Buñuel’s The Exterminating Angel, could never leave.
Participants were thrilled to be granted the privilege of being a part of the work of writing Friends.
The remarkable thing about the Friends writers’ room, Chase believed, was its complete allergy to compromise.
The sheer volume of polished material that the writers of Friends had to come up with placed inordinate pressure on the writers’ room to work in sync and to pick up each other’s slack.
The Friends writers’ room was, as some of its participants described it, a remarkable feat of alchemy, in which a dozen talented individuals transformed into a team that was far greater than the sum of its parts.
Being in the Friends writers’ room, Sikowitz thought, was like an emotional stock market.
The Friends characters were the writers’ stand-ins and doppelgangers, their adventures and discoveries simultaneously reflections of the writers’ own lives and romanticized versions of their more humdrum existences.
Kauffman notwithstanding, the Friends writers’ room was, at the outset, an exceedingly male place, its tastes and interests formed by the concerns of funny young men.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Virtual home makeover: testing Modsy, Havenly, Ikea on my NYC apartment”

Actually want to style your real-life home and implement the design.
I was first introduced to e-interior design startup Havenly a few years ago at SXSW. The service promises to create a mood board, layout, and a shopping list to help make implementing the design easy – all under a flat rate instead of an hourly bill you might get with an in-person designer.
Havenly has a modest group of designers it works with, which means if your aesthetic best matches someone who’s currently working on several projects, you might end up waiting a while until they can start yours.
Modsy starts similarly to Havenly, where you fill out a style quiz by picking photos of rooms you’re more drawn to, like or dislike pieces of furniture in the example designs you chose, and explain the goals of your project.
I particularly liked that Modsy imagined the second half of the room as a cafe-inspired dining area, as it could functionally turn into a workspace when I am working from home.
In comparison with Havenly, Modsy starts at a higher price point at $69 for a slower turnaround time and $149 for the base package for one room.
Still it is clear that Modsy makes most of its money from referral purchases you make through its designs, and often you’ll get renders with a bunch of little pieces you might not want or need.
The catalog of items that you can swap in and out of your design also made it easy to try out a bunch of options in case the pieces Modsy picked didn’t work for you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Escape rooms are very big business”

Brands like HBO and Ford have been creating promotional escape rooms for years now; Red Bull runs a whole Escape Room World Championship.
Pop culture is so saturated with escape rooms that this past January, Columbia Pictures released the pulpy horror flick Escape Room, which should not be confused with either of the other two recent horror movies about escape rooms also called Escape Room.
That’s a common misconception, Scott Nicholson, a professor at Wilfrid Laurier University in Ontario and the world’s leading scholar of escape rooms, tells me, “Not all escape rooms are about escaping a room.” The name, he agrees, is a problem, mostly because it does not connote “Collaborative adventure!” so much as “Claustrophobia!” or “Panic!” and that’s just such a limited understanding of what an escape room can be.
The Spiras, who are in their early 30s and live in Weehawken, New Jersey, write Room Escape Artist, the blog of record for escape rooms.
For Nicholson, the escape room scholar, that was part of what drew him in: Creating escape rooms requires a wide-ranging skill set, and so does playing them.
“The Unbelievably Lucrative Business of Escape Rooms” didn’t exactly say you should open an escape room, but it did suggest that maybe you could open an escape room, and maybe, if you did, it wouldn’t be that hard to get rich quick.
“We wouldn’t be able to make such a game for that anymore. Now that’s around half of what you’d need.” As the line between immersive theater performance and escape room gets blurrier, more escape rooms are hiring actors, and the trouble with actors is they have to be paid.
“The future of escape rooms,” says Chris Lattner bluntly, “Will be that only the very good escape room companies will survive. And the others will just die out.” Which, from his perspective, is just fine, because he is bored.

The orginal article.