Summary of “Zadie Smith Remembers Philip Roth”

One time, I was having a conversation with Philip Roth about lane swimming, a thing it turned out we both liked to do, although he could swim much farther and much faster.
Roth in the swimming pool was no different than Roth at his standing desk.
At an unusually tender age, he learned not to write to make people think well of him, nor to display to others, through fiction, the right sort of ideas, so they could think him the right sort of person.
Roth always told the truth-his own, subjective truth-through language and through lies, the twin engines at the embarrassing heart of literature.
Like all writers, there were things and ideas that lay beyond his ken or conception; he had blind spots, prejudices, selves he could imagine only partially, or selves he mistook or mislaid.
Unlike many writers, he did not aspire to perfect vision.
Roth used every little scrap of what he had. Nothing was held back or protected from writing, nothing saved for a rainy day.
Roth was an unusually patriotic writer, but his love for his country never outweighed or obscured his curiosity about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why new tax rules make Roth accounts better than ever”

The Roth accounts offer a fantastic way to accumulate money tax-free.
New tax laws make Roth accounts look better than ever.
The Tax Cut & Jobs Act lowered marginal tax rates those rates revert to higher levels in 2026.
With the potential for higher tax rates in 2026 and beyond, funding accounts such as the Roth IRA and Designated 401(k) Roth accounts, where money grows tax-free and assuming you follow the rules, is tax-free upon withdrawal, is more important than ever.
Later in retirement, after reaching age 70-½, without this strategy, you would pay taxes on those withdrawals at the 22% or 24% rate, or, if tax rates revert in 2026, at the even higher marginal rates of 25% and 28%. By using the Roth conversion strategy, you pay taxes at 12 cents on the dollar today, instead of 24 cents or more per dollar later.
You can convert traditional tax-deferred retirement accounts to Roth accounts regardless of your income level.
Roth IRAs are one of what I call the two superheroes of retirement accounts.
With the new tax laws, a little planning now can mean thousands in tax savings later.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Build A Large Roth IRA”

How to Build a Large Roth IRA Many 401k plans allow their plan participants to make after tax contributions.
Distributions from Roth 401ks are tax free.
At the earliest opportunity, transfer these directly to a Roth IRA. Why is that helpful? If after tax contributions can be moved to a Roth IRA after a short period of time, the vast majority of the appreciation on the underlying assets will be concentrated in the tax free Roth IRA account.
Conversely, after tax funds that accumulate over many years in the traditional 401k will be taxed at high ordinary income levels when they are finally distributed.
If, instead, he rolls over the sum to a Roth IRA immediately, those funds grow tax free.
At the end of 20 years, his IRA will be worth $46,610 with NO TAX LIABILITY. The foregoing is a simplified scenario but it does illustrate the increased benefit of a rapid rollover of after tax 401k contributions to a Roth IRA account.
The value of after tax 401k contributions hinges on the immediacy with which the plan participant can move after tax contributions to a Roth IRA outside.
One key advantage to it is that qualifying 401k plan participants should will be able to move more money into their Roth IRA. It’s important to note that after tax 401k contributions are NOT substitutes for conventional 401k deferrals.

The orginal article.