Summary of “Understanding the’Beautiful Game'”

Laurent Dubois devotes around 10 pages of The Language of the Game to describing how soccer’s offside rule has changed over the decades.
“Negotiating the offside rule is one of the most complex and absorbing features of the game both for strikers and defenders, an intricate dance that involves positioning and timing of the most nuanced kind,” he writes.
The offside rule is the very heart and soul of what we aficionados, in exalted moods, call “The beautiful game.” Please bear with me as I explain this.
It might be easy to conclude that soccer is the sort of game that you either get or don’t get, yet Laurent Dubois takes up the noble and difficult task of trying to make soccer comprehensible and interesting to people who are used to games that follow a different logic.
One consequence of that model of organization is that The Language of the Game doesn’t work well as a reference guide, but rather as a narrative.
If you want to understand what this most popular of the world’s sports is all about, or if you already understand it and want your friends and family to share your interest, The Language of the Game is an excellent place to start.
Like an ant colony or a slime mold, the game of soccer exhibits emergent complexity: A mere handful of rules generates an astonishingly wide range of action.
That is why Johan Cruyff, one of the greatest of soccer players and thinkers, the closest thing the game had to a philosopher-king, so often spoke in paradoxes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “18 useful financial rules of thumb ~ Get Rich Slowly”

After twelve years of reading and writing about money, I’ve come to love financial rules of thumb.
Financial rules of thumb provide helpful shortcuts for making quick calculations and decisions.
Financial rules of thumb don’t always hold true.
In the past, you’ve probably seen my rant about some of my most-hated financial rules of thumb.
How much should you spend on a house?As I mentioned last week, another rule of thumb that makes me cranky is this common guideline espoused by all sectors of the homebuying industry: “Buy as much home as you can afford.” No no no no no! Of all financial rules of thumb, this is probably the worst.
Financial rules of thumb usually aren’t this bad. In fact, most are useful.
Building on the above, Mr. Money Mustache’s shockingly simple math behind early retirement gives us a useful rule of thumb for determining how long you’ll need to save before you’re financially independent.
What rules of thumb did I miss? Do you disagree with any of those I suggested? What are some of your favorite rules of thumb?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t cheat yourself with the 4% rule”

It’s a rule of thumb that says you can withdraw 4% of your portfolio value each year in retirement without incurring a substantial risk of running out of money.
Unless we see the return of a Great Depression era, followers of the 4% rule “Will most commonly just leave a huge amount of money left over,” says Michael Kitces in his research piece, entitled “How Has The 4% Rule Held Up Since The Tech Bubble And The 2008 Financial Crisis?”.
In addition to being incredibly conservative, the 4% rule does not consider other sources of income you have and the timing of when each source begins.
Why scrimp by only withdrawing 4% of your portfolio while waiting for Social Security? It often makes more sense to withdraw more than 4% during that window of time – yet many retirees won’t do this because the popularized rule of thumb has made them fearful that they’ll run out of money if they don’t follow the rule each year.
It’s much easier to write about a rule of thumb or sensationalize the latest stock market gyration.
Be cautious of a financial adviser who uses a rule of thumb to determine your retirement withdrawal amounts.
There is nothing unprofessional about using a rule of thumb to set broad, general expectations.
Retirement is the biggest financial decision you’ll make and you need a customized plan, not a rule of thumb.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Everything created is predicted by nature: A new video explains the physics of flow”

Going with the flow isn’t just the cool thing to do.
According to a prominent theory of physics, it’s a rule of evolution that dictates the design of all things and ensures individual survival.
According to constructal law, all animate or inanimate systems-including art, trees, people, organizations, and financial structures-follow the natural design principle of flow.
The rule states that for any system to persist over time, it must evolve to provide easy access to impositions, allowing currents to flow through it, and moving with them.
As the Franklin Institute points out, it’s rare for a mechanical engineer to conceive of a new physics theory.
In a new video, he illuminates the rule of flow and its influence on the universe.
Alive are all the freely changing flow configurations and rhythms that facilitate flow and offer greater access to movement.
We can understand the notion that cooperating rather than resisting-going with the flow, as it’s commonly known-tends to increase our chances of success and survival.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘We’re never going to bed’: children rewrite the house rules”

All their funny and entertaining rules are forgotten; they don’t want me to do a chicken dance, or pillow fight; they forget all about emailing Donald Trump.
The epiphany of the weekend is my neglect of frivolity, and we revert to my rules with a new resolve to make family life more fun.
When our mum told us that we were going to get to set our own rules, we wanted to start straight away.
When we first told Laila that we were going to consent to her every demand, she started with the food: “I want Coco Pops for breakfast and chips with peas and fish fingers for dinner every day. And I want to eat my pudding before dinner – because pudding is the best part.” No more granola; no more boring old vegetables and grains.
With more than 15 years between my five children, negotiating rules they all agree on turns out to be an immensely complicated process, and is possibly the reason we have so few rules in our house anyway.
Despite my impending sense of exhaustion, the rules bring a sense of celebration to the house.
Under their rules, at the end of the evening, when I would usually whip through a single chapter of reading to the younger children, I now have to read “For as long as we want”.
“I want a rule! Where are my rules? I want some rules!” he wails.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Europe’s new privacy rule is reshaping the internet”

The rule is called the General Data Protection Regulation, and it’s poised to reshape some of the messiest parts of the internet.
What is the GDPR? The General Data Protection Regulation is a rule passed by the European Union in 2016, setting new rules for how companies manage and share personal data.
In theory, the GDPR only applies to EU citizens’ data, but the global nature of the internet means that nearly every online service is affected, and the regulation has already resulted in significant changes for US users as companies scramble to adapt.
Much of the GDPR builds on rules set by earlier EU privacy measures like the Privacy Shield and Data Protection Directive, but it expands on those measures in two crucial ways.
It’s a lot stronger than existing requirements, and it explicitly extends to companies based outside the EU. For an industry that’s used to collecting and sharing data with little to no restriction, that means rewriting the rules of how ads are targeted online.
That’s a lot more than the fines allowed by the Data Protection Directive, and it signals how serious the EU is taking data privacy.
The GDPR also sets rules for how companies share data after it’s been collected, which means companies have to rethink how they approach analytics, logins, and, above all, advertising.
The GDPR adds complex new requirements for any company that gets user data second-hand, requiring a lot more transparency on what a company is doing with your data.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here are 22 of the best day-to-day, time-saving tips to use now”

We try to squeeze as many hours in one work day, to be “Productive”, but in the end everything depends less on time, and more on your focus, motivation and overall well-being.
The 2-minute rule: if you can do something in two minutes, do it now.
The 5-minute rule: the biggest cure against procrastination is to set your goal not to finish a scary big hairy task, but to just work five minutes on it.
Seinfeld’s productivity chain: if you want to be good at something, do it every day.
You need discipline, and this means for me two things: I plan my day first thing in the morning, and I write a short daily log every day.
Don’t read your email first thing in the day, don’t read it in the evening, and try to do it only 3 times a day: at 11am, 2pm and 5pm. And your email inbox is not a todo list.
Start with the most important first thing in the morning.
The new one took two and a half days and we did it over one hackathon weekend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Death of the Fiduciary Rule Is Bad News for Your Retirement”

The Fiduciary Rule is one step closer to death, and that means it’s once again A-ok for your retirement planner to scam you.
The Fiduciary Rule, crafted by the Obama Administration, would have required that all financial professionals to adhere to the “Fiduciary” standard-meaning they’d have to work in your best interest if they were advising you on your retirement investments.
So Republicans delayed the implementation of the rule for almost a year-lucky for them, “Fiduciary” is such an aggressively boring word it’s easy for the average person to overlook its importance, and hard to get riled up about.
Today, a federal appeals court ruled that the Department of Labor overstepped its authority when it wrote the rule.
The Republican argument against the Fiduciary Rule is that it would make it hard for lower income people to see a financial planner.
To cut through the doublespeak, what that means is it would have made it harder for lower income people to be tricked and ill-advised by planners who have no qualms siphoning away the minuscule retirement savings the average American manages to stash away, under the guise of “Advising” them.
Who else is held to a fiduciary duty? Lawyers are a typical example.
Lobby your state government to institute its own version of the Fiduciary Rule.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Monopoly is a better game with real money and crime”

She created the game, then called The Landlord’s Game, with two sets of rules: Players could win by achieving wealth for all, or they could win by crushing their opponents and assuming all the money for themselves.
Amongst the iconic board games – Scrabble, chess, backgammon, and so on – Monopoly is unique for the way it streamlines and miniaturizes the dynamics that rule us in real life.
I did not begin the game particularly successfully, and irritated with the prospect of going to pauper’s jail, I made a spontaneous attempt to bend the rules by offering real money during a prospective deal: St. Charles, $200 of in-game money, and $20 of American money to secure Illinois, which would allow me to achieve a monopoly and begin building.
First, real money would be allowed into the game, but only as part of a deal for property.
How would you simulate the risk of taking out real loans? While window shopping in a tabletop game store, I came across a wall of multi-sided dice, and had my answer.
The first successful deployment of the rules came about an hour and a half in, when after procuring St. Charles and States Avenue, I proposed a deal to Gaby for Virginia, in order to attain the first monopoly of the game.
If a player was sent to jail three times for armed robbery, they would get the death penalty, and be out of the game – a crueler punishment provided a more efficient barrier to crime.
Faced with such deception outside the spirit of the game, which had irrevocably changed the course of events so that a fair winner could never be determined, we called the game as a draw.

The orginal article.

Summary of “3 Ways to Improve Your Decision Making”

To make a good decision, you need to have a sense of two things: how different choices change the likelihood of different outcomes and how desirable each of those outcomes is.
In other words, as Ajay Agrawal, Joshua Gans, and Avi Goldfarb have written, decision making requires both prediction and judgment.
The first rule of decision making is to just be less certain – about everything.
In general, research suggests, the best starting point for predictions ­- a key input into decision making – is to ask “How often does that typically happen?” If you are considering funding a startup, you might ask: What percentage of startups fail? If your company is considering an acquisition, it should start by asking how often acquisitions enhance the acquirer’s value or otherwise further its goals.
This rule, known as the base rate, comes up a lot in the research on prediction, but it might be helpful for the judgment side of decision making, too.
Rule #3: Think probabilistically – and learn some basic probability.
If you’re not comfortable with probability, there’s no better investment to improve your decision making than spending even 30 minutes to an hour learning about it.
Great decision makers don’t follow these rules only when facing a particularly difficult choice; they return to them all the time.

The orginal article.