Summary of “American Indian high school basketball star Mya Fourstar pursues dream of playing college basketball”

Basketball also makes Mya put more pressure on herself, to be found where college basketball players aren’t often recruited, to stand out on these pale-yellow plains and leave the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, the only home she has ever known.
“For a lot of kids, basketball is the only thing to do here,” said Sasha Fourstar, Mya’s 40-year-old aunt who played for the Frazer Lady Bearcubs in the 1990s.
“Go Mya, go, go,” urged her Aunt Sasha after Mya grabbed a defensive rebound.
TOP: Mya Fourstar walks Frazer School’s halls, which feature posters of her ancestors from the Sioux and Assiniboine tribes.
BOTTOM LEFT: Mya Fourstar receives a hug from her aunt, Sasha Fourstar, after Frazer lost to Froid/Medicine Lake.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Frazer’s Mya Fourstar drives to the basket against Froid/Medicine Lake.
For Mya, at a school that hasn’t made it to the divisional round of the state tournament in almost two decades, the best recruiting tool is word of mouth and individual camps hosted by colleges.
Speaking on the condition of anonymity, a mid-major college coach who has seen Mya play said she is a Division I talent and thinks Mya could be a spot-up shooter who also plays some point guard at the next level.

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Summary of “The Middle-Class Takeover of Bilingual Schools”

School leaders took full advantage of the flexibility allowed to charters to launch what’s known as a “Dual-immersion” program: Children learn in both English and Spanish and, ideally, become fully bilingual in the process.
Portland Public Schools in Oregon has doubled the size of its dual-immersion programs to more than 5,000 students in the past eight years, with those classrooms instructing in a combination of English and Spanish, Mandarin, Vietnamese, Russian, or Japanese.
While the old bilingual-education programs served English-learning children separately, in some other wing of their schools, dual-immersion programs bring English-learning students into schools’ mainstream classrooms and convert their home languages into assets for the entire school community.
The cities’ school districts are using dual-immersion programs to encourage these new residents to send their children to schools in their own zip codes and to provide equitable educational opportunities for all kids.
Demand from privileged, English-dominant families can push ELs and their families out of multilingual schools and convert two-way dual-immersion programs into one-way programs that exclusively serve English-speaking children.
One of the city’s oldest immersion programs, Oyster-Adams Bilingual School, has seen its surrounding neighborhood become so English-dominant that the school is running short on native Spanish-speaking students.
In states where these programs are well established, like Texas and New York, districts are exploring ways of converting bilingual classrooms into dual-immersion programs.
The large majority of Utah’s new dual-immersion schools are one-way programs, for instance.

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Summary of “One Man’s Stand Against Junk Food as Diabetes Climbs Across India”

After seeing the obese girl in the doctor’s waiting room, Mr. Verma couldn’t shake his concern about junk food.
First the couple approached state officials about banning junk food in New Delhi schools – to no avail.
In 2011, the presiding judge asked the national government “To take concrete and effective steps to ensure that the sale and supply of junk food in and around schools is banned.”
The food industry hired some of the country’s most politically-connected lawyers to fight the case, including Mukul Rohatgi, the former additional solicitor general; Abhishek Manu Singhvi, who has been a member of Parliament and spokesman for the Congress Party, which has ruled India for most of its post-independence history; and Kapil Sibal, the three-time president of the Supreme Court Bar Association who had served as a senior minister in the Congress-led government.
In early 2015, the food authority in the health ministry finally recommended regulations to the court, including some limitations on the sale of junk food around schools.
Last year, at a meeting in New Delhi, that committee proposed taxing junk food, prohibiting advertising of it during children’s television shows and requiring consumer labeling of processed food.
Mr. Agarwal, chief executive of the food authority, insisted his agency is finally ready to start adopting new rules early next year for labeling healthy food with a green light and those high in fat, sugar and salt with a red light.
He said taxing junk food and banning it around schools were long term goals.

The orginal article.

Summary of “One Target in Beijing’s Migrant Crackdown: Schoolchildren”

“My Chinese dream is for my family to live a happy and healthy life, without having to worry about whether my children can attend school,” said Mr. Ding, whose family has been evicted from homes twice in the past month.
Their children end up attending privately run, low-cost schools that may be hobbled by poor teaching, insufficient funding and crumbling facilities.
In Beijing, a sprawling network of more than 100 privately run migrant schools serves hundreds of thousands of students for whom these are often the only option.
The Beijing government has shuttered dozens of migrant schools over the years.
“The children see demolitions all around them. We have to calm them down and tell them our school can survive.”
Many families have lived in Beijing for years and are reluctant to send their children back to rural areas that can lack modern schools and hospitals.
In Shaanxi, a northern province, hundreds of parents recently protested new rules making it tougher for migrant children to enroll in schools.
At Zhanbei Elementary in Fuzhou, a southern city, parents and educators have accused the government of abusing children by shutting off hot water and electricity in an effort to force the school to close.

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Summary of “10 Schools of Philosophy and Why You Should Know Them”

The key idea of it is the lack of belief in meaning or substance in an area of philosophy.
Moral nihilism argues that moral facts cannot exist; metaphysical nihilism argues that we cannot have metaphysical facts; existential nihilism is the idea that life cannot have meaning and nothing has value-this is the kind that most people think of when they hear the word.
Hedonism is the idea that pleasure or happiness is the one thing with intrinsic value.
This idea has been held by many other schools across history, most famously the utilitarians.
Marxism is a school based on the collected ideas of Karl Marx, the 19th century German philosopher, and the related ideas others have added after his death.
His key ideas are all critiques of capitalism, such as the idea that the capitalist mode of production alienates us from the results of our labor, the tendency of capitalism to overproduce and crash as a result, and the labor theory of value.
Most of you are probably familiar with the idea of “Cultural relativism” which is the notion that the morality of two differing cultures cannot be compared and a person outside of one culture cannot critique the values and morality of another.
The many schools of Buddhism are rather diverse in their thought, bound together primarily by the Buddha’s ideas on suffering.

The orginal article.

Summary of “France to ban mobile phones in schools from September”

The French government is to ban students from using mobile phones in the country’s primary, junior and middle schools.
Children will be allowed to bring their phones to school, but not allowed to get them out at any time until they leave, even during breaks.
Jean-Michel Blanquer, the French education minister, said the measure would come into effect from the start of the next school year in September 2018.
At another school, Mathilde, 12, said: “It’s ridiculous. At my school, we don’t use them in class or during recess, so what’s the problem? If anyone’s caught using one in the toilets or at lunchtime, the phones are confiscated immediately and the person is given detention.”
“It’s probably a good idea when the kids are in school, but they can’t ban them bringing them to school,” said Sabine.
Blanquer has already suggested schools could install lockers for phones, though many city centre schools have little room for them.
“I’ve done a little calculation myself: 5,300 state schools with an average 500 pupils each, that makes around 3 million lockers.”
“How is the school going to stock them? And how are they going to make sure they’re given back to the owner at the end of school?” GĂ©rard Pommier, head of the Federation of Parents in State Schools.

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Summary of “The Atlantic Interview: Nikole Hannah-Jones”

“White communities want neighborhood schools if their neighborhood school is white,” she says.
“If their neighborhood school is black, they want choice.” Charter schools and magnet schools spring up in place of neighborhood schools, where white students can be in the majority.
In a recent episode of The Atlantic Interview, Nikole Hannah-Jones and The Atlantic’s editor in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, discuss how integrated schools are good for white children and black children.
White communities want neighborhood schools if their neighborhood school is white.
So in New York City, one of the most segregated school systems in the country, if you’re a white parent in the public schools, you don’t want all-white schools.
Hannah-Jones: Interestingly, right after Brown there was consideration of whether or not Brown had to apply to private schools, or whether we should get rid of private schools in the United States altogether, understanding that the way to subvert Brown is to simply withdraw from public schools.
The white parents who wanted the integrated school didn’t give a damn what courses you offered in the black school.
In my daughter’s school, when white parents who lived next door to my daughter’s school would come and tour, they would tell the principal, “We’ll bring our kids, but only if our kids are in classroom by themselves and you keep them together through fifth grade.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside The Voucher Schools That Teach L. Ron Hubbard, But Say They’re Not Scientologist”

Garrett Cantrell, who is not a Scientologist, recalled his time at the school as he sat near Clearwater’s harbor, surrounded by Scientologist retreat centers.
Clearwater Academy International is one of dozens of schools and tutoring centers in the U.S. that use learning materials based on the ideas of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the church of Scientology.
Five of these schools and tutoring centers, including Clearwater Academy, receive public funding through voucher or tax credit scholarship programs, HuffPost has found.
HuffPost has been investigating the schools that receive such money for students, which comes via state-level voucher or tax credit programs.
As Applied Scholastics schools continue to receive millions of dollars in taxpayer funds and are therefore more accountable to the public than typical private schools, their claims of secularity deserve heightened scrutiny.
Voucher programs provide scholarships for students to go to private schools based on criteria like income.
The Florida Department of Education’s directory of schools that participate in its voucher and tax credit programs list the four institutions that use curriculum associated with Hubbard as “Non-religious.”
The four schools in Florida that use Study Technology take advantage of the state’s voucher program specifically for students with disabilities.

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Summary of “Eva Moskowitz’s Plan for Education”

In New York, I could cover the biggest education revolution ever attempted: a total overhaul of the way public schools worked, in the country’s largest school system.
The drivers of this transformation were the city’s billionaire mayor, Michael Bloomberg, and his handpicked schools chancellor, Joel Klein, a prosecutor who had previously taken on Microsoft and had now set his sights on toppling his hometown’s education status quo.
The school’s principal, Eva Moskowitz, spoke next.
While the idea was to improve on traditional public schools, the first comprehensive report on outcomes revealed that many charter schools performed no better, and sometimes worse, than comparable district schools.
A tiny outpost in Harlem spawned brethren all across Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens; Harlem Success Academy is now part of the Success Academy Charter Schools network, of which Moskowitz-the author of a lively new memoir, The Education of Eva Moskowitz-is CEO. From that position, she has become one of the country’s most influential crusaders at a turning point for charter schooling.
Although charter schools are still boutique side offerings in most parts of the country, a growing number of cities have turned them into a centerpiece, which makes The Education of Eva Moskowitz especially timely and important reading.
Traditional public schools must follow suspension and expulsion policies written by the school district; charter schools write their own rules, and many have a no-excuses style that mandates good posture, precisely folded arms and legs, and silent hallways-injunctions some hail as essential to a strong school culture and others skewer as paternalistic and inhumane.
It’s our best shot at delivering the public-school system we wish we had. Take integration: While a majority of Success schools serve homogenous populations, the network has opened a new crop of schools in neighborhoods like the Upper West Side and Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, that are more integrated than most traditional New York City public schools.

The orginal article.

Summary of “American children are drowning in self-esteem”

My children’s experience of school in America is in some ways as indifferent as their swimming classes are good, for the country’s elementary schools seem strangely averse to teaching children much stuff.
According to the OECD’s latest international education rankings, American children are rated average at reading, below average at science, and poor at maths, at which they rank 27th out of 34 developed countries.
Nor is it due to high levels of inequality: the proportion of American children coming from under-privileged backgrounds is about par for the OECD. A better reason, in my snapshot experience of American schooling, is a frustrating lack of intellectual ambition for children to match the sporting ambition that is so excellently drummed into them in our local swimming pool and elsewhere.
After two years of school in England, our six-year-old was so far ahead of his American peers that he had to be bumped up a year, where he was also ahead. This was partly because American children start regular school at five, a year later than most British children; but it was also for more substantive reasons.
There are clearly advantages to the American approach: I expect my children will be better public speakers than they would otherwise have been.
In a study of eight countries, American children came top at thinking they were good at maths, but bottom at maths.
For Korean children, the inverse was true: they considered themselves poorer at maths than the children of any other country, but were the best.
The OECD study found that American children believe they are good at maths and are adept at very simple sums; but give them something halfway tricky and they struggle.

The orginal article.