Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

Ashley had PE that day, so she had her dark hair pulled back and was wearing her gym uniform: track pants and a polo shirt embroidered with the words Niños Héroes, or heroic children, a group of historical figures that the school honors as a kind of mascot.
The girls enrolled in the local school, and Ashley soon found herself bullied again.
Ashley is one of 600,000 American-born children who are believed to be enrolled in K-12 schools across Mexico.
“It’s a huge problem for Mexico,” Patricia Gándara, a research professor at the UCLA Graduate School of Education, told me.
Like Ashley, American students in Mexico frequently end up in rural schools, the ones with the fewest resources to help them.
At the new school, both tried, at first, to hide their American backgrounds.
“The dream of most of them is to go back,” Eunice Vargas, a researcher who surveyed students at 86 schools in Baja California, told me.
“It’s like a boomerang! It will go back to the United States. It’s a generation that won’t have any school or work opportunities. I don’t know what will happen to them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Smashed the Gender Divide in American High Schools”

Fifty years ago this month, at a time when America was divided on questions of war, race, and gender, Alice de Rivera decided that she was fed up with her lousy high school in New York.
Her father, Joseph, was a psychology professor, and her mother, Margaret, was an educational therapist; the family had moved around between college towns before settling in Brooklyn, where de Rivera enrolled in John Jay High School, the local public school.
Fliedner whacked down de Rivera’s request with a nasty letter that read, in essence, “NO GIRLS.” He later told a reporter, “It wouldn’t be just her. There would be a couple of hundred others. And we simply haven’t got the facilities. We’d need a girls’ gym and medical facilities, and a dean of women.” On January 20, 1969, de Rivera filed a lawsuit in New York against the state’s Board of Education.
De Rivera saved some of the newspaper clippings about her, and her insecurities as an adolescent girl are more evident there than in the court records.
Back in the courtroom, beat reporters were delighted to learn that de Rivera came from a feminist family, with a great-great-grandmother, Eugenie de Rivera, who was a suffragist at the turn of the century.
At one point, to gasps in the courtroom, she pointed out that John Doar, the president of the Board of Education, which was fighting to keep de Rivera out of Stuyvesant, had once represented James Meredith in his famous quest to become the first black student admitted to the University of Mississippi.
Soon after the decision, de Rivera’s parents moved the family to an off-the-grid, thirty-five-acre commune in upstate New York, and de Rivera lost touch with her friends.
De Rivera is disheartened by the low numbers of black and Latinos at specialized schools, and feels that racism is still built into the educational system, just as sexism was.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Play Deficit”

In a book called The Play of Animals, Groos argued that play came about by natural selection as a means to ensure that animals would practise the skills they need in order to survive and reproduce.
It explains why young animals play more than older ones and why those animals that depend least on rigid instincts for survival, and most on learning, play the most.
Lion cubs and other young predators play at stalking and pouncing or chasing, while zebra colts and other prey species play at fleeing and dodging.
Groos followed The Play of Animals with a second book, The Play of Man, in which he extended his insights about animal play to humans.
In hunter-gatherer bands, at Sudbury Valley School, and everywhere that children have regular access to other children, most play is social play.
Preschoolers playing a game of ‘house’ spend more time figuring out how to play than actually playing.
Social play is by far the most effective venue for learning such lessons, and I suspect that children’s strong drive for such play came about, in evolution, primarily for that purpose.
We think of play as childish, but to the child, play is the experience of being like an adult: being self-controlled and responsible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Baltimore’s St. Frances Academy has a football team so good, no one in its league will play it”

The best high school football team in Maryland, and maybe the nation, plays its games in a public park in Baltimore.
No one in their private-school league would play them.
“We’re going to make it no different for a kid to go to St. Frances than we are for a kid to go to any great school.” Other prep schools had big endowments and rich alumni.
The school would no longer play St. Frances in football because, officials charged, the two institutions did not share the goal of “a safe and healthy competitive environment.” A day later, Calvert Hall followed suit, citing the “Size and athletic disparity” between the teams.
Another countered in support of the boycotters: “I don’t blame ’em. St. Frances recruits grown men to play against kids.” References to the players’ “Size” and jabs about their being “Grown men” sounded racially coded to the supporters of St. Frances, whose team, like the school, is nearly all black.
The school’s coaches had wanted to play some nationally prominent football teams while remaining in league competition.
He couldn’t play football until he paid tuition, so St. Frances offered him a scholarship.
The MIAA’s Dove hopes that he and the board of directors can come to a decision soon, so that member schools can “Get back to normalcy next year without all the distraction.” The goal is to have St. Frances continue participating in other MIAA sports but let the varsity football team be independent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bauhaus at 100: the revolutionary movement’s enduring appeal”

The name has become an adjective as well as a noun – Bauhaus style, Bauhaus look.
The Bauhaus brand is consistent, coherent and universal.
Driven by the belief that a deep knowledge of technical skills was necessary for art to flourish, the Bauhaus taught metalworking, ceramics, textiles, photography, cabinetmaking, typography and theatre design as well as art and architecture.
The early Bauhaus was sometimes more like a forerunner of the Californian communes of the 1960s than a laboratory for an industrial future.
Between them, Bauhaus architects determined the look of commercial and cultural America in the years after the war.
Wherever Bauhaus ideas go, the objections of the burghers of Weimar have often followed.
“Every child,” lamented Tom Wolfe in From Bauhaus to Our House of 1981, “Goes to school in a building that looks like a duplicating-machine replacement-parts wholesale distribution warehouse”.
Now on its 100th birthday it should be possible to see the Bauhaus not as a threat to civilisation, nor as the manifesto of a single vision of modern life, but as a place of abundant creative energy and technical skill.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Precocious Puberty Case: I Went Through Puberty at Age 2”

My parents had been anticipating it, my father especially, having had precocious puberty himself.
A decade before the Lincoln assassination, in the 1854 edition of a long-defunct publication called The Eclectic Medical Journal, Stone wrote one of the first medical accounts of a boy with familial male-limited precocious puberty.
I at once declared my incredulity, for his height and robust development seemed those of a child at least six years older than the age he mentioned If the child’s face is concealed, the examiner would declare his figure to be that of a miniature man, perfectly developed, and at least twenty-one years of age I may observe that the father presented extreme precocity, having experienced his first sexual indulgence at the age of eight years delicacy forbids my detailing his prowess at that early age.
The goal of the drugs was to slow or even stop my pubertal development so I’d have a normal childhood and reach my “Target height.” For all their accelerated growth as kids, men with precocious puberty typically don’t get much taller than five feet.
Shame is an outgrowth of repression, and repression is my family’s prevailing mechanism for coping with the hardships of precocious puberty.
Proving the gods do have a sense of humor, infertility medicine is a subspecialty of endocrinology – the field that also studies familial male-limited precocious puberty.
Still, we never talked about precocious puberty or about the difficult years when we were at war.
“Look, I don’t know what kind of childhood you would’ve had without precocious puberty – maybe it would’ve been easier, maybe you would’ve been happier, who knows. What I do know is that it made you the person you are today. And that’s a person I love and admire very, very much. So do the test or don’t do the test, but just know that, if you have a son, and that son has precocious puberty, he’s going to be just fine. Hell, with you as a father, he’s going to be better than just fine. He’s going to thrive.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why we should be watching the sun, not the clock”

Today, Bad Kissingen has rebranded itself as the world’s first ChronoCity – a place where internal time is as important as external time, and sleep is sacrosanct.
Most of us are not free to choose our work or school hours; we have little control over the lighting in our public spaces and external environment; and we are even forced to reprogramme our internal clock twice a year because of daylight saving time.
Quickly, the two men began drawing up a manifesto of the things they’d like to change: schools should start later, children be educated outdoors where possible, and examinations not conducted in the mornings; businesses should be encouraged to offer flexitime, allowing people to work and study when they felt at their best; health clinics could pioneer chronotherapies, tailoring drug treatments to patients’ internal time; hotels might offer guests variable meal- and check-out times; and buildings should be modified to let in more daylight.
In southern England many would like to see the entire country shifted permanently forward into Central European Time, given that, in Britain, the annual changing of clocks back to winter time means that it gets dark as early as 4pm in December and early January.
In a country with the same time zone – and the same TV and radio shows, school start times, and work culture – you might expect that everyone would rise at more or less the same time, but Roenneberg has demonstrated that people’s chronotype – their innate propensity to sleep at a particular time – is shackled to sunrise.
A similar pattern has been documented in the US, where those living on the eastern edge of its time zones get up earlier than those on the western edge, where the sun rises later.
Rather than judging colleagues on how they spent their time, workers were encouraged to work at whatever time or place they wanted, so long as they achieved specific results, such as delivering finished projects to customers.
It’s about internal time, not what the clock on the wall says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lauryn Hill, Tara Westover, ‘Cameron Post’: A Year of Miseducation”

Stories of miseducation echoed across 2018, in Lauryn Hill’s New Jersey studio, in Cameron Post’s fictional boarding school, in a scrap heap in rural Idaho, and beyond.
In the late ’90s, when Miseducation was recorded, Ras Baraka was an activist and educator in an occupied school district.
To Booker, miseducation would mean living with public schools that had demonstrated little capacity to educate their children.
Senior year at my school always began with a class retreat.
A year into college, the spell of my miseducation had worn off enough that I found myself taking courses on the Bible again-multiple ones, even though I had rarely experienced a day of schooling from first through 12th grade that didn’t begin with a lesson on that book.
As his memoir tells it, James and his three friends decided to attend St. Vincent-St. Mary High School, a private school, because of a pact the four friends made to stay together, instead of the public school Buchtel, a launching pad for many of the city’s black athletes.
Like the schools James attended from kindergarten to eighth grade, I Promise is a traditional district public school.
Most of the money to create and support the school comes from Akron Public Schools.

The orginal article.

Summary of “School lockdowns: How many American children have hidden from gun violence?”

More than 4.1 million students endured at least one lockdown in the 2017-2018 school year alone, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis by The Washington Post that included a review of 20,000 news stories and data from school districts in 31 of the country’s largest cities.
The total figure is likely much higher because many school districts – including in Detroit and Chicago – do not track them and hundreds never make the news, particularly when they happen at urban schools attended primarily by children of color.
Still, on a typical day last school year, at least 16 campuses locked down, with nine related to gun violence or the threat of it.
School systems in every state and the District had several last school year, The Post’s analysis found, and they happened in buildings with as few as four students and as many as 5,000.
Last school year, the system Czajkowski oversees, Sweetwater Union High School District, dealt with 71 student threats, he said, but only seven times did schools lock down, and five of those were prompted by off-campus danger, such as a burglary or gunfire.
In the month after dozens of people were slaughtered at a Las Vegas country music festival on Oct. 1, 2017, the number of lockdowns in Nevada’s Clark County School District spiked 42 percent to a total of 37, the highest count during the entire school year.
Last school year, there were 136 lockdowns of varying degrees across the 110 schools in the Columbus district, one of the highest ratios among large-city systems that The Post reviewed.
A year of carnage in American schools In April, the country will mark the 20th anniversary of the massacre at Columbine High, and that day will arrive in the aftermath of the worst year of school shootings in modern American history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Later School Start Times Really Do Work To Help Teens Get More Sleep”

Later School Start Times Really Do Work To Help Teens Get More Sleep : Shots – Health News American teens are chronically sleep deprived, in part because of early school start times.
How much difference can a later start make? As Seattle’s school district found out, it can help a lot.
As evidence grows that chronic sleep deprivation puts teens at risk for physical and mental health problems, there is increasing pressure on school districts around the country to consider a later start time.
They found students got 34 minutes more sleep on average with the later school start time.
“This study shows a significant improvement in the sleep duration of students, all by delaying school start times so they’re more in line with the natural wake-up times of adolescents,” says senior author Horacio de la Iglesia, a University of Washington researcher and professor of biology.
Seattle’s switch to later start times is still unusual for school districts around the country, where school typically starts around 8 a.m. In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy statement calling on school districts to move start times to 8:30 a.m. or later for middle and high schools so that students can get at least 8 1/2 hours of sleep a night.
Franklin High School science teacher A.J. Katzaroff says “There was lots of yawning” when school started at 7:50 a.m. Students had a hard time engaging in the work or in brief discussions, which is extremely unfortunate.
The later school start time gave them a better opportunity to make it to school on time.

The orginal article.