Summary of “What it’s like to go to school when dozens have been killed nearby”

Jaleyah, then a high school sophomore, barely had time to grieve when a month later, her best friend, Alex Lomeli, 18, was shot and killed when someone tried to rob a market about a mile from the same high school, located at 60th and Hoover streets.
In the early hours of Mother’s Day 2018, two other teens Jaleyah was close to, Monyae Jackson and La’marrion Upchurch, were walking home with friends, when they were fatally shot near Dymally High School.
Each of Jaleyah’s friends was killed within walking distance of public high schools in Los Angeles.
Sixteen-year-old Carl Hull, a sophomore at Dymally High School, starts his walk to school each morning by turning into an alley to avoid gang members who live on his street.
Over the last five years, 105 people have been killed within a mile of the campus, the highest number surrounding any public high school in the county.
Similar scenes played out at several area schools where students had known the boys who were killed.
As Dymally was preparing for graduation just weeks after former student Monyae’s death, there was more tragic news: Campus aide James Lamont Taylor was killed at 8:30 a.m., walking on the street about a mile from the school.
A member of Dymally’s school site council, Hull said she wants to see staff pay more attention to the climate on campus and try to understand the root of students’ problems rather than suspending or arresting them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “12 months. Nearly 1,200 Kids Killed By Guns.”

After the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, kids who endured the unspeakable emerged with a blunt message for the grownups of America: You are failing us.
Their frustration was initially and primarily directed at elected officials in Washington and state capitals around the country, but it also extended to the media.
Since Parkland, a new project from The Trace and the Miami Herald.
Was conceived as an antidote to that imbalance – one powered by young people themselves.
Over the summer, more than 200 teen reporters from across the country began working together to document the children, ages zero to 18, killed in shootings during one year in America.
The stories they collected go back to last February 14, the day of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, when at least three other kids were fatally shot in incidents that largely escaped notice.
As the weeks went on, the stories came to include children lost to school shootings, as well as to armed domestic violence, unintentional discharges, and stray bullets.
Please click the banner below to visit the project site.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Erika Christakis: Active-Shooter Drills Are Misguided”

Deaths from shootings on school grounds remain extremely rare compared with those resulting from accidental injury, which is the leading cause of death for children and teenagers.
In 2016, there were 787 accidental deaths among American children ages 5 to 9-a small number, considering that there are more than 20 million children in this group.
Preparing our children for profoundly unlikely events would be one thing if that preparation had no downside.
Much more worrying: School-preparedness culture itself may be instilling in millions of children a distorted and foreboding view of their future.
It’s also encouraging adults to view children as associates in a shared mission to reduce gun violence, a problem whose real solutions lie at some remove from the schoolyard.
In an escalating set of preparations for nuclear holocaust during the 1950s, the “Duck and cover” campaign trained children nationwide to huddle under their desk in the case of a nuclear blast.
Assessments of this period suggest that such measures contributed to pervasive fear among children, 60 percent of whom reported having nightmares about nuclear war.
This comes at a time when children are already suffering from sharply rising rates of anxiety, self-mutilation, and suicide.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Policy Makers Need a New Path to Education Reform”

Today, the Chicago Schools CEO, its chief education officer, and two of the seven members of the board of education, including Hines, are former Chicago public-school principals.
No one disputes that some charter schools, like the Noble Network here in Chicago, are terrific.
What many reformers fail to acknowledge is that a lot of more traditional alternatives-places such as Poe Elementary, an award-winning neighborhood school on the South Side-are great as well.
It’s high time we stop fighting about brands, because the only thing that really matters is whether a school is providing a top-notch education.
The reform gospel’s focus on graduation rates obfuscates what’s really important for students in grades nine through 12.
If students don’t know where they’re headed after they finish 12th grade, they lose interest in their education well before the 12th grade.
High school needs to be seen as a bridge to the next thing, no matter whether it’s college, military or civilian service, or a specific job.
Kids today spend 80 percent of their time outside the classroom, and most well-off parents have the resources to augment what happens at school.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The California Sunday Magazine”

Ashley had PE that day, so she had her dark hair pulled back and was wearing her gym uniform: track pants and a polo shirt embroidered with the words Niños Héroes, or heroic children, a group of historical figures that the school honors as a kind of mascot.
The girls enrolled in the local school, and Ashley soon found herself bullied again.
Ashley is one of 600,000 American-born children who are believed to be enrolled in K-12 schools across Mexico.
“It’s a huge problem for Mexico,” Patricia Gándara, a research professor at the UCLA Graduate School of Education, told me.
Like Ashley, American students in Mexico frequently end up in rural schools, the ones with the fewest resources to help them.
At the new school, both tried, at first, to hide their American backgrounds.
“The dream of most of them is to go back,” Eunice Vargas, a researcher who surveyed students at 86 schools in Baja California, told me.
“It’s like a boomerang! It will go back to the United States. It’s a generation that won’t have any school or work opportunities. I don’t know what will happen to them.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How a Thirteen-Year-Old Girl Smashed the Gender Divide in American High Schools”

Fifty years ago this month, at a time when America was divided on questions of war, race, and gender, Alice de Rivera decided that she was fed up with her lousy high school in New York.
Her father, Joseph, was a psychology professor, and her mother, Margaret, was an educational therapist; the family had moved around between college towns before settling in Brooklyn, where de Rivera enrolled in John Jay High School, the local public school.
Fliedner whacked down de Rivera’s request with a nasty letter that read, in essence, “NO GIRLS.” He later told a reporter, “It wouldn’t be just her. There would be a couple of hundred others. And we simply haven’t got the facilities. We’d need a girls’ gym and medical facilities, and a dean of women.” On January 20, 1969, de Rivera filed a lawsuit in New York against the state’s Board of Education.
De Rivera saved some of the newspaper clippings about her, and her insecurities as an adolescent girl are more evident there than in the court records.
Back in the courtroom, beat reporters were delighted to learn that de Rivera came from a feminist family, with a great-great-grandmother, Eugenie de Rivera, who was a suffragist at the turn of the century.
At one point, to gasps in the courtroom, she pointed out that John Doar, the president of the Board of Education, which was fighting to keep de Rivera out of Stuyvesant, had once represented James Meredith in his famous quest to become the first black student admitted to the University of Mississippi.
Soon after the decision, de Rivera’s parents moved the family to an off-the-grid, thirty-five-acre commune in upstate New York, and de Rivera lost touch with her friends.
De Rivera is disheartened by the low numbers of black and Latinos at specialized schools, and feels that racism is still built into the educational system, just as sexism was.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Play Deficit”

In a book called The Play of Animals, Groos argued that play came about by natural selection as a means to ensure that animals would practise the skills they need in order to survive and reproduce.
It explains why young animals play more than older ones and why those animals that depend least on rigid instincts for survival, and most on learning, play the most.
Lion cubs and other young predators play at stalking and pouncing or chasing, while zebra colts and other prey species play at fleeing and dodging.
Groos followed The Play of Animals with a second book, The Play of Man, in which he extended his insights about animal play to humans.
In hunter-gatherer bands, at Sudbury Valley School, and everywhere that children have regular access to other children, most play is social play.
Preschoolers playing a game of ‘house’ spend more time figuring out how to play than actually playing.
Social play is by far the most effective venue for learning such lessons, and I suspect that children’s strong drive for such play came about, in evolution, primarily for that purpose.
We think of play as childish, but to the child, play is the experience of being like an adult: being self-controlled and responsible.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Baltimore’s St. Frances Academy has a football team so good, no one in its league will play it”

The best high school football team in Maryland, and maybe the nation, plays its games in a public park in Baltimore.
No one in their private-school league would play them.
“We’re going to make it no different for a kid to go to St. Frances than we are for a kid to go to any great school.” Other prep schools had big endowments and rich alumni.
The school would no longer play St. Frances in football because, officials charged, the two institutions did not share the goal of “a safe and healthy competitive environment.” A day later, Calvert Hall followed suit, citing the “Size and athletic disparity” between the teams.
Another countered in support of the boycotters: “I don’t blame ’em. St. Frances recruits grown men to play against kids.” References to the players’ “Size” and jabs about their being “Grown men” sounded racially coded to the supporters of St. Frances, whose team, like the school, is nearly all black.
The school’s coaches had wanted to play some nationally prominent football teams while remaining in league competition.
He couldn’t play football until he paid tuition, so St. Frances offered him a scholarship.
The MIAA’s Dove hopes that he and the board of directors can come to a decision soon, so that member schools can “Get back to normalcy next year without all the distraction.” The goal is to have St. Frances continue participating in other MIAA sports but let the varsity football team be independent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bauhaus at 100: the revolutionary movement’s enduring appeal”

The name has become an adjective as well as a noun – Bauhaus style, Bauhaus look.
The Bauhaus brand is consistent, coherent and universal.
Driven by the belief that a deep knowledge of technical skills was necessary for art to flourish, the Bauhaus taught metalworking, ceramics, textiles, photography, cabinetmaking, typography and theatre design as well as art and architecture.
The early Bauhaus was sometimes more like a forerunner of the Californian communes of the 1960s than a laboratory for an industrial future.
Between them, Bauhaus architects determined the look of commercial and cultural America in the years after the war.
Wherever Bauhaus ideas go, the objections of the burghers of Weimar have often followed.
“Every child,” lamented Tom Wolfe in From Bauhaus to Our House of 1981, “Goes to school in a building that looks like a duplicating-machine replacement-parts wholesale distribution warehouse”.
Now on its 100th birthday it should be possible to see the Bauhaus not as a threat to civilisation, nor as the manifesto of a single vision of modern life, but as a place of abundant creative energy and technical skill.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Precocious Puberty Case: I Went Through Puberty at Age 2”

My parents had been anticipating it, my father especially, having had precocious puberty himself.
A decade before the Lincoln assassination, in the 1854 edition of a long-defunct publication called The Eclectic Medical Journal, Stone wrote one of the first medical accounts of a boy with familial male-limited precocious puberty.
I at once declared my incredulity, for his height and robust development seemed those of a child at least six years older than the age he mentioned If the child’s face is concealed, the examiner would declare his figure to be that of a miniature man, perfectly developed, and at least twenty-one years of age I may observe that the father presented extreme precocity, having experienced his first sexual indulgence at the age of eight years delicacy forbids my detailing his prowess at that early age.
The goal of the drugs was to slow or even stop my pubertal development so I’d have a normal childhood and reach my “Target height.” For all their accelerated growth as kids, men with precocious puberty typically don’t get much taller than five feet.
Shame is an outgrowth of repression, and repression is my family’s prevailing mechanism for coping with the hardships of precocious puberty.
Proving the gods do have a sense of humor, infertility medicine is a subspecialty of endocrinology – the field that also studies familial male-limited precocious puberty.
Still, we never talked about precocious puberty or about the difficult years when we were at war.
“Look, I don’t know what kind of childhood you would’ve had without precocious puberty – maybe it would’ve been easier, maybe you would’ve been happier, who knows. What I do know is that it made you the person you are today. And that’s a person I love and admire very, very much. So do the test or don’t do the test, but just know that, if you have a son, and that son has precocious puberty, he’s going to be just fine. Hell, with you as a father, he’s going to be better than just fine. He’s going to thrive.”

The orginal article.