Summary of “New Canaan’s Missing Lunch Money”

Headed by Bruce Gluck, a classically trained chef, the kitchens of the New Canaan public schools served farm-to-table fare before such a label existed.
Gluck had his cheerleaders, moms and dads who advocated for the new offerings.
According to a federal lawsuit filed by one of the cafeteria workers, Gluck ran his kitchens with a petty tyranny that verged on caricature.
With her office next to Gluck’s, Wilson endured his storming in and yelling loud enough for workers on the meat slicer to hear him.
Torcasio also filed a federal lawsuit against Gluck, the town of New Canaan, and the school board alleging that Gluck had created a hostile work environment and discriminated against female workers.
If Gluck had been taking $100, that still left money unaccounted for.
Was it possible that Gluck had taken $100 a day, and she and Pascarelli also had each taken $100? Wilson remained adamant: Gluck took the money.
In May, Gluck’s lawyer emailed detectives to say that Gluck would not consent to an interview about the missing money.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Schools Are Banning Yoga”

While up-to-date data on the prevalence of school-based yoga is hard to come by, a 2015 survey led by the New York University psychologist Bethany Butzer identified three dozen programs in the United States that reach 940 schools and more than 5,400 instructors.
Amy Wax, a University of Pennsylvania law professor who specializes in social-welfare policy, in a 2016 Atlantic story criticized some existing studies on yoga and mindfulness as being of “Low quality and dubious rigor.” Julia Belluz, a senior health correspondent for Vox, has noted that despite a drastic increase in recent decades in the number of studies on yoga, the research tends to rely on small numbers of participants and imperfect comparisons, among other limitations.
In the Cobb County case, some parents felt that the school was using a double standard in allowing yoga classes yet banning other forms of religious practice in schools.
Other schools adopt yoga as an in- or after-school elective, while some incorporate it into regular PE classes.
“Many original forms of yoga are practiced in a religious or spiritual manner,” acknowledges Marlynn Wei, a psychiatrist, therapist, and certified yoga teacher who’s written about yoga’s educational uses.
“The minute you put Sanskrit into a curriculum some parents are going to freak out,” agrees Jai Sugrim, a yoga instructor who’s taught in schools.
In a state like Alabama, where school-based yoga has long been banned and where according to that same survey just 10 percent of the population has taken a class, it’s conceivable that many might see yoga as bizarre and inappropriate in a school setting.
Ironically, proponents argue that the value of yoga in schools is its inclusiveness -its promise to help boys who don’t know how to contain their outbursts, students with physical disabilities, children who struggle with obesity, and teens who lack direction.

The orginal article.

Summary of “As Student Debt Rises, Teens Are Rethinking the College Experience”

Jake’s top priority isn’t student athletics, a high college rank or a vibrant party scene – it’s to graduate debt-free.
For the past few years, college debt – now the highest it’s ever been – has risen from a taboo dinner topic to one of our most pressing political issues.
Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are leading the conversations with legislative proposals for free public college tuition and student-loan debt forgiveness.
He says these progressive proposals “Sound great,” but he believes he’d be “Well out of college before anything happens.” Debt anxiety influenced Andrew’s decision to spend two years at Haywood Community College in Clyde, North Carolina.
All these college kids talkin bout student loans n stuff like that making me scared shitless for my life.
Zach, a first-generation college student from Fulton, Mississippi, “Didn’t have a clue” what he was doing while applying for colleges.
Even for more fortunate students who plan to pay off their tuition costs in real time, there’s still worry about the trauma of college debt looming large over the entire country.
The only way he can make sense of it is to turn the fear of debt into college motivation.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Perks of a Play-in-the-Mud Educational Philosophy”

In a nation moving toward greater standardization of its public-education system, programs centered around getting kids outside to explore aren’t normal.
These muddy explorers stand out at a moment when many American pre-K programs have become more and more similar to K-12 education: row after row of tiny kids, sitting at desks, drilling letter identification and counting.
According to these advocates, a kid who suffers from anxiety doesn’t necessarily need medication, a child who can’t pay attention doesn’t need a computer program to reshape her development, and one who struggles to keep up physically doesn’t need a targeted summer-camp experience to build his muscles.
Give young kids the opportunities to engage in hours of free, unstructured play in the natural world, and they develop just as organically as any other creature.
The hard part is to nail down how much time outside are particularly good for kids-which is to say, what should outdoor education actually look like in practice? Are there particular types of outdoor experiences that kids really need? It’s not clear that anyone knows.
Her small, private program serves mostly “Somewhat more affluent families.” In West Virginia, where the average monthly cost of center-based child care runs around $560, Riverside’s monthly $400 price tag is relatively steep, since that price only gets kids four days of care per week, and just three and a half hours each day.
Well-heeled parents realize, she says, that “This is what’s going to give your kid an academic advantage. This is what’s going to give your kid life success.” She hopes that if “Affluent folks [are] demanding it,” more early education programs will emerge to provide more kids-of all backgrounds-more time outside.
How can-how should-early-education programs balance the competing demands of academic development and outdoor play? Most kids could benefit from more time outside, but it’s hard to imagine that they don’t also need time with interesting, vocabulary-rich books.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the College-Admissions Scandal Ensnared the Richest Families and Fanciest Private Schools in Southern California”

Werdesheim’s friend and fellow board member at Buckley, Adam Bass, got hooked on Singer too.
Bass’s name has not surfaced in any news report, yet his Rick Singer tale stands alone in its particular set of bizarre circumstances.
He signed Eliza up with Singer, neglecting to mention it to administrators, and got to work making her an irresistible applicant.
One of Singer’s obsessions was a clean transcript.
As Singer wrote: “Your chance of acceptance goes up 50% if you apply early, and you can apply to multiple schools with early action.” The Bass family wasn’t going to screw this up now.
Singer wasn’t done with the dudes on the Buckley board.
Together, Singer and Sloane selected USC and agreed to pass him off as a water polo athlete who played for the “Italian Junior National Team” and the “L.A. Water Polo” team, even though he did not play competitively.
When Sloane sent Singer the photoshopped image of his son rising out of the water to hit the ball, Singer replied that the boy was “a little high out of the water-no one gets that high.” Adjustments were made, and presto: Matteo got his conditional acceptance letter to USC. Sloane paid Singer $200,000 through the foundation and paid $50,000 to USC’s Women’s Athletics, an account controlled by Donna Heinel, the senior women’s athletic director and one of Singer’s alleged coconspirators.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Create a Morning Routine for School, Starting in the Summer”

Summer feels antithetical to morning routines – the days are longer, the weather is perfect for backyard sports and neighborhood adventures, and, of course, there’s sleeping in.
Unstructured days and late starts on summer mornings can make the morning routines harder when it’s time to return to school.
That’s why parents should establish a morning routine for summer and take the pain out of transition.
“The key to a good transition from summer to the routines needed for school is to never give up on having a routine,” explains Dr. Ari Yares, a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist with more than 15 years of experience working with families and children with academic and behavioral problems.
Kids still need that structure, and a summer routine can also help make those summer days a little bit easier for everyone involved.
It doesn’t have to be the same routine as the school year, but every day should have some structure.
Transitions are easier when they happen slowly, so the transition to a school morning routine should happen over weeks.
ADVERTISEMENT. “As with any transition, it is going to be easier to slowly transition into the school-year routine than it will be to abruptly switch from lazy summer to a frenetic school year,” recommends Yares.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Problem With America’s Culinary Schools”

Today, Sanders is the director of operations for Brownsville Community Culinary Center, a culinary training program in a historically Black neighborhood in Brooklyn founded by Claus Meyer, the culinary entrepreneur behind Noma, and Lucas Denton, a former hospitality worker.
Culinary schools are meant to offer aspiring chefs, writers, food photographers, and restaurateurs a toolkit of foundational techniques and working knowledge of professional cooking history.
Since the first American culinary arts school was founded in Boston in 1879, curricula at schools like Johnson & Wales, the International Culinary Center, Institute of Culinary Education, and the Culinary Institute of America have emphasized French techniques and dishes, and a professional kitchen environment based on the brigade system.
As a result, culinary school students graduate with a flattened idea of which foods comprise culinary arts.
If the goal of culinary schools is to produce a well-rounded chef, curriculum that only prioritizes French or Italian cuisine seems insufficient.
Why not teach a Mexican mole next to a French mornay or Nigerian jollof rice next to a pilaf? Or a Hoppin’ John next to cassoulet? Why don’t American culinary schools reflect the multi-faceted world in which they exist?
Jodi Liano, founder of San Francisco Culinary School, says traditional culinary schools produce “Recipe robots,” or cooks that reproduce what they’ve been taught without thinking about why they’re cooking a dish or making a sauce a certain way.
Amanda Cohen, chef and owner of award-winning, plant-focused Dirt Candy in New York and a graduate of the recently closed Natural Gourmet Institute, says culinary schools should do a better job of preparing students for restaurant realities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teen Girl Activists Take On Skeptical Boys, Annoying Buzzwords”

In her home country, girls are often married young and may be discouraged from going to school.
As Ayesha says, “If that’s making your girls bad, please, can I make your girls bad?”.
Ayesha was one of ten young activists NPR interviewed at the Girl Up 2019 Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., this week.
Girl Up is a campaign founded by the U.N. foundation that promotes activism for 13- to 22-year-olds to work for the health, safety and education of girls.
Here’s what young activists are talking about this year.
“My own brother told me when I was going to senior high school that science is not for girls and that I should pursue something much more girl-like, like the liberal arts. He told me that I am likely to be a failure or probably always be at the bottom of the class because it’s very unnatural to see girls doing so well in school. I said, that’s not true. We’ve seen other women across the continents in other places make it. And I told him, I’m going to go to school and do science, and when I finish I’m going to medical school. And I can say that I was always at the top of my class.”
Paola Moreno-Roman, 29, Lima, Peru.”A lot of activists are passionate about things because we truly believe in them. But for most of us it comes from events that we went through when we were younger and that fuels and gives us energy. But I forget that there are things that we went through that we actually never addressed that we just shoved under the bed and just don’t like looking at it because it’s painful.” For her, therapy is helpful: “It goes along the lines of speaking to your friends, because if not, it can be a very lonely journey. Sometimes it just feels like you are the only one who cares. And that’s the loneliest feeling ever.”
“I think my girl here will be Sor Juana ; she’s a poet. She started creating poetry and art to be outspoken on issues that women were facing at that time. One specific poem talked about how men back then said that women were the ones creating their own problems. For her, it was like, how are we creating prostitution when it’s men creating demand for it? Or how do you say it’s women who are not successful when we can’t get an education?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Just Some Kids from Northeast Ohio”

Kids spill out of cars and into the school building, where they are greeted by a line of adults and older students who clap them into the building.
The people who work at the school know these kids well enough to decode a smile or lack thereof.
What might be considered a guiding philosophy of the I Promise School: “I think that’s what kids ultimately want: They just want someone to feel like someone cares about them. And that’s what we’re trying to do here.”
“Well, guess what? Yes, it does. These kids know how to respect. They know how to be loving. They know how to give love in return. So, don’t tell me that it’s not possible with what we poured into the school. Look at all of this.”
The large black school flag dances unevenly with whatever breeze the thick humidity of Ohio can spare.
While most young kids spend their summers tearing through the streets on bikes or crowding around televisions, joyfully draining the uncommitted daytime hours, I Promise School kids fill in every classroom.
“We continue to shrink our footprint, close schools, rezone kids, so people who can move do move oftentimes. So, we have a high poverty rate. We’re struggling on our state report card. We pride ourselves as being one of the top urban [districts], but that’s not good enough when you’re looking at kids going to college and kids graduating high school. We’re [at a] 70 percent graduation rate and lower sometimes. We have Fs on our middle school, high school, elementary report cards, meaning kids aren’t achieving in comparison to the other kids across the state.”
Because of these partnerships, the university offered scholarships to students of the I Promise School with an explicit goal of making sure kids from Akron stay in Akron if they choose to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Does Presidio Have One of the Best High School Rocketry Clubs in the Country?”

It’s possible to build a model rocket in the middle of the Chihuahuan Desert, but those who live in the remote West Texas border town of Presidio face an extra challenge: the nearest Home Depot is nearly four hours away, in Odessa.
Once those household items were hooked up to a fifty-newton, four-inch-tall motor and fueled with a few ounces of gunpowder, they were transformed into a rocket that qualified for the world’s largest student rocketry competition.
“I’m so nervous right now,” the team’s captain, Presidio High senior Leonardo Uribe, said as he watched another team’s rocket explode.
His team was one of 101 that had bested 729 other middle school and high school rocket clubs to qualify for the national finals at the Team America Rocketry Challenge, held annually in The Plains, Virginia.
To prepare it for launch, Flotte, a seventeen-year-old with a warm smile who moved to Presidio from Mexico in the third grade, sprinkled clumps of shredded newspaper into the bottom cylinder; the paper was intended to function as insulation, a wall between the gunpowder explosion and the rest of the rocket.
This year’s challenge: to launch the rocket exactly 856 feet high and land it within 43 to 46 seconds of launch.
While most teams worry that their rockets might get stuck in a tree, the students in largely treeless Presidio worry more that theirs might get stuck in Mexico, because one actually had. But despite the fact that they didn’t use any high-tech rocket pieces or have the most advanced motor, they placed nineteenth at the competition, which made them eligible to submit a rocket-design proposal to a NASA program that simulates a NASA mission from the drawing board to launch.
“He’s very passionate. When they lost their best rocket earlier this year, he didn’t eat. He skipped lunch to replace it.”

The orginal article.