Summary of “The comeback of cursive: A new generation finds the tactile joys of an old-school art”

Francesca Curatilo attended three camps this summer: wilderness, martial arts and – in the final days before the start of school – cursive.
In the classroom pantheon of Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, cursive was the writing.
In the early 20th century, cursive was sometimes taught for an hour each day, and all the way through high school, as an almost military exercise.
Because cursive required a level of fine-motor skills not typically accessible before third grade, printing was embraced as a way to get younger children to express themselves through writing.
Campers seemed to luxuriate in the tactile activities, the way cursive allowed them to rarely raise their pens from paper, an entire word recorded in a few swooping strokes.
Johnson isn’t required to teach cursive during the school year but sometimes adds it to the curriculum after she’s met the state testing requirements.
“Society has gotten nervous about deviating from what is the norm,” she said, and cursive “Tends to make a comeback when conformity is threatened.”
“Where is cursive really, really big? Christian home schooling and places like Louisiana.” But also the New York City schools, which last year encouraged, but didn’t mandate, teaching script.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Swedish 15-year-old who’s cutting class to fight the climate crisis”

She is on strike, refusing to go to school until Sweden’s general election on 9 September to draw attention to the climate crisis.
Thunberg herself is a diminutive girl with pigtails and a fleeting smile – not the stereotypical leader of a climate revolution.
“I want the politicians to prioritise the climate question, focus on the climate and treat it like a crisis.”
Thunberg’s protest might come as a surprise to anyone seduced by Sweden’s reputation as a climate pioneer and champion of the environment.
This year the country enacted “The most ambitious climate law in the world”, aiming to become carbon neutral by 2045 and comfortably beating the 2015 Paris climate targets along the way.
“Our inability to stop climate change is like the efforts to stop world war one – we knew for years it was coming, they arranged all sorts of conferences, but still they didn’t prevent it,” Wagner says.
Thunberg’s own awakening to the climate crisis a few years ago caused upheaval in her family.
She sees her condition not as a disability but as a gift which has helped open her eyes to the climate crisis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Education a Fundamental Right?”

In Brown, the Court had described an education as “a right which must be made available to all on equal terms.” But the Detroit plaintiffs also cite Plyler, in which the majority deemed illiteracy to be “An enduring disability,” identified the absolute denial of education as a violation of the equal-protection clause, and ruled that no state can “Deny a discrete group of innocent children the free public education that it offers to other children residing within its borders.” Dismissed by a district court in June, the case is now headed to the Sixth Circuit on appeal.
In June, the Texas State Teachers Association called on the governor of the state to make provisions for the education of the detained children, before the beginning of the school year, but has so far received no reply.
The Judge had a policy preference: “The predictable effects of depriving an undocumented child of an education are clear and undisputed. Already disadvantaged as a result of poverty, lack of English-speaking ability, and undeniable racial prejudices, these children, without an education, will become permanently locked into the lowest socio-economic class.” But the question didn’t turn on anyone’s policy preferences; it turned on the Fourteenth Amendment.
Is education a fundamental right? The Constitution, drafted in the summer of 1787, does not mention a right to education, but the Northwest Ordinance, passed by Congress that same summer, held that “Religion, morality, and knowledge, being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.” By 1868 the constitutions of twenty-eight of the thirty-two states in the Union had provided for free public education, open to all.
Justice noted, so are other children, including native-born children, and children who have immigrated legally, and their families are not asked to bear the cost of their special education.
For Powell, establishing education as a fundamental right invited claims: are health care, food, and shelter fundamental rights, too?
Education is not a constitutional right, he wrote, “But neither is it merely some governmental ‘benefit.'” Undocumented migrants are not a suspect class, but their children are vulnerable, and laws that discriminate against them, while not subject to strict scrutiny, deserved “Heightened scrutiny.” Powell wrote to Brennan after reading the draft, “Your final product is excellent and will be in every text and case book on Constitutional law.”
“Powell wanted the case to be about the education of children, not the equal protection rights of immigrants, and so the decision was,” Linda Greenhouse remarked in a careful study of the Court’s deliberations, published a decade ago.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The School Shootings That Weren’t”

The School Shootings That Weren’t The federal government said schools reported 235 shootings in one school year.
Students around the country are heading back to school this month under a cloud of fear stemming from the most recent mass shootings in Parkland, Fla., and Santa Fe, Texas.
In the 2015-2016 school year, “Has there been at least one incident at your school that involved a shooting?”.
Most of the school leaders NPR reached had little idea of how shootings got recorded for their schools.
The CRDC lists four shootings among the 16 schools of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District in California.
Ray Poole, the chief of legal services for the Nassau County School District in Florida, told us that at one school where a shooting was reported, Callahan Middle School, on Nov. 21, 2015, a Saturday, a student took a picture of himself at home holding a gun and posted it to social media.
At Redan Middle School, there is a report of a toy cap gun fired on a school bus – not a shooting.
The CRDC shows a shooting at Stone Mountain Middle School, but a police report shows an incident at Stone Mountain High School instead. And district officials provided a police report showing that there was a shooting after a McNair High School football game – in August 2016, after the time period covered in the survey.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ask Your Kid ‘How Did You Think About It?'”

Parenting, I am learning, is like being the belayer to a roped rock climber-you’ve got to know when to hold on tight and when to give some slack.
You want to make sure your kids are safe and not making bonehead decisions, but you can’t follow them around throughout their lives, whispering, “Eh, you sure about that move there, buddy?” For them to reach new heights, sometimes you’ve got to let go.
How do you help them analyze situations and gain confidence in their choices along the way? I like this strategy from entrepreneur and investor Bryan Johnson, founder of Braintree, OS Fund and Kernel.
As kids head back to school and must navigate new campuses, new classrooms, and new social settings, there’s the tendency to want to jump in and guide their every move.
Ask them how they succeeded, or why they think they stumbled.
If your preschooler climbs to the top of the playground dome, instead of just saying “Great job,” you might ask her how she kept herself steady.
Or when your usually-shy middle schooler announces he made a new friend, ask him how the conversation got started.
Recounting how they thought through these scenarios will allow them to use those same decision-making skills in other situations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Wonderschool raises $20M to help people start in-home preschools – TechCrunch”

Enter ‘Wonderschool’, a company that lets licensed educators and caretakers launch in-home preschools or daycares.
With the cash and Andreessen partner Jeff Jordan joining its board, Wonderschool is looking to build powerful lead generation and management software to turn teachers into savvy entrepreneurs.
Wonderschool started when co-founder Arrel Gray was having trouble finding childcare for his daughter close to home.
Wonderschool would recruit existing teachers and caregivers or guide people to get licensed so they could become “Directors” of in-home schools.
Wonderschool acts almost like Airbnb by turning them into small businesses earning money from home.
Wonderschool now has over 500 directors working with its software, with some making as much as $150,000 or $200,000.
In exchange for its 10 percent cut of tuition, Wonderschool provides directors with a “Bootcamp” to prep them for the job.
If Wonderschool can keep its brand clean through thorough oversight, it could both create better paying jobs in a field rife with undercompensated heroes, and open early schooling to a wider range of students.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Internal Facebook Note: Here Is A “Psychological Trick” To Target Teens”

An internal document from Facebook, obtained by BuzzFeed News, shows TBH’s leadership explaining a well-tested method the startup used to attract teens at individual high schools to download its app.
The note provides a window into Facebook’s growth-at-any-costs mentality and the company’s efforts to keep a key demographic engaged as its popularity among teens declines and it simultaneously runs out of people in the connected world to bring to its platform.
A Facebook spokesperson declined to comment on the note or on questions about whether the company employed the growth tactics learned from TBH. Though Facebook shut down TBH last month “Due to low usage,” the app, which the company bought for less than $30 million according to a source, provided plenty of learning opportunities at a crucial time.
In addition to helping Facebook launch and fine-tune its own polling tools, the document shows that it also provided growth tactics explicitly designed to target young users.
“The purpose of sharing these tactics is to provide guidance for developing products at Facebook – specifically ones that have not reached product-market fit yet,” TBH’s founders wrote.
TBH made sure its private account featured a mysterious call to action – something like “You’ve been invited to the new RHS app – stay tuned!” The startup would make one private account for each high school it wanted to target.
TBH’s founding team told their Facebook colleagues they would typically wait 24 hours to collect all inbound follow requests from the high schoolers before moving on to the next, key phase of the strategy.
While TBH did nothing to violate Instagram’s terms of service – Instagram allows for users to create multiple accounts and does not require them to disclose their real identity – it recognized that Facebook might not approve of using the exact methods.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tokyo medical school admits changing results to exclude women”

A Tokyo medical school has apologised after an internal investigation confirmed it altered entrance exam scores for more than a decade to limit the number of female students and ensure more men became doctors.
Tokyo Medical University manipulated all entrance exam results starting in 2006 or even earlier, according to findings released by lawyers involved in the investigation, confirming recent reports in Japanese media.
The school said the manipulation should not have occurred and would not in the future.
The investigation found that in this year’s entrance exams the school reduced all applicants’ first-stage test scores by 20% and then added at least 20 points for male applicants, except those who had previously failed the test at least four times.
“We sincerely apologize for the serious wrongdoing involving entrance exams that has caused concern and trouble for many people and betrayed the public’s trust,” school managing director Tetsuo Yukioka said.
Studies show the share of female doctors who have passed the national medical exam has plateaued at around 30% for more than 20 years, leading some experts to suspect that other medical schools also discriminate against women.
The education minister Yoshimasa Hayashi told reporters he planned to examine the entrance procedures of all medical schools.
Gender equality minister Seiko Noda was quoted by Kyodo News as saying: “It is extremely regrettable if medical schools share a view that having female doctors work at hospitals is troublesome.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Littleton Learned”

It’s 8:27 a.m. on a sunny Thursday morning in April, and Grace, the director of Security and Emergency Preparedness at Littleton Public Schools outside Denver, Colorado, is standing in the lobby of Goddard Middle School.
Beside him are Derek, an armed school resource officer, and a handful of school administrators.
Grace’s district had its own tragic shoot- ing in 2013, when two students died at Arapahoe High School.
At the click of a button, Grace and his team can bring up interactive floor plans of any school and see which doors are open or locked, or connect into live video and audio from any remote corner of school property.
Littleton Public School District has 22 schools spanning 28 square miles.
Littleton’s technology lets director of security Guy Grace and his team know what’s happening at any school, instantly, and communicate to administrators and first responders.
The exterior doors at elementary and middle schools in Littleton are always locked.
Like many secure schools in the U.S., Littleton has a backstory.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How LeBron James’ new public school really is the first of its kind”

James’ I Promise School opened Monday to serve low-income and at-risk students in his hometown, and the public school could be an agent of change in the eastern Ohio city.
I Promise is building from a model that’s shown success I Promise will feature longer school days, a non-traditional school year, and greater access to the school, its facilities, and its teachers during down time for students.
It does not go as far as KIPP or Rocketship in those charges, but it’s clear I Promise is designed to operate at a level beyond the typical public school by creating a more comprehensive experience for students, not just one that begins at 7 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. I Promise is a regular public school, not a charter or a voucher-receiving private school This kind of wide reform is rare to see at a traditional neighborhood school.
That shows how badly James wanted his school to be a no-exceptions public school.
In either case, the school would have operated as a separate entity from the school system in which James grew up.
That’s not a lot of money to operate a school with such grand aspirations, which is where the LeBron James Family Foundation comes in.
Last December, James laid the mission for his school out to Theresa Cottom of the Akron Beacon-Journal, painting a broad strokes explanation of why his school would be different.
“We’re going to be on ’em like a school should be because we want them to be successful not only in the school, but successful in life,” James said.

The orginal article.