Summary of “What Really Happened At The School Where Every Graduate Got Into College”

It was a triumphant moment for the students: For the first time, every graduate had applied and been accepted to college.
How did all these students graduate from high school?
An internal email obtained by WAMU and NPR from April shows two months before graduation, only 57 students were on track to graduate, with dozens of students missing graduation or community service requirements or failing classes needed to graduate.
Ultimately, they stand behind the school’s decision to graduate these students despite missing so much school.
“Our students need to get here every day and we continue to ask our community and our families to partner with us to get students to school every day,” Spence says.
Some say the school district uses these students’ situations as a crutch to ignore larger unaddressed issues in the building, like in-seat attendance and student behavior.
Three are in college now, including one student who was absent about half the school year.
Instead, they say the school and school system need to better prepare students for the hurdles they’ll face when they get to college, and they need to hold students accountable when they don’t meet the requirements.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Silicon Valley startup is quietly taking over U.S. classrooms”

Sixteen of the top 25 reported a jump in MBA program applications for the 2016-2017 academic year, and four schools – Yale, Columbia, Carnegie Melon, and the University of Chicago – saw double-digit leaps, per Poets & Quants, a website that covers graduate business education.
Campus recruiting at lower-ranked schools is down: In a survey by MBA Career Services, the 30 schools ranked 21 to 50 reported a 42% decrease in recruiting by companies in 2016.
Programs are shutting down: Wake Forest, the University of Iowa, Virginia Tech and other schools have all recently discontinued their full-time MBA programs.
51% of B schools report a decline in international enrollment in fall 2016, a 13% jump from 2015, according to the MBA Career Services survey.
32% of Georgetown’s B school applicant pool was international in the 2016-2017 academic year, compared with 43% the year before.
The trend is even more pronounced in the lower-ranked schools.
Who wins: While only 32% of U.S. business schools reported an increase in international applicants last year, 76% of Canadian schools and 67% of European schools saw a jump last year.
Graduate education is a global market: “The return on investment calculation for the international student is even more amplified for many of them, coming from markets that are more price sensitive,” Scott DeRue, dean of the business school at the University of Michigan, tells Axios.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Silicon Valley Plans to Conquer the Classroom”

A Baltimore County school board member, David Uhlfelder, said a representative from the Office of the Maryland State Prosecutor had interviewed him in September about Mr. Dance’s relationship with a former school vendor.
At least $13,000 of Mr. Dance’s airline tickets, hotel bills, meals and other fees were paid for by organizations sponsored by tech companies, some of which were school vendors, The Times found.
One prominent provider is the Education Research and Development Institute, or ERDI, which regularly gathers superintendents and other school leaders for conferences where they can network with companies that sell to schools.
A $13,000 fee for Bronze membership entitles a company to one confidential meeting, where executives can meet with five school leaders to discuss products and school needs.
A few months after the event, the school board approved additional money for both companies.
Asked whether Ms. White had received ERDI payments, Mr. Dickerson said, “Participation in ERDI is done independently of the school system.” In an email, Ms. White said she found ERDI to be a “Beneficial professional learning experience.” She didn’t respond to a question about ERDI compensation.
Mr. Sundstrom, ERDI’s president, said education companies pay a fee to attend events “Not to meet school leaders or make a sale,” but to get meaningful feedback on their education products from knowledgeable school leaders.
Baltimore County’s travel rules say, “No travel expenses will be paid by those seeking to do business with the Baltimore County Public Schools prior to obtaining a contract.” Mr. Dickerson explained that applied to companies currently bidding for contracts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Competition Is Ruining Childhood. The Kids Should Fight Back.”

If enough students manage to master cutting-edge job skills, it will be great for the “Economy,” but as workers they will find themselves rewarded with lower wages.
In the ’70s, the economist Gary Becker theorized that employers would shift the costs of developing human capital onto workers, from paid on-the-job training to unpaid schooling.
If firms want workers who can speak Mandarin or code Python, why should they pay trainees to learn when they can scare kids into training themselves? Within this system, all an individual kid can do is try to put a sufficient number of their peers between themselves and poverty.
Competition between workers means lower wages for them and higher profits for their bosses: The more teenagers who learn to code, the cheaper one is.
Even though older adults are ostensibly worried about the kids, policymakers will never scale back academic competition, and most educators and parents are understandably loath to tell children, “Don’t work so hard.”
Schools can’t run without students, and the economy can’t run without schools; their work matters, and they can withdraw it.
The idea of organizing student labor when even auto factory workers are having trouble holding onto their unions may sound outlandish, but young people have been at the forefront of conflicts over police brutality, immigrant rights and sexual violence.
Only young people, united, can improve their working conditions and end the academic arms race.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Education of Betsy DeVos”

Before coming to Washington, DeVos fought and funded a generation’s worth of education wars on a pair of guiding principles: that parents should be free to send their children wherever they choose, and that tax dollars should follow those students to their new schools.
Armed with ideas, and having transitioned from successful outsider to struggling insider-becoming Public Enemy No. 2 in the process-Betsy DeVos is still capable of shaking up American education.
People who know her, and who shudder at the cartooning of DeVos as the Cruella de Vil of Trump’s Cabinet, like to say that she got involved in education “for the right reasons.
The same dynamic was visible during her first week on the job, when DeVos was physically prevented from entering the public school in D.C. “We got back in the car and the security detail said, ‘Ma’am, I don’t think we should go back there,'” Devos recalls.
“The opportunity of talking from a bully pulpit about what needs to happen-rethinking school, innovation, creativity, entrepreneurial activity around education, those kinds of things-can have a much broader and longer impact, I think, than a lot of machination within a bureaucracy,” DeVos says.
While past education secretaries tended to visit a wide range of schools, DeVos has been intent on showcasing primarily those that reflect her priorities: unique, adaptive programs that break from the rigid norms of public education.
For these reasons, amid some hysterical responses, DeVos received plaudits from unusual places: The Washington Post editorialized that her approach was “right on target”; liberal writers showered her with credit-where-it’s-due plaudits in Slate, the New Yorker and the Chronicle of Higher Education.
If the education of Betsy DeVos has been discovering the relative limits of her authority on the job, the American people, if they study her closely, might find themselves learning a similar lesson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The ‘Problem Child’ Is a Child, Not a Problem”

Jessica found another school that uses C.P.S.C.P.S. was developed in the late 1990s by Dr. Ross Greene, now the director of a nonprofit called Lives in the Balance, and later expanded upon by Stuart Ablon, a psychologist who runs the Think:Kids program at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Many kids flounder when schools use the popular “Token economy” approach, which gives checkmarks or tokens for good behavior that students cash in for rewards.
The school recommended a special education classroom that used physical restraints and a plywood closet with padded walls for students to “Work out” their anger.
Christine ultimately got the school district to pay for Quinn to attend a private school that uses C.P.S., but it took an expensive lawsuit for which she had to borrow money from friends and hold public fund-raisers she found embarrassing.
Rea Powell, who teaches kindergartners with special needs at the Albert Bridge School, a public school in Brownsville, Vt., agrees.
Her colleague, the school counselor David Gale, sees our penchant for quick fixes as part of the problem.
Jessica Hannon believes Matt’s struggles in school could have been prevented if his teachers and family had built up his self-regulation skills in the early years.
Now an eighth grader, Matt has adjusted well to his new school and hopes to attend the local public high school next year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fragile Generation”

The principle here is simple: This generation of kids must be protected like none other.
We told a generation of kids that they can never be too safe-and they believed us.
How did we come to think a generation of kids can’t handle the basic challenges of growing up?
In free play, ideally with kids of mixed ages, the children decide what to do and how to do it.
The little kids desperately want to be like the bigger kids, so instead of bawling when they strike out during a sandlot baseball game, they work hard to hold themselves together.
Parents today know all about the academic milestones their kids are supposed to reach, but not about the moments when kids used to start joining the world.
A police chief in New Albany, Ohio, went on record saying kids shouldn’t be outside on their own till age 16, “The threshold where you see children getting a little bit more freedom.” A study in Britain found that while just under half of all 16- to 17-year-olds had jobs as recently as 1992, today that number is 20 percent.
We will research the effects of excessive caution, study the link between independence and success, and launch projects to give kids back some free time and free play.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Asian Test-Prep Centers Offer Parents Exactly What They Want: ‘Results'”

Traces of the Asian tutoring industry have emerged in the United States after each wave of immigration from countries like China and South Korea, says Pyong Gap Min, a sociology professor at Queens College in the City University of New York.
The preparation certainly pays off; Asian students from varying backgrounds are now a majority in New York’s most competitive public schools.
Jennifer Lee, a professor of sociology at Columbia University, says such perceptions of Asian exceptionalism percolate in both liberal and conservative circles, with conservatives using Asian success as a main point in arguing against affirmative-action policies.
The fortunes of educated Asian immigrants become what’s known as “Ethnic capital,” a stock of knowledge and resources that can trickle down – through networks ranging from test-prep centers to religious institutions to ordinary family and social connections in immigrant enclaves – and benefit less established families as well.
According to David Lee, demand for supplemental classes is higher for Asian immigrant families that are not as wealthy: “They’re hungrier,” he says.
Wang has never thought of his mother and father as “Tiger parents,” that stereotype of the cold, disapproving Asian parents who demand success, on threat of denouncing their child as a dishonor to the family.
Local parents poured exorbitant shares of their income into mortgages to secure their children spots in public schools regularly ranked among the nation’s best – and then poured even more into supplementary tutoring classes, music lessons, sports leagues and more.
“The Asian American Achievement Paradox” touches on this, too: Despite supposedly positive stereotypes of Asians, we still face what Lee calls a “Bamboo ceiling,” keeping us from leadership positions and from recognition in more subjective career fields – which tend not to favor a demographic that lacks networking connections and has long been imagined to be uncreative or submissive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “End of Apartheid in South Africa? Not in Economic Terms”

At 38, Mr. Moloeli no longer needs to wonder.
On a recent afternoon, he leaned into a sofa, gazed at his private pool and reflected on how a black man born in apartheid South Africa had landed here.
In his township school, 10 children shared a single textbook.
For high school, he talked his way into a technical school reserved for Indians.
The ranks of South Africa’s black, Asian and mixed-race millionaires expanded to 17,300 from 6,200 from 2007 to 2015, according to New World Wealth, a consultant based in Johannesburg.
Mr. Moloeli’s three children attend a predominantly white private school, where they take violin and golf lessons.
“Government has in a way provided a space for most people to succeed,” Mr. Moloeli said.
“If you are hungry enough, you can make it in South Africa. You can build a very beautiful lifestyle.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kimbal Musk Wants to Feed America, Silicon Valley-Style”

Unlike some of his colleagues in the tech world, Mr. Musk is driven more by cooking than by the love of a good algorithm.
His mother, the model Maye Musk, worked as a dietitian to support the family after she divorced his father, Errol Musk, an engineer and pilot.
Set financially, Mr. Musk moved from Silicon Valley to New York and enrolled in the French Culinary Institute.
Mr. Musk became interested in school gardens.
Paired with instructions on how they can be used to teach subjects like science, the first gardens were installed in Denver schools in 2011.Mr. Musk has begun a chain of hyper-local restaurants called Next Door, which he and Mr. Matheson envision as the Applebee’s for a new generation.
The partners plan to add 50 more Next Door restaurants by the end of 2020.Mr. Musk also opened an outpost of his more upscale Kitchen restaurant inside a 4,500-acre urban park called Shelby Farms in the center of Memphis.
Whether food actually needs soil is one of the flash points between organic traditionalists and people like Mr. Musk.
Mr. Musk’s ascent has underscored a generational rift that pits old-liners who shun aspects of emerging food science against a new wave of food disrupters who haven’t embraced the roles that history, flavor and pleasure play, said Garrett Broad, an assistant professor at Fordham University who recently wrote about one aspect of the divide for the publication Civil Eats.”Somebody like Kimbal Musk could be an important bridge to bring some of these ideas together,” Dr. Broad said.

The orginal article.