Summary of “The Company Making Billions Off China’s Worried Parents”

Steven, a serious-looking 9-year-old public school student in Beijing, spent a recent Friday evening in a classroom at a tutoring center operated by TAL Education Group, cramming mathematics drills.
TAL’s initials stand for Tomorrow Advancing Life, a none-too-subtle nod to one of the biggest anxieties of middle-class families in the test-based world of Chinese education.
No one had profited from the stock’s rise more than Zhang Bangxin, TAL’s co-founder, a 37-year-old former math tutor who’s become one of China’s richest people: His TAL shares are worth about $7 billion.
TAL’s tutoring encourages students to practice the kinds of questions they’ll face on China’s exams.
The measures aimed to eliminate one of TAL’s profit centers: training for the Mathematical Olympiad, an intense competition for students up to age 20.
They were so central to TAL’s success that the company promoted them in its IPO prospectus.
At the time of the antitutoring edict, Nicky Ge, an analyst with China Renaissance Group, said the initiative could lower demand for TAL’s services, especially in math, which made up more than 60 percent of the company’s revenue last year.
Investors may be agreeing with Zhang, who says the government intervention could help TAL as tighter regulation drives smaller companies out of the market.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Dutch teenagers are among the happiest in the world”

The last HBSC report, comparing children of 11, 13 and 15, showed a happy Dutch youth.
The results chime with a 2016 Dutch Statistics Office study of 4,000 people from 12 to 25, who ranked their happiness at 8.4 out of 10, and a PISA report in 2015 noting that the country – alongside Finland and Switzerland – seemed “Able to combine good learning outcomes with highly satisfied students”.
Like most Dutch teenagers, he cycles to school and feels he has a good level of self-determination.
Despite the country’s reputation for cannabis smoking, the Trimbos Institute reports a downward trend for using alcohol and drugs and smoking in Dutch children aged 12 to 16.
The HBSC data supports this: 86% of Dutch teenagers say their classmates are kind and helpful, putting the country top of the tables at 13 and 15.
Meanwhile a poster on her school’s wall encouraging people of all sexualities to “Come out” reaffirms that openness is OK. The rate of teenage pregnancies in the Netherlands is also the lowest in the EU. The Dutch school system – almost entirely public -incorporates major exams at about the age of 12 and three levels of secondary education from practical to the most academic.
There are social problems such as differences between minority ethnic and native Dutch achievement, while one in nine children grows up in poverty.
Who developed happiness classes at the school a decade ago, and also gives positive psychology lessons to educators, is worried that Dutch children are under threat from new pressures around educational achievement.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Dial Back Stress For High-Achieving Kids”

How To Dial Back Stress For High-Achieving Kids : Shots – Health News Part of a parent’s job is to help kids do their best, but pushing too hard can backfire.
Research shows kids in high-achieving communities are at higher risk of anxiety, depression and substance use.
From an early age, Savannah says, she was considered one of the smart kids, and when she arrived at Wilton High School, she was surrounded by many other high achievers.
Like many kids at her school – and at elite high schools across the country – she felt compelled to push herself to get good grades and get into a top college.
Unlike supervised activities, Skenazy says, free play teaches kids how to negotiate, compromise, make friends and communicate.
She has published several studies that document the elevated rates of drug and alcohol use by kids who grow up in privileged communities – where incomes and expectations are high.
“What we’ve found is that kids in high-achieving, relatively affluent communities are reporting higher levels of substance use than inner-city kids and levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms are also commensurate – if not greater,” Luthar says.
Her most recent study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, found that rates of substance abuse remain high among upper-middle-class kids, as they enter early adulthood.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the Travis Hill High School at the New Orleans Jail”

The New Orleans jail has offered something unusual: a full-day high school that’s part of the public school system and offers real credits.
There are between a dozen and 50 juveniles at the jail at any given time – and they needed a school.
The Orleans Parish School Board signed a contract last year with the national nonprofit Center for Educational Excellence in Alternative Settings to start the Travis Hill School, named after a local trumpeter who was incarcerated as a teenager.
Since the school’s opening, three have earned a diploma; another 13 passed state exams in English, and 14 passed in math – all of it a first for anyone at the New Orleans jail.
To ease the students’ confusion, Travis Hill created a staff position that no other school would have: a “Transition” director.
In March, just a few weeks after Juron’s arrival, the Travis Hill School got the worst kind of news.
The news landed hard, piercing the illusion that school was just school and that jail and court were somehow ignorable.
The school’s first-ever graduate, Tristion, who received a degree in April, succeeded in school by trying to ignore the part where he was in jail.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Steph Curry and Klay Thompson overcame their childhood nemeses”

While he might well be one of the most feared weapons in the NBA today, when Steph Curry was 12 years old, a kid named CJ Young owned him.
While the barrel-chested Young looked older than his peers, the wispy Curry was often mistaken for a younger player.
During one of their games, Carl Young remembers, Curry drilled seven 3-pointers in a row over an increasingly agitated defender.
As Curry grew older – and taller – he enrolled at a private school, Charlotte Christian, and no longer crossed paths with Young.
The last time Young saw Steph Curry was in 2005, when they ran into each other at the Indian Trail Rec Center on the outskirts of Charlotte, working independently on their games and preparing for the next step in their basketball journey.
CJ Young, Curry is informed, has a debilitating illness.
“Recently, while watching Curry drain one of those absurdly long 3s, Young turned to the friends who were watching with him and informed them proudly,”I know him.
He quickly thumbed through, then triumphantly pointed to a faded AAU photo from 18 years ago, when Steph Curry was just a skinny little zone-buster and CJ Young was on top of the basketball world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The making of Doris Burke”

For her fourth-grade ritual, Burke would put on the purple jacket.
Burke dismissed the urban legend-like work ethic extolled by those who know her as nothing more than a love of sports.
Burke gave no credence to the thought that it was uncool to be a girl athlete as she grew up.
The flat-footed, set-shooting players of the ’80s looked like they were always chasing Burke.
“For me to even think about attending a college or university would have been a real financial hardship. It would not have happened,” Burke said.
Burke became an All-Big East player, and upon graduation, head coach Bob Foley knew his point guard could be a valuable asset on his staff.
After two years of analyzing and learning the game from the sidelines, Burke left the coaching staff to start her family after she married Gregg Burke, an employee in the athletic department, in 1989.
To stay involved with her obsession, Burke announced Providence women’s games on the radio to an audience of practically zero.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Yearbook Signatures Have Evolved Since the 1600s”

The first “Yearbooks” and their signatures can be traced back to the East Coast schools of the late 17th century, where people would sign scrapbook-style books containing hair clippings, dried flowers, newspaper articles, and other mementos of the school year.
The 1806 class at Yale created the first known official bound yearbook with information about the school year, the students, and the faculty.
Signatures in these early yearbooks were often lengthy and mainly focused on friendship and remembrance.
The two often combined, creating the epitome of yearbook signatures of these decades: “Best wishes for lots of luck and success to a swell gal,” someone scribbled in a 1947 yearbook from Mount Horeb High School in Wisconsin.
The 1950s saw the last of the “Gals” and “Fellows,” but it also held fast to the supposed wholesome, middle-class, white American Christian values of the time, with many yearbook signatures including “God bless” in some form.
Yearbook signatures witnessed a massive change in the 1960s and ’70s. Free love was in full swing, and as a result, the word “Love” itself appeared to lose its sacred quality.
Everyone signed with “Love” or “Love ya,” even when they hardly knew the person who owned the yearbook.
Yearbook signatures in the early 2000s were an exercise in technology.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I went to high school in a high-security fortress. You don’t want that for your kids.”

After the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School this February reignited the debate around gun control and school safety, some politicians are using the same logic as my school district did: Just outfit schools with cops, cameras, and metal detectors, and everything will go away.
In response to the Allen Independent School District’s new and overbearing policies, Boccia and her fellow protesters would wear a plain black armband to school.
The high school was the closest, ostensibly safe place for the middle schoolers to go after the evacuation.
As the drama played out in the courts, the city was finishing the construction of a massive new high school it called Allen High School.
In 1999, around 2,000 kids were enrolled at Allen High School alone.
The danger of these security measures to students is heightened in schools in communities that suffer from high rates of incarceration, especially neighborhoods with a high proportion of people of color.
Fortunately for students in Allen, and unlike in other schools across the country, that experiment was short lived: by the end of the school year, AISD decided the cost of the metal detectors outweighed their benefit and stopped using them, in addition to loosening security.
Those of us who went to Allen High School in 1999 know security theater doesn’t work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Overcome A Legacy Of Pain”

How An Alaskan Family – And Their Teenage Son – Overcome A Legacy Of Pain : Goats and Soda More than 50 years after the federal government forced hundreds of Alaska Natives into boarding schools, their descendants are haunted by – and trying to overcome -residual trauma.
The effects of Sam’s elementary school years didn’t go away.
In sixth grade, Sam’s parents transferred him to Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences, a private independent day school that gave him a scholarship.
At least once, Sam caught a pigeon and set it loose in the teacher’s lounge at school, but he didn’t get in big trouble.
As Sam made his way through middle school into high school, Jeremy saw new skills emerging in his son.
“In a lot of ways, Sam is a unicorn,” says Stacie Cone, an adviser at Sam’s school who has worked with him throughout high school.
Sam is spending the summer in Alaska, guiding with his dad. Sam traces his mother’s pain back to the same forces that his cousins are dealing with today in Alaska: cultural isolation and intergenerational trauma.
“Her parents’ generation were all sent off to boarding schools,” Sam explains.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Texas Shooting: Schools Can’t Stop Violence”

What about the second line of defense-schools? After the shooting in Parkland, Florida, President Trump and others demanded that schools make themselves “Harder” targets.
After the shooting at Santa Fe High School on Friday, Texas’s Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick suggested that the incident might have been avoided if the school had had only one entrance.
Hardware upgrades won’t stop a committed shooter, says Ronald Stevens, the executive director of the National School Safety Center, an advocacy group.
After the Columbine shooting in 1999, government and academic researchers closely studied some three dozen attacks at schools, with one central question: How can they predict, and thwart, future attackers long before they walk into the building?
Schools can offer mental health services to the boy-although generally, the school cannot have a child committed without the parent’s permission.
Even in the most notorious high school attacks, the shooters were leaking their intentions: Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris produced a video for class in which the two young men, wearing trench coats, portray themselves shooting several people at school, before setting off pipe bombs.
Another described a work of short fiction in which Cho’s protagonist plans a mass school shooting.
Ronald Stevens, of the National School Safety Center, argues that schools also should be more proactive in sharing their concerns with outside authorities.

The orginal article.