Summary of “How Purdue University’s President Froze Tuition”

The number of domestic undergraduate “Underrepresented minorities” at Purdue grew from 2,483 in 2012 to 3,461 in 2019.
“We couldn’t wait on the public high schools to catch up to us.” The original Purdue Polytechnic High School, in Indianapolis, will graduate its first class, of 115 kids, in 2021.
“My dream is that we can slip a Purdue scholarship in with each diploma,” he said.
Last November, Purdue’s student newspaper released audio of Daniels discussing faculty hiring with a group of mostly minority students.
D’Yan Berry, the president of Purdue’s Black Student Union, wrote that she was “Disappointed but not at all surprised by his reference to Black students as creatures. It afflicts me that this is how he speaks even when ‘boasting’ on students.”
Overnight, Purdue Global, as it’s now called, brought approximately 30,000 online students, most of them part-time, into Purdue’s orbit and made the school one of the largest online educators in higher ed.
Kaplan-best known for its test-prep service-continues to provide back-end and marketing services for Purdue Global in return for a percentage of revenue.
Daniels presented the Kaplan deal to the Purdue community as a fait accompli; the trustees quickly approved it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Famous Teen Basketball Players Go to Sierra Canyon”

Sierra Canyon’s founders had neither the expertise nor the money to run a high school, but after looking at the donor lists at L.A.’s top private high schools, they realized some of those parents had once been Sierra Canyon elementary parents.
In 2004, Stevie Wonder, whose daughter went to Sierra Canyon, performed a three-hour benefit concert hosted by fellow Sierra Canyon parent Howie Mandel.
The star power at Sierra Canyon was unique – players with famous names, from families already plugged into the city’s engine of celebrity.
Sierra Canyon won back-to-back state titles in 2018 and 2019, with NBA dads filling the Feinberg Family Pavilion along with their famous friends: Kanye and Kim Kardashian West, whose half-sisters Kylie and Kendall Jenner were Sierra Canyon cheerleaders, showed up to watch alongside Larsa Pippen, Scottie’s wife and one of Kim’s best friends.
The locker room was lined with jerseys representing Sierra Canyon graduates who had gone on to play Division I college basketball, including Bagley at Duke and Robbie Feinberg at Harvard, although the current players were already looking beyond that.
While most schools must pay their own way to the tournaments Sierra Canyon was playing around the country, the organizers of these events were so desperate to have Sierra Canyon on the marquee that Shapiro had been able to charge anywhere from $15,000 to $40,000; for the games played in NBA-size arenas to accommodate the demand for tickets to see Sierra Canyon live, Shapiro has worked out a revenue-sharing model that he said could generate fees that approach six figures per game.
At Sierra Canyon, LeBron wore sunglasses, a Sierra Canyon sweatshirt, and a cap printed with the phrase MORE THAN AN ATHLETE. The previous day, Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gigi had died alongside seven others in a helicopter crash in Calabasas.
The documentary crew from LeBron’s company was called into action on their off day to film the scene at the school, and while Bronny James and Zaire Wade had grown up with the Bryants as family friends, the other Sierra Canyon players also seemed moved by his death.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On Running in the City as a Woman”

In his beloved book What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, Haruki Murakami appraises a group of girls who run past him: “Most of these girls are small, slim, have on maroon Harvard-logo outfits, blond hair in a ponytail, and brand-new iPods, and they run like the wind. You can definitely feel a sort of aggressive challenge emanating from them.” When a girl runs fast, she’s seen as a threat.
No matter how fast you run, danger can still find you.
I began running when I was eight years old, competing on my school’s cross-country and track teams.
Thoughts of the warm changing room motivated me to run faster.
One day, he kicked a puddle of water at me during an after-school run, soaking the entire side of my running tights with dirty water.
Do I acknowledge the harasser? Run faster? Stop running?
Throughout my years of running, the catcalls have included honks; “Run, Forrest, Run!”; and crude remarks about my body.
In the book, Murakami writes that he practices two habits while running: listening to music and attempting to clear his head Neither of these activities are possible for me when running.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Path to Success Is a Squiggly Line”

“I started thinking, What would I really love to do? I figured being a fireman or law-enforcement officer would be a lot of fun,” Kryger said.
On January 20, 1993, while searching a house with his team, Kryger was shot in the thigh by a suspect.
Thinking of the “Amazing high-school coaches” who inspired him, Kryger met with the assistant superintendent of his school district, who advised him about the courses he’d need to complete in order to coach and teach math in the public­-school system.
It took three more years of college, plus another year when he was teaching high school during the day and completing his own studies at night.
Two decades later, Kryger is the athletic director at Menlo­-Atherton High School, where he also teaches four math classes and coaches the boys’ varsity lacrosse team.
Kryger’s story is similar to that of Nate McKinley, who overcame a set of internal challenges before settling on the job that would become his career.
McKinley started out following the path that had been set for him by his father, an international busi­nessman.
Eventually, McKinley told me, he decided he wanted to try something more challenging: “A friend brought me an old apple press, and I made my first batch of hard cider. It was revolting! So during my commute on the train, I would read about yeast, fermentation, and the hundreds of varieties of apples. My next batch of cider wasn’t gross; it was actually drinkable.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Trump’s words used by kids to bully classmates at school”

“It’s gotten way worse since Trump got elected,” said Ashanty Bonilla, 17, a Mexican American high school junior in Idaho who faced so much ridicule from classmates last year that she transferred.
Three weeks into the 2018-19 school year, Miracle Slover’s English teacher, she alleges, ordered black and Hispanic students to sit in the back of the classroom at their Fort Worth high school.
Still, Miracle said, school officials took no action until six weeks later, when Clark, 69, tweeted at Trump – in what she thought were private messages – requesting help deporting undocumented immigrants in Fort Worth schools.
The day after the 2016 election, Donnie Jones Jr.’s daughter was walking down a hallway at her Florida high school when, she says, a teacher warned her and two friends – all sophomores, all black – that Trump would “Send you back to Africa.”
The Post found that players, parents or fans have used his name or words in at least 48 publicly reported cases, hurling hateful slogans at students competing in elementary, middle and high school games in 26 states.
School staff members in at least 18 states, from Washington to West Virginia, have picked on students for wearing Trump gear or voicing support for him.
Last February, a teenager at an Oklahoma high school was caught on video ripping a Trump sign out of a student’s hands and knocking a red MAGA cap off his head. Trump supporters respond as the president speaks at a rally in El Paso in February 2019.
In a YouTube video, Jayne Zirkle, a high school senior, said that the trouble started when classmates at the School Without Walls discovered an online photo of her campaigning for Trump.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Eco-anxiety is overwhelming kids. Where’s the line between education and alarmism?”

As climate change continues unabated, parents, teachers and medical professionals across the country find themselves face-to-face with a quandary: How do you raise a generation to look toward the future with hope when all around them swirls a message of apparent hopelessness? How do you prepare today’s children for a world defined by environmental trauma without inflicting more trauma yourself? And where do you find the line between responsible education and undue alarmism?
The nexus between climate change and the mental health of children is rarely at the forefront of the discussion around environmental politics, but it’s very real: In a Washington Post-Kaiser Family Foundation poll of American teenagers released in September, 57 percent said that climate change made them feel scared and 52 percent said it made them feel angry, both higher rates than among adults.
The group’s executive director, Kathleen Minke, responded in an email to Guthrie that her group focuses on “Issues that have a very direct impact on schools, student learning and children’s mental and behavioral health.” Climate change, she said, “Falls outside this professional focus.” When I interviewed her later, Minke told me that her organization isn’t ignoring climate change and has dedicated resources to help school psychologists deal with kids affected by natural disasters.
Still, more schools have picked up the S4CA resolution model, and in September, Rep. Barbara Lee introduced a nonbinding resolution acknowledging climate change as a social justice issue and supporting more climate education.
Haase is a founding member of the Climate Psychiatry Alliance, an ad hoc group that has sprung up to offer patients and doctors advice on discussing climate anxiety.
For an overwhelming problem like climate change, being able to take some action – whether eating less meat or switching to an electric vehicle – can help fight paralysis and get patients to recognize that the worst of climate change is not a fait accompli and that some progress can be made.
In Pennsylvania’s Central Bucks School District in 2017, a Republican school board member used fears about rising anxiety among the young in lobbying to remove textbooks that discussed climate change.
A survey from the National Center for Science Education and Penn State’s Survey Research Center during the 2014-15 school year found that fewer than half of the teachers responding had taken a formal course on climate change.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why American Students Haven’t Gotten Better at Reading in 20 Years”

Officially known as the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, the data reflect the results of reading and math tests administered to a sample of students across the country.
Math scores have been flat since 2009 and reading scores since 1998, with just a third or so of students performing at a level the NAEP defines as “Proficient.” Performance gaps between lower-income students and their more affluent peers, among other demographic discrepancies, have remained stubbornly wide.
The long-standing view has been that the first several years of elementary school should be devoted to basic reading skills.
The statute required states to administer annual reading and math tests to students in grades three through eight and once in high school, and attached hefty consequences if schools failed to boost scores.
The best way to boost students’ reading comprehension is to expand their knowledge and vocabulary by teaching them history, science, literature, and the arts, using curricula that that guide kids through a logical sequence from one year to the next: for example, Native Americans and Columbus in kindergarten; the colonial era and the American Revolution in first grade; the War of 1812 and the Civil War in second grade, and so on.
Another panelist-Timothy Shanahan, an emeritus professor at the University of Illinois and the author or editor of over 200 publications on literacy-went on to debunk a popular approach that goes hand in hand with teaching comprehension skills: To help students practice their “Skills,” teachers give them texts at their supposed individual reading levels rather than the level of the grade they’re in.
Shanahan said, recent research indicates that students actually learn more from reading texts that are considered too difficult for them-in other words, those with more than a handful of words and concepts a student doesn’t understand.
The failure to build children’s knowledge in elementary school helps explain the gap between the reading scores of students from wealthier families and those of their lower-income peers-a gap that has been expanding.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After Years of Tumors, Growing a Baby Instead”

Any child I had would develop in my damaged abdomen, stretching its web of scars.
Time and again I wondered – is it fair, wise, or kind to bring a child into the world knowing I may not live long?
Was a child a selfish attempt to perpetuate my genes, a way to eclipse my own death? If my mothering time was cut short, would my child resent me?
Our child would join an ample clan of grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins and, of course, a father.
I imagined our child living without me, learning all I wanted to teach her – how to paint, to bargain shop, to prune blackberries, to heal a broken heart – from another.
To ensure our child had no unwelcome cancerous neighbors, I squeezed my bulging self into an MRI machine, the tech wedging in an extra pillow and wishing me luck.
Then he showed me what had never appeared on any of my other scans: The contour of a nose, the angle of a chin, the curve of a belly – the parts of my perfectly growing child, outlined in shades of gray on the screen.
Draped in blue, I waited to greet our child, staring at the striped towels arranged on the infant warmer nearby.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Case for the Rebel”

My favorite colleagues ask tough questions of school leadership, are impatient with the status quo, and often intentionally break rules if it means a better education for the students in their classrooms.
What tends to be expected of students in schools is the opposite of what many people admire in adults.
Students who raise their hands, sit quietly, do their work without question, and generally have figured out how to “Do school” are the ones who tend to benefit most from the system and the ones who seem to have the strongest “Work ethic” in the classroom.
In a study of teacher expectations and perceptions on student behavior, most teachers noted that self-control and cooperation were the most important indicators of school success.
9 percent of college students define preparedness as “Work ethic,” compared to 23 percent of business leaders and 18 percent of recruiters.
A few years ago, I taught a student who, like the aforementioned one I currently teach, was awful in class.
Teachers can create strengths-focused classrooms that help students like the class clowns and the rebels see the value in their gifts and reframe them positively, rather than seeking negative attention.
A disruptive student can utterly destroy a positive learning environment for him or herself, the other students, and the teacher.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Confessions of an Outsider in Elite Black America”

The feeling took me back to my teenage years, which I spent with my face pressed against the glass of elite black society.
Some of these rules were no-brainers, like never snitch on another black student, never make fun of another black student’s complexion or call them “Ashy” in front of white people, whether you like them or not, always make room at your lunch table for another black student, and of course, if you are in a room full of white people and the N-word is used, you are morally obligated to fight.
For the most part, the black elite I grew up rubbing elbows with were a lot like me.
Coined in 1903 by black scholar W.E.B. Du Bois, the talented tenth concept was the idea that 10 percent of African-Americans had the opportunity for upward mobility through higher education, and that this 10 percent were morally obligated to be the “Rising tide” that lifted the black population out of their intended status as permanent second-class citizens.
No matter what I did, I never had a shot at being accepted into elite black society.
I was reminded of my inferior status every spring, when most of the black students and all of the black girls had cotillion rehearsal.
Because my mother didn’t pledge the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority at a historically black college, I couldn’t leverage family friendships to build inroads with the black elite like my cousin had. My mother probably would have found a way for me to participate in cotillion if I had asked, but I was too embarrassed to do so.
What I had learned from my experience in elite society was that as a black woman I wasn’t free to take risks that might not pay off.

The orginal article.