Summary of “Should Parents Eat Lunch With Their Children at School?”

“The parents would bring pizza for some students and not others. It became a little bit of a circus and I do remember feeling like it was disruptive instead of being just a sweet lunch between just the mom and the kid,” she said.
Other children whose parents aren’t able to visit them can be left feeling neglected.
School districts have attempted to thwart these problems by forcing parents to sit with just their own children, sometimes in separate rooms or areas.
Rogers Middle School in Texas even offers parents and children the opportunity to dine at a “Bistro” with fancy-looking chairs to avoid lunchroom disruption.
“Some parents make hot lunch at home and bring it to them.” She says that there are at least seven or eight parents a day in her school’s lunchroom.
Parents who do eat with their children said that family lunches are a positive thing.
They argue, schools should be encouraging parents to become more active and involved in their children’s school lives.
In her district, she says, there are parents who join their children for lunch up to three days a week.

The orginal article.

Summary of “25 Lessons Business School Won’t Ever Teach You”

There are a lot of great lessons you can learn in business school.
Some of the most important lessons you’ll ever learn about how to be successful in business comes from getting out there and doing it.
If you’re hoping that MBA will be your golden ticket to kickstarting a successful career in business, consider these all-important 25 lessons that you’ll have to learn outside the classroom.
This is a topic rarely covered in business school.
Business school will teach you the steps you should follow when forming a business: how to do research, come up with a plan, make a budget, choose a business structure and so on.
Weighing opportunity versus potential failure is often personal – you must take into account so many factors beyond the business formulas you learn in school.
Business school may teach you that disruption begins with defining a solution to a problem and then finding a way to add value to customers’ experience.
Learning to navigate the harsh business world will teach you more than you can ever learn in a classroom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Helping My Fair-Skinned Son Embrace His Blackness”

For the most part, the neighborhood in New Haven, Connecticut, where we lived for the first 11 years of our son’s life was a refuge from such skeptics.
Sure, the new crop of Yale grad students and junior faculty who moved in each year often looked askance when our son would yell “Mom” to me across grocery-store aisles, but they soon caught on.
Like other mixed-race children, our son started his journey to figure out his racial identity early.
School is the place where kids navigate their identity and relationships apart from their families.
In our children’s case, school was also separate from their neighborhood: Each day, they boarded a bus to attend a diverse magnet school about five miles from our home.
We moved to Washington, D.C., after 16 years in New Haven, and mere weeks before our children started high school and middle school.
Our son sat alongside his cousins of varying hues of black and brown as they listened to stories about how their great-uncle was fired from his factory job after he told his boss he supported Martin Luther King Jr., and how he later sold scrap metal to send my eldest cousin to college.
Our son roared with laughter as his mother and aunties stayed up late singing and dancing to soul, R&B, and old-school hip-hop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Millions of Teens Can’t Finish Their Homework”

In what’s often referred to as the “Homework gap,” the unequal access to digital devices and high-speed internet prevents 17 percent of teens from completing their homework assignments, according to the new Pew analysis, which surveyed 743 students ages 13 through 17.
Black teens are especially burdened by the homework gap: One in four of them at least sometimes struggle to complete assignments because of a lack of technology at home.
The homework gap can have major consequences, with some studies suggesting that teens who lack access to a computer at home are less likely to graduate from high school than their more technologically equipped peers.
The “Challenge to complete homework in safe, predictable, and productive environments can have lifelong impacts on their ability to achieve their full potential,” wrote John Branam, who runs an initiative to provide lacking teens with internet access, in an op-ed for The Hechinger Report last year.
While disadvantaged students can resort to public libraries and other venues that offer free Wi-Fi, such alternatives are still major obstacles to finishing homework every night.
“Your aunt has internet access [at home] but she lives a 40-minute bus trip across town,” Barnum wrote, illustrating the roadblocks for teens without internet access.
The researchers’ forthcoming book, The Digital Edge: How Black and Latino Youth Navigate Digital Inequality, chronicles the ways low-income students of color get around not having access to the internet and a computer.
In what Watkins calls “Social hacking,” students often “Reengineer their socioeconomic circumstances in order to get access to technology that they otherwise would not have access to.” For example, the researchers observed that students without such resources at home were adept at developing relationships with teachers who could, say, give them special weekend access to laptops and software for use at home.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mount Hood’s Deadliest Disaster”

Today is the 32nd annual Mount Hood Climb Service Day, and Melissa Robinson, the middle school chaplain, is offering a benediction.
The Oregon Episcopal School Mount Hood climb remains, to this day, the second-deadliest alpine accident in North American history, behind a 1981 avalanche on Mount Rainier that killed 11.
In the early hours of Tuesday, May 13, Mark Kelsey’s phone rang: there was trouble on Mount Hood, involving student climbers who were due back and hadn’t been seen.
“You can’t even stand up in 100-mile-per-hour winds,” says Matt Zaffino, the KGW meteorologist and a climber who has summited Mount Hood twice.
It’s later in the morning on Mount Hood Climb Service Day, and kids in first through fifth grade from the Lower School have gathered in the chapel.
“We do take a chance … every single year before Mount Hood Climb Service Day, to remember the story of the Mount Hood climb,” he says softly.
Over the past 32 years, there has never been another Oregon Episcopal-sponsored student expedition to climb Mount Hood.
“Leaving a prayer for eternal healing and acceptance of what we cannot understand,” the text read, “For all those impacted by the OES climb of Mt. Hood May of 1986.” Lamb is aware that his loss-though deep-was not commensurate with the loss of a child or a sibling or a parent or a spouse.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Amazon HQ2 Could Make Tech Diversity Worse in Atlanta”

When Lonnell Warner was in middle school, his family moved from Atlanta to a suburb just outside town.
Eventually Warner got into a fight with a white student.
Warner secured his degree by homeschooling back in Atlanta, but he was off track for the jobs in computing that he had hoped to pursue after graduation.
Those alternate pathways to computing education, like boot camps and IT certification courses, would seem to offer the perfect solution for aspiring tech workers like him.
In advance of its promise of 50,000 new jobs to its chosen HQ2 location, Amazon has pledged $50 million to STEM education over the next five years.
10 million of that already went to Code.org, a nonprofit that supports expanding computer-science education and diversity.
Amazon also donated $300,000 each to Greater Foundation and the Technology Access Foundation, investments meant to help local nonprofits help students without access to computer-science education.
Warner had to make a living, so he took a job doing facilities work at a local university.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Teacher Project says low expectations hurt kids”

A new study from The New Teacher Project, a national nonprofit focused on teacher development and educational programming, aims to dispel this idea.
“They’re planning their futures on the belief that doing well in school creates opportunities-that showing up, doing the work, and meeting their teachers’ expectations will prepare them for what’s next,” the study notes, but something, along the way, is not working.
“As we visited classrooms around the country, we found teachers working hard individually to help their students, but we also saw pretty low-quality assignments kids were getting, and instruction that doesn’t give them a chance to do deep thinking and the type of work they’re going to need to do in order to succeed,” Weisberg says.
There’s no one cause for this gap, but one is low expectations on the part of teachers: Less than half surveyed by TNTP believe their students could work at grade level, so they assign them work that doesn’t require them to stretch.
Teachers themselves are not solely responsible for this problem: Teacher prep programs in the U.S., TNTP found, are often too focused on cookie-cutter curricula or standardized test scores, and doesn’t prepare them to lead nuanced and engaging lessons or deal with students as individuals.
“What we prioritize is operational efficiency-getting large volumes of kids through the system,” he adds, but The Opportunity Myth calls for an approach that not only gets kids through high school, but ensures that they succeed afterward.
Weisberg wants to start seeing teachers and schools re-engage with students’ experience of the work-are the engaged throughout the whole time in a classroom? Are they asking questions, or zoning out during a lecture that requires no participation?-and ensure that their lessons are pulling kids forward, not letting them stay stuck.
TNTP does not yet have a full set of recommendations for what exactly this new approach might look like-the organization compiled The Opportunity Myth to understand why so many kids were struggling, despite finishing high school, and their next step will be to build a system that ensures that they succeed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘School Choice’ and How High Schools Shaped the U.S.”

The high school still galvanized a shared, American society.
High schools can continue to do this, so long as they can resist being dismantled.
The public high school got its start in the early-19th century, when the education reformer Horace Mann-the “Father of the public school”-pressed for the establishment of “Common schools,” intended to provide a universal base of knowledge to be shared by all citizens, free of charge.
The public high school issued a challenge to the old classical curriculum of higher education and the vision of society it entailed.
Instead, many early high schools embraced a more practical curriculum, featuring literature, writing, science, and other modern subjects.
Communities still rallied behind their public high schools, convinced they would connect education to local and national prosperity.
Through the influence of the High School we have better lower schools, more thorough and efficient teachers, broader and more cultivated parents and citizens, better prepared to exercise the duties and privileges of citizenship.
Reflecting this shared sense of investment, locals called public high schools “Our schools,” and the students became not just children but “Our children.” Large public audiences attended performances, public examinations, and school ceremonies, which were also advertised and noticed in local newspapers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is Harvard Trying to Hide?”

The secret deal gave the Education Department access to the tape and other sensitive internal Harvard information on two conditions: that the feds fight any FOIA request for the records and that they return them to Harvard at the conclusion of the investigation.
The investigators’ notes also showed that Harvard was willing to admit recruited athletes with academic profiles well short of Harvard’s usual standards.
“The disclosure of information that reveals-to an unprecedented degree-the inner workings of Harvard’s admissions process may harm Harvard not only by motivating applicants to modify their behavior to take advantage of that information, but also by disadvantaging Harvard in the extremely competitive market to recruit, admit, and enroll the most outstanding students across the world,” Harvard’s lawyers wrote in a June filing.
Harvard also complained that SFFA was essentially trying to dump the university’s files into the public domain, accusing the group of trying “Clutter the docket with irrelevant exhibits in an effort to make them public.”
“Disclosure of these documents would likely force Harvard to expend significant resources to dispel myths about its admissions process that emerge from erroneous third-party statistical analyses of these data,” Harvard attorneys argued.
Larew, who railed against Harvard’s legacy policy in the wake of the Education Department probe, insists that Harvard has frequently dissembled about and obscured its actions.
While it’s indisputable that Harvard fought my initial records request, Harvard’s admissions dean took a more moderate approach during the ensuing publicity.
A Harvard admissions office memo that appears to date to 2013 suggests that special treatment for alumni has eroded a bit, with the former practice of the admissions director reading all legacy applications now reined in to cases that “Might require special handling” or where doing so “Might be helpful.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Child marriage in the U.S. is surprisingly prevalent. Now states are passing laws to make it harder.”

Even in an era when the median age of marrying has climbed higher and higher, unions like Phil and Maria’s remain surprisingly prevalent in the United States.
“What do you think, Mama?” Phil finally asked, but his mother only shook her head. Maria wandered away with her son to play at the lake’s edge.
Phil met Maria on Feb. 25, 2017, in a trailer on the other side of Everett, where a buddy from jail was living.
A boy who would always and only know him as dad – not as Phil, or stepdad, but simply dad. So he’d been talking to Maria about it.
Maria? Maria had always been her responsible child, the one she could count on.
Lines blurred, family roles shifted: Was Maria the adult she often seemed, or the girl who still thought about prom, loved video games and sometimes needed mothering? And was Phil a “Pervert,” as she’d initially worried, or a husband who seemed to genuinely love Maria and was nothing but decent every time Michelle saw him?
Expression softening with sympathy, Michelle leaned forward, and, as her cigarette burned down to nothing and her other girls disappeared into the house, she stayed focused on the phone call, speaking not with Maria the mother, or Maria the wife, but Maria, her 16-year-old daughter.
Early one Friday morning, those concerns seemed remote, as Douglas and Phil slept side by side in the bedroom, and Michelle wrote her a Facebook message, telling her she was proud of her, and Maria headed out by herself for school, the child bride who didn’t drop out.

The orginal article.