Summary of “It’s Time to Be Honest About Seafood”

Aquaculture, or aquatic farming, is increasingly meeting this demand and now supplies just over 50 percent of all seafood globally.
A 2019 bill that proposes a moratorium on commercial permits for marine finfish aquaculture facilities in U.S. waters could serve to widen this gap, and it represents another divergence: between public wariness about domestic aquaculture operations and the science showing aquaculture’s potential for sustainable growth.
While wild-caught fisheries have hit “Peak fish” domestically and globally, with limited potential for additional sustainable growth, there is mounting scientific evidence that the U.S. could dramatically increase domestic aquaculture production and do so sustainably, as we did with our fisheries before they peaked.
The oceans, including around the U.S., have a lot of space to put sustainable aquaculture operations, and the amount of space required to farm a lot of seafood is miniscule compared to land-based farming.
If the U.S. wants a future with more local and sustainable seafood production, part of the solution is better communication of what sustainable aquaculture looks like and who are the people working in that space, including chefs, scientists, conservationists and farmers.
This can help raise awareness of the realities of seafood production and demand, and of the potential for sustainable aquaculture.
At the policy level, we need more evidence-informed conversations and policies around the future of domestic aquaculture that address important philosophical questions-namely, where do we want our food to come from and what, if any, role should we play in its production? Can aquaculture have its own Magnuson-Stevens Act, which changed the game for the sustainability of our wild fisheries?
Halley E. Froehlich, PhD, is an incoming assistant professor of marine aquaculture and fishery sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and co-leads the Conservation Aquaculture Research Team at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Eat Seafood Responsibly: A Guide From Chef Eric Ripert”

Ripert split his time between the Mediterranean and Atlantic sides of the country, fishing for treasures like octopus and loup de mer, and gathering lake trout and frogs with his family.
In addition to responsibly sourcing fish, Ripert stresses that seeking out freshness and using proper technique will help guarantee success with fish in the home kitchen.
“While sourcing organic produce and humanely raised land animals is relatively easy, identifying sustainable fish can be more difficult,” Ripert says.
Despite the work it takes to keep track of it all, Ripert says doing your research is worthwhile to ensure that the fish we use are not endangered, were fed naturally, and were treated humanely.
Today, many dock-to-door style companies and responsible fish markets and auctions are making this type of seafood more readily available and easier to distinguish.
“If we don’t pay attention to and don’t support the artisanal way of catching fish,” Ripert says, “It is going to disappear and we are going to end up with a bunch of factory boats and reach the point of no return with sustainability in the oceans.”
“The challenge with seafood is that many home cooks have had a bad experience, such as a stinky fish in the house, a bone in the throat, or fish that falls apart in the pan,” Ripert says.
Hone Your Cooking Skills “The easiest technique that I would recommend for someone at home is to basically broil the fish or bake the fish, either whole or as a fillet,” Ripert says.

The orginal article.