Summary of “Seinfeld at 30: 5 ways the “show about nothing” changed television”

Its pilot, “The Seinfeld Chronicles,” aired that evening in 1989, but the show wouldn’t return for nearly a full year – its second episode didn’t air until May of 1990.
1) Seinfeld changed the way sitcom stories are written It’s not terribly exciting to think about television in terms of its story structure – the combination of plot developments, scenes, and raw dramatic beats that make up any given episode of TV – but Seinfeld’s impact on television comedy is actually most pronounced in this arena.
The best Seinfeld episodes are marvels of story structure, with jokes and storylines dovetailing and tucking into each other in ways that can be as thrilling as any twist in a plot-heavy drama.
Not every show uses the Seinfeld structure, but the series gave other shows the option of pursuing far more than the typical two stories per episode.
Even a short year before Seinfeld debuted, a show like Murphy Brown had to essentially center everything on the fact that its protagonist was a single woman making her way through her life and work.
4) Seinfeld predicted the growing whiteness of network television Little of this is Seinfeld’s fault; television’s whiteness has far more to do with the Clinton-era repeal of the Financial Interest and Syndication Rules.
NBC actually forced creators Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David to make the show a multi-camera, but once the two were committed to doing so, they essentially broke all of the established rules of how multi-camera sitcoms worked, twisting and bending them so far that the multi-camera sitcom had essentially nowhere else to go if writers wanted to continue to innovate.
The longer Seinfeld ran, the more single-camera sequences Seinfeld and David inserted into the action.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee’ Season 10 Netflix Review”

The tenth season of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, which starts streaming Friday, marks the first fresh batch of episodes since host Jerry Seinfeld moved the chat show from Crackle to Netflix.
It’s tempting to call Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee Jerry Seinfeld’s second show about nothing, since sometimes that description rings true.
He’s guided completely by his own curiosity and instincts, which is what makes Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee so interesting, particularly if you’re a Seinfeld fan, but also maddening at the same time.
Perhaps that’s why this first Netflix season of Comedians in Cars demonstrates, purely by accident, why Seinfeld’s humor felt so right in the 1990s and feels less in sync with the current moment.
It’s harder this season – either because of Seinfeld himself, the times in which we are living, or some combination of the two – to overlook how out of touch the whole exercise, including Seinfeld, sometimes seems.
No one would ever accuse Seinfeld of being woke, but there are times in Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee when he seems to be the anti-woke.
Of course, Seinfeld would have no patience for this type of critique, and he says as much at various points during Comedians in Cars.
It’s a generous, ego-free act on Seinfeld’s part that a lot of other comedians would never allow on their own show.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s the deal with Jerry Seinfeld?”

It’s been twenty years since Seinfeld went off the air, twice as long as the show actually ran, and in that time, Jerry Seinfeld’s efforts to distance himself from his role as “Jerry Seinfeld” have been few and far between.
Unlike his co-stars Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Jason Alexander, Seinfeld’s primary role, from his stand-up days to the show that made him famous to his latest venture, Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee, has been a version of himself.
Our fondness for “Jerry Seinfeld” is boundless – episodes of Seinfeld continue to air non-stop throughout the world at all times of the day, something that has made him a very, very wealthy man – but Seinfeld the real human has, understandably, changed.
Seinfeld, undoubtedly one of the funniest men in comedy for decades, drives beautiful cars, and shoots the shit with his likewise successful and famous friends.
Stripped of the affable fiction of his show – which was almost entirely about the ways Seinfeld did not like to be inconvenienced – it’s not hard to imagine the real world Seinfeld having graduated into a series of petty annoyances that are so far beyond the realm of the familiar that they barely register as human anymore.
“Jerry, did you bring your car?” Norm asks as Seinfeld calls to say he’s nearby.
“Seinfeld” infamously set out to turn traditional comedy structure on its head – no hugging, no learning – to brilliant effect, but it goes a long way toward explaining what’s missing from Comedians In Cars: There are no stakes.
Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated Jerry owned a Porsche on Seinfeld.

The orginal article.