Summary of “What Self-Awareness Really Is”

A few years ago, my team of researchers and I embarked on a large-scale scientific study of self-awareness.
In 10 separate investigations with nearly 5,000 participants, we examined what self-awareness really is, why we need it, and how we can increase it.
Our research revealed many surprising roadblocks, myths, and truths about what self-awareness is and what it takes to improve it.
1: There Are Two Types of Self-Awareness For the last 50 years, researchers have used varying definitions of self-awareness.
The first, which we dubbed internal self-awareness, represents how clearly we see our own values, passions, aspirations, fit with our environment, reactions, and impact on others.
The second category, external self-awareness, means understanding how other people view us, in terms of those same factors listed above.
In our interviews, we found that people who improved their external self-awareness did so by seeking out feedback from loving critics – that is, people who have their best interests in mind and are willing to tell them the truth.
3: Introspection Doesn’t Always Improve Self-Awareness It is also widely assumed that introspection – examining the causes of our own thoughts, feelings, and behaviors – improves self-awareness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to See Yourself Clearly: Skip the Introspection Mode”

Thinking about yourself is not correlated with knowing yourself.
Introspection involves thinking, categorizing, labeling, analyzing - you are evaluating your thoughts and emotions.
The Introspection Mode Trap”The problem with introspection is that it has no end.” Philip K. DickSelf-reflection is not wrong, how most people do it is.
When you fall into the introspection mode trap, you let your thoughts take over.
You need to neutralize your thoughts to avoid turning introspection turn into a suffering game.5.
Self-Awareness Is Not Just about You”Self is a sea boundless and measureless.” Kahlil GibranTo know yourself is to accept yourself.
Thinking about yourself isn’t necessarily correlated with knowing yourself.
Increasing self-awareness is not just about how well you know yourself, but how others see you.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Self-Awareness Really Is”

Four years ago, my team of researchers and I embarked on a large-scale scientific study of self-awareness.
In 10 separate investigations with nearly 5,000 participants, we examined what self-awareness really is, why we need it, and how we can increase it.
Analyzing the results of nearly 800 existing scientific studies to understand how previous researchers defined self-awareness, unearth themes and trends, and identify the limitations of these investigations.
Surveying thousands of people across countries and industries to explore the relationship between self-awareness and several key attitudes and behaviors, like job satisfaction, empathy, happiness, and stress.
Conducting in depth interviews with 50 people who’d dramatically improved their self-awareness to learn about the key actions that helped them get there, as well as their beliefs and practices.
Surveying hundreds of managers and their employees to learn more about the relationship between leadership self-awareness and employee attitudes like commitment, leadership effectiveness, and job satisfaction.
The second category, external self-awareness, means understanding how other people view us, in terms of those same factors listed above.
In our interviews, we found that people who improved their external self-awareness did so by seeking out feedback from loving critics – that is, people who have their best interests in mind and are willing to tell them the truth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is How To Be More Self-Aware: 5 Secrets From Research”

In one study of more than 13,000 professionals in financial services, technology, nursing, and more, researchers found almost no relationship between self-assessed performance and objective performance ratings.
They’re more creative, more confident, and better communicators.
They’re more effective leaders with more enthusiastic employees.
They even lead more profitable companies some research has even shown that self-awareness is the single greatest predictor of leadership success.
In a few cases, he found the opposite: the more time the participants spent in introspection, the less self-knowledge they had. In other words, we can spend endless amounts of time in self-reflection but emerge with no more self-insight than when we started.
If you really want to get to know yourself better, do it like a good researcher would: spend less time theorizing and more time collecting data points to see patterns and trends.
A true commitment to ongoing learning- saying to ourselves, the more I think I know, the more I need to learn- is a powerful way to combat knowledge blindness and improve our effectiveness in the process.
Reflect less, notice more: Your calendar and your credit card bill will tell you more about who you really are than that story you’re spinning in your head. Ask “What” not “Why”: “Why” is for philosophers and whiners.

The orginal article.