Summary of “Death by Instagram: Inside Detroit’s gang wars”

Federal prosecutors are piecing together a rare death penalty prosecution against members of the Seven Mile Bloods, a notorious east-side Detroit gang blamed for terrorizing neighbors, fueling the opioid epidemic and assassinating rivals targeted on Instagram hit lists.
Since 2003, prosecutors say gang members targeted for death dozens of rivals on Instagram hit lists, participated in more than 14 shootings, at least four homicides, 11 attempted murders and drug crimes that eroded the quality of life on the gang’s home turf, known by locals as The Red Zone.”The SMB made The Red Zone into a war zone,” U.S. Department of Justice Trial Attorney Julie Finocchiaro said.
More than 1,000 pages of federal court records and trial testimony illustrate how prosecutors used Facebook and Instagram posts, YouTube videos and rap lyrics to try and topple a social-media savvy gang that had a death grip on both the opioid drug trade and violence on the east side of Detroit.
Five defendants in the Seven Mile Bloods case face possible death sentences under federal law, even though Michigan has abolished the death penalty.
A mix of arrogance and naiveté leads gangsters to document crimes on social media and is the result of living in a place so poor and violent that a possible death sentence is meaningless, said Carl Taylor, a Michigan State University sociology professor who has studied Detroit’s gang culture.
A common symbol of the gang is a five-pointed star, which signifies that the Seven Mile Bloods belong to the “People Nation,” an alliance of street gangs that includes the Bloods, Vice Lords, Latin Kings and Latin Counts.
The Seven Mile Bloods and its affiliated group, Hobsquad, use various gang signs and symbols, including the five-pointed star and a hand displaying all five fingers.
The gang paid $15 per pill in Detroit and sold the drug for $60 in Charleston.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alexander Hamilton’s Deep Advice”

Ten will be his hour of going to bed throughout the year.
From the time he is dressed in the morning till nine o clock he is to read Law.
At nine he goes to the office & continues there till dinner time-he will be occupied partly in the writing and partly in reading law.
After Dinner he reads law at home till five o’clock.
From this hour till seven he disposes of his time as he pleases.
From seven to ten he reads and studies what ever he pleases.
Who along with Jefferson and Madison, was one our most intellectual founder fathers, had learned through experience that doing anything worthwhile with your brain requires a foundation built on thousands of hours of deep work.
If you want to make a difference, you can’t avoid the necessity of waking up at six to read law before breakfast.

The orginal article.