Summary of “Want to Fall in Love With Your Partner Again? Science Says to Ask Them These 36 Questions”

The person we often crave to feel most known by is our partner.
Name three things you and your partner appear to have in common.
Take four minutes and tell your partner your life story in as much detail as possible.
Alternate sharing something you consider a positive characteristic of your partner.
Share with your partner an embarrassing moment in your life.
Tell your partner something that you like about them already.
Share a personal problem and ask your partner’s advice on how he or she might handle it.
Ask your partner to reflect back to you how you seem to be feeling about the problem you have chosen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Fall in Love With Your Partner Again? Science Says to Ask Them These 36 Questions”

The person we often crave to feel most known by is our partner.
Name three things you and your partner appear to have in common.
Take four minutes and tell your partner your life story in as much detail as possible.
Alternate sharing something you consider a positive characteristic of your partner.
Share with your partner an embarrassing moment in your life.
Tell your partner something that you like about them already.
Share a personal problem and ask your partner’s advice on how he or she might handle it.
Ask your partner to reflect back to you how you seem to be feeling about the problem you have chosen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Happens to Your Body After Giving Birth?”

Watch: What they won’t tell you about being a new mom.
“You have Instagram, you have Facebook, you have this idealized version” getting publicized and shared on social media, Karp says.
“I bet if you searched a million images of new babies and new mothers, you’d get only one image that focuses on swollen ankles.” Which can lead, he says, to unrealistic expectations and discomfort with sharing the less adorable realities of new parenthood.
Mayer credits social media with having the opposite effect.
As the Millennial generation, known for its propensity to post status updates and frequent broadcasts to social media, has grown up, all facets and stages of people’s lives have become fodder for sharing, including new motherhood.
“They can share anything they want to share, and that’s really powerful.” And perhaps, she adds, the same culture of radical public honesty about the unglamorous, unpleasant aspects of new motherhood has given rise to the graphic, unfiltered mothering humor that Wong, Teigen, and Schumer have helped popularize.
New motherhood and its medical challenges have come into the public spotlight in other ways, too, Mayer notes.
A few notable books aimed at enlightening new mothers on how to care for their own bodies after birth have been released in the past couple of years-such as 2016’s The First Forty Days and 2017’s The Fourth Trimester.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Talk To Boomers And Other Older People In Your Life About Fake News”

Costales sat next to his friend and fellow tutor, Mareson Suresh, 15, to discuss the online behavior of the older people in their lives.
Boomers and older generations are by no means the only people having trouble in our new and chaotic information environment, although research suggests they have the most pressing challenges.
Younger people also face difficulty, which is why so many news literacy programs target K-12 and college students.
Caulfield said his students see the need for older people in their lives to learn the skills he’s teaching.
Caulfield said it’s common for older people to unwittingly share things that have extremist messages or iconography.
One of its first programs was Senior Connects, which helps older people get online and gain basic internet skills.
Even if some of the adults in your life struggle with what they share, they’re still people with a wealth of knowledge, experience, and love to offer.
“I feel like one of the biggest things about this program is having a reason to talk to elders, because as teens you don’t have that many opportunities to talk to some of the smartest people in your community, and especially people who have all those life experiences,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Planning Friend Hangouts on Google Calendar”

As people get older, the opportunities to simply find oneself among friends without any prior planning grow more infrequent.
The shared calendar doesn’t eliminate these scheduling difficulties, but it creates a home base for making plans that keeps our text chain less cluttered with “So, when is everyone free for dinner?”-type messages.
Though it might appear more bureaucratic than fun, other friend groups have also found organizing their time this way to be helpful.
Kiki Pierce, 25, a development coordinator at a think tank in Washington, D.C., started talking about implementing a shared calendar with her friends as a joke, but the idea quickly became serious.
When Jordyn Holman, a 25-year-old reporter in New York, received a Google Calendar invite from one of her friends for a pretty standard hangout they had previously talked about, she found it amusing.
She’s used calendar invites, along with a shared Slack room, to organize plans with her friends.
This sense of feeling “Professional” that Holman mentioned is one that came up in most of the interviews I did for this piece, and something I’ve thought about a lot during the seven or so months my friends and I have been using our shared calendar.
“It’s like trying to exercise without getting sweaty.” Unless adults already have some external space in their life where they see one another, such as at their kids’ school, at church, or at a book club, friends rarely just happen to find themselves in the same place anymore.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I Post Photos of My Kids on Instagram”

I get a lot of satisfaction out of sharing our moments, but ultimately I want my kids to be able to look back when they’re teenagers or adults and be glad I documented their lives in a fun way.
Lots of parents refuse to put their kids on Instagram because it feels too public.
Since I’m now a dad and not chasing news stories, my kids are my subjects and I chase smiles, passed-out toddlers after a day on the hill, and other moments that capture the awesomeness of childhood.
I thought about posting photos of them throwing fits-as a way to be more honest with my followers-but my wife and I talked it over and decided that the kids might not want to see themselves losing it.
Right now I get a lot of satisfaction out of sharing our moments, but ultimately, Instagram motivates me to shoot more photos.
I’m not close to everyone, but I consider them friends or acquaintances, so it doesn’t feel like I’m sending my kids’ photos off to some random group of people.
For my aunt who doesn’t get to see the kids very often, she feels closer to them because she knows what’s going on when she sees my posts.
If either of my kids feel like they’re sick of me posting their images, I’ll stop.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Not Great, Bob! The Case for Actually Being Honest When People Ask How You Are”

When you’re in the midst of a crisis or low period, it can be hard to remember how much people care about you, or to believe that their support will actually make you feel better.
A lot of people take it as indisputable fact that no one who asks “How are you?” wants a real answer.
Is that really always the case? Why have we all decided that this is true? I ask people how they are doing every day, and even if I’m saying it out of habit sometimes, I still want to know.
If you’re worried about burdening someone who just wanted to exchange pleasantries, that can be mitigated by what you share and how you share it.
If you’re thinking that being more open would make you feel better but simply have no idea how to respond to “How are you?,” below are some scripts similar to the ones I’ve used in my own life that you can use as a jumping-off point.
Even more forthcoming; can be specific or vague; doesn’t even require being asked “How are you?:” “Hey, I just wanted to let you know that my mom was recently diagnosed with cancer. No need to worry-she has great doctors and I have a good support system in place. I don’t really want to talk about it now, but I wanted you to know in case I seem a little distracted or start taking more PTO than usual.”
Ultimately, what you choose to share, who you share that information with, and how you communicate it is super personal and completely up to you.
When I’m struggling, I find it helpful to simply remember that I have a choice, that I’m allowed to give a candid answer to “How are you?,” that being vulnerable isn’t an all-or-nothing proposition, and that being a little more honest can actually make me feel a lot better.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Learning about Critical Thinking from Kitty Claws and Ice Cream Cones”

Try as I might to explain the decision-making process, I can’t imagine I will ever approach the clarity and impact of Mo Willems’ Should I Share My Ice Cream? Spoiler alert for those have not followed this particular adventure, the elephant gets some ice cream and has to decide whether to share it with his best friend, Piggie.
Elephant takes so long making the decision that his ice cream ultimately melts, and Piggie shows up just in time to console her friend by sharing an ice cream cone of her own.
My ~894 readings have taught me that young readers can not only follow the logic of deciding whether to share, but also be driven to such sympathy to need to hug the book on pages when the characters look sad. Part of the magic comes not just from the ultimate decisions, but the steps the characters take in making them.
The initial excitement, the realization that he has a chance to share, the question of whether he should share, the question of whether he wants to share, the discovery of an excuse to keep the ice cream to himself, and the logical breakdown of that excuse.
On one page, the elephant gleefully determines that the chance that Piggie might not like the flavor absolves him of any reasonable obligation to share.
He looks at the ice cream with almost manic anticipation.
Not only can we start conversations about critical thinking before they can be fully considered conversations, but we can remember the power of a clear narrative in opening conversational doors that might otherwise be closed to us.
If picture book authors can use their prodigious skills to engage toddlers in logic, trade-offs, and critical decision making with 500 words and an ice cream cone, the rest of us can take the time to get to know our audiences, find the right narrative, and open the door to conversations with a shared story.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Cars Divide America”

Jane Jacobs identified the automobile as the “Chief destroyer of American communities.” Cars not only clog our roads and cost billions of dollars in time wasted commuting, they are a terrible killer.
Applied to the economy, the term captured Ford’s move to higher pay for his workers-the famous $5-a-day wage-that enabled them to buy the cars they produced.
Mellander ran correlations for the share of workers who drive their cars to work alone, along with three other types of commuting: taking transit to work; walking to work; and biking to work.
Car dependence encompasses both liberals and conservatives: 73 percent of independents, 86 percent of Republicans, and more than three-quarters of Democrats say that they depend on their cars to get to work.
The key is not individuals’ car use, but the way we sort into communities based on our reliance on cars.
Metros in which a higher share of people depend on their cars to get to work are poorer, and those where more people use transit or bike or walk to work are considerably more affluent.
Nall’s work shows how road infrastructure that has promoted car use-and in particular America’s massive investment in the federal interstate highway system-played a profound role.
The car’s politically divisive role extends beyond America.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Renting Instead Of Owning, And Taking It To The Extreme”

They own less stuff than their parents’ generation, and they rent or share a lot more.
More young people are leaning into the rental or sharing economy – owning less of everything and renting and sharing a whole lot more.
He spends most of his days using things he does not own.
He uses the gym’s laundry service because he does not own a washing machine.
Johnson says he owns so little that he has even been able to get rid of his backpack.
A little more than a third of millennials currently own homes, a rate lower than Generation X and baby boomers when they were the same age.
Skyler Wang, a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Berkeley who studies the sharing economy, says even if young people own less and are less enamored with ownership than their parents may be, they still have a lot of stuff – it’s just not tangible.
“They’re the type of people who love to couch-surf. They own like 30 things, but … they hoard digitally. They have tons of photographs. They have thousands and thousands of Instagram posts.”

The orginal article.