Summary of “Naomi Osaka Is the Coolest Thing in Tennis”

At Indian Wells, Naomi Osaka looked like she could beat any tennis player in the world.
At a press conference after the finals match, Naomi Osaka described the feeling of winning her first title the way any champion would: in reference to a meme.
Four days later, in the first round of the Miami Open, Osaka faced her childhood hero and inarguably the greatest living tennis player-perhaps the greatest ever-Serena Williams, a woman with more Grand Slam titles than Osaka has years on Earth.
Naomi Osaka has to sort out different dilemma: “I was debating if I should travel with my PS4 or not.”
Despite being the circuit’s most soft-spoken player, Naomi Osaka is a champion of the press conference.
The tennis circuit is long and arduous, and Osaka is just at the beginning of it.
Maybe the best way to reconcile Naomi Osaka, mild-mannered gamer and meme lover, with Naomi Osaka, the WTA’s destroyer of worlds, is her Instagram.
The tennis player Osaka wants to project isn’t the hyper-focused competitor.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cover Story: Janelle Monae on Prince, New LP, Her Sexuality”

As she sings on a song from her new album, Dirty Computer, “Let the rumors be true.” Janelle Monáe is not, she finally admits, the immaculate android, the “Alien from outer space/The cybergirl without a face” she’s claimed to be over a decade’s worth of albums, videos, concerts and even interviews – she is, instead, a flawed, messy, flesh-and-blood 32-year-old human being.
“I created her, so I got to make her be whatever I wanted her to be. I didn’t have to talk about the Janelle Monáe who was in therapy. It’s Cindi Mayweather. She is who I aspire to be.”
Janelle Monáe Robinson was born here on December 1st, 1985, to a mom who worked as a janitor and a dad who was in the middle of a 21-year battle with crack addiction.
Monáe soon passed a bigger audition, for the American Musical and Dramatic Academy, and headed to New York.
Simultaneously, Chuck Lightning, seemingly the more extroverted half of two-man funk act Deep Cotton, who make their own music as well as work with Monáe, grabs a bowl of quinoa from the kitchen as Monáe doles out decisions on which version of the “Pynk” video will be released.
Monáe recorded most of Dirty Computer here, in a small studio with Havana-inspired decor.
Monáe’s America is the one on the fringes; it accepts the outsiders and the computers with viruses, like the ones she thought she had. She understands the significance of now making her personal life a bigger, louder part of her art.
Still, Dirty Computer is meant to be a celebration, and if she loses a few people along the way, Monáe seems OK with that risk.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Could Paulette Jordan Be The First Native American Governor?”

While the bulk of the Idaho Democratic establishment has endorsed Jordan’s opponent, Boise school board member A.J. Balukoff, Jordan has earned the support of the progressive PAC Democracy for America, Planned Parenthood, Our Revolution, and was among the first five candidates endorsed on the national level by Indivisible.
When Mic ran a brief piece about Jordan in January, it stamped a picture of Jordan with “Young, Progressive, and Running.” At least 250,000 people shared or liked the piece on Facebook – several thousand more than live in all of North Idaho.
Jordan has caught the national eye as a Native woman, and a progressive at that, who is vying to make history in a conservative state.
Winning in November might ultimately matter less than what a Jordan candidacy would symbolize to many in Idaho, long accustomed to a certain type of representation.
At the Women’s March earlier this year, Jordan attracted attention when she introduced Scott – the far-right “Liberty legislator” known for her defense of the Confederate Flag – as her “Friend.” But working with people like Scott is the only way for Jordan to get elected in Idaho, whether to the state legislature or, today, in her run for the governor’s office.
As much as her name, and her campaign, is preceded by “First Native American woman,” Jordan doesn’t see herself uniquely in those terms.
She told me about a young Native girl from Oklahoma who’d posted to Facebook that, when she grew up, she wanted to be like Paulette Jordan.
“But are you Paulette Jordan?” Jordan nodded.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Power of Leaders Who Focus on Solving Problems”

The talk has covered a lot more than this, as Ming has touched on many initiatives and startups she’s been involved with, all solving problems at the intersection of advanced technology, learning, and labor economics.
She’s an entrepreneur, a CEO, and a teacher – all leadership roles – but when we ask her about her leadership style, she demurs.
“What I’ve learned about myself as a leader, as an executive, is – I’ll be blunt – I’m a pretty mediocre manager. I try to do the right things, but I’m much more focused on problems than I am on people, and that’s not always that healthy.” While she’s utterly confident in herself, she just doesn’t identify as top management.
“For a long time, I tried to be the whole package. I put a lot of energy into making certain that I was shepherding everyone along, doing all the right things for my teams. Then I realized: You know what? If I can get some people that are really good at the things that I’m not, then I can focus on my strengths. And my strengths are in creative problem solving – all the way down to writing the code myself.”
The attitude she’s espousing doesn’t really map to the traditional image of the enterprise leader, or to what typically gets taught in leadership development programs.
Over the past year, as faculty director and executive director of the MIT Leadership Center, we have been trying to put a finer point on a distinctive style of leadership we keep seeing all around us.
Cautiously, we called it problem-led leadership, and launched into all the interviewing, case studying, and literature review that goes into a leadership research project.
Having fallen in love with a problem, they step up to leadership – but only reluctantly, and only as necessary to get it solved.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emma Gonzalez profile: What you need to know about the Marjory Stoneman Douglas student”

She hid in the auditorium while Nikolas Cruz was firing on her classmates: Gonzalez says that as she waited in the dark room at Marjory Stoneman Douglas on February 14, she searched Google News for updates.
Her father fled Cuba and is a lawyer: Gonzalez was born in the US. Her dad sought refuge from Fidel Castro’s regime by moving to New York in 1968.
Her mother is a math tutor and worries about her: In an interview with CBS’ “60 Minutes,” mom, Beth, reminded viewers that Gonzalez is still young despite the strength she’s displaying: “It’s like she built herself a pair of wings out of balsa wood and duct tape and jumped off a building, and we’re just like running along beneath her with a net, which she doesn’t want or think that she needs.”She’s says being open about her sexuality has helped propel her activism: Gonzalez has been president of her school’s Gay-Straight Alliance for three years.
She shaved her head two weeks before school began in September.
She’s been on the cover of Time: The April 2 issue of the magazine features Marjory Stoneman Douglas students who are leading the national conversation about gun control.
Along with Gonzalez, it also features David Hogg, Cameron Kasky, Alex Wind and Jaclyn Corin with the word “ENOUGH,” written in bold letters and imposed across the image.
She’s still planning on college after graduation: Just four days before the shooting, Gonzalez went on a tour of New College of Florida in Sarasota.
That’s still her plan, People magazine reported.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jennifer Lawrence Is A Prisoner Of Her Cool Girl Image”

Four years and eight days ago, Jennifer Lawrence reached Peak Cool Girl.
Lawrence never played a Cool Girl onscreen – not in her blockbusters, not in the small, indie film that garnered her first Oscar nomination and national attention, not in her two collaborations with David O. Russell in which she plays decidedly unchill female antagonists.
As one Twitter user asked, “If Jennifer Lawrence falls and no one’s around… is it still quirky?” The Cool Girl image began to feel less, well, cool: few things seem less chill than tripping so people will make a GIF of you.
Since this Cool Girl image first formed around Lawrence, it’s proven remarkably difficult to shake – even as she makes decisions and statements that should complicate it.
Lawrence’s response revealed just how flimsy, how oversimplistic, the Cool Girl image built around her was in the first place.
So much of the frustration, the fed-up-ness, and the fatigue directed toward Lawrence derived from lingering Cool Girl behaviors.
In the conversation with Stern, that exhaustion is raw: because Lawrence is funny, and because the image of her created in her early twenties is rooted in chill, and because, as a 27-year-old, she periodically does or says things that still fit that image, most people refuse to take her – or her causes, or opinions, or acting – seriously.
In five years, Lawrence will be in her early thirties, past what Hollywood considers her prime and peak palatability, nearing the age when Cool Girl behaviors start to signify as desperate, even sloppy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Brenda Lee Is More Than ‘Rockin Around the Christmas Tree'”

Brenda Lee is sitting inside her spacious Nashville home, sipping a glass of sweet tea and staring at dead friends.
Lee turns to another recent acquisition: a signed photo of Jerry Lee Lewis.
Right now Lee is thinking less about her legacy and more about her left foot, which she broke recently and which is bothering her more than usual.
“Brenda Lee is in the top three female rock & roll singers of all time: her, Janis Joplin and Tina Turner.” John Lennon seemed to agree; he’s said to have called Lee “The greatest rock & roll voice of them all.”
Just about everyone in town has a Brenda Lee story: the time they ran into her at the grocery store, the time they interrupted her lunch at the Cheesecake Factory to ask for an autograph, the time they helped lift her luggage into an overhead compartment.
Brenda Lee Tarpley’s first official performance was in 1951, at the age of seven, when she won the talent show at her elementary school, belting out the country standard “Slow Poke” and Nat King Cole’s “Too Young.” Influenced in equal part by the gospel, country and R&B she heard growing up, Lee soon began singing Hank Williams and Peggy Lee songs in talent shows and variety programs in and around Atlanta.
Did the death of her father also give Lee access to the type of adult pain she expressed in her earliest pop hits? “I think so,” Lee says quietly.
“I don’t think Brenda Lee has been acclaimed as much as she should,” says Wanda Jackson, who, like Lee, was a pioneer in the male-dominated worlds of country, rockabilly and rock & roll.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Poppy Just Might Be the Warhol of the Youtube Era”

It might not seem like an important characteristic to note about an ambulatory human being, but in the context of Poppy, the strange, viral YouTube star and pop singer, the existence of this foot is a huge relief.
Her most popular one, “I’m Poppy,” came a few months later and features Poppy saying “I’m Poppy” in slightly varied ways for ten minutes and one second.
Poppy and Sinclair play around with viewers’ desires to be puzzled: When it was suggested Poppy was in a cult, they released a video called “I’m Not in a Cult,” with a corresponding T-shirt; at her live performances, Poppy will drink from a cup of Kool-Aid that she then passes along to the audience.
When fans wondered if it’s meant to be a strange religion, Sinclair and Poppy self-published a book called The Gospel of Poppy, which reads like both Scripture and a meditation guide.
This kind of highly meta marketing has created two camps of obsessives: Poppy Seeds, who love her in an earnest way, and Poppy Truthers, who dedicate sub-Reddits and videos to unearthing personal information about her and working out conspiracy theories: Is she being held captive by Sinclair? Is this an extended commercial for something?
Poppy went even more viral in 2017, when a bunch of people in Istanbul decided Poppy was in fact deeply sinister.
Sinclair, who was born Corey Mixter, spent much of the aughts gaining a little bit of internet fame with the songs and YouTube videos he made with his then-girlfriend, a sort of Poppy prototype who went by Mars Argo.
At Sundance, for the splashy premiere of “I’m Poppy” – a 24-minute scripted satirical pilot about “An odd pop singer and internet star who signs a deal with a TV network on the strength of her social-media following, only to discover the dark side of fame after she signs a contract with actual Satan to become the most famous girl in the entire world” – Poppy is dressed like one of Richard Prince’s nurses and can barely stand in her six-inch white pleather platform boots.

The orginal article.

Summary of “From ‘Westworld’ To The Real World: How Evan Rachel Wood Balances Acting And Activism”

Evan Rachel Wood, the Emmy-nominated star of HBO’s hit show Westworld, is no stranger to fame.
Ever since, Wood has been living her life, at least partially, on-camera, with her breakout role coming at age 14 when she played Tracy Louise Freeland-a teenager involved in drugs, sex and crime-in Thirteen.
Wood’s life off-screen is equally as dynamic.
It’s a role made for someone with as many experiences as Wood, who is often described as wise beyond her years.
“Dolores is multifaceted; she’s obviously an artificial being but what the show explores is what consciousness even is,” said Wood.
“The experiences she’s having are very real; the trauma is real; the pain is real. What’s to say her pain isn’t any different than ours?”.
“She’s a survivor; she’s been abused for about 30 years … she’s been knocked down so many times and she comes back even stronger,” Wood said, adding that Dolores’ strength gave her the strength to go to trauma therapy.
“Being an actor doesn’t take away your humanity or take you out of the real world,” she said, repeating the sentiment she recently expressed on Twitter in response to comments made by Steve Bannon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “From ‘Westworld’ To The Real World: How Evan Rachel Wood Balances Acting And Activism”

Evan Rachel Wood, the Emmy-nominated star of HBO’s hit show Westworld, is no stranger to fame.
Ever since, Wood has been living her life, at least partially, on-camera, with her breakout role coming at age 14 when she played Tracy Louise Freeland-a teenager involved in drugs, sex and crime-in Thirteen.
Wood’s life off-screen is equally as dynamic.
It’s a role made for someone with as many experiences as Wood, who is often described as wise beyond her years.
“Dolores is multifaceted; she’s obviously an artificial being but what the show explores is what consciousness even is,” said Wood.
“The experiences she’s having are very real; the trauma is real; the pain is real. What’s to say her pain isn’t any different than ours?”.
“She’s a survivor; she’s been abused for about 30 years … she’s been knocked down so many times and she comes back even stronger,” Wood said, adding that Dolores’ strength gave her the strength to go to trauma therapy.
“Being an actor doesn’t take away your humanity or take you out of the real world,” she said, repeating the sentiment she recently expressed on Twitter in response to comments made by Steve Bannon.

The orginal article.