Summary of “The Hardest Effect I Ever Pulled Off”

As part of Vulture’s weeklong series of stories about the wonder of special effects, we spoke to 35 filmmakers – directors, cinematographers, effects artists – about the toughest effect they’ve ever pulled off.
The hardest visual effect would probably be at the end of the movie – the whole showdown with Emily [Blunt] and Millie [Simmonds], when Emily is pointing the gun.
Mimi Leder, director: The hardest visual effect I’ve ever encountered was when I was making Deep Impact with ILM, creating the water coming across New York City.
Even though it may not be the flashiest effect, or the most Emmy-winning effect we’ve ever done, I learned the most.
When you’re grounded, when you’re taking input from all of these other pieces of the filmmaking process, and you’re using visual effects to integrate – to play jazz off of all of the different artists and people who are making this image on film – it becomes something that’s more than just a visual effect.
Kevin Kolsch, director: What really made the effect hard wasn’t the actual play of the effect, but the aftermath.
Tom Woodruff Jr., director and effects artist: The hardest effect I’ve ever done always goes back to Mortal Kombat with Goro, the four-armed creature.
Susanne Bier, director: The hardest special effect was the rapids with the kids and Sandy [Bullock], because it’s such a combination of Sandy and the two kids, stunts, effects.

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Summary of “The Flu Nearly Killed Him. Now He Says ‘Get The Vaccine'”

Charlie Hinderliter wasn’t opposed to the flu shot.
Now, after 58 days in the hospital, a week in a medically induced coma, two surgeries and three weeks in a nursing home, he’s speaking out to encourage everyone to do something he’d never done before: Get a flu shot.
It’s hard to say why the flu hit Hinderliter so hard.
His primary care doctor, Kevin King at Mercy Clinic in St. Louis County, says there are several factors that can predispose people to complications from the flu including a weakened immune system and age.
About 70 percent of hospitalizations and 90 percent of flu-related deaths occurred in people over 65 in the 2017-2018 flu season, according to the CDC. Hinderliter was an otherwise healthy 38-year-old.
King says the flu shot is important even at times, like last winter, when the season’s flu shot was not particularly effective.
The flu vaccine doesn’t offer complete protection; the CDC estimates that flu vaccination reduces the risk of the virus by about 40 to 60 percent.
In September, for the first time he can remember, he got a flu shot.

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Summary of “Here’s Why You Absolutely Need To Get A Flu Shot This Year, According To Experts”

To answer all of your flu shot questions, we spoke with Dr. Lisa Maragakis, senior director of infection prevention at the Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore, Maryland, and included advice from a panel of public health experts at the 2018 CDC and National Foundation for Infectious Diseases flu vaccination conference.
The vaccine will help protect you for the duration of flu season, which typically goes until March – but it only lasts for one season, so you need to get one every year.
Under the Affordable Care Act, insurance plans are required to cover the flu shot with no copay – but check with your insurance beforehand, because some plans only cover the shot if you get it at a certain location.
Medicare covers one flu shot each season, and Medicaid covers flu shots for children and some adults – contact your state’s Medicaid office to find out if you’re covered.
The overall vaccine effectiveness was 40%, which means the vaccine reduced a person’s risk of having to seek medical care for the flu by 40%, according to the CDC. The flu shot is, at best, about 60% effective.
“The flu shot boosts your body’s ability to fight infection, so you may get the flu but have milder symptoms, avoid hospitalization, and avoid death,” said Maragakis.
The flu has an incubation period of one to four days, so it’s possible to get the shot when you already have the flu and don’t know it.
Getting the flu is not better than getting the flu shot.

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Summary of “John Correia Is YouTube’s Self-Defense Guru”

The first shot poked an ovoid hole in the target’s epigastric region.
“That was about as perfect a shot as existed. We’re going to make an honorary Arizonan out of you.” The next two shots landed off-center.
On Second Amendment issues, Correia is very nearly a gun-rights absolutist.
“You should be able to put five shots in five seconds in that circle,” he said, indicating an area seven yards away and about the size of a dinner plate.
I don’t think I’m an especially incompetent shot.
In Correia I saw the perfect concealed-weapon carrier: someone who has trained to a high standard, who will avoid confrontation whenever possible, and who is much more eager to save lives with his first-aid training than to take lives with his VP9. As Correia drove me to the airport, I told him about a news story I once read about a man, described as a “Good Samaritan,” who saw a kidnapping under way in a Walmart parking lot in Kansas.
I told him I remembered the biblical Good Samaritan story going differently, with the Samaritan administering first aid and nourishment rather than hot lead. Correia, unsurprisingly, had thought a lot about how a Christian life might be reconciled with instruments of death.
“That’s not going to happen till Jesus comes back.”

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Summary of “What Trauma Docs Know”

It’s the visually impressive injuries-like the amputations or near-amputations, the people who have been impaled, with objects sticking out of them-that get everybody’s attention, but it’s not always those injuries they’re going to die from.
Most patients figure out that we’re here to help them.
The triage system tries to spread it out, but sometimes you may have the entire party-both factions-in your trauma bay.
The most common question we get asked is, “Did you take the bullet out?” We don’t take the bullets out.
They’re like splinters: They work their way out eventually.
We haven’t called them “Accidents” since the ’90s. Any holiday where everyone’s out drinking, having fun, it’s just a matter of time, 12 hours or so, before people start getting shot, people start falling, people start drunk-driving.
Someone not wearing a motorcycle helmet, they literally come in with brain matter coming out of their skull.
Just punched me in the face and knocked me out cold.

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Summary of “Six Encouraging Summer League Developments”

Summer league can bring out the existentialist in an NBA fan.
From a scouting perspective, summer league has value.
Carter played stout interior defense by rotating well, playing sturdy post defense, and continuing to alter shots without fouling.
The early returns playing for the Las Vegas summer league champs are positive-he flat-out looks comfortable and plays with both pace and feel.
The fact Simons is already playing competitive defense by sliding over screens and generally being in the right position is even more encouraging.
Melton shot 28.4 percent from 3 and 70.6 percent from the line during his freshman season with the Trojans.
As The Stepien’s Cole Zwicker ‏tweeted, Melton made only a pair of 3s off the dribble in college, yet made seven this summer.
ESPN’s Mike Schmitz pointed out that Mykhailiuk showed similar scoring flashes playing last summer at the U-20 European Championship, but he’s reached a new level since the collegiate season ended.

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Summary of “Does Having the Best Camera Phone Matter?: Reviews by Wirecutter”

It’s important to remember that even if a phone produces brilliant photos, it won’t necessarily be a pleasure to use-or capable of getting the shots you want.
When I asked phone reviewer TJ Donegan of Reviewed.com what makes a camera stand out, he told me that it’s more about the phone’s user interface and the camera’s speed and responsiveness than image quality.
“I used the LG V30 for about five months, and the camera was unbearably slow,” he explained.
“I’d miss shots all the time. The S9 camera badly over-saturates, but I’d rather have the shot.” These are details that any phone review worth its salt would report.
In the past, third-party camera apps were sometimes faster or produced better results than Apple’s, Samsung’s, or Google’s own software.
Those days are largely gone, in part because the phone manufacturers got better at it, and in part because only they know how to properly take advantage of the proprietary hardware included in the recent generations of smartphones: dual-lens systems, special image processing circuitry, and so on.
That said, though phone makers have increased the power of their built-in editing tools-including advanced features like levels adjustments, photo-editing apps are still helpful for getting the most out of your shots.
The editor built into Instagram is also surprisingly powerful, and it eliminates a step if that’s where your photos are headed anyway.

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Summary of “Meet the Five Most Exciting Prospects at the 2018 World Cup”

Sure, all of the best players play for the best club teams, where they get coached by the best managers, who get to use the best facilities on a daily basis.
National teams congregate only a few times per year, for a friendly there or a qualification match here-and most sides get to play in a competitive tournament only once every 24 months.
Most wingers today like to play on the side of the field opposite their strong foot so they can cut infield and take shots or create for their teammates.
The most likely of the five players on this list to switch teams this summer, Ziyech was arguably the best player in the Eredivisie last season.
308 – Hakim Ziyech was involved in 308 shots in the 2017/18 Eredivisie season, more than any player in the top 5 leagues.
Amine Harit intrigued some prospect heads during his lone season in France’s top flight in 2016-17, but he played most of his minutes as a wide player.
Among players who played at least 700 minutes in the Bundesliga this year, no one suffered more fouls per 90 minutes than Harit.
Opposing defenses will key on him in Russia, so other players will have the time and space to step up.

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Summary of “Denis Shapovalov Is the Thrilling, Gutsy Teen of Tennis”

I am walking with Denis Shapovalov on the grounds of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden when a woman approaches him and, after apologizing for being a bother, wishes him luck.
Indian Wells has lots of open practice courts, allowing fans an opportunity to get quite close to their favorite players.
Just a quick glint in a player’s eye that sizes up the stranger-is it a fan? A sponsor? A tournament volunteer? But Shapovalov is, for now, unusually unguarded.
Throughout the tournament, Shapovalov had been staying at the family home of close friend and fellow Canadian tennis player Félix Auger-Aliassime.
Occasionally, you can get the sense that, when a lower-ranked player takes the court against an all-time great like Nadal or Federer, they do so with the modest hope of just not getting blown off the court.
“You can’t just put the ball in and hope Rafa misses. It’s not going to happen. He’ll just run you around the court and make the shots he needs to make. When I play the top guys, I make sure that if I have an opening, I go for it.”
“As a person,” he says, “I find myself to be shy and not that exciting, but on the court I feel like a different animal. We’re entertainers. That’s our job: to give the fans a good show. I grew up wanting to play on the big stages in front of all these fans, so when I finally get the chance to do it, I’m so happy that I let myself go. For me, I feel like the point is to go out there and express your emotions and your feelings for the game.”
“The obligations they must have? Players like Roger and Rafa can’t go anywhere unnoticed, within tennis and outside of tennis. They can’t go to malls. They can’t go to the movies and just relax. They always have to be cautious. And then they somehow balance everything and still play at the highest level. If I were in their position, I don’t know if I could do it for as long as Roger or Rafa. I’ll probably retire earlier than…well, definitely earlier than Roger!”.

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Summary of “Carmelo Anthony’s Failed OKC Experiment”

Carmelo Anthony was bad in the playoff series that ended his first season on the Thunder.
The Nuggets hadn’t made the playoffs for eight years prior to Anthony’s arrival in 2003; with Carmelo on the roster, they immediately began a seven-year playoff streak.
In Oklahoma City’s first-round loss to the Jazz, Anthony was “Bad” in the same way that an unexplained wad of human hair in a fast-food meal is bad. When Anthony was off the court, the Thunder stood a chance-in fact, OKC outscored the Jazz by 32 combined points in the series when Anthony was benched.
We’re left frustrated because the things Carmelo wants are still different from the things we want from Carmelo.
On two stages, Carmelo has proved himself as one of the most important players in basketball.
Ah, yes, Olympic Melo: Playing as a power forward or even a center, Carmelo feasted against international big men who had to choose between guarding his shot or his drive.
We’ll never see a player like Carmelo Anthony again.
Did Carmelo play poorly this season because he hated his non-star turn? Or did Carmelo hate this season because he played poorly? Carmelo’s chickens and eggs will sum up his NBA career: Maybe he was “Bad” as a result of his poor decisions and misguided priorities.

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