Summary of “Why Americans love the Great British Bake Off”

It’s the most British of shows, yet this world of Victoria sponges and Bakewell tarts has Americans transfixed.
What Americans often praise about the show is the lack of cut-throat competition or monetary incentives.
Incredulously, it continued: “That’s right: The winner of The Great British Baking Show wins a title and an engraved cake stand, and that’s it.”
“I’ve been so inspired by the show that I’ve just been using my time off in the kitchen to try new things,” she says.
The Great British Baking Show is now part of US culture.
Saturday Night Live has spoofed it; The Late Late Show has broadcast its staff bake-off; The Daily Show has used it to explain Brexit, calling it the Great British Break-Off.
Great British Bake Off contestant Val Stones is a regular visitor to the US, but says she started to get recognised a lot more this year, after the show went up on Netflix.
“The Great British Baking Show,” it concluded, has become “The perfect set of arms to run into”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”When in Doubt, Play Insane”: An Interview with Catherine O’Hara”

“Schitt’s Creek,” which was created by O’Hara’s longtime collaborator Eugene Levy and his son, Daniel Levy, both of whom also star in the show, is a modern-day reverse “Beverly Hillbillies”: the Rose family, once the millionaire owners of a successful video-store chain, lose everything when their business manager commits fraud.
It’s a classic city-mouse/country-mouse story, but O’Hara’s Moira, with her vainglorious flair for the dramatic and her peacocking wardrobe, elevates the show to a new level of ecstatic eccentricity.
O’Hara played the wicked stepmother Delia Deetz in Tim Burton’s “Beetlejuice” and then spent the nineties as part of Christopher Guest’s troupe of oddballs, starring in his absurdist, unscripted mockumentaries “Waiting for Guffman,” “Best in Show,” “A Mighty Wind,” and “For Your Consideration.” During our free-wheeling conversation, we discussed Moira Rose, the origins of her collaboration with Levy, and the one idea that Christopher Guest would not let her put on film.
After we all agreed we were going to do the show, I had lunch with Daniel and Eugene Levy, and I knew we were going to talk about what I was going to look like.
The night before we shot that scene in “Best in Show,” where I would fall, and then Gerry Fleck would have to take over handling the dog, we were talking about the logistics, and I asked Chris, I said, “Do you think I could do this?” I walked away from him like that.
How did you think about show business from that standpoint, living in L.A.?
There’s such a freedom in the way Chris works, because you improvise, and you get it on film; then he can use whatever he wants, and cut whatever he wants or throw out whatever he wants, but it’s there.
Eugene said, “You might want to run that by Chris before we shoot.” I go, “Well, he can say no afterwards, he can not use it….” And Eugene said, “No, I think you might want to….”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “El Chapo, “Narcos: Mexico,” And The Myth Of The Man In The Suit”

Despite a majority Latino cast and a hefty amount of Spanish, I would say Narcos: Mexico is a show that, like its predecessors, is built to deliver exactly what US audiences want to see when they peek into the illicit world of drug trafficking.
Recent decades have seen the rise of arbitrary abductions and killings in the regions of Mexico that host the country’s leading cartel headquarters; much of the violence is as nonsensical as it is brutal, and yet the myth of the benevolent drug lord persists beyond Mexico’s borders.
Narcos: Mexico tells the story of how, decades ago, Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo managed to go from lowly police officer of the then-underdeveloped state of Sinaloa to the country’s most powerful drug kingpin.
Though Narcos: Mexico is based on true events, its delivery is stalely formulaic, and it seems wholly uninterested in exploring anything beyond the tired tropes of the genre.
Lately I’ve been feeling strangely protective of Mexico.
In Narcos: Mexico, Félix Gallardo, whose nickname was El Padrino, is shown to be an elegant and calculating executive.
Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán’s trial began last November in Brooklyn around the same time that Narcos: Mexico premiered.
Ana Karina Zatarain is a writer living in Mexico City.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Used Clothing Floods Beacon’s Closet, Courtesy of Netflix’s “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo””

The show is “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo,” the new reality series from the famed Japanese organizational expert, which was released on Netflix on New Year’s Day.
A kindly sprite in ballet flats and boxy cardigans, Kondo flutters through the homes of harried Angelenos and, with the help of a translator, advises them on how to declutter.
A curly-haired woman nearby in line said that she’d read Kondo’s book, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” when it first came out in English, in 2014, and watched the show over the weekend, which prompted her urge to purge.
“My husband’s gonna question why he married me now,” the wife, Rachel, says, as Kondo pulls unruly stacks of clothing from her dresser drawers and heaps them onto the bed for sorting.
When the mover arrived, they struck up a conversation about Kondo.
It’s not about rubbernecking at other people’s pain or shortcomings, as in a show like “Hoarders.” Kondo doesn’t judge her subjects for filling their homes with useless objects.
The promise of the Kondo method is that getting rid of physical clutter might clear mental and spiritual clutter as well.
“I honestly never want to hear the name Marie Kondo again,” she said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New York Review of Books”

Public broadcasting appealed to the minister in Rogers: he was concerned that profit-driven networks like NBC diluted arts programming, and he envisioned programming for young people with less slapstick, more meaning.
Coworkers remember Rogers as both zany-dancing across the set with an inflatable sex doll they had hid in his closet-and imperious, as when he reprimanded an actor who kindly suggested to Henrietta Pussycat that she not cry, something Rogers would never suggest to a child.
A new book, Maxwell King’s The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers, offers the almost wacky details of his life but only hints at the tension within Rogers, both the dutiful son of an industrialist and a sensitive composer devoted to the idea that the world children live in is fundamentally different from the world inhabited by adults.
King seems to almost reluctantly settle on “Androgynous” when he might have just left it with what Rogers told a friend: “Well, you know, I must be right smack in the middle. Because I have found women attractive, and I have found men attractive.” This would satisfy a preschooler but is too loose for King, who treats his subject’s sex life as if he were conducting a police investigation: “There was no double life. And without exception, close associates concluded that Fred Rogers was absolutely faithful to his marriage vows.”
Two years later, Rogers was featured in a Wall Street Journal profile under the headline “Loved by Kids for His TV ‘Neighborhood,’ Mr. Rogers is a Hit in Boardrooms, Too.” Rogers declined to discuss the strike but criticized the union’s existence.
In a series of tweets a few weeks after the film grossed $20 million-the highest-earning biographical documentary of all time-Aberlin listed the reasons she chose not to participate, chief among them a refusal first, she says, by Rogers and then by his production company after his death to allow the actors to continue with what Aberlin refers to as the Fred Rogers “Ministry,” Neighborhood-derived performances intended to reach children in meaningful ways, by staging the operas, for example.
Recently, the Fred Rogers Company, renamed for him after his death, sold the rights to one of his songs to be used in Google’s new Pixel 3 phone commercial, and a biopic starring Tom Hanks is now being filmed.
The film and book blur the distinction between art and commerce, and the new shows are born of the mercantilism of the Fred Rogers Company, not the art of its original artistic director.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The Sopranos Sessions’ Book Excerpt: Go Inside Making of HBO Show – Rolling Stone”

DC: I changed agents, and I signed up at UTA. When I went in to meet them, they said, “What kind of ideas do you have?” I told them the idea that was The Sopranos and my agent said, “Forget that. It’s never going to happen. Not going to work.” But I pitched it as a movie then, and he said Mob movies were out of date, especially Mob comedies.
DC: Lorraine never said she didn’t want to play Carmela.
DC: I knew her as Margaret Pynchon , so when I saw her show up, I thought, “What the fuck is this?” [Laughs] Then she started, and that was it.
DC: No, because at that time I had no belief this thing was going to go anywhere but the pilot.
DC: Because if you push in on somebody it means, “This is important,” especially in TV. That’s why there were no music cues in the shrink’s office, because in a typical network TV show, when patients start to get down to business and reveal themselves about why he’s so happy or what the truth really is, they’d push in really slowly and you’d hear a synthesizer, you know? I hated that stuff.
DC: There were things Tony did that really offended her.
DC: Right! So when HBO bought the show, I knew that we had to get to it sooner or later.
DC: No. MZS: Okay, because later on you do leave things unresolved.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Interview: Ron Funches on ‘SNL’ Cast Member Kenan Thompson”

Kenan Thompson is Hartman’s heir apparent, and not just because they both performed in sketches as two wildly eccentric chefs.
As the longest-running cast member in SNL history, Thompson has spent the last 15 seasons cracking the code to cutting through the comedic Gordian knot of what it takes to elevate any and every sketch he’s in.
As one of the breakout stars of Nickelodeon’s sketch series All That, Thompson went on to create some of the more memorable – and dare I say timeless – characters that transcended just the kids’ corner of popular culture.
Thompson was fortunate enough to break the cruel and callous curse that befalls many child actors and pivot into films, television, and sketch comedy for adults, landing a coveted repertory-player spot on SNL in 2003.
While Funches is a proper stand-up, he, too, has leapt from film to TV to, yes, even sketch comedy in similar fashion.
Is there a sketch that features Kenan you’d say was particularly foundational to your sensibilities? The recurring sketch of “What’s Up With That?” It was just a perfect send-up of old BET shows and where some black entertainment was at that time, which was defined by being all catchphrases and being silly and stupid and there being no content.
Kenan first made his mark as a young performer on All That back in 1994 where, coincidentally enough, a full-circle prophecy began as he got to share a sketch with Chris Farley, who was then at the height of his SNL popularity.
To wrap things up, is there a definitive Kenan sketch that showcases just how dynamic of a performer he is? Which one would you recommend to someone not familiar with his work?There are so many to choose from.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why the podcast revolution is here to stay”

Why the podcast revolution is here to stay – Los Angeles Times I get emotional watching movies on airplanes.
A Nielsen survey conducted last year found that half of all American homes contain podcast listeners.
Just as web-enabled TV viewing took off when the technology became reliable, podcasts gained traction with the rise of on-demand audio; smart speakers like Alexa; car stereos that connect seamlessly to our feeds; Apple’s pre-installed podcast app and sleek wireless AirPods, the opposable thumbs of podcast listening.
The power of podcasts today is perhaps most tangible in the context of a traditionally impersonal form of information delivery: news.
Recently, news organizations, including the Washington Post, ABC News, the Guardian and Vox, have been venturing into the podcast space with impressive results.
While some journalists might quibble over the collapse of objectivity in a conventional sense, there is no debating the growth in audience engagement podcasts bring for news organizations.
Where readers spend an average of two to three minutes scanning an article online, data show that podcast listeners tend to stay to the end of episodes.
For these and other reasons, Malcolm Gladwell, the bestselling author and host of “Revisionist History,” and Jacob Weisberg, the former editor-in-chief and chairman of Slate and former host of “Trumpcast,” recently quit their day jobs to start a new podcast company called Pushkin Industries.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bobby Bones Is Just Getting Started”

Ninety seconds into his welcoming standing ovation at Austin’s Paramount Theatre, everything Bobby Bones.
His morning program, the freewheeling, often confessional Bobby Bones Show, was born and built in Austin over the course of a decade.
Post-show, the line for Bones merchandise took as long as two hours-which fans endured in order to purchase T-shirts, sweatshirts, ball caps, and baby onesies bearing optimistic messages such as “#Blessed,” “Every Day Is a Good Day,” and “#PIMPIN JOY,” a recurring theme in the Bones universe that urges listeners to have a positive attitude no matter what challenges they might face.
In 2014, a year after the Bobby Bones Show moved from Austin to Nashville, four billboards popped up around Music City.
In his 2016 memoir Bare Bones: I’m Not Lonely If You’re Reading This Book, Bones revealed that he himself had paid for the $13,000 signs.
Bones spent the rest of that morning’s show marveling at the artist getting his break in real time, and egging on his audience to keep downloading.
Nearly six years after moving to Nashville, Bones has expanded from the daily Bobby Bones Show to add the weekly Country Top 30 Countdown.
Bones has a way of getting where he wants to go.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Mark Burnett Resurrected Donald Trump as an Icon of American Success”

“I said, ‘Welcome, everybody, to Trump Wollman skating rink. The Trump Wollman skating rink is a fine facility, built by Mr. Donald Trump. Thank you, Mr. Trump. Because the Trump Wollman skating rink is the place we are tonight and we love being at the Trump Wollman skating rink, Mr. Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump, Trump.” As Burnett told the story, he had scarcely got offstage before Trump was shaking his hand, proclaiming, “You’re a genius!”.
“Donald will say whatever Donald wants to say. He takes no prisoners. If you’re Donald’s friend, he’ll defend you all day long. If you’re not, he’s going to kill you. And that’s very American. It’s like the guys who built the West.” Like Trump, Burnett seemed to have both a jaundiced impression of the gullible essence of the American people and a brazen enthusiasm for how to exploit it.
Burnett said he hoped that he might someday rise to Trump’s “Level” of prestige and success, adding, “I don’t know if I’ll ever make it. But you know something? If you’re not shooting for the stars, you’re not shooting!” On one occasion, Trump invited Burnett to dinner at his Trump Tower apartment; Burnett had anticipated an elegant meal, and, according to an associate, concealed his surprise when Trump handed him a burger from McDonald’s.
A recent piece in the Ankler, a widely read online newsletter about Hollywood, noted that Burnett “Has spent the past couple years reigning over his corner of resistance territory with nary the slightest hint of backlash.” Donald Trump was a folk devil in Hollywood, and everyone in the industry knew about Burnett’s close association with the President, yet no prominent liberals were refusing to work with Mark Burnett.
Someone who has worked with Burnett told me, “Mark created the world in which Tom Arnold is the only guy who can go after him. Tom Arnold is trolling Mark Burnett just like Donald Trump trolled all his opponents. And he’s doing it for a reality show!”.
Marvin Putnam, a lawyer who represents M-G-M, told me, “Mark Burnett cannot release the tapes. Period. Even if Mark Burnett wanted to release the tapes, Mark Burnett cannot release the tapes.” Putnam explained that the contracts that Trump and other cast members signed contained standard industry stipulations limiting the manner in which outtakes and other footage could be used.
Burnett and Trump have licensed the “Apprentice” format to dozens of other countries, and Burnett once noted that, increasingly, tycoons cast in the Trump role are “People with political aspirations.” At least half a dozen hosts have held political office, including João Doria, the governor-elect of São Paulo State, who is an ally of Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s strongman President-elect.
Last year, Kevin O’Leary, one of the hosts of “Shark Tank,” announced his intention of running for Prime Minister of Canada, as a member of the Conservative Party, noting that he and Trump had “Both worked for Mark Burnett, and we both got famous on reality television.” Burnett joked to more than one person that he was no longer simply a TV producer but a producer of political leaders.

The orginal article.