Summary of “Please like, subscribe, and do not embarrass me”

Colleen Ballinger, more commonly known as her massively popular YouTube persona Miranda Sings, has recently been having a tough time with her fans.
Perhaps the worst for Ballinger’s vocal fans: You’re not supposed to sing along.
Ballinger’s saga is an example of a thoroughly modern and bewildering situation: when an internet star crosses over from digital fame to more mainstream, real-world fame, how do their fans cross over, too? Or do internet stars ultimately reap the fans they sow?
“What the social media individuals have to understand is these fans feel like they know the person and so when they go to a show, they don’t really see it as a performance so much as a like a coffee klatch.”
Ballinger follows 10,000 accounts, mainly of her fans, on Twitter; her DMs are open to everyone.
Perhaps the insouciance of Ballinger’s fans is an instance of a creator’s work backfiring – her fans have been conditioned to be pains in the ass, to flout the rules that govern sacred spaces like Broadway.
Whether she’s “Doing the least or doing the most,” as she often says, she always seems to be falling apart and spending too much money and drinking too many Aperol Spritzes – so maybe it’s not a surprise that fans expect to see that at a live show and want to match her level.
Her fans can go back to being their most authentic selves – with an iPhone to capture every off-tune note Miranda Sings sings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 Best Pop Culture Podcasts”

There are podcasts about the Percy Jackson book series, table reads of independent plays, or the queer and campy canceled TV show Lost Girl.
If there’s a piece of pop culture you love, you can probably find a show about it in the podcast world.
Podcasts haven’t just shaped our tastes and connections to pop culture, but defined the shifting blueprint of the medium itself.
Culture podcasts are no longer just traditional film reviews or unedited conversations between friends.
Pop Culture Happy Hour began its run in 2010 and quickly became a favorite for podcast listeners wanting friendly but deeply informed conversations about pop culture.
It’s a film-review podcast for people who usually don’t like the stuffy, condensed conversations in film-review podcasts.
The show only debuted in 2017, but it’s already become one of the finest spins on the fancast – a podcast in which fans revisit the pop culture they love to talk about what makes it great and, sometimes, what makes it admittedly not that great.
Slate’s delightful Decoder Ring takes something from the zeitgest, looks at it under a microscope, and says, “Hey, actually, what the hell?” With not even an ounce of irony, host Willa Paskin tries to answer questions like, “So, what was up with all those clown sightings back in 2016?” or “Where did ‘Baby Shark’ come from, and why?” It’s a pop-culture podcast that comes with the same level of research, investigation, and sincerity as any investigative journalism podcast, often feeling closer to the true-crime genre than its fellow arts and entertainment podcasts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Derren Brown Remade Mind Reading for Skeptics”

Brown spent the next two and a half hours performing a series of increasingly inconceivable set pieces, organized around the theme of how susceptible we are to hidden influence.
Off the clock, Brown neither reads anyone’s mind nor, despite being a world-class card magician, performs tricks of any kind.
Over time, Brown found himself more and more drawn to mentalism and started developing his credo of letting audiences see what the process of mind reading looked like in action.
Brown no longer does cold reading and, in his shows, has ridiculed psychics and discredited their techniques.
After introducing us to her dog and showing us framed photos of its two predecessors, which, she told us, “Are in spirit now,” she led Brown upstairs for his reading.
“Yeah, it’s hypnosis and suggestion and mind reading and so on,” Brown explained.
“I’m interested in how it sort of blurs into other things and other people’s take on it,” Brown said.
As soon as we were outside, Brown started analyzing Chrissy’s reading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Goodbye to ‘The Good Place,’ TV’s Most Divine Comedy – Rolling Stone”

The show’s central neighborhood looks like a pastel paradise filled with punnily-named shops like Ponzu Scheme, The Pesto’s Yet to Come, and Lasagne Come Out Tomorrow.
In a twist that was kept secret from all the actors save Danson and Bell – and that transformed The Good Place from clever sitcom to something addictive – they would learn that Michael was actually a Bad Place demon testing out a new way to torture souls, and would spend the ensuing seasons trying to save themselves from eternal damnation and figure out why the universe seems utterly broken.
The existence of The Good Place on TV at all, much less on a traditional broadcast network, feels as unlikely as an atheist would feel about the afterlife itself.
He first developed the show’s concept of a point system to get into the Good Place while fighting L.A. traffic and deducting or adding points for other drivers based on how they behaved on the road. He found it was a fascination he shared with Bell, with whom he’d worked briefly on Parks.
The writers use and discard plot ideas in a single episode that most shows would devote entire seasons to, just to keep viewers excited and engaged.
“The show is something that’s incredibly optimistic and snarky,” suggests Harper.
I feel like our show has a really good meshing of the two.
Danson once famously opted to end Cheers before NBC was ready to, for fear the show would grow stale.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The state of comedy in 2019.”

The Muppets were attempting comedy but failing so often, in such flat-footed ways, that I concluded the show did not have what we would recognize today as professional comedy writers who could fill an entire episode with minimally acceptable material.
The stand-up boom had yet to happen, and while HBO began airing its Young Comedians specials in 1976, a comedy fan would be bereft of actual comedy more nights than not.
Of these, 27 could be considered to fall in the comedy genre-which, if extrapolated across the 495 series, indicates that in 2019 there may be as many as 150 writers rooms staffed with comedy writers.
The point isn’t that anyone is watching 150 comedies, it’s that there are 1,000-1,500 professional comedy writers working in television alone, which is an order of magnitude greater than the TV comedy landscape of a generation or two earlier.
More comedy content begets more comedy writers, especially since the funny young people of today have options far beyond the few totems of advanced comedic sensibility of yore.
There is a limitless comedy library in everyone’s pockets, offering easy access to almost every funny moment ever filmed, supplemented by the comedy school of thousands of podcasts committing comedy or commenting upon it.
Your average fan of comedy, or-to invoke a phrase that didn’t exist in the lexicon 20 years ago-a comedy nerd, has a graduate program of comedy knowledge at her fingertips, the likes of which a young Judd Apatow, taping Tonight Show sets with an audio tape recorder in his Syosset, New York, home in 1978 could scarcely dream of.
All the 2019 Emmy nominees for best comedy series are exquisite and hilarious, but they don’t challenge our beliefs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bobby Bones Is Just Getting Started”

Ninety seconds into his welcoming standing ovation at Austin’s Paramount Theatre, everything Bobby Bones.
His morning program, the freewheeling, often confessional Bobby Bones Show, was born and built in Austin over the course of a decade.
Post-show, the line for Bones merchandise took as long as two hours-which fans endured in order to purchase T-shirts, sweatshirts, ball caps, and baby onesies bearing optimistic messages such as “#Blessed,” “Every Day Is a Good Day,” and “#PIMPIN JOY,” a recurring theme in the Bones universe that urges listeners to have a positive attitude no matter what challenges they might face.
In 2014, a year after the Bobby Bones Show moved from Austin to Nashville, four billboards popped up around Music City.
In his 2016 memoir Bare Bones: I’m Not Lonely If You’re Reading This Book, Bones revealed that he himself had paid for the $13,000 signs.
Bones spent the rest of that morning’s show marveling at the artist getting his break in real time, and egging on his audience to keep downloading.
Nearly six years after moving to Nashville, Bones has expanded from the daily Bobby Bones Show to add the weekly Country Top 30 Countdown.
Bones has a way of getting where he wants to go.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Superfans: A Love Story”

Some fans were also mad that Rey, the orphaned heroine, was revealed not to be secretly of noble lineage, undercutting two years of carefully worked-out fan theories.
In the old days of sci-fi conventions and Bobby Sherman fan clubs, fandom was a subculture reserved for the very young or the very obsessed-or, in the case of the Grateful Dead, the very stoned.
Each fan group demanded a nominal payment of one euro, and their lawyer, Emmanuel Ludot, called the allegations a “Genuine lynching.” Frivolous as it seems, the suit gets at the heart of modern fandom: an attack against a celebrity or a beloved character is an attack against the fans, and it is their duty to retaliate.
The rise of Donald Trump, who was a pop-culture icon before he was a politician, neatly overlaps with the rise of toxic fandom, and Trump has pronounced himself “Not a fan” of Jeffrey Epstein, the Vietnam War, and cryptocurrency.
Fandom, Jenkins told me, is “Born out of a mix of fascination and frustration. If you weren’t drawn to it on some level, you wouldn’t be a fan. But, if it fully satisfies you, you wouldn’t need to rewrite it, remake it, re-perform it.” Nowhere is Jenkins’s constructive view of fandom more evident than at Comic-Con International, in San Diego.
“There’s a fine line to tread on how much you listen to fans, because fans aren’t always right, either. But there are certain things where you should listen to them, because they’re smarter than maybe the super-high-up execs are going to think.”
The fan scholar Mark Duffett has suggested that “Fan screaming may be a form of ‘affective citizenship,'” a communal defiance of ladylike behavior.
Jacob Anderson, who played Grey Worm, pulled a Spider-Man mask over his head. The cast members were asked their favorite lines from the series, and fans cheered knowingly at the answers: “Not today,” “Hold the door,” “Nothing fucks you harder than time.” John Bradley, who played the lovable geek Samwell Tarly, chose one of his lines from the first season: “I always wanted to be a wizard.” Samwell was himself a kind of superfan within the show, poring over Westeros history and confirming fan theories about who was descended from whom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Death of Hollywood’s Middle Class”

In 2015, Jack Allison, a comedian with a nerdy affect and an impish wit, was a staff writer on The Jimmy Kimmel Show, doing what he loved best: Hanging out with a bunch of other funny people, writing jokes, and downing Twizzlers.
Almost all of the focus on this upheaval has been on viewers’ first-world problem of too many good shows to watch or the corporate gamesmanship between iconic Hollywood conglomerates and the tech giants who seek to usurp them in delivering the world its entertainment.
The tech entrants into Hollywood typically do not sell their shows to other platforms, which means there are no syndicated reruns, and networks, feeling the pressure to keep up, air far fewer reruns.
A writer on a Netflix show is paid differently from someone on a Hulu or YouTube Premium show, because fees are based on the number of subscribers that a service has.
More recently, the WGA successfully loosened the exclusive holds that studios traditionally held over lower-paid writers, which keep them from seeking other employment while they’re working on a show-which meant that if you’d finished working on one season and were waiting to see if the show was re-upped for a second, you couldn’t seek another gig.
Even with these attempts to level the playing field, there is still the fact that a season for a streaming show is typically less than half the length of a traditional network show.
If someone like Allison theoretically went from a network late-night show to its streaming equivalent, say, Norm Macdonald Has a Show on Netflix, or Sarah Silverman’s I Love You, America on Hulu, it’s a completely different financial outlook.
“My husband is a writer and director. The fact that I have that protection, meaning if one of us were to drop dead, we would definitely still have a source of income to take care of our kids. If I’m only on one show and it’s only 20 weeks, what am I going to do the rest of the year? And if the show is 10 episodes?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 TV Shows That Were Creatively Altered by a Writers Strike”

Thirty years ago, the longest strike in the history of the Writers Guild of America began, and lasted a full 155 days, affecting everything from MacGyver to Tim Burton’s Batman.
Writers strikes have a major impact on TV and film production.
Depending on the strike’s length, dozens of film and TV projects can be suspended, delayed, or even canceled, and rebounding when a strike is over isn’t exactly easy, either.
Numerous TV series have had to return from strike to a kind of creative reboot, from rewriting single episodes to devising entirely new finales.
BREAKING BAD An enduring legend about Breaking Bad sprung up around the 2007-08 Writers Guild of America strike.
STAR TREK: THE NEXT GENERATION The 1988 Writers Guild of America strike was the longest in the organization’s history, and its long run cut into the production of a number of series, among them the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation.
The writers strike offered Kring and company a chance to rethink and restructure.
Initial enthusiasm for the series led to a full season order in October 2007, just weeks before a writers strike was declared.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Dan Patrick and Keith Olbermann’s ‘SportsCenter’ Changed TV Forever”

In Patrick and Olbermann’s hands, SportsCenter was the best TV sportscast and, at the same time, exhilaratingly, the best parody of a TV sportscast.
Keith Olbermann’s first SportsCenters with Dan Patrick were like a taste of freedom.
“God, if you could have a teleprompter in life, how much easier would life be?” -Keith Olbermann To watch Olbermann write his scripts was itself a performance.
Before going on air at ESPN, Olbermann watched Patrick host SportsCenter from the set and noticed that many games were ending midshow.
If Olbermann wanted to reach through the TV and grab your lapels, Dan Patrick was more likely to try to blend into the test pattern.
At Olbermann’s goodbye party, Olbermann asked Patrick: “Why aren’t you the same person on the air as you are off the air?” Eight years later, they were hosting SportsCenter together.
Patrick asked Olbermann to remind him: Which parts had Olbermann written and which parts had he written himself?
Patrick asked Olbermann whether he’d leave MSNBC and join him on the 6 p.m. SportsCenter based in New York.

The orginal article.