Summary of “‘Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat’ Is a Love Letter to Amateur Cooks”

For much of that time, the 38-year-old Nosrat has paired her love of cooking with an affinity for the written word.
The warmly written, pragmatic text begins its first formal section-“Salt”-with an anecdote from the Iranian American chef’s childhood in California, where frequent family trips to the Pacific Ocean shaped Nosrat’s understanding of salt as an element closely associated with the beach.
Rather than inundate aspiring cooks with an index of glamorously photographed recipes to follow precisely, Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat offers Nosrat’s readers something much more substantial: a cooking philosophy.
Now Nosrat is expanding her approach-not to cooking, but to reaching a new set of would-be amateur culinarians.
“Fat: It’s nothing short of a miracle. Fat is flavor. Fat is texture,” Nosrat says in a voice-over at the beginning of the first episode.
Having spent years in Italy following her introduction to cooking, Nosrat explains what drove her choice to return to the country for the series: “As I cooked and ate my way throughout the country, one thing became clear,” she says in the episode.
In the third episode, “Acid,” Doña Conchi, la abuela, teaches Nosrat how the Yucatán Peninsula’s sour oranges, salsas, and uniquely acidic Mayan honey utilize acid to create vibrant dishes, as well as the widely adapted method of escabeche.
“There are only so many ways to cook, there are only so many ways to make food taste good,” Nosrat said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Julia Louis-Dreyfus quietly became the most successful sitcom star ever”

Thus was born the legend of Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who would become one of the greatest sitcom stars in modern television history.
From “Seinfeld” to “The New Adventures of Old Christine” to her remarkable portrayal of Vice President Selina Meyer, Louis-Dreyfus has earned 11 Emmys, including six in a row.
Even if Louis-Dreyfus didn’t create “Seinfeld,” her nine seasons on the hit established a new kind of sitcom actress on a new kind of sitcom.
Julia Louis-Dreyfus remembers first taking the stage in fourth grade.
Judith and Gérard Louis-Dreyfus divorced when their daughter was just 3, so Julia spent much of her childhood shuttling between her father, who lived in New York, and her mother, who lived in the District.
“Women like her. Men like her. On ‘Veep,’ we use it to let her do really horrible things. When people tell me that they wish Selina was president, that’s not what they mean. They wish Julia Louis-Dreyfus was president.”
During her tenure, Louis-Dreyfus was often on the air, whether playing bit parts, grumpy teen news commentator Patti Lynn Hunnsucker or reviving her Northwestern-born televangelist April May June.
“And she is the best number one on the call sheet I have ever worked with, or for. Completely approachable, completely collaborative, warm, friendly, funny, everything you could possibly want your Julia Louis-Dreyfus to be.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Alec Baldwin On Trump, Hollywood and Why Everyone is Out To Get Him”

Now, he’s about to take what could be his biggest gamble yet: The Alec Baldwin Show, airing at 10 p.m. Sundays on ABC starting Oct. 14.
Outside, on the streets of Manhattan, it sure doesn’t feel like everyone’s out to get Alec Baldwin.
As we leave Ray’s on an overcast mid-September afternoon, a young man hollers, “Duuuude, you do that Donald Trump thing real good. Real good.” The man introduces himself as Tyrone, and though he’s waving and pointing and causing something of a scene, the often-irritable Baldwin doesn’t mind a bit.
For a time, Baldwin had been toying with taking his Trump to Broadway, too – turning You Can’t Spell America Without Me, the best-selling parody he co-authored with Kurt Andersen, into a one-man show, the way Will Ferrell once had with his impersonation of George W. Bush.
If there’s one thing that people in the business will tell you about Alec Baldwin – other than sharing their obligatory respect for his acting chops and the intensity he brings to everything he does – it’s that he can be almost impossible to pin down.
More than once, he has doled out his “Last interview,” most famously on a 2014 New York magazine cover that declared his “Goodbye to public life.” In the accompanying article, which carried Baldwin’s byline, he announced he had to move out of Manhattan, his home of several decades.
The Alec Baldwin Show was conceived more in the Tomorrow Show vein – intimate, inoffensive conversations, or what ABC’s Mills describes as “The warm bath style of interviewing.” To Jason Schrift, who was brought over to run the show after years on Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Baldwin’s perfectly suited for the job.
What the interview proves is that Baldwin – who pulls out his eerily good De Niro impression and tells a fabulous, profanity-laced story about the mob that ABC will surely cut – can carry an hour of television if he needs to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Dallas’ 40th Anniversary: The Show That Changed Texas Forever”

While Dallas was selling a new American ideal-not to mention official Dallas aftershave, deodorant, commemorative dishes, 24-karat-gold Southfork belt buckles, and J. R. Ewing Private Stock beer emblazoned with the slogan “If you have to ask how much my beer costs, you probably can’t afford it”-to fans at home and abroad, it was also selling them a new vision of Dallas and Texas.
In short, for all their resemblance to the cast of The Bold and the Beautiful, the Ewings changed Dallas, changed Texas, changed America, and changed the medium of television.
David Jacobs is the creator of Dallas and its spin-off, Knots Landing: Here’s the history of the Dallas pitch.
Matt Zoller Seitz is the television critic for New York magazine and grew up in Dallas while the show was airing: Let’s just say that the makers of Dallas weren’t really big on doing homework.
I asked Mike, “Should I go to Dallas and check it out before I write the show?” He said, “It doesn’t matter. You’ll go after, later.” And I said, “Okay. I’ll write the stereotypes, and then I’ll go to Dallas later and pull it back.” So I wrote the stereotypes, and then we all went to Dallas.
Jim Schutze was a columnist for the Dallas Times Herald from 1978 to 1991: Of course, Dallas hated Dallas at first.
Dallas became the number one show in the U.S., and Dallas mania was in full swing internationally.
Ron Kirk was the mayor of Dallas from 1995 to 2002: Having had the privilege to represent Dallas around the world, it was at best amusing and at worst somewhat disheartening how, just about every country we went to, if I did an interview on a local TV show, it’d open with two film clips: the footage of the Zapruder film and the theme song from Dallas.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Instagram Is Deciding the Future of Concerts, Says LeRoy Bennett – Rolling Stone”

“In the last year, the social media app has added 300 million monthly active users – doubling in size and bringing its total global user count to twice the size of the population of the United States. Of that immense user base, nearly half follow 10 or more verified musicians. And even more are making regularly posts and Instagram stories about music, with concerts a particularly popular photo and video subject.”A show no longer starts when the curtain rises,” entertainment architect Ray Winkler, who designed Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s On the Run II tour, told Rolling Stone earlier this summer.
As Instagram continues on its explosive growth trajectory, artists are employing all sorts of tactics ranging from practical to outlandish to ramp up the visuals of their tours and the create the perfect “Instagram moment,” says longtime concert designer LeRoy Bennett, who’s produced iconic shows for Madonna, Prince, Lady Gaga, Paul McCartney and a litany of other household names.
We’ve seen concerts go from music experiences to visual spectacles, and this year’s big shows seem especially focused on visual theatrics.
Social media is making a lot of artists very concerned about the Instagram moment, about making sure their show’s photographs are the best.
It’s the artists’ concern, yes, about what pictures of their shows look like.
Of course you can’t sacrifice your live show for Instagram, but you can take it into consideration.
“The whole Instagram thing is kind of a slippery slope” – veteran show designer LeRoy Bennett.
Laughs] Social media has become not exactly a hindrance, but it’s adding more stress into designing a show, and it’s putting undue pressure on the artist.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why You Should Watch SNL Like a Sport”

Seemingly in response to something Birbiglia’s character said about a certain cast member’s work on the show, Tami Sagher’s character tells him, “I’m glad you’re keeping score.” Birbiglia says, “It’s the only live sporting event of comedy,” to which Gillian Jacobs’s character responds, “But comedy isn’t a sport.”
Whether SCTV in the ’80s or Mr. Show in the ’90s or Chappelle’s Show in the ’00s or Key and Peele in the ’10s, shows that produced better sketches more frequently have come along, but SNL has lasted because of how singularly exciting it is when something really hits.
If a sketch is bad, you won’t be able to deny it’s bad. And just like sports, you can analyze exactly why it was bad: “The premise didn’t totally make sense for the target of satire.” “The timing was off.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” “Didn’t really have an ending.” That’s part of the fun! If I had a nickel for every time I Gchatted “They took too long to establish what was supposed to be funny” to a friend, I’d have, like, 50 nickels! There just isn’t much use comparing it to other comedy shows.
Though a great SNL sketch, especially when clipped online, can offer a similar experience to any great sketch show, watching SNL live is unlike any other experience on TV. Well, you know, except sports.
Actually watching SNL makes up only part of how I enjoy following the show like a sports team – and not even a large part.
If you’ve seen Don’t Think Twice, you can imagine that when a new cast member joins the show, all his friends at home are both really happy and really resentful.
All in all, sounds good, right? How can you start? Read Live From New York, Tom Shales and James Andrew Miller’s definitive oral history of the show.
Lastly, use the off-season months to follow rumors of cast moves and to think about what the show is or isn’t doing, and what it might mean its future.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Losing the Night Sky”

Satellite data shows that between 2012 and 2016, the Earth’s artificially lit outdoor area increased by 2.2 percent a year, which researchers have partly attributed to the adoption of more energy-efficient LED lighting technology in richer countries.
With constant exterior lighting for buildings, streets, parks and industrial areas now consuming far less costly energy, there is little incentive to turn off the lights, even when they aren’t required.
In big urban areas like London, the light pollution has become such an expected part of life that I had stopped noticing that the sky never really stopped being light.
Light pollution has many negative consequences, some of which are only beginning to emerge as more research is done in the field.
The U.K. now has “Dark sky reserves” in some of its national parks, and greater awareness of the links between too much light and poor sleeping patterns is leading to some areas dimming street lamps when possible.
Areas with little light pollution, like the Shetland Islands in northern Scotland or Snowdonia in Wales, have started using their darkness as a way of attracting tourists that want to be able to see the stars again, just as places like northern Norway and Iceland have long marketed themselves with possibility of gaining a glimpse of the northern lights there.
In some parts of the world, a lack of light is still linked to thwarted growth and progress.
A recent study by economists Praveen Chakravarty and Vivek Dehejia found that satellite images showing the distribution of light across India are an excellent tool for tracking the spread of inequality around the country.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Frasier at 25: An Oral History”

Frasier transformed into one of the show’s most beloved characters, garnering multiple Emmy nominations for Grammer along the way.
Casey: We’d previously knocked around an idea for Cheers that never came to fruition, where Frasier was a guest host on a Boston radio therapist’s show.
David Isaacs: In the first scene in front of the audience, a caller’s having trouble moving on with his life, and Frasier uses himself as an example.
Grammer: People always ask how Frasier and Niles came from a father like Martin.
Lori Kirkland Baker: Martin’s presence, over the show’s duration, softened Frasier.
“Slow Tango in South Seattle” seemed to be a competition between Frasier and an author who cribbed a moment from Frasier’s life for his own personal gain, but then it wound up being Frasier tracking down a long-lost love.
Lee: In “The Matchmaker” , Frasier asks the station manager over as a possible date for Daphne, but the manager thinks that Frasier’s asking him on a date.
Frasier would set off on a new voyage, and come to feel about a woman the way Niles did for Daphne.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cody Rhodes and the Young Bucks Showed Us the Future of Pro Wrestling”

Before him were more than 10,000 people chanting “All In,” the name of the largest independent professional wrestling show in history, which Jackson founded, promoted, and funded alongside his younger brother Nick and their friend Cody Rhodes.
On May 16, 2017, wrestling journalist Dave Meltzer was asked on Twitter whether he thought Ring of Honor, the company the Young Bucks and Rhodes are contracted to, would ever sell out a 10,000-seat arena.
No one outside of World Wrestling Entertainment had drawn a crowd that big in the United States since World Championship Wrestling went under in 2001-a span of 17 years.
Among the innumerable groundbreaking things that happened in Chicago, the most important was the pivotal role that a show featuring maybe 20 seconds of wrestling per week played in creating the most culturally significant wrestling event this decade.
The travel sequences remained but now they stood in service to a new, larger conceit-a platform for the Young Bucks and Kenny Omega to develop their characters on their own terms, free from whatever creative shackles a wrestling promoter could place upon them.
“The power behind that show, if you just look at us and how our careers have grown even in the last few months it’s up there, if not the biggest thing I’ve ever even done in my wrestling career,” Sky said.
Pro wrestling is a copycat business, which makes it a safe bet that other wrestlers or companies will try and piggyback off the YouTube model.
It’s a beacon for anyone seeking to carve out a career on the indies instead of flee to the WWE. It may even coax a few names to go the other direction and emulate Rhodes, who requested his release in 2016 after a 10-year career in WWE. “The biggest impact of all these guys has been actually on all the talent that is not on the show,” said Chris Harrington, cohost of the podcast Wrestlenomics, which analyzes the business of pro wrestling.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How ‘BoJack Horseman’ Got Made: An Oral History”

The email from Raphael Bob-Waksberg to Lisa Hanawalt on March 22, 2010, was to the point: “Hey, do you have a picture of one of your horse guys, by himself? I came up with this idea for a show I’d like to pitch. Tell me what you think: BoJack the Depressed Talking Horse.”
Raphael Bob-Waksberg: The question was: “Could it be sports? Instead of a former sitcom actor, could he be a former racehorse? And what would that look like?” I had some pitches for that, and how the story would change, but I said, “I really like the show-business angle and here’s why “.
Steven A. Cohen: I think one of the great things about Michael is that he’ll come in and try to push something to a certain place – or maybe try just to push Raphael for the first time, to see how much he really believes in this idea.
Raphael Bob-Waksberg: The whole tagline for Secretariat – “He’s tired of running in circles” – came out of that meeting with Michael about BoJack, where we talked about how BoJack is tired of running in circles and he wants to do something else.
The script process, once we hired Raphael to write the script, was also the beginning of knowing how it would be to work with him.
Noel Bright: I love how Raphael tells the story about how the casting went: “Can we get this person?” “Sure!” “Wait – we really can get that person?” And then, all of a sudden, “Yeah, that person just said yes.
The culmination of more than three years of talking, writing, drawing, and animating saw Raphael’s “Depressed Talking Horse” become BoJack Horseman at the stroke of midnight on August 22, 2014, when the series went live.
Raphael could have made that show just a funny cartoon for grown-ups, and it probably would have been fine.

The orginal article.