Summary of “7 British Shows On Netflix With Near-Perfect Rotten Tomatoes Scores”

In recent years, Netflix has become a haven of self-produced, original, and fantastic content.
That’s where the little British tab hidden away in the TV section of Netflix comes into play.
There is a plethora of television to indulge in, whether it’s produced by the streaming giant itself or via broadcasters like BBC or ITV. Also, a lot of these options are critically revered, so finding British Netflix shows with near-perfect Rotten Tomatoes scores isn’t that hard at all.
Well, maybe not to those extremes, but there are plenty of British shows to get hooked on that I had absolutely no idea were streaming on the site.
So here’s a list of seven British shows that will take over your life, all thanks to the wonderful streaming site that is Netflix.
Whilst we all prepare for the third season of Netflix original series The Crown, the first two seasons exploring the early years of Queen Elizabeth II and her marriage to Prince Philip, her coronation, and all the drama that comes with it, are still available to obsess over.
A successful, British take on a Nordic noir, Marcella is definitely not one to miss.7.’Luther,’ 89 percent.
If you aren’t sold on that, the second of the four series earned itself a 100 percent Rotten Tomatoes score.

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Summary of “How ‘Desus & Mero’ Conquered Late Night”

Baker, who has a full beard and an air of felinity, lazed on his side for the duration of the show, subdued and dressed in a Carhartt T-shirt and ripped jeans; the cherubic and excitable Martinez, in a sweatshirt and a fitted cap, sipped from a mug filled, most likely, with the contents of the bottle of Brugal rum at his feet.
As the TMZ footage ran, Martinez did a genuine spit-take when West asserted that Trump was “His boy.” “The Kardashians,” Martinez said, “Got the reverse Erykah Badu effect: You become unwoke once you [expletive] a Kardashian.” Baker began impersonating slaves refusing to pick cotton, disputing work conditions: “I was told I was supposed to be in the house, and I’m in the field, so is there an H.R. rep?” Mero reached to the floor, pretending to pick up an object: “Let me get this paper bag.” He held it up to Baker’s face.
Their show is filmed in what’s called the Bear Room, named for the full-size taxidermied bear that permanently resides there, which, because it was Weed Week when I visited, was dressed in four green Timberlands, a bong mask and a baseball cap that read “Legalize It.” When I arrived, Baker and Martinez were discussing the ubiquity of fecal matter in New York City while their makeup artist powdered their shiny spots.
He told me that he appreciates the show’s specificity of a world that’s so rarely represented on TV. “As a person who exists in the world of making a TV show and often feels like the power of convention can be really overwhelming, there’s something extremely refreshing about how different that show feels in its entirety,” he said.
Though their viewership is dwarfed by behemoths like “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert,” “The Daily Show” or even Andy Cohen’s minor-league “Watch What Happens Live,” their audience has grown each quarter in the past year, most likely because of their appearing as regular guests on those other late-night shows.
Martinez told me that their vision for the new show is a “Mash-up of ‘The Daily Show’ and the Chappelle show,” a comedy show that covers the culture while remaining unabashedly black.
There were interview prompts for Baker and Martinez on a computer screen – Morgan was there to promote his new show, which he would ostensibly want to talk about – but they let Morgan go on, not only because they knew that they could run the full version online, but also because that’s just how a conversation can go: When you make a plan, Tracy Morgan laughs.
Complex relaunched their podcast as a web show; in 2014, the pair departed for a bigger contract at MTV2 but struggled to find their footing, mostly appearing intermittently on other talking-head shows.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of TV Is About Couch Shows vs. Phone Shows”

At first by circumstance, and now by design, this is how I organize my television diet: couch shows and phone shows.
It’s well known by now that Americans have changed the way they watch TV. People pull content from Hulu rather than have it pushed to us by CBS. DVRs allow for shifted viewing times and skipping ads.
Consumers are now, often unconsciously, sorting every media product-from podcasts to magazine stories to video-into three categories: intentional, interstitial, and invisible.
Intentional media are the handful of offerings that we plan in advance to experience and then carve out particular chunks of time to enjoy.
For me, these are the couch shows like Better Call Saul and very little else.
For me, these are the articles saved on Instapaper, audiobooks, and phone shows like Billions, which I enjoy immensely but have never seen inside my own home and have rarely watched in segments longer than a half hour.
Examining the media ecosystem through these three lenses-which focus less on the technologies of distribution and more on the patterns of consumption-yields new clues about both the economics of media and the design principles of its creation.
Fifteen years ago, when I had no choice but to repair to a particular room to watch television, the imperative for anyone in the TV industry was to secure my attention once I got there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rachel Bloom Has a Lot to Say”

It’s been just two days since she arrived back in Los Angeles from the Tony Awards, where she served as the show’s backstage correspondent for the second consecutive year and found time to send off the perfect retort to an ill-conceived Neil Patrick Harris tweet.
Very recently, backstage in the dressing room of a Broadway show.
You’ve said, from the very beginning, that you pitched the show as a four-season arc.
How much does the show, as it exists now, line up with your original plan?
God, if we could show actual sex scenes yeah, I’m sure things would be different.
If we only had a half hour to do this show, I don’t know how much we could have done with other characters.
That’s really special, as opposed to an edgy Showtime show that would just be watched by the hipsters who are similar to the people making the show.
Which song would you use to introduce someone to the show?

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Season’s Most Shocking TV Plot Twists”

If you watch TV competitively, then genre rules dictate what’s possible, and as the series progresses, it becomes possible to guess what’s going to happen next – if not on your own, then with the help of fellow plot guessers who’ve created a sort of virtual FBI field office online.
In the finale, you see Michael in that flashback, so at least you have seen him in the episode without having a story about how much she misses Michael, or about “Is she going to feel upset about getting engaged because the last time she was engaged was to Michael?” I felt like those would be too close actually to his return.
How Jane the Virgin Pulled Off Its Fantastic Surprise “I didn’t know for sure that I was going to do it until the end of season three.”
Often we find that it does defy expectations, because you’re in a certain sort of genre, and people in that genre more often are going to blow each other’s heads off.
JW: There were times that we tried on some more action in that scene for size, but it was pretty obvious to us that Stan is a good enough counterintelligence agent that he’s not going to let two people that he’s behind ever get the drop on him.
You want everyone to know by that Monday, something is going to happen here.
He would’ve been much more straight-down-the-middle: “Arie is going to make the biggest choice of his life, he’s in love with two women, how will it end?” Here, it was sort of like: “Just when you think it’s the end, it’s actually the beginning. You need to see it.” And even in our live show, when Chris is giving almost the emotional equivalent of a parental-discretion-advised warning: “This is not going to be an ordinary night. It’s going to be incredibly emotional, it is going to be tough, there’s going to be a lot of feelings, we’re all going to have a lot of opinions.” So you see that, and you can just feel TVs turning on, like, Oh my God, something big is going to happen here.
Aaron Harberts, co-showrunner and executive producer: Before we even cast Jason , we knew that that character was going to be from the mirror universe.

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Summary of “The Netflix Binge Factory”

“I’ve never seen any one company drive the entire business in the way Netflix has right now,” says Chris Silbermann, managing director of ICM Partners and agent for Grey’s Anatomy and Scandal creator Shonda Rhimes, who moved her production company to Netflix last year.
When Netflix adds more content, it lures new subscribers and gets existing ones to watch more hours of Netflix.
Netflix has a division devoted to acquiring foreign programs from networks like the BBC, but Barmack oversees the production of original non-English-language shows made for Netflix outside the U.S., including Dark, Ingobernable, and 3%. A number of Netflix American-made originals are popular outside the States – “As a percentage of total watchers, as many people watch 13 Reasons Why in India as watch it in the U.S.,” Sarandos tells me – but in order to compete and grow in foreign markets, Netflix believes it needs to offer subscribers stuff made in their own countries, by local artists.
“One in three subscribers watch Netflix unscripted shows monthly,” says Netflix content VP Bela Bajaria, whose team scored an early victory with its Queer Eye reboot.
Instead of grouping members by age or race or even what country they live in, Netflix has tracked viewing habits and identified almost 2,000 microclusters that each Netflix user falls into.
“We try not to program for ourselves. That’s the key. We’ve had to cancel shows that I’ve loved.” But given how many dozens of series and specials and movies Netflix now greenlights every year, couldn’t Netflix do, say, one or two fewer $20 million stand-up specials and make a season three of a Lady Dynamite? “Yeah, but our fans are trusting us to spend their subscription money well,” he says.
“The one thing we’ve been able to do is keep a foot firmly rooted in Silicon Valley and a foot in Hollywood. We don’t jam the tech culture on the entertainment company and vice versa.” By contrast, Sarandos argues, “No studio has been particularly successful with their tech initiatives, and it’s also true that no tech company outside of Netflix has been particularly successful with their entertainment initiatives. That is what’s different about the Netflix story from everyone else. People underestimate the 1,000 engineers in Silicon Valley who make Netflix work every single time you push play.”
Still, Juenger’s theory for why Netflix will succeed seems logical: Subscription video-on-demand services are rapidly replacing linear television, Netflix is the clear leader in the category, and there are still hundreds of millions of potential subscribers to acquire.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Twenty Years Later, Everything Is The Truman Show”

Two decades ago, The Truman Show seemed preposterous.
Twenty years after Truman heroically exited the soul-deadening reality series that was his life … well, to quote co-star Holland Taylor, “Here we are.” In 2015 alone, there were roughly 750 reality series on television.
Added Linney, “The Truman Show is a very foreboding, dark movie-and our world had gone even way beyond that.”
The Truman Show would be Carrey’s first dramatic role, marking the beginning of what he seems to consider a more fulfilling stage of his career.
The woman grows hysterical, Truman hands the baby back, and the woman tells him, “Thank you, Truman.” Pleshette said that there was never any discussion of Oldman starring in the full feature, though; even the actor understood that The Truman Show’s high-concept idea had top billing.
Brian De Palma was at one point attached to direct-but he wanted to remove the dramatic reveal that made The Truman Show so clever.
“The Truman Show was made before video came out-when movies were still made on film,” explained Linney.
“It’s not unlike playing a character in a dream. It’s like sleight of hand, but sleight of mind … being in The Truman Show was a sleight-of-mind trick.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “HBO Announces Its First ‘Game of Thrones’ Pilot”

When Game of Thrones is on its game, it’s like no other show on television.
Thrones isn’t just the biggest show in HBO’s history, it may be the last piece of monoculture we have.
The cable giant announced Friday that it had ordered a pilot for a prequel show set during the Age of Heroes, a time some 10,000 years before the events in the current series when much of Westerosi myth and legend is born.
A quick dissection of HBO’s somewhat vague statement suggests that the new show will put the fantasy elements of the story on center stage, something that is only appropriate for the “Age of Heroes.” The most prominent “Stark of legend” could be Bran the Builder, a legendary figure who supposedly built the Wall to protect against the Others.
In Season 6, Thrones showed us that the white walkers were created by the Children of the Forest to protect against the First Men.
There are entire continents that Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire have left unexplored.
Some of the criticisms lobbed at Thrones in recent years have been aimed at how the show has shied away from fantasy.
With 10,000 years of separation from the current series, there’s no telling which way Goldman and HBO could take the show.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mr. Rogers’s Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Kids”

Rogers brought this level of care and attention not just to granular details and phrasings, but the bigger messages his show would send.
Hedda Sharapan, one of the staff members at Fred Rogers’s production company, Family Communications, Inc., recalls Rogers once halted taping of a show when a cast member told the puppet Henrietta Pussycat not to cry; he interrupted shooting to make it clear that his show would never suggest to children that they not cry.
In working on the show, Rogers interacted extensively with academic researchers.
Rogers learned the highest standards in this emerging academic field, and he applied them to his program for almost half a century.
This is one of the reasons Rogers was so particular about the writing on his show.
“I spent hours talking with Fred and taking notes,” says Greenwald, “Then hours talking with Margaret McFarland before I went off and wrote the scripts. Then Fred made them better.” As simple as Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood looked and sounded, every detail in it was the product of a tremendously careful, academically-informed process.
Maxwell King is the CEO of the Pittsburgh Foundation and the former director of the Fred Rogers Center.
He is the author of the forthcoming book The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Conan O’Brien, in Conversation”

There were his rocky early days on Late Night, the ill-fated eight-month stint as host of The Tonight Show, and now the news that his TBS show, Conan, will move from an hour to half-hour episodes beginning in 2019.
How much of moving to half an hour is a business decision rather than a creative one? The cynical way of looking at the situation is that you wouldn’t be going down in length if 10 million people were watching the hour-long show every night.
You were writing for Saturday Night Live during one of the show’s real golden ages.
Does the conflict you described between you and guests ever occur with musicians who appear on the show? For some reason I’ve never forgotten seeing Pete Townshend come out on Late Night with an acoustic guitar and expecting him to do “Behind Blue Eyes” and he does a cover of “Barefootin'” instead. Did nobody nudge him to play a different song?I don’t remember that specifically, but I had a similar experience in college.
O’Brien hosted Late Night for 14 seasons – until the misbegotten move to The Tonight Show.
Travel bits featuring O’Brien hamming it up with locals were first introduced on Late Night and continued, with increasing ambition and regularity, on Conan, where the show enjoys a ratings spike whenever the specials premiere.
In 2009 Jay Leno moved from The Tonight Show to The Jay Leno Show in prime time and O’Brien became host of the former.
“People asked me why I named the show Conan,” he said in his first monologue.

The orginal article.