Summary of “The Young Man and the Sea Sponge”

Tom Kenny, the voice actor behind SpongeBob’s perpetually enthused munchkin tones has always delighted in the show’s abundance of positive energy.
Stephen Hillenburg, the creator of SpongeBob SquarePants, was 14 when he went scuba diving for the first time.
“SpongeBob should be cool and wear sun glasses and surf,” while another knowledgeably informed Hillenburg that “Pirates were out.”
Burger King wanted SpongeBob flipping burgers on a Burger King-style flame broiler, and Target wanted to market its SpongeBob products with the slogan, “It’s hip to be square,” which Hillenburg coolly rejected on the basis that SpongeBob wasn’t hip.
Like everyone else, Hillenburg started seeing SpongeBob everywhere.
In 2015, as if sensing there was a need for some course correction, Hillenburg took a more active role behind the scenes of SpongeBob SquarePants.
In 2019 so far, Nickelodeon has announced the launch of a dedicated SpongeBob YouTube channel, a new mobile game, a new toy line, SpongeBob Nike sneakers, the SpongeBob Smarty Pants Game Show, collaborations with designer Cynthia Rowley and artists Romero Britto and Jon Burgerman and the Pantone Color Institute – who inaugurated the color “SpongeBob Yellow” – and SpongeBob cosmetics.
Clancy Brown, who voices Mr. Krabs, likened the experience to “Having sex with the lights on.” And, in addition to the new feature film, It’s a Wonderful Sponge, slated for release in 2020, Nickelodeon president Brian Robbins – calling SpongeBob SquarePants “Our Marvel universe” – has promised spin-off shows.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How We Got From Doc Brown to Walter White”

Westworld, Orphan Black, Masters of Sex, CSI, Bones, House, The Big Bang Theory, and several others have all written scientists as diverse and complex humans who have almost nothing in common with the scientists I saw in the 1980s movies I watched as a kid.
As a result, scientists on screen have evolved from stereotypes and villains to credible and positive characters, due in part to scientists themselves, anxious to be part of the action and the public’s education.
Scientists were smart and rational, the report noted, but of all the occupational roles on TV, scientists were the least sociable.
“We know we need scientists to fix up the mess we’re making of the planet. If there’s any hope at all, it has to come from scientists who monitor the risk and are able to find ways to overcome that risk. Whereas before, scientists were seen as part of the risk.”
Eight years after Doc Emmett Brown sent his mad invention traveling through time in Back to the Future, scientists in Jurassic Park enthralled visitors with creatures from the past.
Although Doc Brown’s chaotic goofiness was still acceptable for scientist characters in 1985, the paleontologists in Jurassic Park were held to a much higher standard.
In 2008, the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, having long taken note of the good and not-so-good portrayals of science and scientists in TV and film, set up the Science & Entertainment Exchange, a hotline that connects producers and screenwriters to scientists.
White’s blue meth business is also a reminder that while the overall framing of scientists on TV might have shifted toward the heroic, we can’t help but notice that Walter White is still a villain.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Gateway Episodes: Living Single’s “Love Thy Neighbor” and “Mystery Date.””

The few exceptions include Amazon Prime, home to A Different World, and Hulu, where you can binge Family Matters or, my personal favorite, Living Single.
The all-white simulacrum, which began airing a year after Living Single’s debut, eventually became a megahit, with the core cast members raking in $1 million per episode by the end of the show’s 10-season run.
Despite its own success, Living Single ended after just five seasons, all of which are now streaming for those looking to be initiated into what the theme song calls “a ’90s kind of world.” And those initiates should start with the 18th and 19th episodes of the first season, “Love Thy Neighbor” and “Mystery Date.”.
The first part of “Love Thy Neighbor” revolves around a fairly standard sitcom trope: A new couple has moved in upstairs and is having loud, frequent sex.
Just as the first episode ends, a handsome new neighbor takes their place and ends up stirring up even more of a fuss than the previous ones did.
The episode ends with a party at Kyle and Overton’s apartment, where Hamilton finally chooses between the three ladies-the victor was chosen by viewers calling in to Fox-and Synclaire and Overton, who finally share a kiss at the end of “Love Thy Neighbor,” making a decision about their relationship.
I won’t give away any more than that, but it’s fair to say that “Love Thy Neighbor” and “Mystery Date” combine all the elements that make Living Single one of my favorite shows.
These episodes and Living Single writ large so convincingly capture, through the chemistry of the cast, true-blue friendship.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 Ways to Respond to Ageism in a Job Interview”

Despite the negative stereotypes that older workers have less energy and are less productive, the data shows otherwise.
According to research from the Stanford Center on Longevity, older workers are healthy, have a strong work ethic, are loyal to their employers, and are more likely to be satisfied with their jobs than their younger coworkers.
Show your excitement about the opportunity and the work you do.
Instead of discussing how many years of experience you have, or how many times you’ve done a certain type of project, show your enthusiasm for the job by saying something like, “This is my sweet spot. This is the work I love to do.” Calling out all of your years of experience can have the unintended consequence of alienating or intimidating your interviewer, or making you appear to be a know-it-all.
In finding ways to connect personally with her interviewer, Lauren made sure to use current references that a younger person could relate to, like a popular show on Netflix.
Humor is another way to connect and show the other person you’d be enjoyable to work with.
Show your ability to work well with diverse groups of people.
While ageism exists, focusing on what you can control and employing the strategies above can divert attention from your age and refocus it on why you are right for the job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ten years of ‘Shark Tank,’ the show that explains America”

In August 2009, the reality series Shark Tank debuted on ABC at the height of America’s uncertainty as the unemployment rate rose to 9.7 percent.
For the uninitiated, Shark Tank is a show where aspiring entrepreneurs bring their small businesses or ideas to a panel of “Sharks,” ultra-wealthy investors looking to become partners.
Several pitches this season have featured entrepreneurs talking about growing up watching Shark Tank, as well as the inclusion of a new guest shark, Jamie Siminoff, the founder of the video-doorbell product Ring, which Amazon bought for $1 billion after all the sharks passed on the idea back in season five, marking the first time a former entrepreneur has returned as a shark.
At least once an episode, as though contractually obligated, a shark would proudly proclaim, “The American Dream is alive and well!” In 2019, Shark Tank exists within a complicated cultural milieu that offers content to suit any political sensibility.
Despite this, Shark Tank wants you to believe that the sharks, millionaires and billionaires all, are our friends.
In this way, Shark Tank best resembles a show like Showtime’s Billions, which critiques the wanton greed of its contemptible characters while convincingly inviting us to lavish in it, like a pig in shit.
Like Billions, Shark Tank is aware of the importance of tone and address.
Perhaps Shark Tank is a suitably absurd and ludicrous answer to the specific American trauma of income inequality and economic precarity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Schitt’s Creek and the Making of an Emmy Underdog Success”

As Tuesday’s nominations underscored with the shocking success of Pop TV’s Schitt’s Creek and BBC America’s Killing Eve, the big guys haven’t locked up a monopoly on Emmy gold just yet.
In a sign there’s a limit to how much Emmy love money can buy, those two underdog shows from smaller networks ended up scoring multiple nominations in major categories, while high-profile projects from Julia Roberts, Emma Stone, and George Clooney were virtually ignored by voters.
While the network’s PR team certainly worked overtime to raise the show’s profile, “The idea of us putting together huge Emmy campaigns and spending a lot of money to go get Emmys was never something we would ever do. [So] when the Emmy chatter started happening it happened organically,” he said.
While grassroots support might not have meant much to Emmy voters ten or 15 years ago – or else Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Veronica Mars would’ve taken home a slew of statuettes – in the age of social media and dozens of entertainment-news websites, bottom-up Emmy campaigns today actually have a chance of working.
Even if Emmy voters never saw Orphan Black trend on Twitter, they likely read the countless stories about the Clone Club or the rave reviews, creating a feedback loop that ultimately helped Maslany score three Emmy noms and one win.
“Dan [Levy] had an Ellen appearance strategically placed during Emmy season. We flew the cast out to do Deadline’s The Contenders series. Some of the cast were on the MTV Movie and TV Awards As a smaller network, we can’t compete with huge billboards asking for Emmys. We’ve just done what we can to remind everyone of the great show that everyone loves and to just throw some fuel on the fire that already exists.”
“The goal is really to break through that clutter.” It may have worked: After being ignored by voters for the first two years of Noah’s run, The Daily Show – an Emmy darling during Jon Stewart’s tenure as anchor – was finally nominated for Best Variety/Talk Show in 2018, and again this week.
“These types of campaigns get additional exposure for those shows, so the Emmy window is a piece of the year-round promotional plan. Every opportunity we can to spotlight the show and raise awareness for it, the better.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The “SpongeBob Squarepants” cast dives deep: On their iconic roles and humanity under the sea”

Salon spoke with the cast of “SpongeBob Squarepants” to describe what makes this silly sea show so enduring.
The main characters of the hit TV show “SpongeBob Squarepants” may be a bunch of fish – technically a sea sponge, starfish, cephalopod, crustacean, phytoplankton and squirrel, to be exact – but the key to the show’s enduring success could very well be that, for all of their silly underwater antics, the population of Bikini Bottom is endearingly human.
There is a scene in “SpongeBob’s Big Birthday Blowout,” the 20th anniversary special for the show that premieres on Friday at 7 p.m. ET, which plays with the underlying humanity of SpongeBob, Patrick, Squidward, Sandy, Plankton and Mr. Krabs in a particularly clever way.
Rodger Bumpass, who voices the curmudgeonly Squidward Tentacles, observed how fans identify with the character’s existential malaise – how, in effect, they first identify with SpongeBob as children, and then with his cranky character as adults.
“There’s a passage of time that people go through coming into young adulthood – and that really is where people tell me, when I go to conventions and stuff – that when they were young they associated and identified with SpongeBob because of his youthful playfulness and innocence, and then as they get to be adults and learn what the real world is like, and for a lot of people, that’s a traumatic passage of time,” Bumpass told Salon, who speculated that a lot of young people struggle with “This adult thing” once they reach a certain age.
With 20 years under its belt, it’s difficult to imagine where SpongeBob Squarepants will go from here.
Of course, like other classic animated TV shows such as Looney Tunes, the likelihood is that “SpongeBob Squarepants” will stick with its floating timeline and allow things to remain in their status quo forever – with SpongeBob manning the grill at the Krusty Krab, Squidward muttering to himself behind the cash register, Mr. Krabs in the back counting his money, Plankton scheming and figuratively face-planting each time, Patrick sleeping under his rock, Sandy getting into adventures and saving the day.
“Some shows focus on the childlike aspect of SpongeBob and things they can do by fooling around in the back of the classroom or whatever, or getting bullied by Flats the Flounder. Or sometimes, like you said, it’s more about ‘Midlife Crustacean’ where it’s about other, more adult concerns.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Seinfeld at 30: 5 ways the “show about nothing” changed television”

Its pilot, “The Seinfeld Chronicles,” aired that evening in 1989, but the show wouldn’t return for nearly a full year – its second episode didn’t air until May of 1990.
1) Seinfeld changed the way sitcom stories are written It’s not terribly exciting to think about television in terms of its story structure – the combination of plot developments, scenes, and raw dramatic beats that make up any given episode of TV – but Seinfeld’s impact on television comedy is actually most pronounced in this arena.
The best Seinfeld episodes are marvels of story structure, with jokes and storylines dovetailing and tucking into each other in ways that can be as thrilling as any twist in a plot-heavy drama.
Not every show uses the Seinfeld structure, but the series gave other shows the option of pursuing far more than the typical two stories per episode.
Even a short year before Seinfeld debuted, a show like Murphy Brown had to essentially center everything on the fact that its protagonist was a single woman making her way through her life and work.
4) Seinfeld predicted the growing whiteness of network television Little of this is Seinfeld’s fault; television’s whiteness has far more to do with the Clinton-era repeal of the Financial Interest and Syndication Rules.
NBC actually forced creators Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David to make the show a multi-camera, but once the two were committed to doing so, they essentially broke all of the established rules of how multi-camera sitcoms worked, twisting and bending them so far that the multi-camera sitcom had essentially nowhere else to go if writers wanted to continue to innovate.
The longer Seinfeld ran, the more single-camera sequences Seinfeld and David inserted into the action.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Streaming TV is about to get very expensive”

The most watched show on US Netflix, by a huge margin, is the US version of The Office.
Even though the platform pumps out an absurd amount of original programming – 1,500 hours last year – it turns out that everyone just wants to watch a decade-old sitcom.
Things are just about manageable – if you have a TV licence, a Netflix subscription, an Amazon subscription and a Now TV subscription, you are pretty much covered – but things are about to take a turn for the worse.
The former Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg is about to launch a platform called Quibi, releasing “Snackable” content from Steven Spielberg and others that is designed to be watched on your phone.
Watching television is about to get very, very expensive.
There’s a huge difference between not being able to watch everything because there’s too much choice and not being able to watch everything because you don’t have enough money.
Netflix didn’t become a monster because people wanted to watch a specific show; it became a monster because people wanted to watch everything.
When its streaming platform launched, people were spending more than £15 just to watch a single season of a show on DVD. So to be able to watch every season of a show – and every season of hundreds of others of shows – for a fiver a month was revolutionary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Do the Most GIF-able TV Shows Have In Common?”

According to the GIF-hosting site Giphy, this GIF of the character Patrick from SpongeBob SquarePants has been viewed over a billion times.
What is it about Patrick that makes him so eminently GIF-able? Giphy’s viewing data suggests that the most viewed of their TV channels in 2019 – the collections full of GIFs from individual TV shows – are from Saturday Night Live, SpongeBob, Fallon’s Tonight Show, Game of Thrones, Broad City, and The Bachelor.
The first part of the answer lies in how these GIFs get used, and the SpongeBob examples are prime illustrations of what makes a GIF effective.
If you’ve seen SpongeBob or if you haven’t, if you’re looking at the GIF while quickly scrolling through your feed, if you speak any language – those images will translate.
Looking up “Happy” on a GIF search engine is like looking up “Happy” in a thesaurus: You are presented with hundreds of variations, thousands of more specific ways of expressing the idea you’re trying to communicate.
Great GIF-worthy TV is especially accessible for being clipped and excerpted, so that its most dramatic reaction moments are set adrift from their original contexts and made to float freely among the vast GIF collections of various emotional states.
Once set loose, it’s incredibly easy for a GIF to be divorced from its original framing, forever severed from the ideas and characters and creators who made it.
After searching for half an hour, I still cannot tell you where precisely my beloved happy-faced-girl GIF comes from, although I suspect it’s Toddlers and Tiaras.

The orginal article.