Summary of “Donald Glover Can’t Save You”

Donald Glover sat behind the wheel of the Nissan Sentra, his door ajar, and lit a joint.
“After the premi√®re of the show,” she said, “I asked Donald how he felt, and he said, ‘I’m a very complex person,’ almost apologetically, and walked away.” Glover explained, “The sound was all fucked up and the guy at the controls wouldn’t let me touch it, so it didn’t quite hit. Everyone else was super happy, but I couldn’t be, and I felt really mad at myself, because I was ruining it for everyone else.” He laughed.
“We had a cousin with AIDS and we couldn’t keep her and save her,” Glover said.
Stephen Glover said, “We were wised up early to not celebrating our birthdays and that there was no Santa Claus and no magic. Our mom made us watch ‘Mississippi Burning’ when I was six, and she always warned me about wearing saggy pants and said, ‘If someone sucks your penis, come tell me.'” Glover said, “I know Mom was doing all that to protect us, but it gave me nightmares. I wouldn’t go into bathrooms alone or eat anything except turkey.”
Kevin Feige, Marvel’s president, told me, “When we tested the film, even with that tiny role, Donald was one of the audience’s favorite characters.” Glover said he took the role because “I learn so much. I learn how Marvel movies work, how to handle guest stars, how to make execs happy when they come on set. I gain some of your power. Only now I’m running out of places to learn, at least in America.”
Glover said, of these episodes, “No black people talk to each other like that, or need to. It’s all for white people.” FX told Glover to avoid the N-word in his pilot; the network’s compromise position was that only a white character who says “Really, nigga?” and “You know how niggas out here are” could use it.
Harmon said, “Chevy was the first to realize how immensely gifted Donald was, and the way he expressed his jealousy was to try to throw Donald off. I remember apologizing to Donald after a particularly rough night of Chevy’s non-P.C. verbiage, and Donald said, ‘I don’t even worry about it.'” Glover told me, “I just saw Chevy as fighting time-a true artist has to be O.K. with his reign being over. I can’t help him if he’s thrashing in the water. But I know there’s a human in there somewhere-he’s almost too human.” Glover quit in the fifth season, too bored to do it anymore.
Fam Udeorji had told me, “White Donald would be James Franco-a guy doing a lot of different shit, none of it interesting.” I asked Glover if there was a possibility, given his belief that the black experience was more interesting-albeit far more painful-than the white experience, that White Donald wouldn’t have ended up where Black Donald has.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘M*A*S*H’ Oral History: Untold Stories From One of TV’s Most Important Shows”

Reassured of the show’s intentions, Alda signed on as Hawkeye.
We ended the show with Radar telling them there are choppers with more wounded on their way in.
A few shows in particular stand out with cast members for what they represent, the envelopes they pushed and the emotions that surfaced from cast and audience.
“Don’t you remember the promise we all made to each other?” He was referring to always showing the reality of war whenever possible.
He’d been a working actor throughout his life and never had what he had with that show.
According to the utility commission, when the show ended, there was an enormous drop in the water pressure because people were flushing their toilets at the same time.
So much has changed; TV, the whole concept of reality shows and the number of channels.
We weren’t a military show and I don’t think I’d want to watch one about behind the lines in Afghanistan.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jimmy Buffett Does Not Live the Jimmy Buffett Lifestyle”

In December, Mr. Buffett was still looking to make the show an even more authentic testament to the lifestyle he created and the escapism he knows his fans want.
He had to get on a stage with a pickup band like in the old days and really get back into the original iteration of Jimmy Buffett.
Jimmy Buffett – the nibbling on sponge cake, watching the sun bake, getting drunk and screwing, it’s 5 o’clock somewhere Jimmy Buffett – has been replaced with a well-preserved businessman who is leveraging the Jimmy Buffett of yore in order to keep the Jimmy Buffett of now in the manner to which the old Jimmy Buffett never dreamed he could become accustomed.
Therein lies the Margaritaville¬ģ Mesquite BBQ Rub: The more successful you become at selling the Jimmy Buffett lifestyle, the less you are seen as believably living the Jimmy Buffett lifestyle.
Jimmy Buffett entered a point of no return where the lifestyle of the erstwhile Jimmy Buffett became so distant and unrecognizable to the new Jimmy Buffett that he understood there could be a problem in the making.
Mr. Buffett and I both saw “Escape to Margaritaville” in New Orleans on Oct. 28, which is a day that fans have long since designated as Parrothead Day, though Mr. Buffett doesn’t know why.
Perhaps the inspiration for Mr. Garcia’s previous affable bums had always been the old Jimmy Buffett: the kind of ne’er do well who grapples with living a life of purpose while not wanting to work very hard.
If Jimmy Buffett was a Jimmy Buffett kind of guy, these thoughts would have been incidental, thought up in a hammock then lost to memory the way the best boozy thoughts always are.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Good Place: Mike Schur and Damon Lindelof Interview”

Last November, The Good Place creator Michael Schur and The Leftovers creator Damon Lindelof spoke with our West Coast editor Josef Adalian at Vulture Festival L.A. During the hour-long conversation, they discussed everything from their shows, TV twists, and fan theories to the #MeToo movement, Twitter, and President Trump.
So then the strengthener in the friendship, I would say, was that when I had the idea for The Good Place, I felt very strongly that I was out of my depth and needed to talk to someone, and so I called Damon and said, “Will you meet me for breakfast again?” and “We’re gonna play a game called ‘Is this anything?’ where I tell you an idea for a TV show and you tell me whether it’s anything.”
Damon Lindelof saying, “This is something” is the reason that show exists.
It’s very flattering for you to say that, but I think anybody in this room who had heard your initial pitch it was very baked.
MS: His theory was that they were dead the whole time, and I’m like, “You know, that’s true.” He’s not watching the show very closely.
You couldn’t do it with, “They’re dead the whole time,” but that show was written in a really specific way and it was very, I don’t know what the right word is it was very flashy writing, even though the show was not really flashy.
Mike, you are on Twitter, and you spend a good chunk of your time talking about President Trump.
He’s a very stupid person and all of the people who work for him are very stupid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Data Can Enhance Creative Projects”

Five years in, Netflix’s foray into original content demonstrates that what’s happened is actually the opposite: Data-driven platforms are giving high-quality, innovative entertainment a place to shine.
Digital platforms like Netflix have more data on consumer tastes than any entertainment company has before – that’s obvious.
These companies are not, for the most part, using their data to make creative decisions about how to produce content.
They’re employing the data to match viewers to the content that meets their tastes.
Netflix isn’t in the business of maximizing the number of viewers for each individual movie or show; it’s in the business of assembling the best collection of movies and shows to meet the needs of each viewer.
A viewer switching to another show can be good for Netflix because it offers the company more data about what that individual customer does and doesn’t like, something it can then factor into how it personalizes content.
Of course, without data and the personalized recommendations it produces, an explosion of content could create a tyranny of choices, where users struggle to pick the flavor they want.
Consumers may come to view Netflix and other data-driven entertainment platforms not only as content producers, like any other television network, but also as skilled matchmakers that can bring them exactly what they want – and whose matchmaking will only get better as technology advances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ the Most Radical Show on TV?”

“It is a popular movie, but it didn’t reach everyone the way a weekly television show does,” said Lady Bunny, a drag queen in her 50s who is often regarded as one of the legendary figures of American drag culture.
Anyone familiar with reality television will recognize the premise of “Drag Race”: Loosely modeled on “America’s Next Top Model,” hosted by Tyra Banks, the show features 12 contestants who gather to compete for the title of America’s Next Drag Superstar and a cash prize that varies per season but can be as much as $100,000.
Tom Campbell, head of development at World of Wonder, told me that the idea for the show was to create a competition that would groom the next generation of drag superstars by replicating all the major milestones of Charles’s career – model, television personality, performer.
Charles thinks these new fans who follow him and the queens on Instagram or who show up at live events for the show are embracing the spirit of drag and the freedom it offers.
There have been trans queens on the show, but the topic is a touchy one in the drag community.
Charles frequently described his relationship to drag as “The Superman to my Clark Kent.” The first time he stepped into his drag persona, Charles felt fully alive, electric with a power to command attention and desire.
Charles is rarely in drag these days – only for special occasions, and during the judging and elimination rounds on the show – a shift that he made about a decade ago.
Charles had mentioned to me it several times – he is nothing if not media-savvy – as the future of his empire and a way to widen the culture of drag beyond a television show and nighttime acts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Artist Questioning Authorship”

The most important decisions, about where and how individual pieces will be displayed, won’t be finalized until the last two weeks before the opening, and those decisions will be made by Vo. Katherine Brinson, the Guggenheim curator who proposed the exhibition and made it happen, has worked with Vo before, and she is at ease with his largely intuitive, unpredictable, and playful approach to the process-which he once compared to “Changing your underwear in public.” Vo, she told me last month, “Is very good at pressing us to be less rigid.”
A Dutch court ruled against Vo, saying he must deliver a large new work in the style of his recent pieces; Vo offered the collector a text piece that would read, in large letters, “Shove it up your ass, you faggot!,” which happens to be the title of one of his sculptural collages.
“Berlin was very cheap. I still never thought I would have an artist career, but I came into a circle of friends whom I felt affiliated with, and whose work made sense to me.” He started seeing Michael Elmgreen, of the duo Elmgreen & Dragset, whose avant-garde architectural and sculptural installations were attracting attention in Europe.
The copies are all sold as art works by Danh Vo, who pays his father a third of the three-hundred-euro purchase price.
In her catalogue essay for the Guggenheim show, Katherine Brinson links this dismemberment of relatively unimportant but still genuine art works to “The dense compression and intermingling of narrative strata that is the hallmark of his work.” A certain amount of black humor is also involved, and it becomes overt in some of the titles.
When Vo won the Hugo Boss Prize, in 2012, he chose not to show his own work in the small Guggenheim Museum exhibition that goes with it; instead, he put together a display of hundreds of small figurines, ceramics, and gift-shop tchotchkes that had been collected by Martin Wong, a little-known Chinese-American artist who died of AIDS in 1999.
Although his father figures in many of his works, Vo told me that “I was my mother’s child. My father and I became closer through the work he does for me-reactivating his calligraphy has always felt like one of my biggest accomplishments. But I don’t want to get that close. I love my family, I have a lot of fun with them, and I support my parents financially, but I’m not so emotionally attached.” I asked him if his parents understand what he does.
Vo wants a live, potted chestnut tree in the ground-floor atrium, and he has been working with a landscape designer to redo the plantings inside and outside the museum-not as part of the exhibition, he explained, but as “a good thing for the institution and for the future.” At Vo’s request, the covering over the central skylight will be removed before the opening-something that has not been done in years-to allow unfiltered daylight into the museum.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Breaking Bad at 10: remembering its Shakespearean storytelling genius”

Much has been made of the way the writers of Breaking Bad – which debuted to modest ratings on January 20, 2008, before growing into one of the defining shows of its era – wrote themselves into corners, before improvising their way out.
Almost as much has been made of how Breaking Bad, despite being the heavily serialized journey of a man from mild-mannered teacher to crime boss, worked beautifully on an episode-to-episode level.
Breaking Bad wouldn’t have worked had it not found a way to perfectly balance those smaller, often improvised strokes against a big picture that felt perfectly plotted when you stepped back and took a look at it.
Breaking Bad pointed the way forward, using its “Teaser” as a kind of disconnected prologue that told its own mini story, thus allowing the rest of the episode to unspool as a more traditional story.
The five-act structure let Breaking Bad know where it was going without having to know where it was going To be sure, this kind of structure can end up hampering a story in the latter part of its run, when things start to feel too inevitable.
The five-act structure unquestionably helped give Breaking Bad the tragic weight it wouldn’t have managed without that sort of rigor.
It’s clear that everybody in television wants to make the next Breaking Bad. When I asked a showrunner recently what she was tired of seeing in sample scripts sent to her by young writers, she pointed out just how many drama pilots she read that were beat-for-beat recreations of the Breaking Bad pilot, right down to the opening that picks up in the middle of the story.
What too many writers miss about Breaking Bad is that its big story, which feels so carefully planned, was only planned in the loosest of senses.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Breaking Bad Became a Phenomenon”

Breaking Bad was not a ratings hit, not a household name, not a show that earned a spot in the zeitgeist for several years.
A show about a guy cooking crystal meth and he’s the hero? What did I expect? When I got a call from my agent saying, “Hey, the folks at AMC want to meet with you about your project,” I said, “Which project?” That’s how far gone I was.
We thought the show would be male-skewing, so there’s forty to fifty million men who will be coming off this event, and this is what we would launch Breaking Bad into.
Looking back, there were countless moments like that where Breaking Bad shouldn’t have succeeded, but the material was strong enough to overcome it.2007 – 2008: HIGHS & LOWSOn November 5, 2007, the Writers Guild of America began a strike that would last four months, halting production on more than 60 shows.
Coverage at the time noted that the show was bucking the usual downward trend; most serialized dramas see their audience shrink over time, while Breaking Bad’s kept growing.
Aaron Paul: Breaking Bad was one of the first series people binge-watched, because the first three seasons all plopped onto Netflix at once.
Melissa Bernstein: Vince is actually a masterful marketing mind, and at every turn he had great ideas about how to make the show indelible, how to make it stand out, how to make it really specific in the marketplace.
We were putting so much energy into these little campaigns, these guerrilla tactics, that it was a shock at some point to realize, Oh my god, people are actually watching the show! We had been in a very grassroots place, thinking, How do we get five more people to watch? And the show finally just took on a momentum of its own around Season Four.Aaron Paul: We lived and breathed these characters.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Using Comedy to Strengthen Nigeria’s Democracy”

“If you do a comedy show, you’re going to step on toes,” he said.
P.M.I. was trying to make a polished TV show using equipment that, as one member of the team said, you might find at a U.S. community college.
To help the troupe, Case e-mailed Kevin Bleyer, a former writer for “The Daily Show.” Bleyer has a boyish face that is at odds with his deep baritone.
Over all, Bleyer and Case were interested less in whether someone could structure a joke than in whether the person was well versed in the news and had a point of view that could give the show critical bite.
To find a host, Graeme Moreland had haunted comedy shows in Lagos.
“He’s now using Hollywood talk. He says ‘If this show tanks,’ whereas the international-development language would be something like ‘If this show doesn’t find its audience,’ or ‘If this show-‘”.
At one point, he argued to Case that the talent should wear Nigerian caftans instead of Western suits, showing him a variety of colorful fabrics.
Case disagreed, saying that the show had to look like other Channels programming.

The orginal article.