Summary of “Julia Louis-Dreyfus Acts Out”

“Saturday Night Live” went on the air when Louis-Dreyfus was in high school, and she watched it with her family every week, rapt.
As the boss, Louis-Dreyfus has achieved the ensemble focus she craved at “S.N.L.”-in stark contrast to Selina’s management style.
Louis-Dreyfus got the news just as she was starting work again on “Veep.” “It was out of the blue,” she said.
“Given the fact that that heinous shit came out, I would simply say I’ve kept this under wraps out of reverence for my dearest Emma,” Louis-Dreyfus said.
Louis-Dreyfus, who is fifty-seven, had a memorable part in the 2015 sketch “Last Fuckable Day,” on the Comedy Central series “Inside Amy Schumer.” In it, Schumer is hiking through the woods when she happens upon Patricia Arquette and Tina Fey, feasting and drinking toasts to Louis-Dreyfus.
Out of character, Louis-Dreyfus wears jeans, casual sweaters, and Blundstone work boots-outfits that express a desire to fit in, and that do not draw attention to the fact that she has a body that doesn’t stop.
She went outside with her assistant, Rachel Leavitt, who took out her cell phone to record Louis-Dreyfus in front of a brick wall.
Hall, who is as fair and blond as the sisters Louis-Dreyfus grew up with, pulled a bottle of lotion out from behind his beach chair to prove it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The backstory of Netflix’s $100 million ‘Friends’ deal”

Which is what Netflix is going to pay AT&T* for the right to stream “Friends” next year.
As the Wall Street Journal’s Joe Flint reported yesterday, AT&T’s WarnerMedia, which owns “Friends,” has extended a deal that gives Netflix exclusive streaming rights to all 10 seasons of the show through 2019.
As the New York Times’ Edmund Lee reported today, Netflix is paying $100 million to stream the show next year.
Netflix wasn’t the only streamer interested in “Friends.” Other bidders for the show included Hulu, the streaming service currently owned by Disney, Fox, NBCU and WarnerMedia, as well as Apple, which doesn’t have a streaming service yet, but also plans on launching one next year.
I’m also told that Hulu, which is very likely to end up solely owned by Disney/Fox once those two companies consummate their merger, tried hard to land “Friends.” At the very least, Hulu’s interest in the show ended up pushing the price up well beyond the $30 million a year Netflix was already paying for it.
So here’s the hedge WarnerMedia has ended up with**: After 2019, WarnerMedia has the ability to pull “Friends” from Netflix altogether and keep the show as an exclusive.
Which means there’s a scenario where WarnerMedia can get another $75 million a year from Netflix and still use the show as a key part of its own streaming service.
NBCU execs say Netflix has told them “The Office” generates more viewing hours than anything else on the service.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MST3K creator Joel Hodgson on 30 years of making fun of movies.”

Hey, thanks for coming to Mystery Science Theater 3000,” host and show creator Joel Hodgson says with the friendly, sleepy air of a TGI Fridays host already deep into a weeknight shift.
In the past 30 years, MST3K has undergone many well-documented ups and downs-a pickup by Comedy Central, Hodgson’s departure, the addition of new host Mike Nelson, a pickup by what was then known as the Sci-Fi Channel, cancellation, years of absence, Hodgson’s return and an accompanying Kickstarter campaign, the addition of new host Jonah Ray for its two seasons at Netflix-but its core remains fundamentally the same.
“A lot of people don’t know this, but I read for the part of Woody for Cheers,” Hodgson tells me by phone.
MST3K is now based, like Hodgson, in Los Angeles, but the move to the coast hasn’t endangered its longevity: not counting an 18-year gap that produced no new episodes, the show has endured multiple cast and production changeovers and outlasted all imitators.
“Most of the time they’re mostly just wishing they were 13 again, and I can’t do that. There’s a funny disconnect that happens, where you are forever a certain age while you’re a viewer.” Hodgson’s solution has included making a break from the past with Jonah Ray as the new host and a supporting cast that now includes Hampton Yount, Baron Vaughn, Patton Oswalt, Felicia Day, and Rebecca Hanson.
“I’m 58 years old,” Hodgson explains.
Having just completed a six-week, 41-show tour with Ray, Hodgson has gotten a chance to see the fondness of new fans firsthand.
Where the show will be in 30 years remains an open question, but Hodgson never considered it lasting this long or anticipated it would have the legacy and impact it’s had, one that would lead to everyone from Dan Harmon to The Name of the Wind author Patrick Rothfuss pitching in on the new episodes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Great British Baking Show: Meet the Show’s Illustrator”

In the midst of The Great British Baking Show’s controversial migration between British networks two years ago – a creative decision that lost 75 percent of the show’s personalities – tabloid speculation ran wild at the time about what this new Baking Show iteration would entail, given that the only person following the dough was Paul Hollywood and his piercing blue eyes.
Because also choosing to stay in the show’s family was Tom Hovey, arguably the fifth puzzle piece in its sugary, buttery DNA. You don’t know his face, but you definitely know his work – and that’s because he’s responsible for creating every illustration in Baking Show history, from day one and beyond.
“My best mate worked in television and suggested that I apply for a job in ‘the edit’ at this new cookery show. With no TV experience or idea about how edits worked, I blagged my way in and started two days later.” Soon after beginning this editing job Hovey admitted to the directors and editors that his passion was actually illustration, which spurred the higher-ups to spontaneously incorporate something artistic into the show.
It was only after working on The Great British Baking Show for a few seasons that he realized his creative fulfillment was being met, and yes, he was also turning into a massive foodie, too.
“My job is to illustrate what the bakers planned to create, not what they actually baked in the tent,” he said.
“Sometimes if the bakes don’t go as planned, I have to work out with the producers and the bakers how to fix the issues. Add missing elements, extra layers, that sort of thing. Just make the bakes look the best they can, that’s the key.”
“It’s really enjoyable getting lost in the details of the bakes I get joy from being able to show off the big, bright, and bold bakes,” he said.
“The concept was to create drawings based on what the bakers may have sketched out when deciding what to bake in the show in their own recipe sketchbook,” he said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Home-Cooked Pleasures of “Please Like Me””

In the second season of the Australian series “Please Like Me,” our millennial hero, Josh, visits his mom, Rose, at a psychiatric hospital, carrying a gift box of bonbons.
Still, what makes the show unique, and lends it a rare toughness, is the bond between Josh and Rose, who is played with bravura fragility by Debra Lawrence.
Like Josh in his kitchen, the show continually turns scraps-of dialogue, of plot-into something hearty.
Along with the depressive Hannah, who moves in with Rose, the ensemble includes Josh’s stoical dad, Alan, and his new girlfriend, Mae; Josh’s high-school girlfriend, the equally adrift Claire; and his hangdog friend, Tom.
The show’s treatment of Josh’s sexual adventures, like its treatment of mental illness, is idiosyncratic and unsentimental, romantic without dipping into formula.
In “Simple Carbohydrates,” Josh is dating Arnold, a clinically anxious young man who had a stay at Rose’s hospital.
“That’s my boy,” he tells Arnold, as Josh and his friends tear up.
In a remarkable episode called “Scroggin,” in which Josh and his mother go camping in Tasmania, Rose sings it, solo, during their hike.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If you want to understand Silicon Valley, watch Silicon Valley”

Considering the huge impact that Silicon Valley has on our lives, I’m surprised by how rarely pop culture really gets it right.
It’s about a small team of developers at an Internet startup called Pied Piper.
The show is a parody, so it exaggerates things, but like all great parodies it captures a lot of truths.
Most of the different personality types you see in the show feel very familiar to me.
Silicon Valley gives you the impression that small companies like Pied Piper are mostly capable while big companies like Hooli are mostly inept.
I also understand why the show focuses so much on Pied Piper and makes Hooli look so goofy.
I’ve seen every episode of the first four seasons and am working my way through season 5, which ended in May. I’ve read that the show’s creators originally planned to stop after six seasons, but now they’re open to doing more.
I’ll keep watching as long as they keep making this hilarious show.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Three Feet From God: An Oral History of Nirvana ‘Unplugged'”

We were out on tour for a few days and started to get to know the guys, started to get to know Kurt, and then one evening he said they were gonna do the Unplugged thing.
We had told the camera guys and everyone, “Don’t approach the band. If you have any questions come to us and we’ll talk to them. One person can talk to Kurt. No one else can talk to Kurt.” And Juan got off the camera and I’m in the control room, and all of the sudden I see Juan walking up to Kurt and I was like, “What is he doing? What is he doing?” And he just asked him a question about something camera-related, and Kurt politely answered him, and he went back to his camera.
Cross: Kurt is leading every moment and every gesture in a way that you don’t observe when you watch a Nirvana show that’s electric.
It’s not like every single moment is focused on Kurt at a live Nirvana concert.
Coletti: Nothing about the show, minus the fact that Kurt died shortly thereafter, has a funeral vibe.
McCarthy-Miller: After the show they had Kurt come into the control room and look at some songs.
Finnerty: After the show, Courtney [Love] was out of town, and so we went back to the hotel, and we were just hanging at the bar, and Kurt was like, “I want to go upstairs and call Courtney.” And he’s like, “I’m really bummed. I feel like nobody liked it. It was really bad.” I was like, “Oh my God, you’re out of your mind.” I walked him up to the room.
If there’s an entry point to who Kurt Cobain was as a songwriter and a singer, Unplugged is that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Podcasts Became a Seductive-and Sometimes Slippery-Mode of Storytelling”

To use the language of Walter Benjamin, these podcasts offer the sometimes lurid satisfactions of story bolstered by the apparent rectitude of information.
It is sometimes argued that, because podcasts require a considerable time commitment, people don’t “Hate-listen” to them the way they skim magazine articles that offend them or follow people on Twitter whose points of view they loathe.
The podcast’s originality lay precisely in cultivating that sense of discomfort: a listener longed to know not only what had happened to Simmons but also how Taberski would resolve the ethical dilemma of having subjected a faded celebrity to such scrutiny.
Several of the most well-received podcasts have been produced by public radio, including “In the Dark,” an investigative series made by American Public Media and hosted by Madeleine Baran.
A representative for Blue Apron, which has launched its own branded podcast, “Why We Eat What We Eat,” in addition to advertising on hundreds of shows, told me, “We view podcasts less as an advertising channel and more as a content channel to win new customers and engage existing customers.”
New ways of monetizing podcasts are being explored, including a paid-subscription model; apps such as Stitcher Premium offer ad-free listening and bonus episodes.
“Traditional journalism is all about delivering a final product to an audience and saying, ‘Trust us, here’s our omniscient authority that we have earned.’ Podcasting is, by definition, a more vulnerable, transparent medium. You can hear the reporter’s uncertainty.” Listeners often tell Barbaro how much they appreciate being invited behind the scenes-hearing him and his colleagues stumble toward an understanding of the news.
To revisit the show now is illuminating, as it reveals how persuasively the medium of podcasting can tell a story-the ascent of Hillary Clinton to the Presidency-in such a way that it seems not just plausible but inevitable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s next for podcasting? – TechCrunch”

Based on numerous discussions I’ve had with top figures in podcasting over the last month, it’s clear that popular shows are getting large offers for exclusivity on podcasting platforms, major Hollywood players are entering the market and some top VCs are willing to back new streaming platforms taking a Netflix approach to podcasts.
Even with dramatic market growth, podcasting doesn’t have a comparative advantage in competing against the scale and ad-targeting of the duopoly.
Podcasting is just a content medium and should be filled with shows that appeal to all different types of people, just like music, TV, film, publishing sites and YouTube each have a vast range of content for everyone.
Spotify, Pandora, iHeartRadio and others have made podcasts a priority over the last year, promoting shows to millions of users who aren’t already into podcasting.
Life is admittedly getting good for the most downloaded shows now that the podcasting market is getting serious attention.
Schumer’s podcast isn’t exclusive to Spotify but it’s easy to envision the streaming service signing future podcast deals as exclusives as its base of podcast listeners grows.
Podcasting should embrace “Listener revenue”.
Incumbents moving into podcasting from music streaming have a distinct advantage here over startups dedicated to podcast streaming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Netflix and the streaming wars create income inequality”

A writer on a Netflix show is paid differently from someone on a Hulu or YouTube Premium show, because fees are based on the number of subscribers that a service has.
In August, Becker, a seasoned performer who was a recurring guest star on Parks & Recreation, decided to go public with the way Netflix treats the rank-and-file workers on its shows.
Excited for the work, and the opportunity to work at a place known for its creative risk taking, she excitedly told her friends, “‘I booked a Netflix show!’ And they’re like, ‘Oh my God! Congratulations!'” she says.
A Netflix spokesperson responds, “Decisions about series regulars are always made in consultation with the show creators and depend on a variety of factors including creative vision and production’s scheduling needs for the actor. We work hard to support artists and are always grateful when they share their talent on our shows.”
Even with these attempts to level the playing field, there is still the fact that a season for a streaming show is typically less than half the length of a traditional network show.
If someone like Allison theoretically went from a network late-night show to its streaming equivalent, say, Norm Macdonald Has a Show on Netflix, or Sarah Silverman’s I Love You, America on Hulu, it’s a completely different financial outlook.
The company is not expected to launch its video offering until sometime next year, but its most significant contribution to the streaming wars thus far is paving the way for better deals for the staffs who work on their shows.
“My husband is a writer and director. The fact that I have that protection, meaning if one of us were to drop dead, we would definitely still have a source of income to take care of our kids. If I’m only on one show and it’s only 20 weeks, what am I going to do the rest of the year? And if the show is 10 episodes?”.

The orginal article.