Summary of “Want a Standing Desk? Show This Study to Your Boss”

Standing desks became trendy because of their ability to cut into your sitting time, thereby improving your health and wellness in the workplace.
A small new study says the benefits don’t stop there: standing desks may actually improve your job performance, too.
Office workers who used desks that could be adjusted for sitting or standing reported significant reductions in the amount of time they spent sitting, better health and improved work performance at the end of a year-long trial, compared to employees who sat at their desks as usual.
The results were published Wednesday in the BMJ. The study involved 146 people who worked in office roles at the University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust in the U.K. Seventy-six participants were given sit-stand desks and completed training meant to encourage less sitting at work, including an educational seminar, individual coaching sessions and even a smart seat cushion, which reminded people to stand by vibrating.
People in the other group didn’t get any coaching and worked at their desks as normal.
Over the course of the year, people in the intervention group began sitting much less than people in the control group: After three months, they spent 50 fewer minutes seated each day.
The research suggests that sit-stand desks, which can be adjusted throughout the day, may be a better option than either static sitting or standing desks.
The results of the new study will need to be replicated in a larger group of people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sitzfleisch: The German concept to get more work done”

Literally translated, sitzfleisch means ‘sitting meat’ or ‘sitting flesh’ – in other words, a term for one’s behind or bottom.
To have sitzfleisch means the ability to sit still for the long periods of time required to be truly productive; it means the stamina to work through a difficult situation and see a project through to the end.
When someone says you have sitzfleisch, it’s usually a professional compliment: it means they believe you’re capable of focusing long enough to complete a tough project or finish whatever work needs to be done.
Sitzfleisch is a great example of how these compound words can pack in additional meaning just through juxtaposition.
A recent article about the most recent Star Wars film notes that, at 152 minutes long, the movie “Certainly strains the sitzfleisch of the average movie-goer.”
How do you go about cultivating a bit of sitzfleisch? Robert Hogan, a fellow with the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology in the US, says the first step is recognising you need to work on it in the first place – and having the desire to improve.
Although sitzfleisch is still fairly universally considered as a positive quality – and the lack of it a sign someone is professionally lacking – the word may take on different connotations in a work world that’s more flexible and no longer 9-to-5.
Hogan, underlines however that it really doesn’t matter whether you’re sitting at an office desk or working less regular hours remotely: you can still have sitzfleisch wherever you work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You Sit”

To Fix That Pain In Your Back, You Might Have To Change The Way You Sit : Goats and Soda In the past century, many Americans have lost the ability to sit in a way that doesn’t strain their backs.
Then back in November, I walked into the studio of Jenn Sherer in Palo Alto, Calif. She is part of a growing movement on the West Coast to teach people to move and sit and stand as they did in the past – and as they still do in other parts of the world.
There’s a perception that we sit way more than any other culture out there – or even any culture throughout time.
Maybe the problem, when it comes to back pain, isn’t how much Americans are sitting, but the way we’re sitting.
If we change the way we sit, Khan says, it will help to decrease back problems.
“We should sit less, and we should sit better,” he says.
There’s a high probability their back is curving like the letter C – or some version of C. Or it might make you think of a cashew nut, sitting in the chair.
“If you sit like this, you’re going to put a lot less stress on your spine and have less back issues,” Khan added.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Expelling Demons in Nevada”

To much of the outside world, gambling is a vice not worthy of mercy: It is a symptom of recklessness, of compulsiveness, of greed.
Compulsive gambling is also an addiction-one that affects some three to four million people in the United States alone.
Between the first row of pews and the chancel, a group of five adults, none of them younger than 50, read aloud from a pocket-sized yellow handbook: “We learned we had to concede fully to our innermost selves that we are compulsive gamblers. This is the first step in our recovery. With reference to gambling, the delusion that we are like other people, or presently may be, has to be smashed.”
The group continues: “We have lost the ability to control our gambling. We know that no real compulsive gambler ever regains control. All of us felt at times we were regaining control, but such intervals-usually brief-were inevitably followed by still less control, which led in time to pitiful and incomprehensible demoralization.”
Compulsive gambling is also an addiction-one that affects some three to four million people in the United States alone, and causes suicide attempts in one-fifth of those afflicted.
He’s lived in Las Vegas for the last 37 years; for the last 18, he’s been attending Gamblers Anonymous meetings across the city.
Meetings have supplanted gambling as the object of his addiction-he estimates he attends around eight or nine meetings per week, sometimes three in a single day.
There’s the way she would sneak out of the house in the wee hours of the morning, while her husband and four children were still asleep, careful to let the car roll down the driveway in neutral, lest the engine wake anyone up; the extra shifts pulled in secret, to allow for some extra gambling money that wouldn’t pull directly from the family bank account; the relapses in the casinos, and the shameful calls to her sponsor that would inevitably follow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Get Up, Stand Up!”

Accelerometers are, of course, an objective measure of how much and often someone sits, exercises or otherwise moves about.
They then stratified these participants into various groups, depending on how many hours per day each person had sat, as well as how long each of the bouts of sitting had continued, uninterrupted – 10 minutes? 30 minutes? 60 minutes? more? – and how much time, if any, they had spent exercising.
The scientists then found strong statistical correlations between sitting and mortality.
The risk of early death did drop if sitting time was frequently interrupted.
People whose time spent sitting usually lasted for less than 30 minutes at a stretch were less likely to have died than those whose sitting was more prolonged, even if the total hours of sitting time were the same.
In essence, the data showed that “Both the total hours spent sitting each day and whether those hours are accrued in short or long bouts” of physical stillness influenced longevity, says Keith Diaz, an assistant professor of behavioral medicine at Columbia University, who led the new study.
The accelerometers could not readily distinguish between sitting and standing, Dr. Diaz says, so the “Breaks” in sitting time in this study always involved walking about and not merely standing up.
In future randomized experiments, Dr. Diaz and his colleagues hope to better parse how often and how much people need to move during breaks in order to lessen sitting’s risks, and whether standing by itself is effective or we must move about.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Prolonged Sitting And Binge TV-Viewing May Take A Toll On Ability To Walk”

Prolonged Sitting And Binge TV-Viewing May Take A Toll On Ability To Walk : Shots – Health News If you sit too much during middle age – at work and at home – your ability to exercise or even walk in late decades is at risk, a study hints.
In a study of sitting and walking ability that surveyed people ages 50 to 71 across 8 to 10 years, those who tended to sit the most and move the least had more than three times the risk of difficulty walking by the end of the study, when compared to their more active counterparts.
Young bodies may rebound from prolonged sitting with an hour at the gym, she says.
“Before binge watching, at least when a show ended you got up and walked around,” DiPietro says.
Though being sedentary at work is also a risk, office employees tend to at least get up now and then, walk down the hall to the printer or restroom, and go to lunch, she says.
To measure the effect of prolonged sitting on mobility, DiPietro and colleagues took data from the large NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study of men and women ages 50 to 71.
King says she’s joined walking groups – including the national program Walk With A Doc – as a way to build more activity into her day.
“If I’m walking solo I’m probably walking at a more leisurely pace,” she says, “Because I tend to take a picture of the occasional wildflower, or the clouds that are in a wonderful formation.”

The orginal article.