Summary of “Seinfeld at 30: 5 ways the “show about nothing” changed television”

Its pilot, “The Seinfeld Chronicles,” aired that evening in 1989, but the show wouldn’t return for nearly a full year – its second episode didn’t air until May of 1990.
1) Seinfeld changed the way sitcom stories are written It’s not terribly exciting to think about television in terms of its story structure – the combination of plot developments, scenes, and raw dramatic beats that make up any given episode of TV – but Seinfeld’s impact on television comedy is actually most pronounced in this arena.
The best Seinfeld episodes are marvels of story structure, with jokes and storylines dovetailing and tucking into each other in ways that can be as thrilling as any twist in a plot-heavy drama.
Not every show uses the Seinfeld structure, but the series gave other shows the option of pursuing far more than the typical two stories per episode.
Even a short year before Seinfeld debuted, a show like Murphy Brown had to essentially center everything on the fact that its protagonist was a single woman making her way through her life and work.
4) Seinfeld predicted the growing whiteness of network television Little of this is Seinfeld’s fault; television’s whiteness has far more to do with the Clinton-era repeal of the Financial Interest and Syndication Rules.
NBC actually forced creators Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David to make the show a multi-camera, but once the two were committed to doing so, they essentially broke all of the established rules of how multi-camera sitcoms worked, twisting and bending them so far that the multi-camera sitcom had essentially nowhere else to go if writers wanted to continue to innovate.
The longer Seinfeld ran, the more single-camera sequences Seinfeld and David inserted into the action.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Roseanne’ Revival’s Huge Debut Stuns Hollywood, Prompts Soul-Searching”

Roseanne made a triumphant return Tuesday night, blowing past projections with a 5.2 adults 18-49 rating and 18.2 million total viewers for the debut of its revival, which remarkably drew 10% more viewers than the original series finale 21 years ago.
Not surprisingly, the top TV markets where Roseanne delivered its highest ratings were in states handily carried by Trump in the election.
Roseanne delivered the highest demo rating for any comedy telecast in 3 1/2 years, since the fall 2014 season premiere of TV’s biggest comedy series of the past five years, The Big Bang Theory.
Somehow Roseanne transcended age, recruiting droves of young viewers for a show whose two leads, Roseanne Barr and John Goodman, are both 65, well outside of the 18-49 demo.
ABC did a major marketing campaign for Roseanne, including a three-day stunt during SXSW in Austin that drew huge crowds, and a tie-in with NASCAR, which is hugely popular in the flyover states.
Like Roseanne, Fox has a popular blue-collar sitcom in Married with Children, but its two stars, Ed O’Neill and Katey Sagal, are on other comedy series, ABC’s Modern Family and CBS’ Superior Donuts, respectively.
If Roseanne continues to be a ratings juggernaut, ABC, which is close to renewing the revival for a second season, should look into bringing back its other big blue-collar sitcom hit of the 1990s, Home Improvement, which starred another open Trump supporter, Tim Allen.
With The Middle is going away, there is a vacuum in representing middle-class families on broadcast TV, and the success of Roseanne no doubt will help get more blue-color sitcoms on the air.

The orginal article.