Summary of “The Best Mentors Ask These 8 Questions”

One of the most important characteristics the good ones have in common is their ability to ask insightful questions, says Lisa Z. Fain, CEO of The Center for Mentoring Excellence, a mentoring consultancy and coaching organization.
“For mentors, the most important thing, really, is to ask questions, to be this guide on the side, rather than the sage on the stage,” she says.
The beauty of this question, which is another version of asking about the protégé’s goals, is that it can be adapted for big-picture scenarios or specific situations, says transformation management consultant Christie Lindor, author of The MECE Muse: 100+ Selected Practices, Unwritten Rules, and Habits of Great Consultants.
Similar to the previous question about what success looks like, this question is effective for situations where there is more than one equally viable solution or course of action, says Jennifer Labin, principal at mentoring consulting firm Terp Associates, and author of Mentoring Programs That Work.
“If is facing a really complicated situation, that is often the best question you can ask to help them lift their head up and start to look at the situation from an entirely new angle,” she says.
While not technically a question, this statement prompts the protégé for more detail about what led them to form their opinions or helped them reach a conclusion.
With the benefit of some objectivity and another degree of separation from the situation, the mentor can help them expand their thinking and possibly find new ways of looking at a situation, she says.
Lindor asks about interests, hobbies, reading habits, and other similar questions to get to know her protégés on a more personal level.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To Handle Increased Stress, Build Your Resilience”

Managing stress over the long term requires cultivating your own resilience skills before seeking external solutions so that you can turn changes, stresses, and challenges into opportunities.
To begin to shift the way you deal with stress and cultivate resilience, there are a handful of things you can do right now.
How we perceive stress can be just as important to how we handle it as the amount of stress we’re experiencing.
A 2013 Harvard study also revealed that when researchers told participants that the physiological signs of stress prepared them to cope better they became less anxious and more confident in stressful situations, viewing their stress response as helpful.
You might ask, “How can I use the energy created by feeling stressed about this new job to better prepare for it?” or “What can I learn from the stress about my increased workload that will help me better prioritize my time?”.
Take time to reflect on your personal context as well as the larger business and global context to better understand the root causes and possible ways to alleviate and avoid future stress.
By identifying actions you can take you’ll be able experiment with solutions and new behaviors and discover productive ways to handle challenges and stress.
By making conscious choices that help us build these skills, we’ll be between equipped to turn our stress and challenges into opportunities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “5 traits all emotionally intelligent leaders share”

Empathy, self-awareness and authenticity are just some of the traits that make certain leaders stand out.
Some of the most revered leaders in business today share common traits that attract great staff and inspire the best work.
If you aspire to be a better leader, you would do well to work on your emotional intelligence quotient.
Great leaders are able to look at issues from many different perspectives and to consider the effects from other points of view.
Great leaders can be positive in the face of difficulty and still be very much in touch with the situation.
Great leaders know that getting to know their team members – professionally and personally – and caring about them and their careers will mean that everyone works better together in the long run.
How to practice: Your integrity is paramount to your reputation as a leader, so only say what you mean and don’t make promises you can’t keep.
Every chance to work on your skills will make you a better leader, no matter the location.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Don’t Just Need One Leadership Voice”

We often equate developing a leadership voice with finding ways to come across or sound more confident.
You can build true confidence by more intentionally focusing on cultivating many different parts of your leadership voice each day.
Ultimately, you should cultivate enough parts of your voice so that, no matter the leadership situation or audience you find yourself facing, you can respond in an authentic, constructive, and effective way.
We often equate developing a leadership voice with finding ways to appear more confident.
Rather than living with imposter’s syndrome, or feeling exhausted by wearing your game face all day, you can build a truer confidence by more intentionally focusing on cultivating many different parts of your leadership voice each day.
Ultimately, you should cultivate enough parts of your voice so that no matter the leadership situation or audience you find yourself facing, you can respond in an authentic, constructive, and effective way.
What are the various voices to access within yourself and cultivate over time? And what are the situations that warrant each voice?
Use each situation as an opportunity to access more parts of your voice, rather than having a one-size-fits-all approach.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Faced with Conflict, Try an Introspective Approach”

How is it that rational, good, understanding, kind, collaborative people like you and me can get so triggered by certain colleagues’ work performance that our minds race with how we want them to get out of our lives and work – in any way possible? We come up with long diatribes of the million and one reasons why they need to get their act together – or, better yet, disappear.
In my research and experience as a time management coach, and in my work developing my new book, Divine Time Management, I’ve discovered that people often jump to blaming others in conflict.
Ask yourself: Was something else going on in my life that had an impact on how I saw this event? Had something happened previously in this work relationship that affected how I saw this person? Am I tired, stressed, hungry, hot, or in any other way mentally, emotionally, spiritually, or physically not at my best? Identify any external factors at play, particularly those that might have nothing to do with your counterpart or conflict.
If you are feeling confident about the projects you’re working on, your relationships with people at work, and your overall team performance, someone dropping the ball on a few things may slightly annoy you but won’t infuriate you.
When you’re feeling uncertain about your projects, believe that people think badly of you at work, and are insecure about your team’s performance, one little slipup could send you over the edge.
Instead of calmly working with a coworker on improvements, you could end up lashing out at her or going behind her back to try to get rid of the problem.
The why shouldn’t be “Because you made me so mad that I wanted to spit,” but something like “When you turned in this report late, I ended up working until 1 AM and missed my son’s soccer game to meet the client deadline. For us to work together effectively, I need to receive reports on time from you.” Then move on to find a solution: “We’re a team, and I want us to work well together. Can you explain what happened, so we can work together on preventing this situation from happening in the future?”.
I’ve had times when the people I work with do change their approach, and other times when it’s become clear that they’re not the right fit for the job and need to move on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 Tricky Work Situations, and How to Respond to Them”

Gives you the upper hand when addressing the matter with a manager.
Manuel realizes Alvin’s work often requires longer hours to tend to.
Feeling ignored, Alvin repeats his intention and asks, “You have nothing to say about this?” Dismissively, Manuel responds, “About what?” Alvin feels disrespected by Manuel’s lack of concern or consideration.
Despite Manuel’s many acts of appreciation, Alvin regularly feels shortchanged in comparison with the focus, regard, and responsiveness Manuel shows to paying customers.
When Alvin addresses it, Manuel snaps back, “Look at how much I do for you!”.
Manuel apologized, realizing he hurt Alvin by not being more mindful and considerate when Alvin came to speak to him.
Julia texted Sam “This is a good launching point! I’ll get my team together to prepare the data, and reach out to you with ideas of how we can approach the call hold times.”
Situation #5: You have to give negative or awkward feedback to someone you’re close with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Why before the Why”

Every company is interested in why people buy their products, but rewind time a bit further and you’ll find even more fundamental insights.
Across the interviews, it turns out there were four common situations that triggered people to actively shop for Basecamp.
2 “We can’t mess up like that again.” Unlike the first example above which mostly anticipated problems up ahead, this situation gets right to the heart of it: Something bad actually happened.
People may be on different schedules in different locations, so continued real-time meetings or communication isn’t possible.
They need something that not only brings people together, but something that helps them organize, delegate, communicate at different speeds, and make progress together on everyone’s own schedule.
They’ll need to track work that needs to get done, who’s working on what, what they asked people to do, and the overall status of the project.
What’s most interesting is feeling the moments, the situations people find themselves in before they’re our customers.
Basecamp is often second - they’ve tried something else before, or cobbled together a series of tools they stumbled into but fumbled around with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “General James Mattis: Arm Yourself With Books”

How many situations will you face that have not already been experienced by someone else? Billions of people, thousands of years probably not too many.
Thanks to my reading, I have never been caught flat-footed by any situation, never at a loss for how any problem has been addressed before.
130 years later, with Napoleon’s experience to draw from, it’s staggering that Hitler went down the same path.
Ask yourself, what body of knowledge would I benefit from having deep in my bones? Unless you’re trying to make discoveries in fundamental physics or advanced technology, someone else has probably already gained the knowledge that you seek, and they likely have put it in a book to share with you.
Learning how to read for wisdom is simple, but not easy.
You will react, not as a neophyte, but as someone whose instincts have been honed by the experiences of others, rather than just your own.
Knowledge comes from experience, but it doesn’t have to be your experience.
If you’re interested in military matters, you might even start with Mattis’ reading list itself.

The orginal article.