Summary of “I Stopped Eating Carbs After 2:30 P.M. And It Changed My Body”

We wanted to give my body a chance to burn off any of the carbs I consumed earlier in the day to help me debloat overnight.
“Because carbs retain water in your body, you start looking fuller. Cutting your carb intake off at a certain point, such as 2:30, gives your body a chance to absorb and drain all of that excess water. It also gives you time to burn them off throughout the rest of the day.”
“Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that is most optimal to have increased levels of at night as it promotes healthy sleep.” So eating carbs at night could theoretically help you sleep more soundly.
“Eating carbs at night can boost serotonin, which will convert into melatonin and help support a healthy night sleep. We know from studies on lack of sleep that one bad night can lead to eating hundreds of calories more the next day, which would lead to increase cortisol, fat gain, and ultimately an unhealthy state.”
“Others get slow and bogged down by this and do better with sips of carbs intra workout. Still, there is another group who do better with carbs post-workout to help replenish glycogen stores and to recover.”
Dr. Berkowitz is a fan of eating carbs before you workout-even if it’s at night.
For my experiment, I focused on mainly eating gluten-free carbs and whole grains, which are easier to digest than complex carbs.
“There is no set amount of carbs a person should have throughout the day. If you are a male athlete training for an upcoming game or marathon, your carb intake is going to be different than a young woman who works at a corporate job all day.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your lack of sleep is ruining your productivity”

The one topic that comes up the most, and that really is at the root of a lot of other productivity issues like focus, decision making, and time management, is sleep.
No one thinks they are getting enough, and everyone wants to offer advice on tips and tricks and routines around sleep.
Sleep basically impacts every aspect of our work lives.
Not getting enough sleep can ruin your focus and concentration.
According to the Division of Sleep Medicine At Harvard, if we get a bad night’s sleep, we’re going to pay for it with impairment in our judgment, mood, and ability to learn and retain information.
What better place to start Fast Company’s new podcast, “Secrets of the Most Productive People,” than getting to the root of the problem? In our pilot episode, I talk to my co-host and colleague Anisa Purbasari Horton about what’s ruining our sleep.
The reason I’m not clocking a full night’s sleep is my toddler who wakes up in the middle of the night, every single night, no matter what.
We talk about our sleep issues and seek expert advice from Gary Zammit, executive director of the Sleep Disorders Institute.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You should be sleeping more than eight hours a night. Here’s why”

Why 8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
A professor I collaborate with at Penn State named Orfeu Buxton says that 8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
In order to get a healthy eight hours of sleep, which is the amount that many people need, you need to be in bed for 8.5 hours.
The standard in the literature is that healthy sleepers spend more than 90% of the time in bed asleep, so if you’re in bed for eight hours, a healthy sleeper might actually sleep for only about 7.2 hours.
8.5 hours of sleep is the new eight hours.
For optimum productivity, we need around eight hours of sleep, right? But that doesn’t have to be in one go.
Gallup has reported that over the past 50 years, we’re sleeping a whole hour less per night than we did in the 1950s.
There is certainly a false myth that we need eight hours of continuous sleep: I think it’s possible to have your sleep be a little bit broken up and be perfectly healthy-but getting that eight hours is crucially important.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Keep Your Bed as Cool as Possible This Summer”

In sleep mode, you can set your AC at a sleep-inducing cool temperature before bed, and the AC will slowly raise the maximum allowable temperature overnight.
If you don’t have air conditioning:Your home will stay cooler at night if you keep it as cool as possible during the day.
During the afternoons, close the windows and pull down the blinds to keep the cool air in and the hot summer sun out.
If you can’t cool your home down, cool your body down instead. A cold shower right before bed can help lower your body temperature just enough for you to fall asleep.
Having something cool that close to your major blood vessels will help cool your whole body.
Try buying a mattress cover or mattress topper specially designed to keep your mattress cool.
Don’t forget your hydration! One of the best ways to cool down is to drink a glass of cool, refreshing water-and even though you may have to wake up in the middle of the night to use the toilet, it’s way better than waking up headachy and dehydrated.
What other tips do you have for keeping your bed cool during the hottest days of summer?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Weekend lie-ins could help you avoid an early death, study says”

Researchers have found that adults under the age of 65 who get five or fewer hours of sleep for seven days a week have a higher risk of death than those who consistently get six or seven hours’ shut-eye.
“I suspected there might be some modification if you included also weekend sleep, or day-off sleep.”
Once factors such as gender, body mass index, smoking, physical activity and shift work, were taken into account, the results revealed that those under the age of 65 who got five hours of sleep or under that amount seven days a week had a 65% higher mortality rate than those getting six or seven hours’ sleep every day.
There was no increased risk of death for those who slept five or fewer hours during the week but then managed eight or more hours’ sleep on weekend days.
“The assumption in this is that weekend sleep is a catch-up sleep,” said Åkerstedt, though he noted the study did not prove that to be the case.
While the study did not investigate the link between sleep patterns and mortality rates, Åkerstedt said it was possible little sleep had a negative effect on the body, while consistently lengthy sleep could be a sign of underlying health problems.
The study had limitations; participants were only asked about their sleep patterns at one point in time.
An expert on the human “Body clock” but who was not involved in the research, said the study offered a more nuanced view than previous research, which had suggested that both very little or a lot of sleep was bad for health and longevity.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Dangerous Is It When A Mother Sleeps With Her Baby?”

How Dangerous Is It When A Mother Sleeps With Her Baby? : Goats and Soda Many doctors in the U.S. say the practice puts an infant at risk of sleep-related death.
Back in the early 1990s, Notre Dame’s McKenna decided to do what seemed almost impossible: Figure out just what happens at night when a mom sleeps with a baby.
“We measured heart rate, breathing patterns, chest movement, body temperatures, brain waves – even the carbon dioxide levels between the moms’ and babies’ faces.” They even had infrared cameras to watch how the babies moved around at night.
The baby also hears the mom’s breathing, which has a rhythm similar to the sounds the baby heard in the womb.
So her baby’s risk of SIDS is tiny, even when Nichols sleeps with the baby.
The baby is more likely to get struck by lightning in her lifetime than die of SIDS, even when Nichols sleeps with her.
A premature baby with a younger mother and whose parents smoke and drink starts out with a moderate risk of SIDS – about 1 in 1,500.
They talk about what increases the risk, such as drug use and alcohol use, and they give families a so-called Moses basket so that the family can bring the baby into the bed, but the baby is protected from a rollover by this separate sleeping container.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Do trees sleep at night? Yes.”

Here’s one more, from the journal Frontiers in Plant Science: Birch trees “Sleep” at night.
It’s harder to do with big trees in the forest.
Why are the trees drooping? One reason could be that they’re dropping their internal water pressure, as New Scientist suggests, in response to the cessation of photosynthesis at night.
Another reason could be that the trees are actually resting: It takes energy to raise limbs up toward the light during the day.
Puttonen hopes this research will lead to a better understanding of how trees use water at different times of the days.
Since the study published in 2016, a followup report in 2017 found that different species of trees have different “Sleep” patterns.
So more research will be needed to full understand the complex patterns of tree sleep.
The tree at day is less droopy than the tree at night.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MIT Researchers Have Developed a ‘System for Dream Control'”

Horowitz and his colleagues at the MIT Media Lab have developed a relatively simple device called Dormio to interface with this unique stage of sleep.
Their hypothesis is that this liminal period between wakefulness and sleep is a fount of creativity that is usually lost in the ocean of sleep.
The thinking is that if you’re able to descend into that stage of sleep and return to consciousness without descending deeper into sleep, you will benefit from the intensely associative thinking that characterizes the strange microdreams experienced during the transition to sleep.
In other words, these MIT researchers have developed a low cost device that allows users to interface with sleep.
The technical name for the awareness of the brief period between wakefulness and sleep is hypnagogia, and its something of a mystery for neuroscientists.
People woken from hypnagogia often report strong visual and auditory hallucinations or microdreams, but like sleep itself, what counts as a ‘dream’ is a subject of debate among neuroscientists.
Dormio, which is part of a wider MIT Media Lab initiative to interface with sleep, is essentially a 21st century take on Edison’s technique.
This phrase is meant to prime the sleeper’s brain so that it changed the content of the dream based on what the Jibo robot said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Harvey Karp Turned Baby Sleep Into Big Business”

Birndorf told Karp that a pediatrician had recently visited the center and suggested that babies not be put to sleep on nursing pillows or on bouncing chairs – a reversal of previous pediatric guidelines.
Karp insists that this explains why during the first months of life, babies can be lulled back into a womblike “Trance” through the use of certain cues that Karp calls the 5 S’s: a combination of swaddling, shushing, placing the baby on her side or stomach, swinging her and letting her suck.
She turned out to be right: Karp ended up securing a $1.1 million advance for “The Happiest Baby on the Block,” along with a sequel for toddlers.
Karp describes Montée as the one in the household who “Seals the deal.” At Happiest Baby Inc., she is in charge of business strategy and creative direction.
The soaring popularity of sleep guides may have been propelled by an observable, objective deterioration in baby sleep, which can be traced back to a single year, 1992, when the American Academy of Pediatrics, upon reviewing research on sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, came out with the recommendation that parents put babies to sleep exclusively on their backs in the first year of life.
The “Baby Book” begins with an aphorism that puts many women at a disadvantage before they’ve even started mothering: “Feeling good about your baby’s birth carries over into feeling good about your baby.” They go on to ask, hypothetically, “Won’t holding our baby a lot, responding to cries, breast-feeding on cue and even sleeping with baby create a spoiled and overly dependent child?” To which they provide an emphatic answer: “No!” Though they see themselves as Spock’s disciples, experts from the soft camp can seem exceedingly hard on parents, especially mothers, not to mention downright punitive for anyone with a full-time job.
“Nobody else noticed this stuff in the whole world!” he told me at the end of dinner one evening when we talked about the 5 S’s. “No one knew about swaddling. Nobody knew about sleep.” As “The Happiest Baby on the Block” began to take off, Karp left his pediatric practice and with Montée turned the “Happiest Baby” into a franchise that now includes three books, two DVDs, a line of swaddles and white noises for purchase on iTunes, as well as SNOO, which rocks and plays white noise continuously and has sensors that respond to a baby’s cry by changing intensities; it keeps the baby swaddled and fastened inside the crib and can be controlled from afar on a smartphone.
Karp earnestly compares the $1,200 bassinet to the advent of penicillin – “I’m not here to promote a product, but I am saying if someone developed penicillin, wouldn’t it be important to tell people about it?” – and insists that it can save lives by stopping babies from rolling into an unsafe position in their sleep.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Can’t sleep? Tell yourself it’s not a big deal”

Note to publishers: in my view, there’s an unfilled gap in the “Wellness” market for a book on how sleep isn’t really that important.
In contrast to the message relentlessly promoted by lifestyle gurus these days, this book would argue that four hours a night is probably fine, that caffeine before bed is no big deal, and that even severe sleep deprivation poses no real risk of poor performance, health troubles or early death.
Actually, the ironies of insomnia are even worse than that, because there’s growing evidence that thinking of yourself as an insomniac – having an “Insomnia identity”, in the coinage of the sleep researcher Kenneth Lichstein – is a major part of the problem.
It’s not just that such a self-image makes it harder to sleep, though doubtless that’s the case.
In a review of the research published last year, Lichstein concluded that “Non-complaining poor sleepers” – who sleep badly but don’t define themselves as insomniacs – don’t suffer the high blood pressure commonly associated with severe sleeplessness.
“Complaining good sleepers” – who get enough shut-eye, but are heavily invested in their alleged insomnia – were essentially as tired, anxious and depressed as those who genuinely didn’t sleep.
Drag your weary bones to the doctor and she may be willing to prescribe sleeping pills.
The root of the problem, as Sasha Stephens explains in her book The Effortless Sleep Method, is that any external crutch on which you lean – not just pills, but herbal remedies and elaborate bedtime rituals, too – risks further eroding your trust in your ability to fall asleep on your own, and it’s that lack of self-trust that is insomnia’s main cause.

The orginal article.