Summary of “Why Socks Help You Sleep Better”

To understand why, you first need to grasp the relationship between core body temperature and sleep.
During daylight hours, the human body hums along at an average temperature of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.
Your core body temperature dips as much as 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the course of six or seven hours of sleep.
The faster you can lower the core body temperature, the faster you will fall asleep.
One of the ways that your body regulates its temperature is through blood vessels in your skin.
If the brain decides the body is too hot, it will dilate blood vessels, redistributing warmer blood from the body’s core through the rest of the body to cool it down.
Researchers have shown that warming the feet before going to sleep using a warm foot bath or by wearing socks promotes vasodilation, which in turn lowers the body’s core temperature faster than going to sleep with cold, bare feet.
Inside the PO/AH is a type of neuron called a warm-sensitive neuron that increases its firing rate when there’s a temperature difference between the body’s core and extremities like the feet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to minimize jet lag? Here’s what the doctors order.”

Caldwell explains that while our bodies are able to adjust to about one time zone change per day, jet lag sets in when we cross three or more of them, because it wreaks havoc on our circadian rhythms.
Work to align your sleep schedule with your destination: Because your body can naturally adjust to about only one time-zone change per day, you’ll want to manually adjust your schedule, and that means changing your bedtime to be better mesh with the destination to which you’re traveling.
To be ready to hit the ground running when she arrives, she starts adjusting her bedtime two to five days in advance to match the local time at her destination.
Caldwell creates a timetable so that, at a glance, he can see what time it is at home and at his destination and plan accordingly.
“Similarly, bright light exposure after waking up also will help advance our biological clock to suit the new time zone.” When traveling westward, he adds, the biological clock is ahead of the latest time zone.
It provides a brief plan to avoid jet lag, sharing the ideal time to get to sleep and the ideal time for light exposure.
“Taking a very small dose helps to recalibrate its release so that it is in sync with the time zone of your destination,” says Kern Singh, a spine surgeon in Chicago with Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush.
Turn your wine into water: Having a glass of wine or two on the plane may sound tempting, but it could negatively impact your sleep, which could worsen jet lag, says Quay Snyder, president and CEO of Aviation Medicine Advisory Service of Centennial, Colo., who advises pilots on staying in top condition while in the air.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sleep Better, Lead Better”

Although the ranks of sleep advocates are no doubt growing-led by the likes of Arianna Huffington and Jeff Bezos-a significant percentage of people, and U.S. executives in particular, don’t seem to be getting the sleep they need.
By contrast, insufficient sleep and fatigue lead to poor judgment, lack of self-control, and impaired creativity.
My research shows that sleep deprivation doesn’t just hurt individual performance: When managers lose sleep, their employees’ experiences and output are diminished too.
Lorenzo Lucianetti, Eli Awtrey, Gretchen Spreitzer, and I conducted a series of studies of what we termed “Sleep devaluation”-scenarios in which leaders communicate to subordinates that sleep is unimportant.
Specifically, subordinates of leaders who model and encourage poor sleep habits get about 25 fewer minutes of nightly rest than people whose bosses value sleep, and they report that their slumber is lower in quality.
As a leader, even if you fail to get enough sleep yourself, you should be careful to promote good sleeping behavior.
Avoid bragging about your own lack of sleep, lest you signal to your subordinates that they, too, should deprioritize sleep.
If instead you make sleep a priority, you will be a more successful leader who inspires better work in your employees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to deal with jet lag”

Someone has probably told you that, in order to combat jet lag, you should fight your urge to sleep and stay awake until it’s nighttime in your new time zone.
You can be pumped full of adenosine because you haven’t slept in a day, but if it’s peak “Daytime” in your circadian cycle you will still have a difficult time sleeping.
“If there’s something known as too much sleep, we haven’t found it yet,” Matthew Walker, neuroscientist and author of Why We Sleep, which explains the state of contemporary sleep science and how the modern world has largely deprived us of it, told me.
Melatonin pills, which contain the natural hormone that our bodies produce to help us sleep, may help you drift off but they won’t make your sleep long or good or address the very common jet-lag problem of interrupted sleep.
Sleeping pills probably aren’t worth taking, for jet lag, or for anything.
“Existing sleeping pills are minimally helpful,” Walker writes in his book, but one study performed on animals indicates that Ambien significantly weakens the brain’s ability to form memories while sleeping, one of the main purposes of lying down in the first place.
When I do need to make the Eastward shift, what will happen is that, no matter how well I timed my first day or whatever, I will soon find myself wide awake from midnight until 6 a.m. It will only be at around 7 a.m. that I can sleep, and by 9 a.m. I will really want to sleep.
In your normal life, you can probably stay up until 3 a.m. But if you are already fatigued from travel, then try to get to bed at your internal 8 p.m., toss and turn for hours only to get a tiny bit of sleep between your circadian 1 a.m. and 3 a.m. and then try wake up for daytime activities, with the full light of the sun in your face, you will feel insane.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Try This Military Meditation Routine to Fall Asleep Fast”

It may not be magic, but it seems like a pretty good way to relax your body and mind.
The basics, described in Relax and Win and summarized on Medium, are to relax your body, part by part, and then attempt to totally clear your mind for ten seconds.
Relax the muscles in your face, including your tongue, jaw, and the muscles around your eyes.
Then relax your upper and lower arm on one side, and then the other.
Finally, relax your legs, first thighs and then calves.
Take about a minute and a half to go through the list, relaxing every body part fully, and then try to clear your mind for ten seconds.
Saying “Don’t think, don’t think, don’t think” over and over for ten seconds.
If this sounds familiar, it’s because a similar sequence-relaxing your body part-by-part-is the basis of almost every sleep meditation track out there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fight insomnia: Here’s how to sleep better”

So he decided to write a book about how to sleep better.
Nicholls surveyed the latest medical research on sleep, interviewed many of the researchers involved, and underwent intense sleep therapy to treat his own condition.
Henry Nicholls The simplest thing is to work on something called “Sleep stability,” which is very common advice in insomnia clinics and something my physician, Dr. David O’Regan, recommended as part of my cognitive behavioral therapy course for insomnia.
Children need much more sleep, teens still need a lot of sleep, and, as an adult, you’re probably looking at somewhere between six and nine hours of sleep in order to be healthy.
A lot of people get obsessed with this goal of getting eight hours of sleep every single night, and because they’re someone who just doesn’t need that much sleep, or they can’t reliably sleep that long, they get anxious about it and that actually creates issues with insomnia.
I’m not a physician, so I can’t give advice about which medications to take and when, but the consensus among the specialists I spoke to was that you should try to get your sleep stability right first, and make sure that you’re getting consolidated sleep and not waking up all the time.
Sean Illing Is bad sleep better than no sleep? In other words, is it better to just get up and do something productive rather than lying in bed for hours frustrated about not being able to fall asleep?
Sleep specialists have established that staying in bed while you’re anxious or not sleeping is one of the most common contributors to chronic insomnia, because it trains the brain and creates bad associations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to sleep better”

So he decided to write a book about how to sleep better.
Nicholls surveyed the latest medical research on sleep, interviewed many of the researchers involved, and underwent intense sleep therapy to treat his own condition.
Children need much more sleep, teens still need a lot of sleep, and, as an adult, you’re probably looking at somewhere between six and nine hours of sleep in order to be healthy.
A lot of people get obsessed with this goal of getting eight hours of sleep every single night, and because they’re someone who just doesn’t need that much sleep, or they can’t reliably sleep that long, they get anxious about it and that actually creates issues with insomnia.
What did the sleep specialists you spoke to say about people using melatonin or other over-the-counter or prescription meds to help with sleep?
I’m not a physician, so I can’t give advice about which medications to take and when, but the consensus among the specialists I spoke to was that you should try to get your sleep stability right first, and make sure that you’re getting consolidated sleep and not waking up all the time.
Sean Illing Is bad sleep better than no sleep? In other words, is it better to just get up and do something productive rather than lying in bed for hours frustrated about not being able to fall asleep?
Sleep specialists have established that staying in bed while you’re anxious or not sleeping is one of the most common contributors to chronic insomnia, because it trains the brain and creates bad associations.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Better Sleep is a Luxury Good That Will Cost You”

The outlook has found acolytes in the thousands of Equinox members who have each laid out $495 for six sessions since the gym launched its sleep training program this past May. After funding a University of California, Los Angeles, study, Equinox rolled out a test: one comprehensive fitness training program that included sleep coaching and one without.
“If you were going to see a psychiatrist or a psychologist, right? People would say that that was a luxury. And yet people find the money to do it. I think for people to see the deleterious effects of ongoing sleep deprivation to their health as being a drag on their health and something that they can control-to take 12 sessions with a sleep coach-[it’s] not that big a stretch.”
Dr. Dieter Riemann, editor in chief of the Journal of Sleep Research, spun his answer similarly to why we snooze: “Maybe the question might be wrongI mean, this is a philosophical question.” Answering why we sleep is like answering why we breathe: because it helps us live.
Read blog posts on ThriveGlobal.com, like the one written by an Israeli politician titled “Sleepless Countries Count Their Enemies, It’s time to Sleep and Count Our Allies.” in which he argues that sleep could help solve the Middle East crisis because when “Nations don’t sleep, they look at each other through the lens of a gun.” Quickly, the gospel of relaxation became big business.
“We’re just one slice of the massive sleep ecosystem. We’re at the top of the 2nd inning of a sleep industry boom!” he said.
“Aromatherapy meets audio therapy in the groundbreaking new sleep aid,” the press release read. There are countless more potential physical products in the pipeline, said Acton Smith: duvets, curtains and again maybe a hotel especially configured for sleep.
“Like if you haven’t fixed your sleep hygiene. Because then, it probably won’t be successful. And you’re going to be mad at your device. And it’s probably not your device’s fault-it’s probably just your sleep hygiene.” Go to bed at normal times.
Because they so desperately wanted to perfect their sleep data, they couldn’t get to sleep.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Better Sleep is a Luxury Good That Will Cost You”

The outlook has found acolytes in the thousands of Equinox members who have each laid out $495 for six sessions since the gym launched its sleep training program this past May. After funding a University of California, Los Angeles, study, Equinox rolled out a test: one comprehensive fitness training program that included sleep coaching and one without.
“If you were going to see a psychiatrist or a psychologist, right? People would say that that was a luxury. And yet people find the money to do it. I think for people to see the deleterious effects of ongoing sleep deprivation to their health as being a drag on their health and something that they can control-to take 12 sessions with a sleep coach-[it’s] not that big a stretch.”
Dr. Dieter Riemann, editor in chief of the Journal of Sleep Research, spun his answer similarly to why we snooze: “Maybe the question might be wrongI mean, this is a philosophical question.” Answering why we sleep is like answering why we breathe: because it helps us live.
Read blog posts on ThriveGlobal.com, like the one written by an Israeli politician titled “Sleepless Countries Count Their Enemies, It’s time to Sleep and Count Our Allies.” in which he argues that sleep could help solve the Middle East crisis because when “Nations don’t sleep, they look at each other through the lens of a gun.” Quickly, the gospel of relaxation became big business.
“We’re just one slice of the massive sleep ecosystem. We’re at the top of the 2nd inning of a sleep industry boom!” he said.
“Aromatherapy meets audio therapy in the groundbreaking new sleep aid,” the press release read. There are countless more potential physical products in the pipeline, said Acton Smith: duvets, curtains and again maybe a hotel especially configured for sleep.
“Like if you haven’t fixed your sleep hygiene. Because then, it probably won’t be successful. And you’re going to be mad at your device. And it’s probably not your device’s fault-it’s probably just your sleep hygiene.” Go to bed at normal times.
Because they so desperately wanted to perfect their sleep data, they couldn’t get to sleep.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Went to a Sleep Coach, and Honestly, It Was Life-Changing”

That’s why the health and fitness world is increasingly focusing its attentions on sleep, with the NFL handing out smart beds and gyms like Equinox launching sleep coaching programs.
Sleep coaches aren’t necessarily new: pro athletes have been working with sleep doctors for years.
It hasn’t been until relatively recently that people are learning how crucial sleep is to improving overall health and wellness – hence, the explosion of the sleep coach industry.
So I called up W. Christopher Winter, M.D., author of The Sleep Solution and sleep advisor forMensHealth.com, to see how my sleep habits impacted my lifestyle – and where I could afford to make some serious changes.
First and foremost: I didn’t take a formal lab sleep test, which involves a doctor monitoring your sleep.
A higher score can indicate that you’re either not getting enough sleep or that something’s wrong with your sleep, notes Winter.
As Winter told me: “You have a very advanced chronotype.” The results did surprise me a bit: after all, I only rarely wake up before 7:00 a.m., and some mornings, all I want to do is sleep in.
Realizing just how much of an early person I was and a bit more about how chronotypes work, in general, has helped me see that even in short-term situations there are ways to take control, take your sleep into your own hands, and feel better because of it.

The orginal article.