Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Logged off: meet the teens who refuse to use social media”

Another survey of 9,000 internet users from the research firm Ampere Analysis found that people aged 18-24 had significantly changed their attitudes towards social media in the past two years.
As young people increasingly reject social media, older generations increasingly embrace it: among the 45-plus age bracket, the proportion who value social media has increased from 23% to 28% in the past year, according to Ampere’s data.
According to a study by US marketing firm Hill Holliday of Generation Z – people born after 1995 – half of those surveyed stated they had quit or were considering quitting at least one social media platform.
“You start doing things that are dishonest,” says Amanuel, who quit social media aged 16.
“If you meet someone new and they ask for your Instagram and you only have 80 followers,” says Sharp, “They’re going to think: ‘You’re not that popular’, but if you have 2,000 followers they’re going to be like: ‘You’re the most popular person in school.'” Sharp quit social media at 13.
Dr Amanda Lenhart, who researches young people’s online lives, conducted a survey of US teenagers, asking them about taking time off social media.
“Constant screen time damages your ability to see, and it also causes internal damage, such as anxiety.” Studies have shown that social media use can negatively affect mental wellbeing, and adolescents are particularly susceptible: one nationally representative survey of US 13- to 18-year-olds linked heavier social media use to depression and suicide, particularly in girls.
41% of the Gen Z teens surveyed by Hill Holliday reported that social media made them feel anxious, sad or depressed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Leave No Trace: How Influencers Affect the Environment”

Not all outdoor influencers share Boué’s passion for activism, but with the growth of their platforms in recent years, many have been pulled into the growing debate about responsible social media usage in nature.
In 1999, the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics published seven leave no trace principles to “Communicate the best available minimum impact guidance for enjoying the outdoors responsibly.” Today, these principles remain largely intact, despite calls for LNT to add responsible social media usage to the list.
Groups like Hikers for an 8th Leave No Trace Principle have gone so far as to pen the new principle themselves.
Ben Lawhon, the education director at LNT, said they’re waiting to see how social media evolves before responding to these demands.
“If we were to jump at every perceived opportunity to add a new principle, we’d have way more than seven,” he said, adding, “Nine out of 10 people who visit public lands are uninformed about Leave No Trace, so consistency is important.”
Outdoor influencers are a relatively new phenomenon, and their rise is largely attributable to Instagram.
Today, Boué works part time as a contractor for the Outdoor Industry Association, and part time on her own social media brand.
Although Boué’s part-time job allows her to be this discerning, most outdoor influencers expressed a similar level of hesitance regarding brand sponsored posts on social media.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “The autistic view of the world is not the neurotypical cliché”

Her memoir of mothering an autistic son, To Siri with Love, triggered waves of outrage from the autistic community, on account of a multitude of condescending and ill-informed remarks, from the author’s mockery of her son’s emergent sexuality to her breezy certainty that he’s a kind of empty vessel.
The qualities assigned to autistic people are the inverse of those that neurotypical society most prizes.
What many autistic people would question is the framing of these descriptions: they appear to favour the offence to the sensibilities of the practitioner over the challenges faced by the autistic subject.
The DSM-5 only ever mentions the phenomenon of sensory sensitivity as a subset of the ‘Restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviour’, and yet this, for many autistics, is routinely described as the experience from which many of the observable autistic behaviours derive: the repetitive movements, withdrawal from social contact, ‘extreme distress at small changes’ and ‘inflexible adherence to routines’ are often responses to being sensorily overwhelmed, and are aimed at managing chaotic environments and bringing about pleasant feelings to counteract unpleasant ones.
Because autistic people are in a minority, in mainstream discourse – including the language of respected tomes such as the DSM – neurotypical mindblindness is invisible.
To an autistic viewer like me, neurotypical life can seem astonishingly unemotional.
I’m not arguing that neurotypical writers should never create autistic characters.
I’m delighted to say that my own memoir, The Electricity of Every Living Thing, recently landed on a pile of other wonderful books by autistic authors, including The Reason I Jump by Naoki Higashida, The State of Grace by Rachael Lucas, Odd Girl Out by Laura James and The Autistic Alice by Joanne Limburg, but it’s fair to say that as a group we have not yet reached the kind of critical mass that would make autism better understood, not least among clinicians.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.