Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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The orginal article.

Summary of “Social media can predict what you’ll say, even if you don’t participate”

The average social media user has a 5,000-word vocabulary, so choosing at random from among that would be an entropy of a bit more than 12.
To see how these concepts worked in the world of social media, the researchers turned to a database of about 14,000 Twitter users who collectively produced more than 30 million tweets.
A stronger social tie tended to mean a stronger contribution to predictability.
If a person leaves a social network, but their history remains, then it should be possible to reconstruct their social network and analyze it to get some understanding of the person who has tried to become more anonymous.
If you can reconstruct a person’s offline relationships and find them on social media, then it’s possible you could learn something about a person who has never joined the service.
As the authors of the paper describe it, “If an individual forgoes using a social media platform or deletes their account, yet their social ties remain, then that platform owner potentially still possesses 95.1 3.36% of the achievable predictive accuracy of the future activities of that individual.”
This doesn’t indicate that we can predict much about a person other than their more probable social media posts, more specifically responses to the social media posts of their connections.
Given that everyone from marketers to Russian intelligence agencies seem to be interested in figuring out users’ social media proclivities, the finding that you don’t even have to be on social media to have them draw inferences isn’t especially comforting.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook Block: I Cut Facebook Out of My Life. I Missed It”

Originally, I just planned to block myself from using Facebook the same way I’d blocked myself from using Amazon, by routing all my internet traffic through a virtual private network controlled by the technologist Dhruv Mehrotra, who is prohibiting my devices from communicating with the 122,880 IP addresses controlled by Facebook.
The Amazon block took out whole websites and services for me, but that’s not the case with Facebook, because it doesn’t control the building blocks of the internet.
The vast majority of Facebook’s requests are likely its attempts to track my movements around the web, via Like and Share buttons, Facebook Analytics, Facebook Ads, and Facebook Pixel.
Facebook Pixel, if you haven’t heard of it, is a little piece of code that a company can put on its website-say, on a particular sneaker page that you look at while signed into Facebook on your work computer.
Cutting Facebook out of my life is easy technically; Dhruv’s IP address block works well.
The first day of the Facebook block is Halloween, which is particularly hard because I can’t post cute photos of my 1-year-old, Ellev, dressed up as Boo from Monsters Inc. And I can’t find out what my friends are dressed as unless I individually text or email them, which is weird.
If you give up Facebook and all the companies it owns, you’re cut off from participating in your community, whatever your community may be.
Freedom From Facebook has been pushing the Federal Trade Commission to treat Facebook like a monopoly and break it up.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Urge to Share News of Our Lives Is Neither New nor Narcissistic”

While we pine away for that perfect Snapchat filter or track our likes on Instagram, the mobile phone has become a vortex of social media that sucks us in and feeds our narcissistic tendencies.
In the 18th and 19th centuries, as secular diaries became more popular, middle-class New Englanders, particularly white women, wrote about their everyday lives and the world around them.
Diaries are not the only media that people have used to document lives and share them with others.
Together, they suggest that we have long used media as a means of creating traces of our lives.
Building on a 20th-century broadcast model of media, today’s social media platforms are, by and large, free to use, unlike historical diaries, scrapbooks and photo albums, which people had to buy.
In these cases, Kodak had access to all of the traces, or memories, of its customers but the company didn’t commodify these traces in the ways that social media platforms do today.
The company didn’t give it away in exchange for mining their customers’ traces to sell ads targeted at them in the way that social media platforms use our traces to target us today.
The urge to be present on social media is much more complex than simply narcissism.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The year social networks were no longer social – TechCrunch”

Are social networks even social anymore? If you have a feeling of tech fatigue when you open the Facebook app, you’re not alone.
The concept of wide networks of social ties with an element of broadcasting is dead. From interest-based communities to your lousy neighbor.
As social networks become bigger, content becomes garbage.
One of the key pillars of social networks is the broadcasting feature.
Most social networks are now publicly traded companies – they’re always chasing growth.
There are two ways to make you spend more time on a social network – making you come back more often and making you stay longer each time you visit.
Social networks now want to direct you to other parts of the service.
In other words, as social networks become bigger, content becomes garbage.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to redesign cities to fight loneliness”

You may also underestimate the effects of loneliness.
Federal MP Andrew Giles, in a recent speech, said: “I’m convinced we need to consider responding to loneliness as a responsibility of government.”
What do cities have to do with loneliness? “The way we build and organize our cities can help or hinder social connection,” reads a Grattan Institute report.
The students, using design as a research methodology, came up with potential architectural and urban responses to loneliness.
Having a pet is one of the most effective ways to tackle loneliness, but often people don’t have enough time to care for one.
Beverley Wang looked at loneliness in the aging population.
There is an utterly different kind of loneliness that accompanies the loss of a loved one.
Without claiming to solve loneliness, design can be a important tool in response to it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.