Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Games Disorder Explained”

The WHO told me that it began evaluating the public-health implications of excessive use of computers, smartphones, and the internet in 2014, in response to concerns from its community.
Despite those concerns, gaming disorder made it into the ICD-11 draft as the only “Clinically recognizable and clinically significant syndrome” related to the broader category of computing and the internet.
Some researchers wonder if the WHO might be under pressure to codify gaming disorder.
In 2017, an article in the journal Professional Psychology: Research and Practice argued that two members of the WHO advisory group, Geoffrey Reed and Vladimir Poznyak felt political pressure to identify gaming disorder, particularly from member states where the consequences of excessive online gaming have been particularly extreme.
“There was no pressure or any communication to the WHO s.ecretariat from any government with a suggestion to consider inclusion of gaming disorder in ICD-11,” a spokesperson told me – while also acknowledging that members of the organization’s constituency have repeatedly brought attention to their “Concerns about the health consequences of gaming behavior.”
If the overuse of games or smartphones are a matter of behavior, then of course that behavior is bound to vary by region, nation, culture, and other social conditions.
Unlike a viral infection or an autoimmune condition, a behavioral disorder is particularly susceptible to the varied social contexts in which the behavior takes place.
What about people who dance to excess, or become obsessed with tanning parlors, or while away hours tapping and swiping on Instagram, or even those who read novels-the source of a moral panic in the 18th century-or watch football to the detriment of their social and work lives? If the purpose of the DSM or ICD is to help people, and if only a very small percentage of gamers are compelled to the point of pathological overuse, and if what is pathological in the first place is subjective, then why not create a broader Behavioral Overuse Disorder that could apply to anything, without prejudice?

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is Why Small Talk Makes Some People So Anxious”

The American Psychological Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders defines social anxiety as “a persistent fear of one or more social or performance situations” that involve being “Exposed to unfamiliar people or to possible scrutiny by others.”
Conversation anxiety, though not itself a disorder, is an aspect of social anxiety that can make dates, parties, and mixers anywhere from mildly stressful to intolerable.
In her new book, How to Be Yourself, Ellen Hendriksen says social anxiety is rooted in a fear of what she calls “The reveal” of a fatal flaw that will ultimately lead to social rejection.
If your fears of being found out cause more distress than seems appropriate for the situation, you might be dealing with symptoms of social anxiety.
In theory, a script would take the edge off of the uncertainty, which is somethin people with anxiety really struggle with.
A recent study of undergraduate students with social anxiety symptoms found, unsurprisingly, that young adults with higher levels of social anxiety were more likely to expect that they would feel bad in certain social interactions.
“This could potentially cause them to avoid those types of situations altogether if they’re expecting to feel bad,” says Kimberly Arditte Hall, the lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at the VA National Center for PTSD. Understanding the thought process behind social anxiety is important because it sheds light on how to help people overcome it.
Of course, sometimes social interactions really are painful or difficult, and people with social anxiety may need some extra help learning how to tolerate those experiences, as well as the aftermath of them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Keeping Evolution in Mind: The Future of Evolutionary Social Science”

Evolution has shaped the human body, but it also shaped the human brain, so evolutionary principles are indispensable for understanding our psychology.
Teachers, and even social scientists struggle to see how our evolutionary history significantly shapes our cognition and behavior today.
The lack of willingness to view human cognition and behavior as within the purview of evolutionary processes has prevented evolution from being fully integrated into the social science curriculum.
Psychological adaptations for social learning, such as conformity bias, develop in complex and diverse cultural ecologies that work in tandem to shape the human mind and generate cultural variation.
Truly satisfying explanations of human behavior requires identifying the components of human cognition that evolution designed to be sensitive to social or ecological conditions and information.
Applying evolutionary theory to social science has the potential to transform education and, through it, society.
Evolutionary perspectives can help social scientists understand, and eventually address, common social problems.
The researchers recommend that the esteem bullies seek “Should be borne in mind when engineering interventions” designed to either decrease a bully’s social status or channel the bully’s social motivations to better ends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NPR Choice page”

By choosing “I agree” below, you agree that NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic.
This information is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other third-party service providers.

The orginal article.