Summary of “Why are so many languages spoken in some places and so few in others?”

Despite continually mapping the distribution of languages across the world, scientists have few clear answers about what caused the emergence of thousands of languages.
Collectively, human beings speak more than 7,000 distinct languages, and these languages are not uniformly distributed across the planet.
Far more languages are spoken in tropical regions than in temperate areas.
Why are there so many languages spoken in some places and so few in others?
Such as the West Coast from present-day Vancouver to southern California, had far more languages; other areas, such as northern Canada and the Mississippi delta region, appear to have had fewer languages.
With more distinct groups, you’d also expect to see more languages in these locations.
Some studies support the idea that less language diversity is found in locations with unstable and extreme climatic conditions, while others found little or no support for that idea.
Recently, our interdisciplinary research group tried to untangle which factors had the most influence on language diversity in different places.

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Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “NPR Choice page”

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Summary of “Here’s How to Get Over Social Media Obligation”

Social media has become our go-to connector, helping us stay in touch with long distance family and friends, generating job leads, or rekindling romantic relationships.
Because of this, there is a weird obligation that comes along with actively participating in social networks that can make it feel like a chore.
So how can we make sure social media feeds us instead of sucking us dry? Dallas-based clinical psychologist Lillian Gibson, Ph.D suggests adding more structure to your social media presence and activity.
“For most people, if they’re on social media for a relaxation tool or a connection tool, I would really recommend that they filter what they want to be on social media for,” Gibson says.
Ask yourself: How long am I am going to be on? What is going to be the purpose and intent of being on social media? Knowing why you’re there will lead to more meaningful connections that result in less forced interactions.
Use social media features to do your dirty workIf unfriending an old acquaintance causes anxiety, there’s an easier way out.
“Some people don’t want to be rude, so take advantage of those social media options to snooze pages as well,” Gibson suggests.
While social media can feel overwhelming, I’m not suggesting you become a grouch.

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Summary of “How to Redesign Cities to Fight Loneliness”

You may also underestimate the effects of loneliness.
Federal MP Andrew Giles, in a recent speech, said: “I’m convinced we need to consider responding to loneliness as a responsibility of government.”
What do cities have to do with loneliness? “The way we build and organize our cities can help or hinder social connection,” reads a Grattan Institute report.
The students, using design as a research methodology, came up with potential architectural and urban responses to loneliness.
Having a pet is one of the most effective ways to tackle loneliness, but often people don’t have enough time to care for one.
Beverley Wang looked at loneliness in the aging population.
There is an utterly different kind of loneliness that accompanies the loss of a loved one.
Without claiming to solve loneliness, design can be a important tool in response to it.

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Summary of “What Happens to Your Body After Giving Birth?”

Watch: What they won’t tell you about being a new mom.
“You have Instagram, you have Facebook, you have this idealized version” getting publicized and shared on social media, Karp says.
“I bet if you searched a million images of new babies and new mothers, you’d get only one image that focuses on swollen ankles.” Which can lead, he says, to unrealistic expectations and discomfort with sharing the less adorable realities of new parenthood.
Mayer credits social media with having the opposite effect.
As the Millennial generation, known for its propensity to post status updates and frequent broadcasts to social media, has grown up, all facets and stages of people’s lives have become fodder for sharing, including new motherhood.
“They can share anything they want to share, and that’s really powerful.” And perhaps, she adds, the same culture of radical public honesty about the unglamorous, unpleasant aspects of new motherhood has given rise to the graphic, unfiltered mothering humor that Wong, Teigen, and Schumer have helped popularize.
New motherhood and its medical challenges have come into the public spotlight in other ways, too, Mayer notes.
A few notable books aimed at enlightening new mothers on how to care for their own bodies after birth have been released in the past couple of years-such as 2016’s The First Forty Days and 2017’s The Fourth Trimester.

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