Summary of “I Made One Simple Financial Change and It Lowered My Spending”

The idea is to increase the pain of paying, especially with a credit card, by forcing myself to take note of what I’m spending.
Looking back at my bank-account statements from the past few years, I can see that my monthly discretionary spending dropped somewhere between 10 and 15 percent in the five months after I introduced this system.
Perhaps the more definitive success of my system is the fact that, even as I have begun to earn more money, my monthly spending has remained more or less the same-a fact that I attribute in part to the increased clarity of my cash flow.
“Making a list of spending is very useful,” he told me, and said I’d successfully devised a way to increase my pain of paying.
Another thing to consider when making spending decisions, Ariely says, is what one could be buying instead with the same money.
The conventional way of thinking about budgeting, he says, usually “Puts a lot of blame on people when they’re spending money on things that give them pleasure. There’s a sort of puritanical aspect, like, I caught this person going to Starbucks.” He continued, “I think the real goal of budgeting is to make sure that you’re spending your money on the things that are the most valuable and enjoyable for you.” He also made the point Loewenstein did about “Big-ticket items,” but said he thinks my system is a good way to make sure someone’s nonessential spending goes toward things they enjoy.
Hearing all this feedback about my personal-finance system made me a bit discouraged about the dynamics that shape spending.
What would create such a culture? There is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which provides high-level government oversight, and there are small individual actions, but there isn’t something in between-a powerful advocacy group, a mainstream cultural movement, or something else not yet built or imagined-that serves as a counterweight to the pressure on Americans to spend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Keep Going If You Don’t Know What’s Next”

A lot of people want to start a business.
Aspiring writers start off strong and write for several days, weeks or months, and then move on to the next thing that catches their attention.
Based on my experience, and the experience of my readers, the most important thing is to keep going.
“Hi Darius, I like to read your blog. I’ve read it when I was depressed. And it changed my thoughts and perspective about my life and world. And now I want to create something for others. I started with a tiny step. It was easy at first. But after that I felt like I lacked inspiration. How do you keep going even if you don’t know what’s next?”.
Not knowing what’s next is something every person who wants to make something out of their life has to deal with.
The best thing you can do is to focus on your very next step-RIGHT NOW. What are you going to do next? Not as in, “What’s your next big move?” No, what are you going to do after you’ve read this?
That’s why you want to focus on things you control.
If people don’t want to give you their business, so what? If people don’t want to hire you, so what?

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Give Constructive Criticism at Work”

You’re working with someone whose work isn’t exactly what you need it to be, and you need to ask them to do it differently.
Corrective feedback isn’t a referendum on anyone’s value as a person – it’s just a normal and expected part of the process of improving work.
Do you resent your own manager when she asks you to approach something differently? Or does it feel like a pretty normal and expected interaction? Plus, you probably want to know how you could improve your work and wouldn’t appreciate someone withholding important feedback from you out of fear of awkwardness – thus leaving you to repeat the same mistake or work quality problem over and over.
Assume that whoever you need to deliver feedback to also appreciates knowing how to make their work better.
You can’t shy away from giving your employees feedback if you’re the one in charge; you have a professional and ethical obligation to talk to them about where they stand and how they could do better.
While you need to be committed to giving feedback if you manage people or projects, that doesn’t mean that you should give it whenever it occurs to you without thinking about your timing.
If you’ve ever read a management book, you’ve probably heard of the “Feedback sandwich”: a technique where you sandwich criticism in between two compliments.
Truly, you should want feedback to be a regular, normal thing, because regular feedback leads to better work outcomes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Will Help You Grasp the Sizes of Things in the Universe”

“The start of your journey through this book and through all known scales of reality is at that edge between known and unknown,” he writes.
Nautilus caught up with him to talk about our experience with scale and why he thinks it’s mysterious.
We talk about space and time-and perhaps we puzzle more over the nature of time than we do over the nature of scale or space-but it’s equally mysterious.
We’re aware of a very narrow range of scales: In some sense, we know more about the very large than we do about the very small.
On the big scale, it’s stuff we can actually see, we can actually chart.
We have all this rich stuff going on in the scale of the solar system and the earth and our biological scale.
It is the scale where matter seems to condense down, where things appear solid, when in fact, it’s equally empty on the inside.
How did you represent things that we don’t have pictures of, like the surface of an exoplanet, or things at really small scales?

The orginal article.

Summary of “43 Embarrassing Grammar Mistakes Even Smart People Make”

Honed in Just know that to “Home in” on something means to move toward a goal, such as “The missile homed in on its target.” To “Hone” is to sharpen.
The first word should actually be “Bated,” which stems from the verb “Abate,” meaning to stop or lessen.
Peaked my interest To pique means to arouse, so the correct phrase is “Piqued my interest,” meaning that my interest was stimulated.
Chalk full The word “Chock” is an Old English word which means “Cheek” as well as “Full to the brim.” In other words, “Chock-full” means “Mouthful.”
A mute point Mute means silent, so would you really want to make a point that doesn’t say anything? A point that is “Moot” is debatable or doubtful.
Since “Jibe” means “To agree,” the correct phrase would be “Jibe with the facts.”
If you use the correct version you’ll sound intelligent to the grammarians of the world but you risk alienating a certain percentage of people who will not understand your meaning.
The correct word is “Peek,” which means a quick look.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Meaning of Life Is a Ham Sandwich”

First off, before we can even appropriately ask “What is the meaning of life?” we must first settle something more subtle and something more important.
What does it mean for something to mean something? As humans, we have a constant need to attach meaning to everything that happens in our lives.
That’s why your friends are sometimes the biggest assholes – because that meaning you just shared, to them, meant something completely different.
Meaning is not something that exists outside of ourselves.
Meaning is something that we must continually find and nurture.
How to Find Meaning in Your Life In a very real sense, the meaning of life is therefore to create meaning.
Goals are dangerous because the meaning they provide when you’re working towards them is the meaning that is taken away once you achieve them.
So what’s the meaning of life? Well, for me, right now, it’s a ham sandwich.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s Why I Pick Up Other People’s Litter-And Why You Should, Too”

It’s not just ocean health, but a host of other issues: climate change, species extinction, natural resource depletion, ongoing environmental racism, and so much more.
I’ve also found a tiny speck of hope-that stuff that seems so very difficult to come by at times-in a small, quiet action that I can take every single day: picking up other people’s litter.
Our sole project was snapping up candy wrappers and other stuff we found discarded around the Boys’ and Girls’ Club grounds, which we planned to bury in a “Time capsule” that we could dig up in a few decades.
The program has since expanded to include non-backpackers who pledge to clean up not only trails, but also green spaces and waterways-people who are also trying to do something, anything.
I carried a litter grabber and a small bag latched onto my waist belt.
Even more meaningful was the effect my exercise in litter patrol had on others.
All told, I plucked a few pounds of litter over the course of a few weeks on trail.
Sure, picking up a few pieces of litter might seem nearly inconsequential when you think about the big picture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Ancient Habit Will Maximize Your Focus”

Don’t tell me you never worry or fear nothing.
Everyone spends time thinking about things that will never happen.
Our thoughts are so cluttered with fear, worry, and stress, that we can’t focus on our goals.
That’s why I want to share one ancient habit that stood the test of time.
A person with those kinds of results must do things right.
If you want to get through things, you need action.
Pessimists say: “Just saying three words won’t help you with real problems.” To those people I say: What will help? Drowning in your own misery? Being paralyzed? Never taking action? Complaining? Feeling bitter about life?
We all know that life’s too short to spend worrying about things that will never happen.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Serena Williams Responds to 2018 US Open Match Controversy”

I went on to win the US Open not one or two but six times.
It’s the final of the US Open, and I’m competing to win my 24th Grand Slam against Naomi Osaka.
In the end, my opponent simply played better than me that day and ended up winning her first Grand Slam title.
Every night, as I would try to go to sleep, unresolved questions ran through my mind in a never-ending loop: How can you take a game away from me in the final of a Grand Slam? Really, how can you take a game away from anyone at any stage of any tournament? I turn over, exhausted from lack of sleep, thoughts still spinning in my head. Why can’t I express my frustrations like everyone else? If I were a man, would I be in this situation? What makes me so different? Is it because I’m a woman? I stop myself to avoid getting worked up.
“Hey, Naomi! It’s Serena Williams. As I said on the court, I am so proud of you and I am truly sorry. I thought I was doing the right thing in sticking up for myself. But I had no idea the media would pit us against each other. I would love the chance to live that moment over again. I am, was, and will always be happy for you and supportive of you. I would never, ever want the light to shine away from another female, specifically another black female athlete. I can’t wait for your future, and believe me I will always be watching as a big fan! I wish you only success today and in the future. Once again, I am so proud of you. All my love and your fan, Serena.”
It was in this moment that I realized the real reason the US Open was so hard for me to get over: It wasn’t because of the backlash I faced but rather because of what had happened to the young woman who deserved so much more in her special moment.
I’ve been blatantly cheated against to the point where the Hawk-Eye rules were introduced so that something like that would not happen again.
Ultimately, my daughter is the reason I use my voice, the reason I picked up a racket again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Ancient Habit Will Maximize Your Focus”

Don’t tell me you never worry or fear nothing.
Everyone spends time thinking about things that will never happen.
Our thoughts are so cluttered with fear, worry, and stress, that we can’t focus on our goals.
That’s why I want to share one ancient habit that stood the test of time.
A person with those kinds of results must do things right.
If you want to get through things, you need action.
Pessimists say: “Just saying three words won’t help you with real problems.” To those people I say: What will help? Drowning in your own misery? Being paralyzed? Never taking action? Complaining? Feeling bitter about life?
We all know that life’s too short to spend worrying about things that will never happen.

The orginal article.