Summary of “How One Tiny-Home Designer Makes a Small Space Feel 10 Times Bigger”

Matt Impola was already living in a small space when he decided he would take on a new weekend project: his first-ever tiny home.
The most striking thing about Impola’s tiny homes is that they don’t immediately look.
Clearly Impola has picked up on plenty of ways to make even the smallest spaces feel much larger, and his advice can be applied to cramped apartments or even not-so-tiny homes.
“Motor homes and travel trailers can feel so temporary, especially when they use cheaper materials like vinyl and plastic, funky wallpapers, and all that,” says Impola.
Opt for High-Quality MaterialsThose aren’t the only elevated pieces Impola swears by.
“Everything’s got to be a bit scaled down, especially sofas,” says Impola.
Kondo Your Belongings”Especially in a kitchen, you’re not going to have room for a ton of extra stuff. It’s about choosing your favorite 10 to 20 dishes,” Impola says.
Impola advocates for more unexpected choices: “I do a lot of behind-the-scenes tricks with my loft floors,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Aborted Launch and Meteoric Rise of Astronaut Ice Cream”

“Astronaut Ice Cream” is a trademark owned by American Outdoor Products and its affiliated company, Backpacker’s Pantry, although other companies, such as Mountain House and Emergency Essentials, sell it as simply “Freeze-dried ice cream.” According to NASA, the product was originally developed by the Whirlpool Corporation for the 1968 flight of Apollo 7.
Although modern-day astronauts aren’t eating the stuff, freeze-dried ice cream has since found a new life, snapped up by kids trailing through space and science museum shops, backpackers looking for a lightweight and long-lasting treat, survivalists fleshing out their stockpiles, and even soldiers in Afghanistan who want an ice cream that doesn’t melt in the desert’s punishing heat.
Freeze-dried ice cream is made by placing a slice of real ice cream into a chamber, freezing it, subjecting it to a vacuum, applying heat to sublimate its ice crystals directly from a solid state into a vapor, and then trapping and removing the vaporized water.
Some examples include the ever-popular Neapolitan, chocolate chocolate chip, mint chocolate chip, as well as ice cream sandwiches and ice cream drops.
“It is real ice cream,” says Belinda Sanda, an intergalactic sales representative for American Outdoor Products, which began selling its Astronaut Ice Cream in the mid-1970s.
Given the fact that this is the only kind of ice cream that can survive without any form of refrigeration, even members of the military are occasionally finding freeze-dried ice cream in their care packs.
“People are getting it and sending it to their kids in Afghanistan because it doesn’t melt,” said Jason VanSickle, CEO of the Astronaut Ice Cream Shop, which sells American Outdoor Products’ Astronaut Ice Cream through an online store based in Lansing, Michigan.
According to an article in the May 2002 issue of a newsletter published by NASA’s Food Technology Commercial Space Center, “Consumption records of freeze-dried ice cream are not readily available, but most of the product must have been returned, since that is the only time freeze-dried ice cream was used in space.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Earth’s Orbiting Junkyard Threatens the Space Economy”

Photo from ESA.You never see it in those lovely NASA pictures of Earth, but the space surrounding our pale blue dot is a cosmic junkyard.
In low-earth orbit, space debris travels at velocities approaching 5 miles per second-roughly 18,000 mph-which gives even the tiniest bits of junk enormous destructive energy.
Today, satellite operators periodically maneuver their birds to avoid object strikes just as NASA must do with the International Space Station.
“Commercial space in low-earth orbit is growing so rapidly we really have to run quickly to keep up,” Dan Ceperley, LeoLabs’ chief executive officer, said in an interview.
Another potential threat lies with the European Space Agency’s Envisat earth-observation satellite, an eight-ton, 30-foot-long behemoth that ceased responding in April 2012.
The new fence “Will be able to track objects as small as a peanut M&M in low-earth orbit,” a Lockheed project manager said in November, when the Air Force and Army opened a new Air Force Space Fence Operations Center.
The more space junk there is, the more often satellites will need to be moved, and the better shielded they must be to withstand frequent plinks by space projectiles.
According to the Aerospace Corp., a research firm in El Segundo, Calif. that consults on space issues for the Department of Defense and civilian space users.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Space: The Final Illusion”

Each event will also become a cause of events in the future.
In the same sense that a liquid is just a description of the collective motions of myriads of atoms, space and spacetime will turn out to be just a way of talking about the collective properties of the large number of atomic events.
The aim of a quantum theory of gravity is then first to hypothesize the laws that govern the elementary events, by which they continually come into being and then recede into the past.
Initially there is no space-just a network of individual elementary events, together with the relations expressing which of these were the direct causes of which other events.
To get a sense of how much is involved in this average, we expect that during each second there are around 10120 elementary events happening within each cubic centimeter of space.
I can then summarize the story I’ve been telling by saying that when locality, and space itself, emerge from averaging over fundamental processes involving a myriad of individual events, it is inevitable that locality will be disordered.
Mostly, influences will be local, because most of the time, causally related events will end up close to each other in the emergent rough description we call space.
There will be many pairs of events that are causally related, that will end up far from each other-thus disordering space and locality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Quanta Magazine”

The basic model of hyperbolic geometry is an infinite expanse, just like flat Euclidean space.
Because hyperbolic geometry expands outward much more quickly than flat geometry does, there’s no way to fit even a two-dimensional hyperbolic plane inside ordinary Euclidean space unless we’re willing to distort its geometry.
From our perspective, the triangles near the boundary circle look much smaller than the ones near the center, but from the perspective of hyperbolic geometry all the triangles are the same size.
In ordinary Euclidean geometry, the circumference of a circle is directly proportional to its radius, but in hyperbolic geometry, the circumference grows exponentially compared to the radius.
Just as with flat and spherical geometries, we can make an assortment of other three-dimensional hyperbolic spaces by cutting out a suitable chunk of the three-dimensional hyperbolic ball and gluing together its faces.
Hyperbolic geometry, with its narrow triangles and exponentially growing circles, doesn’t feel as if it fits the geometry of the space around us.
Small triangles in spherical geometry have angles that sum to only slightly more than 180 degrees, and small triangles in hyperbolic geometry have angles that sum to only slightly less than 180 degrees.
The larger the spherical or hyperbolic shape, the flatter each small piece of it is, so if our universe is an extremely large spherical or hyperbolic shape, the part we can observe may be so close to being flat that its curvature can only be detected by uber-precise instruments we have yet to invent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Six NASA Astronauts Describe the Moment in Space When “Everything Changed””

As six NASA astronauts tell Inverse, what you see isn’t necessarily what you envision.
The astronauts – Chris Hadfield, Jerry Linenger, Nicole Stott, Mae Jemison, Leland Melvin, and Mike Massimino – have all had the rare opportunity to view our home planet from space.
Some refer to that change as the “Overview Effect,” a term coined in 1987 by celebrated space writer Frank White to describe the mental shift astronauts experience when they consider the Earth as part of a larger whole.
One of the reasons we take so many pictures is we don’t have time to see what we’re looking at.
In my five months on the Russian Space Station, I had some opportunities where, for 90 minutes, I would just levitate over a window, and I’d see the sun rise, the sun set, the stars come out, and I’d just sort of block the world out.
I do remember initially looking out the window the first couple of days and wanting to see my home, wanting to see Florida from space.
From Russia, can look over to the side and see his home.
You’re floating around; you’re seeing the Earth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Colors Change the Perception of Interior Spaces”

To provide the desired spatial experience, there are elements which change the perception of a space without changing an inch of wall.
Lighter and cooler colors make the space appear larger.
Compact the Space On the other hand, when the idea is to make the room appear more compact, smaller, and cozier, opting for stronger colors on wall surfaces can work well.
There are apartments whose lower ceilings give a claustrophobic feel to the spaces.
Make the Space Wider Painting the back wall and the ceiling with the same darker colors and leaving the side walls lighter will make the space appear wider and more spacious.
Narrow the Space Painting the two opposing side walls dark colors and leaving the background and the ceiling in light colors will make the space narrower to the eyes, improving the proportions of rooms with unbalanced dimensions.
Shorten the Space If you have a very large space in your home and want it to feel more intimate, invest in dark tones on the back wall in contrast to lighter colors elsewhere.
Shorten the Walls If the idea is to make the walls shorter, applying a darker shade to the bottom of the wall will work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The International Space Station Is More Valuable Than Many People Realize”

In 1984 when President Reagan directed NASA to build a permanently occupied space station, no one could have predicted the critical role it would play in human space exploration nearly four decades later.
The International Space Station took 12 years to build with support from 16 nations and has been populated continuously since November 2000.
Under Space Policy Directive 1, NASA and the ISS National Laboratory are accelerating the nation’s push into commercial space.
With an expected trillion-dollar space economy to come, the ISS can play a defining role in the formation of the industry.
Aboard the ISS, an array of basic and applied research programs are underway with participation of companies such as Boeing, Anheuser-Busch, Sanofi, LambdaVision, Space Tango, Airbus, and Teledyne Brown Engineering.
The ISS is effectively the premier space R&D lab, and companies are utilizing microgravity at the edge of the human frontier 250 miles up to solve problems here on Earth.
In July, NASA and Boeing assembled 80 percent of the massive core stage needed to launch the Space Launch System and Orion on their first mission to the Moon: Artemis 1.Notably, NASA’s “New” charge to facilitate and encourage the commercial sector is nothing new.
We can’t get there from here-not without the ISS. The lion’s share of onboard station research is aimed at solving long-term challenges for human survival in deep space.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What It’s Like to Go to Space Camp-as an Adult”

At NASA’s Adult Space Academy, wannabe astronauts can moonwalk, build mini rockets, and even journey to Mars.
There’s only one place in the solar system where you can wear a flight suit, experience weightlessness, and work on rockets, all without entering orbit: Space Camp.
NASA’s Space Camp opened its doors to adults, offering three-day, two-night camps to anyone over the age of 18 with $549 and an unrealized astronaut dream.
The program bears some similarities to the junior version: Campers reside in bunks at the Space Academy Habitats in Huntsville, Alabama, and eat at the crew galley with camp guides and staff.
Those same learning tools-from spacewalk simulators to science experiment kits-await the adult Space Camp voyager.
Some of us moved into a model of a Space Shuttle control cabin, while others changed into space suits in the model of the ISS to await the personnel exchange.
The second day opened with one of the more impressive Space Camp challenges: a scuba dive into a 30-foot-deep underwater training tank to get a feel for what it would be like to do repairs in an airless vacuum while weightless.
Space Camp exists to inspire kids to become astronauts-and to remind adults of how much humans can achieve together.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Designing a home for living alone”

The living room is her least-used space; the couch is a hand-me-down from the frat house of a local college, and the TV is mostly for watching sports or noteworthy series, usually on the rare occasion she invites someone over.
They “Named it and framed it” in 1981, Popcorn says, and in her 1991 book, The Popcorn Report, she broke down the trend into three initial sections: armored cocooning, or living in gated communities and having substantial home security; wandering cocooning, or seeking alone time in individual vehicles and solo transportation, just as Lindsey did; and socialized cocooning, or retreating to a private sphere while still interacting with family and friends.
In 2017, Pew Research Center analysis of the census found that 42 percent of Americans lived alone and 61 percent of Americans under the age of 35 lived alone.
If you’re living alone in 2019, it’s almost instinctive to find yourself in some type of socialized cocoon, and that’s changing how solo dwellers use their living spaces.
One-bedroom apartments are increasingly pricey everywhere in the U.S. But those who live alone often prize doing so despite the cost, and see their homes as spaces for the individual first, and guests second.
“When I’m designing for someone living alone, it’s almost always focused on the living space and the bedroom,” she says.
“There’s not a lot of focus on the kitchen and the dining room. It can go both ways, and a lot of people do want to be set up to entertain, but the main focus is on a living space for themselves.”
Popcorn, who has made her career by predicting future trends, pointed out that the living room will become more like a “Life space” designed to fit its dweller.

The orginal article.