Summary of “The Young Man and the Sea Sponge”

Tom Kenny, the voice actor behind SpongeBob’s perpetually enthused munchkin tones has always delighted in the show’s abundance of positive energy.
Stephen Hillenburg, the creator of SpongeBob SquarePants, was 14 when he went scuba diving for the first time.
“SpongeBob should be cool and wear sun glasses and surf,” while another knowledgeably informed Hillenburg that “Pirates were out.”
Burger King wanted SpongeBob flipping burgers on a Burger King-style flame broiler, and Target wanted to market its SpongeBob products with the slogan, “It’s hip to be square,” which Hillenburg coolly rejected on the basis that SpongeBob wasn’t hip.
Like everyone else, Hillenburg started seeing SpongeBob everywhere.
In 2015, as if sensing there was a need for some course correction, Hillenburg took a more active role behind the scenes of SpongeBob SquarePants.
In 2019 so far, Nickelodeon has announced the launch of a dedicated SpongeBob YouTube channel, a new mobile game, a new toy line, SpongeBob Nike sneakers, the SpongeBob Smarty Pants Game Show, collaborations with designer Cynthia Rowley and artists Romero Britto and Jon Burgerman and the Pantone Color Institute – who inaugurated the color “SpongeBob Yellow” – and SpongeBob cosmetics.
Clancy Brown, who voices Mr. Krabs, likened the experience to “Having sex with the lights on.” And, in addition to the new feature film, It’s a Wonderful Sponge, slated for release in 2020, Nickelodeon president Brian Robbins – calling SpongeBob SquarePants “Our Marvel universe” – has promised spin-off shows.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The “SpongeBob Squarepants” cast dives deep: On their iconic roles and humanity under the sea”

Salon spoke with the cast of “SpongeBob Squarepants” to describe what makes this silly sea show so enduring.
The main characters of the hit TV show “SpongeBob Squarepants” may be a bunch of fish – technically a sea sponge, starfish, cephalopod, crustacean, phytoplankton and squirrel, to be exact – but the key to the show’s enduring success could very well be that, for all of their silly underwater antics, the population of Bikini Bottom is endearingly human.
There is a scene in “SpongeBob’s Big Birthday Blowout,” the 20th anniversary special for the show that premieres on Friday at 7 p.m. ET, which plays with the underlying humanity of SpongeBob, Patrick, Squidward, Sandy, Plankton and Mr. Krabs in a particularly clever way.
Rodger Bumpass, who voices the curmudgeonly Squidward Tentacles, observed how fans identify with the character’s existential malaise – how, in effect, they first identify with SpongeBob as children, and then with his cranky character as adults.
“There’s a passage of time that people go through coming into young adulthood – and that really is where people tell me, when I go to conventions and stuff – that when they were young they associated and identified with SpongeBob because of his youthful playfulness and innocence, and then as they get to be adults and learn what the real world is like, and for a lot of people, that’s a traumatic passage of time,” Bumpass told Salon, who speculated that a lot of young people struggle with “This adult thing” once they reach a certain age.
With 20 years under its belt, it’s difficult to imagine where SpongeBob Squarepants will go from here.
Of course, like other classic animated TV shows such as Looney Tunes, the likelihood is that “SpongeBob Squarepants” will stick with its floating timeline and allow things to remain in their status quo forever – with SpongeBob manning the grill at the Krusty Krab, Squidward muttering to himself behind the cash register, Mr. Krabs in the back counting his money, Plankton scheming and figuratively face-planting each time, Patrick sleeping under his rock, Sandy getting into adventures and saving the day.
“Some shows focus on the childlike aspect of SpongeBob and things they can do by fooling around in the back of the classroom or whatever, or getting bullied by Flats the Flounder. Or sometimes, like you said, it’s more about ‘Midlife Crustacean’ where it’s about other, more adult concerns.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How SpongeBob SquarePants came to life on Broadway”

SpongeBob SquarePants, of the 18-year-old Nickelodeon cartoon, is a talking yellow kitchen sponge with a head that takes up more than two-thirds of his body.
This is all just to say, for designer David Zinn, when it came to bringing SpongeBob SquarePants to the stage, the question of the pineapple under the sea turned out to be the least of his problems.
SpongeBob SquarePants debuted on Broadway on December 4, at the Palace Theatre.
“You’re doing SpongeBob SquarePants, so at some point, you kind of have to use a kitchen sponge,” he said; for one backdrop, in an opening scene, he wound up using more than 4,000.
SpongeBob came with its own bizarre constraints.
In the end, it was less a matter of dressing up like SpongeBob than finding a way to transmit SpongeBob’s essence.
The earliest SpongeBob SquarePants workshops included actors, designers, a Foley artist, a choreographer, and a clowning expert.
If cartoons succeed by surprising a viewer with all in the world that is not possible, then this real-life version of SpongeBob SquarePants similarly surprises with all the things that are.

The orginal article.