Summary of “The Supermarket Cafeteria That Major League Baseball Players Love”

The hands behind the food are led by Francisca Dominguez, the Bravo cafeteria head chef who is from the Dominican Republic, which has produced the most foreign-born players in Major League Baseball.
Dominguez fields food orders directly by phone from players.
“I love my job. I love cooking for them.”
The woman who makes coladas, Cuban style espresso, is Cuban.
Bravo is a supermarket chain with at least 60 stores in Florida and the Northeast, including the Bronx and New Jersey, in areas with a high concentration of Latinos.
The Port St. Lucie location has perhaps fed the most professional baseball players.
On the advice of his brother, who already lived in Port St. Lucie, Merejo opened this Bravo franchise to cater to the Latino community growing about an hour north of West Palm Beach and two hours north of Miami.
About a fifth of Port St. Lucie’s population of 175,000 is Latino, according to the United States census.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Town Fights to Turn Retail Tide at a Little Mall That Might”

She found a new kind of anchor: a group of residents who had formed a company, North Country Showcase, to sell wares from local artists.
It has filled the vacated Express store with bowls, mittens, mugs and miniature wooden reindeer earrings carved by a retired technician at the power company.
An Amish farmer delivers handmade fly swatters and other goods to the store by bus since he does not drive a car.
The store writes him a letter if they sell out and need him to make more because he does not use a phone.
“Quite frankly, I am tired of our future being controlled by corporations that live in other places, whether it is Alcoa or these corporate stores,” said Ms. St. Hilaire, president of North Country Showcase.
Holiday sales at the store have been twice what Ms. St. Hilaire expected.
Lenny Nesbit and his partner, Jason Foster, run an event-planning business, Elite Events by Lenny, at St. Lawrence Center.
They are also raising a 7-year old son, who likes to spend time in the mall’s hair salon watching women get their hair washed while his fathers work nearby.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Trip to St. Kilda, Scotland’s Lost Utopia in the Sea”

Only the cliffs, falling improbably from hilltops and cols and making it impossible to land anywhere but the village bay, reminded us that the islands are often cut off by storms for weeks, or even months, at a time.
Hirta-the “Big” island, at two and a half square miles-was inhabited for thousands of years, with Soay and Boreray reserved for sheep.
The islanders farmed little and fished less, preferring to subsist on seabirds.
At their population’s peak, the islanders took an annual harvest of tens of thousands of birds and eggs, which one sixteenth-century traveller, Martin Martin, found to be of “An astringent and windy quality.” To match their strange diet, the St. Kildans, who spoke only Gaelic and had minimal contact with their feudal overlord, on Skye, had an unusual economic and political system.
Advancing technology slowly made the island’s traditional exports of mattress feathers and lamp oil, both derived from seabirds, obsolete or unprofitable.
Vivi Bolin, the current ranger and a trained biologist, described her stint on Hirta as “The holy grail.” She believes that the islanders, thriving in isolation, lived in stable balance with their environment.
In many ways, the St. Kildans had, of course, an extremely hard life,” she said, they also had “a good diet” and “a generous landlord.” So why did they evacuate? Bolin told me that with “This combination of disease and knowing there is a different way of life, the attraction is too big: you’d want to leave.” She compared the islanders to uncontacted peoples in the Amazon, who, despite the rules meant to protect their way of life, still have regular run-ins with outsiders.
Mainlanders always knew that St. Kilda was there, and to describe its people as uncontacted is hyperbole-so why does it, in common with other abandoned places and lost or threatened cultures, arouse such fascination? Perhaps it’s because, in our globalizing, urbanizing, capitalist age, such places remind us that there are alternative ways to relate to the world, and the people, around us: they spur our utopian imagination.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After Irma, a once-lush gem in the U.S. Virgin Islands reduced to battered wasteland”

Helicopter footage over the British and U.S. Virgin Islands shows the damaged left behind by Hurricane Irma on Thursday, Sept. 7 and Friday, Sept. 8.
Once a lush gem in the U.S. Virgin Islands, a chain steeped in the lore of pirates and killer storms, this 20-square-mile island is now perhaps the site of Irma’s worst devastation on American soil.
In the days following the storm, lawlessness broke out – here and on other Caribbean islands.
Prisoners had broken free on nearby Tortola, in the British Virgin Islands, seized guns and formed armed gangs.
On late Wednesday morning when Irma hit, the Virgin Islands, a haven for cruise ships and those in search of a good piƱa colada, were supposed to get lucky.
In the U.S. Virgin Islands, only St. Croix was largely spared.
Kenneth Mapp, governor of the U.S. Virgin Islands, insisted in a telephone interview that there had been no pillaging at all on St. John, despite evidence to the contrary.
President Trump, Mapp said, called him Monday and was due to survey the Virgin Islands damage this week.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The value of a liberal arts education in the modern world”

Consider St. John’s College, America’s third-oldest institution of higher education, founded in 1696.
In contrast to some liberal arts stalwarts like Brown or Wesleyan that allow students to choose from a vast array of classes with few restrictions, St. John’s offers only the Program; it’s prix fixe is a higher education world of a la carte.
Context is viewed as ideology, something that St. John’s believes distorts true education and the ability to form one’s own opinion.
While it’s fair to say most liberal arts students live in a “Bubble” cut off from reality, St. John’s is unapologetic about, and in fact encourages, a four-year respite from the pressures and distractions of the outside world.
Like other US liberal arts colleges since the Great Recession, St. John’s has been dealing with two common headwinds: rising costs and declining traditional student enrollment.
As one alumni, Columbia Law School professor Shawn Watts, said, “St. John’s is less about the books than the process and the community. It trains your mind and frees it at the same time. This allows you to truly follow your own passions and interest in life without the subconscious impositions and prodding of our wired world.” In the face of a very uncertain future, a St. John’s education may be money very well spent.
The growing demand around the world for liberal arts education, as I’ve recently chronicled, has boosted overseas applications to St. John’s unique program.
US News now ranks St. John’s as the 53rd best national liberal arts college.

The orginal article.