Summary of “When Crime Comes for the Crime Writer”

All week long, Vulture is exploring the many ways true crime has become one of the most dominant genres in popular culture.
What if, I thought, as crime novelists often do, what if someone showed up now and claimed to be one of the sisters? What would happen? If she’s telling the truth, then where is the other sister and why has she waited so long to resurface? If she’s lying, what’s the endgame?
There was a problem with my personal ethics policy: It was steeped in the hubris of a crime writer who had little firsthand experience with crime.
Can I literally imagine what his wife, Maria, and his three grown children are going through now? Or his brother, the celebrated comic crime novelist Carl Hiaasen? Before June 28, I would have insisted that I could use my imagination and empathy to do just that.
What is it about the genre, why are so many readers drawn to it, why do you write it? It’s old hat to argue that today’s crime novels function much like the social novels of the early-to-mid 20th century.
A violent crime lays bare things that a community is trying to hide: Race, class, sexism, income inequality, the horrible things that families do to their own.
A lot of crime novelists working now are very clever about sneaking issues into their work.
Crime fiction has long been a conservative genre, made up of stories in which a dogged investigator – usually a cisgender white male – makes the world safe again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Did the Climate Apocalypse Become Old News?”

The New York Times has done admirable work on global warming over the last year, launching a new climate desk and devoting tremendous resources to high-production-value special climate “Features.” But even their original story on the wildfires in Greece made no mention of climate change – after some criticism on Twitter, they added a reference.
Over the last few days, there has been a flurry of chatter among climate writers and climate scientists, and the climate-curious who follow them, about this failure.
In perhaps the most widely parsed and debated Twitter exchange, MSNBC’s Chris Hayes – whose show, All In, has distinguished itself with the seriousness of its climate coverage – described the dilemma facing every well-intentioned person in his spot: the transformation of the planet and the degradation may be the biggest and most important story of our time, indeed of all time, but on television, at least, it has nevertheless proven, so far, a “Palpable ratings killer.” All of which raises a very dispiriting possibility, considering the scale of the climate crisis: Has the end of the world as we know it become, already, old news?
The news about what more to expect, coming out of new research, only darkens our picture of what to expect: Just over the past few weeks, new studies have suggested heat in many major Indian cities would be literally lethal by century’s end, if current warming trends continue, and that, by that time, global economic output could fall, thanks to climate effects, by 30 percent or more.
When you think about it, this would be a very strange choice for a producer or an editor concerned about boring or losing his or her audience – it would mean leaving aside the far more dramatic story of the total transformation of the planet’s climate system, and the immediate and all-encompassing threat posed by climate change to the way we live on Earth, to tell the pretty mundane story of some really hot days in the region.
As NPR’s science editor Geoff Brumfiel told Atkin, “You don’t just want to be throwing around, ‘This is due to climate change, that is due to climate change.'”.
Wildfires are “Not caused by climate change” only in the same way that hurricanes are not caused by climate change – which is to say they are made more likely by it, which is to say the distinction is semantic.
They won’t be, and the longer-view story is much more harrowing: not just more months like July, but an unfolding century when a month like this July has become a happy memory of a placid climate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “No, you probably don’t have a book in you”

When people talk about “Having a book in them,” or when people tell others they should write a book, what they really mean is I bet someone, but probably not me because I already heard it, would pay money to hear this story.
A book has a beginning, middle, and an end that keeps the reader invested for the five, six, ten hours it can take to read a book, because if it gets boring in the middle, most people stop reading.
Writing a book that people will pay money for or take a trip to the library to read, requires an awareness few storytellers have.
A publisher doesn’t really want book two until they see how book number one is selling.
Publishers take a financial risk on a book, because no one knows how a book is going to sell until it’s on shelves, and very successful authors help pay the bills for the less successful books.
No one deserves to be published just because they completed a book.
Writing a book that someone else wants to read is running your fastest marathon.
Just be careful when well-meaning, though wholly uninformed, people say you should write a book.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Did the Climate Apocalypse Become Old News?”

The New York Times has done admirable work on global warming over the last year, launching a new climate desk and devoting tremendous resources to high-production-value special climate “Features.” But even their original story on the wildfires in Greece made no mention of climate change – after some criticism on Twitter, they added a reference.
Over the last few days, there has been a flurry of chatter among climate writers and climate scientists, and the climate-curious who follow them, about this failure.
In perhaps the most widely parsed and debated Twitter exchange, MSNBC’s Chris Hayes – whose show, All In, has distinguished itself with the seriousness of its climate coverage – described the dilemma facing every well-intentioned person in his spot: the transformation of the planet and the degradation may be the biggest and most important story of our time, indeed of all time, but on television, at least, it has nevertheless proven, so far, a “Palpable ratings killer.” All of which raises a very dispiriting possibility, considering the scale of the climate crisis: Has the end of the world as we know it become, already, old news?
The news about what more to expect, coming out of new research, only darkens our picture of what to expect: Just over the past few weeks, new studies have suggested heat in many major Indian cities would be literally lethal by century’s end, if current warming trends continue, and that, by that time, global economic output could fall, thanks to climate effects, by 30 percent or more.
When you think about it, this would be a very strange choice for a producer or an editor concerned about boring or losing his or her audience – it would mean leaving aside the far more dramatic story of the total transformation of the planet’s climate system, and the immediate and all-encompassing threat posed by climate change to the way we live on Earth, to tell the pretty mundane story of some really hot days in the region.
As NPR’s science editor Geoff Brumfiel told Atkin, “You don’t just want to be throwing around, ‘This is due to climate change, that is due to climate change.'”.
Wildfires are “Not caused by climate change” only in the same way that hurricanes are not caused by climate change – which is to say they are made more likely by it, which is to say the distinction is semantic.
They won’t be, and the longer-view story is much more harrowing: not just more months like July, but an unfolding century when a month like this July has become a happy memory of a placid climate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The discourse is unhinged’: how the media gets AI alarmingly wrong”

In June of last year, five researchers at Facebook’s Artificial Intelligence Research unit published an article showing how bots can simulate negotiation-like conversations.
Should We Stop It? The story focused almost entirely on how the bots occasionally diverged from standard English – which was not the main finding of the paper – and reported that after the researchers “Realized their bots were chattering in a new language” they decided to pull the plug on the whole experiment, as if the bots were in some way out of control.
While the giddy hype around AI helped generate funding for researchers at universities and in the military, by the end of the 1960s it was becoming increasingly obvious to many AI pioneers that they had grossly underestimated the difficulty of simulating the human brain in machines.
As reports of deep learning’s “Unreasonable effectiveness” circulated among researchers, enrollments at universities in machine-learning classes surged, corporations started to invest billions of dollars to find talent familiar with the newest techniques, and countless startups attempting to apply AI to transport or medicine or finance were founded.
Lipton, a jazz saxophonist who decided to undertake a PhD in machine learning to challenge himself intellectually, says that as these hyped-up stories proliferate, so too does frustration among researchers with how their work is being reported on by journalists and writers who have a shallow understanding of the technology.
“If you compare a journalist’s income to an AI researcher’s income,” she says, “It becomes pretty clear pretty quickly why it is impossible for journalists to produce the type of carefully thought through writing that researchers want done about their work.” She adds that while many researchers stand to benefit from hype, as a writer who wants to critically examine these technologies, she only suffers from it.
While closer interaction between journalists and researchers would be a step in the right direction, Genevieve Bell, a professor of engineering and computer science at the Australian National University, says that stamping out hype in AI journalism is not possible.
“Experts can be really quick to dismiss how their research makes people feel, but these utopian hopes and dystopian fears have to be part of the conversations. Hype is ultimately a cultural expression that has its own important place in the discourse.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kurt Vonnegut Offers 8 Tips on How to Write Good Short Stories”

You can’t talk about American literature in the second half of the 20th century without talking about Kurt Vonnegut.
He worked wonders with the short story, a form in whose heyday he began his writing career, but he also had a knack for what would become the most social media-friendly of all forms, the list.
Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
In the short lecture above Vonnegut gets more technical, sketching out the shapes that stories, short or long, can take.
In one possible story the protagonist begins slightly happier than average, gets into trouble, and then gets out of it again.
Vonnegut first explored the idea of story shapes in his master’s thesis, rejected by the University of Chicago “Because it was so simple and looked like too much fun.” Clearly that didn’t stop him from continuing to think about and experiment with those shapes all throughout his career.
He assigned term papers that can still teach you how to read like a writer, he appeared on television dispensing advice to aspirants to the craft, and he even published articles on how to write with style.
Nobody could, or should try to, write just like Kurt Vonnegut, but all of us who write at all could do well to give our craft the kind of thought he did.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Real Story of the Fake Story of One of Europe’s Most Charismatic CEOs”

This is the story of how, in our classroom, we at HEC Paris created false news before anyone understood the phenomenon – and what we’ve learned about the techniques that make false news spread and stick.
Each class would create new highs and new lows – a polluted river tarnished Berden’s reputation another year.
If false news sticks, it carries real consequences for businesses.
Recent research indicates that false news is easier to spread than real news, and our 10-year experience of managing the reputations of Laboratoires Berden and Eric Dumonpierre bears this out.
In 2010 the first result for a search on “CSR manager” was a story published by a French news site called Le Post.
The students enhanced the stickiness of the false news by recycling old stories when they generated new ones.
Fact-checking sites like Snopes and Emergent document a steady stream of false news that hurts corporate reputations, such as these rumors: PepsiCo’s CEO told Trump supporters to take their business elsewhere; McDonald’s is replacing all its cashiers with robots and discontinuing the Big Mac; and Facebook launched a new algorithm that shows members the status updates from just 26 friends.
Starbucks’ sensitivity training day, which made news earlier this year, generated a whole cycle of false news about the company, including a report that CEO Kevin Johnson said, “Patrons of colorwill be allowed to move to the head of the line.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Improve Your Kids’ Reading Comprehension”

If you’re like me, you dive into book after book with abandon.
It turns out that by plowing through stories, we may be missing a key step: prediction.
When your kid takes the time to contemplate what he’s about to read, making predictions based on what he already knows, he’ll be more invested in the story and more likely to understand and retain the material.
Show them the cover and ask, “What do you think this book will be about? Why?”.Take a “Picture walk,” as Kriegel suggests.
Flip through the pages of illustrated book, and without reading any words, let them to form their own ideas about the story.
Use Post-Its to cover important words in the story, and see if they can guess what those words are when they land upon them.
In the middle of a story, stop and ask them what they think is going to happen on the next page.
After the final page, ask, “If you could write the next chapter, what would happen?” It helps them to stay curious even after the story ends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I Lied to Everyone in High School About Knowing Karate”

In 10th grade, I was chosen to be photographed for a yearbook feature called “Out of the Ordinary Hobbies.” The yearbook staff heard I had a green belt in karate and wanted to do an interview with photos.
Why didn’t the school offer karate instead of stupid stuff like home economics? She’d rather know how to protect herself than sew a button.
Maybe he’d see my profile next to his and seek me out after school.
What would my father say? He was already unhappy with my struggles in school, unhappy with how I was turning out.
A few nights before I had plagiarized the short story, my father sat with me at the kitchen table, going over the geometry test my teacher had sent directly to my parents with a note.
It was like every girl in high school knew which nights to congregate at the mall except me.
The yearbook feature could say what I couldn’t to my friends and peers and teachers over the span of ten years roaming the school hallways alone: look at me.
I must have told someone I knew karate forI don’t even know what reason, but I never thought it would get around the school this way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Best Movies of 2018, So Far”

We’re six months into 2018, which means it’s time to take stock of everything we’ve seen so far this year-and determine which films released between January 1 and July 1 stand out most among the crowd.
Positioning an African superhero and his family and countrymen at the center of a big-budget spectacular, with a diverse array of talent behind the camera, Black Panther showed millions of people something they hadn’t seen before, an awfully late-arriving relief in a series that’s now 20-plus movies deep.
In exploring it, his movie offers one of the best recent analyses of what virulent racism, and how we tell the story of that racism, accomplishes.
It’s one of the most surprising films of the year-and, so far, the best.
What sets Let the Sunshine In apart from films of its ilk is the hot streak of intellectualism coursing through it: Denis has made a movie that’s as brutally concerned with how these people talk as it is with what they say, as focused on how desire manifests as on the fact that the desire is there to begin with.
The movie is docu-fiction; Zhao films it all with an airy alertness, combining scenes of the novice Jandreau “Acting” alongside scenes of him interacting with his own family and his own friends, one of whom is a paraplegic said, in the movie, to have been injured on the back of his horse.
So the movie is certainly not some pleasant distraction from the ills of the day-but Soderbergh’s calm, assured style is slick and winding enough to keep us more than engaged.
Claire Foy tosses Queen Elizabeth’s crown in the dumpster and hurls herself into her role, tearing through the movie with thrilling fury.

The orginal article.