Summary of “Want To Be A Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
A story that’s powerful and relevant can galvanize people and inspire action.
Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Are Snapchat, Instagram, and Facebook ‘Stories’?”

Facebook’s chief product officer, Chris Cox, made a remarkable announcement during a keynote at the company’s big conference this week: “The increase in the Stories format,” he explained, “Is on a path to surpass feeds as the primary way people share things with their friends sometime next year.”
I have been ignoring Stories for years, deeming it a trifle for young people.
Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, added Stories in 2016, essentially copying it from Snapchat, which inaugurated the format.
Even if Stories aren’t really stories, they deserve careful attention, especially given Cox’s warning.
Like them or hate them, Stories might be the first true smartphone media format.
This tendency drove one of Facebook’s newly announced features: a software integration for Stories that would allow direct posting from an app.
On Snapchat, Stories are more informal, making use of the face-filters and geotags common to that platform.
Sequence is not sufficient to create narrative, and many Stories feel like random collections of unrelated materials.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After a week of Russian propaganda, I was questioning everything”

Like its sister outlet RT, Sputnik is a Russian government-funded media outlet, widely seen by Russia experts as a vehicle to disseminate disinformation for the Kremlin, and, like its space-dwelling namesake, to make the West look bad. While RT is television, Sputnik lives on the radio, a wire service and website.
Today, Sputnik operates in 34 countries in more than 30 languages, including, as of this past summer, on an FM station in Washington, D.C. When Sputnik launched stateside, the investigations into Russia’s supposed interference in the U.S. election were accelerating, and the media outlet was greeted with critical coverage.
Because its provider is now a foreign agent, Sputnik is now required to disclose that it is funded by the Russian government.
Over the last month, questioning the chemical attack in Douma dominated the news at Sputnik.
While at Sputnik’s offices, I also sat down with Mindia Gavasheli, a Russian national who runs Sputnik’s D.C. newsroom.
When I sat down with Lee Stranahan, the former Breitbart reporter, who calls himself a “Political futurist,” he shrugged off the idea that Sputnik was Russian propaganda by employing some whataboutism of his own.
“When you work for Sputnik, you get called a traitor and a Putin puppet But why does no one bring up the coup we fomented?” he said, referring to Russian allegations that the U.S. fomented a coup in Ukraine.
As one last attempt to better understand Sputnik, I put myself on a weeklong Sputnik media diet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Facebook shrinks fake news after warnings backfire – TechCrunch”

That’s what happened when Facebook put red flags on debunked fake news.
First, rather than call more attention to fake news, Facebook wants to make it easier to miss these stories while scrolling.
When Facebook’s third-party fact-checkers verify an article is inaccurate, Facebook will shrink the size of the link post in the News Feed.
“We use machine learning to help predict things that might be more likely to be false news, to help prioritize material we send to fact-checkers,” a spokesperson from Facebook confirmed.
Distribution – To limit the spread of false news, Facebook works with fact-checkers.
If they debunk an article, its size shrinks, Related Articles are appended and Facebook downranks the stories in News Feed.
Together, by chipping away at each phase, Facebook says it can reduce the spread of a false news story by 80 percent.
Facebook needs to prove it has a handle on false news before more big elections in the U.S. and around the world arrive.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I’m Sorry To Report Instagram Is Bad Now”

In my experience, the problem is that as Stories has exploded in popularity, people – at the very least, my friends and the celebrities I follow – seem to be posting to the regular photo feed less often.
Stories has made the stakes for posting photos to the feed way higher.
When Instagram launched Stories in summer 2016, people initially scoffed that it was ripping off Snapchat – any yet they quickly adopted it.
It seemed for a moment in those early days with Instagram Stories that it might be a fix for all the things that made Instagram toxic: the staged, airbrushed photos of people looking their best, experiencing impossibly fabulous moments.
Just as people’s photos became overwhelming, users figured out how to make Stories “Good,” or too good – the right number of times to post per day, how to use stickers and text effectively to be clever and funny, capturing a narrative in four to seven segments.
Your friends are probably divided into three groups: never posts, terrible shitposters, and the rare group that posts really entertaining multipart Stories.
Then people either post Stories way too much or not at all because they’re intimidated by the concept of having to post a full, charming narrative.
With Stories, Instagram is no longer an oasis away from the internet; it’s a full blast of it right into your face.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teach Kids Compassion By Creating Stories About Others”

It’s easy to conclude that people generally suck.
As a parent, I want to teach my daughter to view others with compassion over judgment-a tough skill to learn, but one that will serve her every day.
We take turns creating stories from observations of people and events on trips to and from school.
If we see a man walking rapidly on the sidewalk with tattooed arms and a sleeveless vest, we might make up a story that he’s late for work because his car broke down, so he’s walking fast to get help.
Maybe he owns a tattoo parlor across the bridge and is a walking advertisement for his business.
What if we didn’t? What if we taught them to wonder about people, even those who might hurt them? What if we reminded them that everyone is fighting a hard battle? What if will pushed them to challenge their assumptions and give others the benefit of the doubt-or even better, ask them about their lives? In Brené Brown’s book Rising Strong, she asks her husband if he believes people are doing the best they can.
With your kids, help them use their natural love for stories to come up with their own narratives for the toddler throwing a tantrum in the grocery store, the man who’s getting upset at the bank or the bully in the book their reading.
In the end, the story they’re changing will be their own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jim Starlin, Creator of Infinity War’s Thanos, Hates Marvel”

Most important, he’s the guy without whom this month’s Marvel mega-blockbuster movie Avengers: Infinity War couldn’t have happened – in the pages of his comics, he created its supervillain, the intergalactic killer Thanos, as well as its magical MacGuffin, the Infinity Gauntlet.
To be clear, his main grudge is with Marvel Comics, Marvel’s publishing arm, not the filmmakers at Marvel Studios.
Now, on the eve of Infinity War – what should have been the apotheosis of his time with Marvel – he thinks relations are worse than they’ve ever been.
“Jim had come to New York with these characters and he wanted to do them for Marvel. In his mind, these were Marvel Comics characters.”
In his telling, the company kept changing up the artists who were assigned to ink his pencils, he got fed up with it, and he and Marvel parted ways one issue before he could resolve his Thanos arc in Captain Marvel.
That’s the general pattern that Starlin and Marvel have followed ever since: Starlin becomes dissatisfied with something, he quits, Marvel approaches him about returning, and he comes back with a new set of cosmic stories – almost always ones that feature Thanos.
His most famous tale came nearly 20 years into his time with Marvel, in the pages of 1991’s The Infinity Gauntlet, which saw Thanos assembling the titular object, a glove that he embellished with mystical gems of enormous power.
Pencilers George Pérez and Ron Lim brought to life Starlin’s vision of legions of Marvel heroes coming together to take the Mad Titan down during his attempt to wipe out half of all life in the universe – an idea being more or less directly lifted by Marvel Studios for Infinity War.

The orginal article.

Summary of “J.R.R. Tolkien book The Fall of Gondolin coming in August”

J.R.R. Tolkien, author of The Hobbit and The Lord of The Rings, died in 1973.
Fans will get the chance to read a new book by the author this August.
HarperCollins will publish The Fall of Gondolin on Aug. 30, the publishing company announced Tuesday.
The book was edited by Tolkien’s son Christopher, 93, and illustrated by Alan Lee.
The book tells of the founding of the Elven city of Gondolin, and is considered one of Tolkien’s Lost Tales.
“We never dared to dream that we would see this published,” said Shaun Gunner, chair of the Tolkien Society, on the group’s webpage.
“The Fall of Gondolin is, to many in the Tolkien community, the Holy Grail of Tolkien texts as one of Tolkien’s three Great Tales alongside The Children of Húrin and Beren and Lúthien. This beautiful story captures the rise and fall of a great Elven kingdom, taking place millennia before the events of The Lord of the Rings. This book brings all the existing work together in one place to present the story in full.”
Tolkien is believed to have started writing the story in 1917 while recovering from trench fever he contracted during World War I. It follows another posthumously published Lost Tale, The Tale of Beren and Lúthien, which came out in 2017.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 50 Best Fantasy Books of the 21st Century :: Books :: Lists :: fantasy books :: Page 1 :: Paste”

The 21st century has been a particularly fruitful time of fantasy literature, with J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series ushering in an era of both publishers willing to take a chance on new fantasy writers and readers opening themselves up to worlds of magic.
Many readers have worked their way back from movies like the Lord of the Rings franchise or TV series like Game of Thrones to their fantasy novel origins, seeking out new authors after devouring J.R.R. Tolkien and G.R.R. Martin’s books.
We’ve gathered Paste editors and writers to compile a list of our favorite books in the genre, ranging from high fantasy worlds with distinct systems of magic to simple fantastical fables to urban fantasies filled with characters ripped right out of own realities.
Thief of Time by Terry Pratchett The Discworld books manage to satirize nearly every topic under the sun while also presenting a fully formed and innovative fantasy world la Middle Earth or Westeros.
“If one believes there is truth in art-and I do-then it’s troubling how similar the skill of performing is to lying. Maybe lying is itself a kind of art. I think about that more than I should.” Dragons are a mainstay of fantasy as a genre, but rarely as complex, thinking beings integral to a story’s interpersonal dramas, which is how Rachel Hartman frames her coolly calculating shape-shifting dragons in Seraphina and its companion books.
Want to read about a grand scheme, involving magic, fighting, and all the joys of fantasy? These books are for you.
Grace of Kings by Ken Liu Game of Thrones comparisons abound in epic fantasy, and are often more burden than boon, but Ken Liu’s Grace of Kings may be one of the few fantasy tomes to earn that comparison favorably.
Joe Abercrombie’s fantasy world may feel like an amalgamation of places you’ve visited in your reading before, but the characters feel fully realized and the storytelling is taut, avoiding an over-reliance on fantasy trappings and delivering a gritty, gripping tale.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to be more hopeful |”

Fortunately for your loved ones, your livelihood and your life, we’ve gathered together eight tactics from TED speakers to cut through the fog.
His entire adult life, he’d worked for others, but at the age of 66, he decided to become a first-time entrepreneur.
Solomon transformed a childhood marked by bullying and emotional torment into a life of helping others communicate their own stories of growth.
His advice: “You need to take the traumas and make them part of who you’ve come to be, and you need to fold the worst events of your life into a narrative of triumph, evincing a better self in response to things that hurt.”
How can you find your own center amid life’s sturm und drang? Identify the thing or things in this world that you love more than you love yourself, says Gilbert.
“Innovation leads to more innovation leads to more innovation,” says Rinaudo.
“There is an unfathomable amount of kindness that I have seen,” she says, “And when we put our fears aside, when we connect to strangers, when we smile at the people next to us or put away our judgments, it opens up a door into an entirely different way of life.”
As Chang says, “In our age of increasing distractions, it’s more important than ever to find ways to maintain perspective, and remember that life is brief and tender.” In this way, preparing for death – and thinking about all the things you can achieve right now – can be one of the most uplifting things you can do.

The orginal article.