Summary of “How Pixar Became a Sequel Factory”

In its initial 10-film run, when even a single flop could have sunk the studio, Pixar released just one sequel.
With Pixar preparing to set out on its own, Disney created a rival animation studio called Circle 7 that began developing sequels to Toy Story 2, Finding Nemo, and Monsters, Inc. These franchises would be fully monetized whether Pixar was involved or not.
The rogue sequels were never made, but Toy Story 3, Monsters University, and Finding Dory were all eventually developed in-house at Pixar.
Since the release of Toy Story, Pixar has been steadily increasing its output and has long known that sequels would be necessary to stabilize its business.
In his book Creativity, Inc., Pixar cofounder Ed Catmull calls sequels “a sort of creative bankruptcy” but notes that the company had a long-term plan to eventually develop one sequel for every two original films.
Lasseter, the chief creative officer for both Pixar and Disney’s animation studio, is leaving the company after accounts of unwanted grabbing and kissing of female subordinates.
After Toy Story 4, due in June 2019, Pixar says it’s taking a break from sequels.
Even now amid the endless Cars and Toy Story films, Pixar is the studio whose original ideas are the most exciting to see brought to life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Definitive List of 50 Books to Understand Everything in the Universe”

A few weeks ago I put up a note on my LinkedIn about books that can form the building blocks to our understanding of just about everything there is to know in this universe.
Core: similar to working out in the gym, this part is the most important one and also the ideal starting point.
These books cover the principles of how this world works at an elemental level.
A weak core makes rest of the knowledge unapproachable.
Together with the core, these two form the basics of further development IMHO.Torso: a better upper body is often the end goal - it’s the most visible, the most outwardly attractive, and appeals to the ego.
The books in this category therefore cater to matters of charisma, influence, and power.
It’s tough to stay the course without an inspiring story or a personal passion that drives you out of bed to hit the gym.
This section focuses on feeding the soul with stories of struggles and wins against exceptional odds, stories of growth through deeply meaningful failures, and stories of redemption.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every Pixar Movie, Ranked”

What follows is the result of that process-The Ringer’s official ranking of every Pixar movie.
Finding Dory Ben Lindbergh: Thirteen years elapsed between the releases of Finding Nemo in 2003 and Finding Dory in 2016, which seems like a dangerous span of time between an animated movie and its sequel/spinoff: long enough that the kids who watched the former have aged out of the audience, but not long enough that they’ve created tiny Pixar consumers of their own.
Which reunited Nemo director Andrew Stanton and stars Ellen DeGeneres and Albert Brooks, did billion-dollar business, becoming the highest-grossing animated movie ever in the domestic market and ranking second behind Nemo in inflation-adjusted dollars on the all-time Pixar earnings leaderboard.
Monsters, Inc. Alison Herman: If your favorite SNL cast is inevitably the one that was on the air while you were in high school, your favorite Pixar movie is undoubtedly one released when you were between the ages of 8 and 12.
You’re young enough to have the intensity of feeling that can imprint a movie in your brain for decades to come, but just old enough to understand the emotional sophistication that comes with all the best Pixar projects.
To my mind, Monsters, Inc. is the movie that best exemplifies that Pixar blend, even if you remove the nostalgia factor.
In a profile of Inside Out director Pete Docter around the time of its release, the writer Lisa Miller noted that, “In my house, the movie has given us a new way to talk about how we feel.” While riding bikes, she asks her young daughter, “Who’s driving now?” Her answer is inspired by the movie: “Joy, and a little bit of Fear.” Talk about a mind-altering children’s movie.
I judge a Pixar movie by its ability to destroy me emotionally, and thus Up is, by my estimation, the best Pixar movie ever, a tale of sad widower Carl learning to live after losing his love, with the help of a child and a flying house.

The orginal article.

Summary of “HBO Announces Its First ‘Game of Thrones’ Pilot”

When Game of Thrones is on its game, it’s like no other show on television.
Thrones isn’t just the biggest show in HBO’s history, it may be the last piece of monoculture we have.
The cable giant announced Friday that it had ordered a pilot for a prequel show set during the Age of Heroes, a time some 10,000 years before the events in the current series when much of Westerosi myth and legend is born.
A quick dissection of HBO’s somewhat vague statement suggests that the new show will put the fantasy elements of the story on center stage, something that is only appropriate for the “Age of Heroes.” The most prominent “Stark of legend” could be Bran the Builder, a legendary figure who supposedly built the Wall to protect against the Others.
In Season 6, Thrones showed us that the white walkers were created by the Children of the Forest to protect against the First Men.
There are entire continents that Game of Thrones and A Song of Ice and Fire have left unexplored.
Some of the criticisms lobbed at Thrones in recent years have been aimed at how the show has shied away from fantasy.
With 10,000 years of separation from the current series, there’s no telling which way Goldman and HBO could take the show.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Growing Emptiness of the “Star Wars” Universe”

I thought of this scene this weekend, after watching “Solo: A Star Wars Story.” “Solo” is an entertaining movie, with engaging performances, vivid production design, and enthralling action sequences.
“Solo” evokes “Star Wars” without quite being it.
Because “Star Wars” is so self-consciously mythic, “Solo” is especially vulnerable to the “Simulacra of simulacra” problem.
In “The Force Awakens,” Rey tips the Falcon while zooming through a wrecked Star Destroyer; in “The Empire Strikes Back,” Han does it while navigating a canyon on a giant asteroid.
As the film draws to a close, its climactic moment turns out to be a riff on the “Han shot first” controversy-an inside-baseball fan debate about a 1997 revision to the original “Star Wars,” from 1977.
Although many talented actors have appeared in the latter-day “Star Wars” movies-Natalie Portman, Oscar Isaac, John Boyega, Daisy Ridley, Ewan McGregor, and so on-none have seemed as present and vivid as Fisher and Ford in the original films.
At the moment, there are numerous “Star Wars” projects in the works, including one helmed by the creators of “Game of Thrones.” Each one will make the “Star Wars” universe bigger, while making each individual act within it smaller.
“Star Wars” may become an endless meditation on adolescence through which different actors precipitate, first as teen-agers, then as parents.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Every story in the world has one of these six basic plots”

In a 1995 lecture, Vonnegut chalked out various story arcs on a blackboard, plotting how the protagonist’s fortunes change over the course of the narrative on an axis stretching from ‘good’ to ‘ill’.
“Thanks to new text-mining techniques, this has now been done. Professor Matthew Jockers at the University of Nebraska, and later researchers at the University of Vermont’s Computational Story Lab, analysed data from thousands of novels to reveal six basic story types – you could call them archetypes – that form the building blocks for more complex stories. The Vermont researchers describe the six story shapes behind more than 1700 English novels as:”.
We looked at some of the best-loved tales from BBC Culture’s 100 stories that shaped the world poll to try and find the six story types.
At one point, the Creature gets to take over the narrative, making the novel a story within a story within a story.
The shortest story of them all, Hans Christian Andersen’s famous fairy tale also has the most complex structure, incorporating two man in a hole sentiment arcs within an overall rags to riches narrative framework.
BBC Culture’s Stories that Shaped the World series looks at epic poems, plays and novels from around the globe that have influenced history and changed mindsets.
The poll of writers and critics, 100 Stories that Shaped the World, will be discussed at the Hay Festival in May and later broadcast on BBC World News.
A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Culture, Capital and Travel, delivered to your inbox every Friday.

The orginal article.

Summary of “George Takei Accuser Scott Brunton Changed His Story of Drugs, Assault”

Twitter similarly exploded with users accusing Takei of drugging Brunton and labeling Takei as a rapist.
Brunton’s pants were around his ankles, and Takei was grasping at his underwear, Brunton said.
What type of drug might Takei have used? I gave the experts the details of Brunton’s story and asked for their conclusions on what drugs could have been involved.
The Oregonian reported that, according to Brunton, “Takei was on top of him, shirt and shoes off. Brunton said his own pants were crumpled around his ankles and that Takei had his hand in his underwear, trying to get them off.”
A possible explanation for that is how Brunton related what happened-as an amusing anecdote, rather than a life-changing trauma, according to Brunton himself.
Brunton said that his anger toward Takei ignited in late 2017, after THR posted a story about Takei criticizing Kevin Spacey for deflecting a pedophilia accusation by coming out of the closet.
Takei was older than Brunton that night in 1981, and Brunton hadn’t consented to the come-on.
What should you get for something like Brunton says Takei did? For making too bold a move on a date who, it turned out, just wanted to be friends? What kind of sacrifice should be asked for when an accuser feels hurt but says it all could be a misunderstanding?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 100 stories that shaped the world”

In April, BBC Culture polled experts around the world to nominate up to five fictional stories they felt had shaped mindsets or influenced history.
Homer’s Odyssey topped the list, followed by Uncle Tom’s Cabin – examples of the different ways in which respondents interpreted a ‘world-shaping story’, with the ancient epic having survived generations of retelling, while Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 novel was commended for being “The first widely-read political novel in the US”. Frankenstein, Nineteen Eighty-Four and Things Fall Apart rounded up the top five – which features two female authors.
In among the recognised classics, there are a few texts less well-known globally: Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle, which directly led to the introduction of new federal laws on food safety, and Toba Tek Singh by Saadat Hasan Manto, praised as “a classic short story that translates the trauma of Partition through the post-Partition exchange of lunatics across the India and Pakistan border”.
This is just a starting point, aiming to spark a conversation about why some stories endure; how they continue to resonate centuries and millennia after they were created.
Why sharing those stories is a fundamental human impulse: one that can overcome division, inspire change, and even spark revolutions.
BBC Culture’s Stories that Shaped the World series looks at epic poems, plays and novels from around the globe that have influenced history and changed mindsets.
The poll of writers and critics, 100 Stories that Shaped the World, will be discussed at the Hay Festival in May and later broadcast on BBC World News.
A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Culture, Capital and Travel, delivered to your inbox every Friday.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ira Glass’s Commencement Speech at the Columbia Journalism School Graduation”

I am very aware that Maggie Haberman shows us all, day after day, a rigorous demonstration of how you use the traditional tools of journalism to get inside information from suspicious sources and break news and answer the biggest questions in the most important ongoing story out there right now.
To be totally honest, most weeks I spend most of my hours at work not working on my own stories but in a scrum of people who are puzzling out how to make somebody else’s work the very best it can be.
We edit each story over and over and over, each time dragging in some new person who hasn’t heard the thing yet to bring fresh ears.
In the interest of factual accuracy I will say that the majority of the stories on the program that’ve gotten the most attention – Harper High School, the Giant Pool of Money, convicted murderers putting up a production of Hamlet in prison, Nikole Hannah Jones stories on our show and Sarah Koenig’s and Chana Jaffe Walt’s – they were not my idea or my doing.
Editing is crucial because in my experience anything you try to make – what YOU want is for the story to be AMAZING. But what the story wants to be is MEDIOCRE OR WORSE. And the entire process of making the story is convincing the story to not be what it wants to be, which is BAD. And turning it from the bad thing it’s trying to be, where the sources are inarticulate, and you don’t know how to structure it, and the structure you make doesn’t work, into the shining gleaming jewel that you have in your heart that is editing!
In some crude dumb way, those stories do the most old-fashioned thing a story is supposed to do.
There are so many other stories in this category: climate change I’d argue almost anything about the environment for most people is like that This is awful to say, but so many human rights stories – it’s so hard to get people interested no matter how important they are to document so many social justice stories, so many criminal justice stories, so many of these issues that we cover and I think are so important to cover.
Turns out perhaps you anticipated this plot turn … a couple of the alarming stories were true but MOST of the stories Ben had read were exaggerated or totally false.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Marti Noxon Wants to Put Angry Women on TV”

On a soundstage in Queens, New York, the crew for Marti Noxon’s new TV series Dietland has built an extremely realistic replica of the offices of a modern women’s magazine.
At 53, Noxon has written, produced, and directed TV shows and films for more than two decades, but it’s only now, right now, that the stories she’s really interested in are stories that Hollywood wants to tell.
Joss Whedon, the creator of the cult hit Buffy the Vampire Slayer-which Noxon worked on as a writer and producer for six seasons, until the series’ finale in 2003-dubbed her the “Chains-and-pain gal.” Gillian Flynn, who wrote the novel Sharp Objects, describes Noxon as an “Amazing force wrapped in this kind of calm, pleasant package, but also, don’t fuck with her.”
If a singular thread runs through Noxon’s work, it’s the assertion that women can be just as complex as men-that they can make catastrophic decisions, put themselves in danger, damage others, and damage themselves.
Buffy’s own struggles preceded the darker stories about women that have emerged in recent years, in shows including Jessica Jones, Fleabag, Insecure, Big Little Lies, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, and UnREAL-an Emmy-nominated series, co-created by Noxon, that makes its own meta-commentary on the portrayal of women in entertainment.
Until Noxon left Buffy, a show she describes as “This little enclave of feminist thought and respect for female voices,” she didn’t fully realize how male-dominated the TV industry was.
Noxon is on the fence about how much women in Hollywood should expect from this particular moment, though.
As soon as Noxon proposed making Sharp Objects into a TV show, “It was like the shackles on the storytelling fell off.”

The orginal article.