Summary of “Student Loans Are Too Expensive To Forgive”

The federal government is considering ending some of its student loan forgiveness programs, which could raise the economic barrier to entering certain public service professions and leave social workers, teachers and other people in public-service fields that require graduate degrees paying thousands of dollars more for their education.
President Trump’s Education Department and its inspector general, as well as lawmakers and think tanks of all ideological stripes, have raised concerns about the growing cost of the federal government’s student loan programs – specifically its loan forgiveness options for graduate students.
A new audit from the Department of Education’s inspector general found that between fiscal years 2011 and 2015, the cost of programs that allow student borrowers to repay their federal loans at a rate proportional to their income shot up from $1.4 billion to $11.5 billion.
The federal government currently offers several types of loans, with varying repayment terms, one of which can cover up to the full cost of a student’s graduate program.
A Georgetown Law grad who’s gunning for a job at a U.S. attorney’s office and enrolled in the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program would expect that the federal student loans she took out to help pay her $180,000 tuition will be forgiven after 10 years.
If, like the typical lawyer, she graduates with $140,000 in federal student loan debt and her salary rises from $59,000 to $121,000 a year over her first 10 years on the job, she could have the government wipe out $147,000 in debt – the full remaining principal of her debt plus interest – according to a 2014 study from the think tank New America, which Delisle co-authored.
Ending the option of having student loans forgiven also removes a bargaining chip for graduate programs that have a reputation for supporting public service careers, like Georgetown University’s Law Center.
If the PROSPER Act passes, rather than paying 10 percent of her discretionary income for 10 years and having $147,000 in federal student loan debt forgiven, she would have to choose from one of the two repayment plans it allows.

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Summary of “Poor grades tied to class times that don’t match our biological clocks”

It may be time to tailor students’ class schedules to their natural biological rhythms, according to a new study from UC Berkeley and Northeastern Illinois University.
After sorting the students into “Night owls,” “Daytime finches” and “Morning larks” – based on their activities on days they were not in class – researchers compared their class times to their academic outcomes.
Their findings, published today in the journal Scientific Reports, show that students whose circadian rhythms were out of sync with their class schedules – say, night owls taking early morning courses – received lower grades due to “Social jet lag,” a condition in which peak alertness times are at odds with work, school or other demands.
“We found that the majority of students were being jet-lagged by their class times, which correlated very strongly with decreased academic performance,” said study co-lead author Benjamin Smarr, a postdoctoral fellow who studies circadian rhythm disruptions in the lab of UC Berkeley psychology professor Lance Kriegsfeld.
While students of all categories suffered from class-induced jet lag, the study found that night owls were especially vulnerable, many appearing so chronically jet-lagged that they were unable to perform optimally at any time of day.
To separate the owls from the larks from the finches, and gain a more accurate alertness profile, the researchers tracked students’ activity levels on days that they did not attend a class.
Finding these patterns reflected in students’ login data spurred researchers to investigate whether digital records might also reflect the biological rhythms underlying people’s behavior.
The results suggest that “Rather than admonish late students to go to bed earlier, in conflict with their biological rhythms, we should work to individualize education so that learning and classes are structured to take advantage of knowing what time of day a given student will be most capable of learning,” Smarr said.

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Summary of “Teachers and Parents Share Stories From Inside the ‘Fortnite’ Phenomenon”

Having played Fortnite herself, she could speak their language, and made a proposal: if everyone finished their work without a single interruption, they’d hold a big discussion about Fortnite.
It’s hard to tell when something moves from popular to cultural phenomenon, but it seems similar to the Ernest Hemingway quote about going bankrupt: “Gradually, and then suddenly.” I knew Fortnite was officially big when my wife’s younger sister, who’s not into games, asked me if I could explain this “Fortnite” thing and why all her guy friends were playing it.
How long Fortnite remains the talk of the playground is impossible to know, but the students, teachers, and parents I’ve talked to the past week said they haven’t seen something grip the children around them since Minecraft.
A number of teachers echoed this, observing how some of the biggest introverts are also some of the best Fortnite players in their class, and their expertise has transformed them into bonafide extroverts because everyone’s coming to them looking for advice on how to play.
Maybe we already have the best metric to know whether Fortnite is a phenomenon, and it has nothing to do with Twitch concurrents or YouTube views.
I heard from plenty of parents and teachers who said their daughters were into it, and in some cases, Fortnite became the first time they’d bonded over a shared interest in games.
Fortnite is still a game that involves players running around with guns-assault rifles, shotguns, sniper rifles-and it’s a point that hasn’t been lost on parents like Keith Krepcho, whose nine-year-old just started playing Fortnite.
Fortnite Gatsby, a student re-imagining of The Great Gatsby, became a tale of Tom and Daisy living in Snobby Shores, a notable location in Fortnite’s Battle Royale map, while Gatsby watches as 100 new “Dreamers” are brought to his island by bus.

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Summary of “Why dance class is just as important as math class |”

I tweeted the title “Why Dance Is as Important as Math in Education.” I had a lot of positive responses and a number of incredulous ones.
One tweet said, “Isn’t that going to be one of the shortest lectures ever?” Another said flatly, “Ken, dance is not as important as math.” One person tweeted, “So what? Telephones are more important than bananas. Ants are not as important as toilet ducks. Paper clips are more important than elbows.” Some responses were more pertinent: “Is that so? Important for what and to whom? By the way I’m a math teacher.”
In Dance Education around the World: Perspectives on Dance, Young People and Change, researchers Charlotte Svendler Nielsen and Stephanie Burridge bring together recent studies of the value of dance in all kinds of settings: from Finland to South Africa, from Ghana to Taiwan, from New Zealand to America.
The low status of dance in schools is derived in part from the high status of conventional academic work, which associates intelligence mainly with verbal and mathematical reasoning.
Dance can help restore joy and stability in troubled lives and ease the tensions in schools disrupted by violence and bullying.
A number of professional dance companies offer programs for schools.
Using dance, the organization aims to improve social relationships especially among genders and to enrich the culture of the schools by cultivating collaboration, respect and compassion.
Dance education has important benefits for students’ social relationships, particularly among genders and age groups.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Teens And Teachers Say Fortnite Mobile Is Destroying Some Schools”

For months now, teachers everywhere have heard students talk about Fortnite, the world’s latest obsession, nonstop.
Everyone is playing it, teens say, so schools have tried to ban it.
What makes Fortnite different is that it is a meaty and intense game that everyone is playing, because it’s free.
Plus, if you’re bad at Fortnite, you can still just watch others play and have a blast.
According to Nick Fisher, the teacher with the Fortnite mobile confiscation bin Tweet, part of what makes Fornite so viral for kids is that its culture is tied to social media.
Players feel compelled to talk about Fortnite with other people, to make their prowess public.
Phones are enough of a neccesity that students can use them during designated times, like lunch breaks, but there’s still some marvel over how much Fortnite is taking over student’s lives.
Fortnite isn’t the only shooter occupying student’s minds right now, as PUBG also released on mobile earlier this month.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Good Leaders Make Good Schools”

After a contentious strike in 2012, Emanuel managed to extend the school day.
We’ve spent a lot of time over the past few decades debating how to restructure schools.
Researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of Toronto studied 180 schools across nine states and concluded, “We have not found a single case of a school improving its student achievement record in the absence of talented leadership.”
How do students feel about their schooling? How do they understand motivation? Do they have a growth mind-set to understand their own development?
These attitudes are powerfully and subtly influenced by school culture, by the liturgies of practice that govern the school day: the rituals for welcoming members into the community; the way you decorate walls to display school values; the distribution of power across the community; the celebrations of accomplishment and the quality of trusting relationships.
In some schools, teachers see themselves as martyrs in a hopeless cause.
At Independence Middle School in Cleveland, principal Kevin Jakub pushes a stand-up desk on wheels around the school all day.
A lot of teachers want to be left alone and a lot of principals don’t want to give away power, but successful schools are truly collaborative.

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Summary of “Is college worth it? One professor says no.”

For the typical student, he writes, a year in college “Neither raises their productivity nor enriches their lives.”
If it is the coursework that makes college students more valuable workers, Caplan asks, then why don’t more people skip the admissions process and the tuition and just sneak into large lecture courses to soak up that valuable knowledge free?
For starters, you don’t have to be an elitist to conclude that too many students are showing up at too many universities unprepared.
Caplan is also right that too many college courses are focused on transmitting specialized knowledge that we will never remember or use, and not enough on teaching students to analyze data, think logically and critically, come to reasonable conclusions and make a clear and cogent argument.
To attract more students and ensure that they graduate, too many universities have lowered standards and reduced their workload, making the college degree a less valuable signal to employers about who they are hiring.
In turn, more students have come to believe they must earn a graduate degree to attract the attention of employers.
Despite all the hand-wringing about tuition increases and student debt, universities have never been serious about making the kind of deep structural changes that could lower costs and tuitions without sacrificing quality.
The unfortunate reality is that as long as their graduates earn a 67 percent wage premium, universities will continue to focus on ways to enroll more students rather than delivering better value to – and demanding more from – the students they already have.

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Summary of “The Misguided Drive to Measure ‘Learning Outcomes'”

Some schools use lengthy surveys like the California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory, which claims to test for qualities like “Truthseeking” and “Analyticity.” The Global Perspective Inventory, administered and sold by Iowa State University, asks students to rate their agreement with statements like “I do not feel threatened emotionally when presented with multiple perspectives” and scores them on metrics like the “Intrapersonal affect scale.”
So universities assemble committees of faculty members, arm them with rubrics and assign them piles of student essays culled from across the school.
Even its proponents have struggled to produce much evidence – beyond occasional anecdotes – that it improves student learning.
Pat Hutchings, a senior scholar at the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment, told me: “Good assessment begins with real, genuine questions that educators have about their students, and right now for many educators those are questions about equity. We’re doing pretty well with 18- to 22-year-olds from upper-middle-class families, but what about – well, fill in the blank.”
Learning outcomes assessment has become one way to answer the question, “If you get unprepared students in your class and they don’t do well, how does that get explained?” Mr. Eubanks at Furman University told me.
Mr. Gilbert became an outspoken assessment skeptic after years of watching the process fail to capture what happens in his classes – and seeing it miss the real reasons students struggle.
“Maybe all your students have full-time jobs, but that’s something you can’t fix, even though that’s really the core problem,” he said.
We end up using the language of the capitalist marketplace and speak to our students as customers rather than fellow thinkers.

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Summary of “Who’s Missing From America’s Colleges? Rural High School Graduates”

Variations of this mindset, among many other reasons, have given rise to a reality that has gotten lost in the impassioned debate over who gets to go to college, which often focuses on racial and ethnic minorities and students from low-income families: The high school graduates who head off to campus in the lowest proportions in America are the ones from rural places.
Overall, 59 percent of rural high school grads – white and nonwhite, at every income level – go to college the subsequent fall.
Rural students live in places where it once was possible to make a decent living from farming, mining and timber-harvesting, said Charles Fluharty, president and CEO of the Rural Policy Research Institute at the University of Iowa.
A resulting sense of hopelessness in places where jobs became sparse, Fluharty says, meant that rural students lost interest in their high schools’ field trips to technical colleges or public universities, or in those visits from recruiters.
A third of rural whites, and 40 percent of rural white men, are resigned to believing that their children will grow up with a lower standard of living than they did, a survey by the Pew Research Center found.
The Tennessee-based National Rural Education Association notes that, in addition to other problems, rural areas contend with drug and mental-health issues, poverty and a lack of high-speed access to the Internet, for instance.
“Coming from a rural community, everybody knows who you are,” says Gordon, who quarterbacked his high school football team, played baseball and ran track and field.
Gordon knows that most of his high school classmates and teammates “Are going to stay in rural Iowa and not really get out to see much of the world.”

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Summary of “Here’s What It’s Like At The Headquarters Of The Teens Working To Stop Mass Shootings”

On Wednesday night CNN will air a special town hall meeting with students and lawmakers.
David Hogg, the 17-year-old student journalist who had interviewed his classmates while they hid from the shooter, went on television the next day, pleading with the country for action.
Some of the students hold leadership positions at their school, so they’re used to planning committees and meetings.
Although the room was big, the students worked closely together on a rug, making decisions communally.
At one point that day, a student had a panic attack, while another later cried on the floor.
In these moments, the group repeated a mantra, reminding one another that they were doing this for the students – their classmates – who died on Valentine’s Day.
As others answered phone calls, Jaclyn Corin, the 17-year-old in charge of logistics for the Tallahassee event on Wednesday, worked on a press release about the event – although she referred to it as “An essay.” The teens are planning to meet with Florida’s attorney general, House speaker, and Senate president.
One student mentioned she was supposed to be home at a certain time, while another negotiated with his folks, who seemed to be telling him to get more rest.

The orginal article.