Summary of “Inside The Voucher Schools That Teach L. Ron Hubbard, But Say They’re Not Scientologist”

Garrett Cantrell, who is not a Scientologist, recalled his time at the school as he sat near Clearwater’s harbor, surrounded by Scientologist retreat centers.
Clearwater Academy International is one of dozens of schools and tutoring centers in the U.S. that use learning materials based on the ideas of L. Ron Hubbard, the founder of the church of Scientology.
Five of these schools and tutoring centers, including Clearwater Academy, receive public funding through voucher or tax credit scholarship programs, HuffPost has found.
HuffPost has been investigating the schools that receive such money for students, which comes via state-level voucher or tax credit programs.
As Applied Scholastics schools continue to receive millions of dollars in taxpayer funds and are therefore more accountable to the public than typical private schools, their claims of secularity deserve heightened scrutiny.
Voucher programs provide scholarships for students to go to private schools based on criteria like income.
The Florida Department of Education’s directory of schools that participate in its voucher and tax credit programs list the four institutions that use curriculum associated with Hubbard as “Non-religious.”
The four schools in Florida that use Study Technology take advantage of the state’s voucher program specifically for students with disabilities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s College Good For?”

Every college student who does the least work required to get good grades silently endorses the theory.
Of course, college students aren’t supposed to just download facts; they’re supposed to learn how to think in real life.
College students do hone some kinds of reasoning that are specific to their major.
Today’s college students are less willing than those of previous generations to do the bare minimum of showing up for class and temporarily learning whatever’s on the test.
“Full time” college students now average 27 hours of academic work a week-including just 14 hours spent studying.
For the individual student? Would I advise an academically well-prepared 18-year-old to skip college because she won’t learn much of value? Absolutely not.
Failure rates are high, particularly for students with low high-school grades and test scores; all told, about 60 percent of full-time college students fail to finish in four years.
Simply put, the push for broader college education has steered too many students who aren’t cut out for academic success onto the college track.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Eva Moskowitz’s Plan for Education”

In New York, I could cover the biggest education revolution ever attempted: a total overhaul of the way public schools worked, in the country’s largest school system.
The drivers of this transformation were the city’s billionaire mayor, Michael Bloomberg, and his handpicked schools chancellor, Joel Klein, a prosecutor who had previously taken on Microsoft and had now set his sights on toppling his hometown’s education status quo.
The school’s principal, Eva Moskowitz, spoke next.
While the idea was to improve on traditional public schools, the first comprehensive report on outcomes revealed that many charter schools performed no better, and sometimes worse, than comparable district schools.
A tiny outpost in Harlem spawned brethren all across Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens; Harlem Success Academy is now part of the Success Academy Charter Schools network, of which Moskowitz-the author of a lively new memoir, The Education of Eva Moskowitz-is CEO. From that position, she has become one of the country’s most influential crusaders at a turning point for charter schooling.
Although charter schools are still boutique side offerings in most parts of the country, a growing number of cities have turned them into a centerpiece, which makes The Education of Eva Moskowitz especially timely and important reading.
Traditional public schools must follow suspension and expulsion policies written by the school district; charter schools write their own rules, and many have a no-excuses style that mandates good posture, precisely folded arms and legs, and silent hallways-injunctions some hail as essential to a strong school culture and others skewer as paternalistic and inhumane.
It’s our best shot at delivering the public-school system we wish we had. Take integration: While a majority of Success schools serve homogenous populations, the network has opened a new crop of schools in neighborhoods like the Upper West Side and Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, that are more integrated than most traditional New York City public schools.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The fat cats have got their claws into our universities, and will eat them up”

As vice-chancellor of Bath University, her salary went up this year by £17,500 – which is to say, she got more in just one pay rise than some of her staff earn in a year.
At Bangor University, John Hughes gets £245,000 a year – and lives in a grace-and-favour country house that cost his university almost £750,000, including £700-worth of Laura Ashley cushions.
Two years ago, the University of Bolton gave its head, George Holmes, a £960,000 loan to buy a mansion close by.
Compare these fortunes to that of rank-and-file university teachers, who have seen only a 1% rise in their basic pay in the last year.
Reporting last year, I met one lecturer at a Russell Group university who had until recently worked a total of five jobs a week, including as a binman.
Bring up such examples and the universities will spin you a version of what Rick Trainor, former principal of King’s College London, once said: “If you want the best, you have to pay the best.” What they won’t mention is the finding of the University and College Union that more than seven out of 10 vice-chancellors are either members of the committees that set their pay, or can sit on them – as Bath’s Breakwell did.
There is a lot of AstraZeneca, where the university’s vice-chancellor Nancy Rothwell has served as a non-executive director: two members of her leadership team come from the pharmaceutical firm, while three trustees are either current or former employees.
The result has been extraordinary: just as happened at Bath, staff at the school of languages have passed a vote of no confidence in their university’s management.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Really Happened At The School Where Every Graduate Got Into College”

It was a triumphant moment for the students: For the first time, every graduate had applied and been accepted to college.
How did all these students graduate from high school?
An internal email obtained by WAMU and NPR from April shows two months before graduation, only 57 students were on track to graduate, with dozens of students missing graduation or community service requirements or failing classes needed to graduate.
Ultimately, they stand behind the school’s decision to graduate these students despite missing so much school.
“Our students need to get here every day and we continue to ask our community and our families to partner with us to get students to school every day,” Spence says.
Some say the school district uses these students’ situations as a crutch to ignore larger unaddressed issues in the building, like in-seat attendance and student behavior.
Three are in college now, including one student who was absent about half the school year.
Instead, they say the school and school system need to better prepare students for the hurdles they’ll face when they get to college, and they need to hold students accountable when they don’t meet the requirements.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Evidence mounts that laptops are terrible for students at lectures”

Do you use a laptop or tablet to take notes during school lectures or meetings? If so, you might want to reconsider pen and paper; there’s increasing evidence that using laptops during lectures decreases learning, which can result in lower grades, reports The New York Times.
To study this, researchers at Princeton University and the University of California asked a group of students to take notes at a lecture using pen and paper while another group used laptops.
The experiment found that the students who used a laptop did not understand the lecture as well as those who wrote their notes out by hand.
The researchers hypothesized that this was because students who wrote notes by hand had to process what the lecturer was saying and, in effect, summarize what was being said to keep up with the lecture.
Another study by researchers at York University and McMaster University tested students by asking them to look up things on their laptop that were unrelated to their lecture, like cinema session times.
Unsurprisingly, the distraction caused them to remember less of the lecture, and those sitting near them were adversely affected too.
Lastly, a study from the United States Military Academy tested students’ achievements in an economics class by comparing student performance based on whether laptops or tablets were restricted, unrestricted, or not permitted at all.
The study found that the students who did not have access to a device performed significantly better than those who did.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why philosophy is so important in science education”

I begin by explaining to them that philosophy addresses issues that can’t be settled by facts alone, and that the philosophy of science is the application of this approach to the domain of science.
Many of the young people who attend my classes think that philosophy is a fuzzy discipline that’s concerned only with matters of opinion, whereas science is in the business of discovering facts, delivering proofs, and disseminating objective truths.
Why do college students so often treat philosophy as wholly distinct from and subordinate to science? In my experience, four reasons stand out.
College students tend to think that departmental divisions mirror sharp divisions in the world, and so they cannot appreciate that philosophy and science, as well as the purported divide between them, are dynamic human creations.
The fourth source of students’ discomfort comes from what they take science education to be.
One gets the impression that they think of science as mainly itemizing the things that exist-‘the facts’-and of science education as teaching them what these facts are.
If the right educational platform is laid, philosophers like me will not have to work against the wind to convince our students that we have something important to say about science.
Our scientist colleagues should continue to teach the fundamentals of science, but they can help by making clear to their students that science brims with important conceptual, interpretative, methodological, and ethical issues that philosophers are uniquely situated to address, and that far from being irrelevant to science, philosophical matters lie at its heart.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Laptops Are Great. But Not During a Lecture or a Meeting.”

Researchers can solve that problem by randomly assigning some students to use laptops.
In a series of experiments at Princeton University and the University of California, Los Angeles, students were randomly assigned either laptops or pen and paper for note-taking at a lecture.
The researchers hypothesized that, because students can type faster than they can write, the lecturer’s words flowed right to the students’ typing fingers without stopping in their brains for substantive processing.
The strongest argument against allowing that choice is that one student’s use of a laptop harms the learning of students around them.
In a series of lab experiments, researchers at York University and McMaster University in Canada tested the effect of laptops on students who weren’t using them.
Some students were told to perform small tasks on their laptops unrelated to the lecture, like looking up movie times.
As expected, these students retained less of the lecture material.
The best evidence available now suggests that students should avoid laptops during lectures and just pick up their pens.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Their Pledges Die. So Should Fraternities.”

Do we need any cause beyond all of that dying to do away with fraternities wherever possible and to diminish their prominence at schools where various circumstances, including the housing that fraternities provide, prevent them from being shuttered?
Against all wisdom, fraternities thrive; in the new book “True Gentlemen: The Broken Pledge of America’s Fraternities,” John Hechinger estimates that at least 380,000 male undergraduates belong to Greek organizations, which he says represents a 50 percent increase over the last decade.
There’s some evidence that students in fraternities maintain higher-than-average grades, and the Gallup-Purdue Index, a far-reaching survey of American college graduates, found that those who belonged to fraternities and sororities reported more career and life satisfaction later on than those who didn’t.
Persuasive research – along with common sense – tells us that members of all-male fraternities are more likely to have a warped view of permissible sexual contact and that women who frequent fraternity parties are more likely to be assaulted.
Then we blithely watch and even celebrate the retreat of students into fraternities and sororities, which are in many cases largely homogeneous enclaves antithetical to the broadening of perspective and challenging of ingrained assumptions that higher education should be all about.
“These fraternities have drink, danger and debauchery in their blood – right alongside secrecy and self-protection,” Lisa Wade, an Occidental College sociology professor and the author of “American Hookup: The New Culture of Sex on Campus,” wrote in a Time magazine essay that called for an end to fraternities.
Why not provide detailed information about individual fraternities’ disciplinary records instead? And why not put more energy into nurturing other groups and living arrangements that might siphon students away from fraternities?
Wade began her Time essay by observing that 150 years ago, fraternities were regarded with enormous suspicion by many college presidents, who described them as “Un-American,” a “Plague” and a force for “Greater unkindness and ill feeling than almost anything else in college.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Unpaid Student Loan Bills Mean You Can No Longer Work”

Many student loans are backed by guarantees by the state or federal government, which foot the bills if borrowers default.
In Louisiana, the nursing board notified 87 nurses last year that their student loans were in default and that their licenses would not be renewed until they became current on their payments.
In 2015, Mr. Zolnikov co-sponsored a bill with Representative Moffie Funk, a Democrat, that stopped Montana from revoking licenses for people with unpaid student debt – a rare instance of bipartisanship.
“Deny professional licenses to defaulters until they take steps to repayment,” the department urged in 1990.Two years ago, South Dakota ordered officials to withhold various licenses from people who owe the state money.
Nearly 1,000 residents are barred from holding driver’s licenses because of debts owed to state universities, and 1,500 people are prohibited from getting hunting, fishing and camping permits.
In a state with little public transit, people who lose their driver’s licenses often can’t get to work.
Hawaii has a broad statute, enacted in 2002, that allows it to suspend vocational licenses if the borrower defaults on a student loan.
The state’s licensing board has never done so, said William Nhieu, a spokesman for Hawaii’s Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs, because no state or federal student loan agencies have given it the names of delinquent borrowers.

The orginal article.