Summary of “Bates College has designed a liberal arts education fit for the future of work”

During a five-week “Short term” in May, Bates offers practitioner-taught courses: One digital marketing course was taught by a digital marketing consultant, while a dancer educated students on the business concerns involved in pursuing a career in the arts.
She then spent 15 years at Harvard working with four different presidents, thinking a lot about what, exactly, a liberal arts education is, and should be.
Shortly after taking over as Bates president, Spencer gathered a group of faculty, staff, and students in 2013 to develop the framework for what it would look like to make purposeful work a meaningful part of a Bates education.
“I always thought you had to have a passion and great work would follow. I was awaiting for that a-ha moment.” Bates has also built an internship network dedicated to purposeful work, a key resource for students who lack parents or other personal contacts who can hook them up with jobs.
Bates has raised $1 million for the purposeful work program, which helps fund internships for students who can’t afford to work for free, or next to nothing.
Callie Reynolds, a senior at Bates and current student in the “Life Architecture” class, said that recently, Fraser-Thill showed students a chart from Carleton College in Minnesota, which showed the relationships between students’ majors and their later professions.
The data Bates has released paints a positive picture, showing that a growing number of students say the program has helped them to identify potential future jobs, network, plan their careers, and more effectively present their skills and experiences.
Ninety-seven percent of employers agreed the purposeful work interns “Added value,” and 91% said the Bates student involved in an internship would be a competitive candidate for a full-time job.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why we should bulldoze the business school”

Having taught in business schools for 20 years, I have come to believe that the best solution to these problems is to shut down business schools altogether.
In 2011, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business estimated that there were then nearly 13,000 business schools in the world.
Think about the huge numbers of people employed by those institutions, about the armies of graduates marching out with business degrees, about the gigantic sums of money circulating in the name of business education.
A similar kind of lens could be applied to other modules found in most business schools – accounting, marketing, international business, innovation, logistics – but I’ll conclude with business ethics and corporate social responsibility – pretty much the only areas within the business school that have developed a sustained critique of the consequences of management education and practice.
These are domains that pride themselves on being gadflies to the business school, insisting that its dominant forms of education, teaching and research require reform.
The problem is that business ethics and corporate social responsibility are subjects used as window dressing in the marketing of the business school, and as a fig leaf to cover the conscience of B-school deans – as if talking about ethics and responsibility were the same as doing something about it.
As Joel M Podolny, the former dean of Yale School of Management, once opined: “The way business schools today compete leads students to ask, ‘What can I do to make the most money?’ and the manner in which faculty members teach allows students to regard the moral consequences of their actions as mere afterthoughts.”
So if we are going to move away from business as usual, then we also need to radically reimagine the business school as usual.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Future of College Looks Like the Future of Retail”

As online learning extends its reach it is starting to run into a major obstacle: There are undeniable advantages, as traditional colleges have long known, to learning in a shared physical space.
Paucek is, for someone who runs an online-degree company, remarkably open about the importance of physical space: “The history of online education is a vast underestimation of the power of people,” he told me.
Some of the online students even traveled to Atlanta for commencement-the first time many of them had ever set foot on the campus.
Most of them are not designed to allow students to take just one course at a time or to toggle between online and face-to-face classes; taking a class on most campuses requires enrolling as a student in a full-fledged degree or certificate program and then choosing to participate exclusively in either online or in-person classes.
Several universities, including MIT, Penn, and Boston University, recently started a type of online degree called a “MicroMasters” as a way for students to begin work on a graduate degree without committing to a years-long program.
Such physical-digital experimentation can even alter the experiences of students already enrolled at physical college campuses.
75 percent of the 56,000 undergraduates at the University of Central Florida, in Orlando, took at least one online class at the school last year, even as they were enrolled in face-to-face courses.
Nearly a third of the university’s classes take place online, which officials say has eliminated the need to build at least five additional classroom buildings.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Liberty University Built a Billion-Dollar Empire Online”

By 2015, Liberty had quietly become the second-largest provider of online education in the United States, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education, its student population surpassed only by that of University of Phoenix, as it tapped into the same hunger for self-advancement that Trump had with his own pricey Trump University seminars.
Among the adopters of Sperling’s model was Falwell, who in 2004 began expanding the family’s primitive distance-learning programs into what would become known as Liberty University Online.
Liberty had another advantage over online competitors, he said: its status as a religious-based institution, “That long history of Liberty being a leader among Christian universities,” the “Faith-based mission” that “Makes us so unique and puts us in a class by ourselves.”
There is such a race to get to customers before University of Phoenix and other rivals that the prospective students sometimes marvel at how little time has elapsed – just a handful of minutes – between their providing their information on a website and the call coming from Liberty.
Liberty’s tax filings show that in 2016, the university paid Google $16.8 million for “Admissions leads generation.” In other words, advertising Liberty to those searching online for degree options.
The university now touts itself on its website as “The largest private nonprofit university in the nation.” In a sense, said Ben Miller, who served as a senior policy adviser in Obama’s Department of Education, the crackdown on for-profits offered Liberty a “Marketing advantage.”
Despite its ambitions to become the “Evangelical Notre Dame” that Falwell envisioned, Liberty is still ranked well behind that university and other religious-based institutions like Brigham Young and Pepperdine; U.S. News and World Report clumps Liberty in the lowest quartile of institutions in its “National universities” category.
Falwell told me that Liberty has deliberately brought online enrollment down to around 85,000, explaining that “We wanted to make sure we kept the student quality at a certain standard.” And he said that his alliance with Trump has only helped the university: “For every student we lost because of political concerns, we picked up two or three inquiries who support us because of that political stand.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Yale Is Letting Anyone Take Its Most Popular Class Ever for Free”

“Students want to change, to be happier themselves,” Santos told the The New York Times.
According to Santos, antidepressants are prescribed at 400 times the rate they were 20 years ago.
That’s why Santos and Yale started offering an adapted version of the course for free via online learning platform Coursera.
The Coursera lectures are filmed in Santos’ own living room.
With a casual and personal approach, Santos hopes to reach people on a deeper, habit-changing level.
“The hope is that this isn’t gonna be an ordinary class or lecture series,” Santos explains in an introductory video about the course.
Santos believes understanding the science of happiness isn’t enough.
“You’re signing on to do that hard part,” Santos says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Schools Are Failing to Teach Kids How to Read”

On Tuesday, a panel of experts in Washington, D.C., convened by the federally appointed officials who oversee the NAEP concluded that the root of the problem is the way schools teach reading.
The statute required states to administer annual reading and math tests to students in grades three through eight and once in high school, and attached hefty consequences if schools failed to boost scores.
Since 2001, the curriculum in many elementary schools has narrowed to little more than a steady diet of reading and math.
Rarely do the topics connect: Students might read a book about bridges one day, zebras the next, and clouds the day after that.
A sixth-grader at one of his schools was frustrated that a passage on a reading test she’d taken kept repeating a word she didn’t understand: roog-bye.
The best way to boost students’ reading comprehension is to expand their knowledge and vocabulary by teaching them history, science, literature, and the arts, using curricula that that guide kids through a logical sequence from one year to the next: for example, Native Americans and Columbus in kindergarten; the colonial era and the American Revolution in first grade; the War of 1812 and the Civil War in second grade, and so on.
What struggling students need is guidance from a teacher in how to make sense of texts designed for kids at their respective grade levels-the kinds of texts those kids may otherwise see only on standardized tests, when they have to grapple with them on their own.
Poorer kids with less-educated parents tend to rely on school to acquire the kind of knowledge that is needed to succeed academically-and because their schools often focus exclusively on reading and math, in an effort to raise low test scores, they’re less likely to acquire it there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Are ‘Learning Styles’ Real?”

Experts aren’t sure how the concept spread, but it might have had something to do with the self-esteem movement of the late ’80s and early ’90s. Everyone was special-so everyone must have a special learning style, too.
“Teachers like to think that they can reach every student, even struggling students, just by tailoring their instruction to match each student’s preferred learning format,” said Central Michigan University’s Abby Knoll, a PhD student who has studied learning styles.
The survey then gave them some study strategies that seem like they would correlate with that learning style.
Students seemed to be interested in their learning styles, but not enough to actually change their studying behavior based on them.
Another study published last year in the British Journal of Psychology found that students who preferred learning visually thought they would remember pictures better, and those who preferred learning verbally thought they’d remember words better.
” “Educators may actually be doing a disservice to auditory learners by continually accommodating their auditory learning style,” they wrote, “rather than focusing on strengthening their visual word skills.
The “learning styles” idea has snowballed-as late as 2014, more than 90 percent of teachers in various countries believed it.
Strangely, most research on learning styles starts out with a positive portrayal of the theory-before showing it doesn’t work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘Social media has poisoned us’: young Britons on why they are unhappy”

Young people are often sold the lie they need to get to university to get where they need to be.
University has become desirable because of the freedom it gives young people who have never lived away from home.
Mental health problems are incredibly common among young people.
Schools put unbelievable amounts of pressure on young people with studying.
Schools must stop scaring pupils into studying by threatening that they will be dropped from the course because this has a terrible impact on young people’s mental health.
‘Social media has poisoned young people’: Joe, 24, self-employed, East Midlands.
The whole text generation has taken a lot of character out of young people’s communication and left a lot of them strangers to themselves.
Brexit is one of the things giving young people like me the impression that the electorate is dragging this country down the toilet.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The hidden crisis on college campuses: 36 percent of students don’t have enough to eat”

According to a first-of-its-kind survey released Tuesday by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, 36 percent of students on U.S. college campuses do not get enough to eat, and a similar number lack a secure place to live.
The report, which is the first to include students from two-year, four-year, private and public universities, including GWU, found that nearly 1 in 10 community college students have gone a whole day without eating in the past month.
Researchers blame ballooning college costs, inadequate aid packages and growing enrollment among low-income students – as well as some colleges’ unwillingness to admit they have a hunger problem.
On top of that, the report found, 46 percent of community college students and 36 percent of university students struggle to pay for housing and utilities.
In the past year, 12 percent of community college students and 9 percent of university students have slept in shelters or in places not intended as housing, or did not know from one day to the next where they would sleep.
More low-income students are enrolling in college, thanks to expanded needs-based scholarship and grant programs, a move away from standardized test scores as part of the application process, and other initiatives designed to recruit more diverse students.
“We know for some students, even one small financial problem can throw them off course,” said Tim Miller, the associate dean of students in the Division of Student Affairs at George Washington, where Torres is a senior.
Others have proven skittish about opening a food pantry or even surveying students, concerned with the message it will send prospective students and donors.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hunger And Homelessness Are Widespread Among College Students, Study Finds”

Hunger And Homelessness Are Widespread Among College Students, Study Finds : The Two-Way More than a third of them don’t have enough to eat and a similar number lack stable housing, according to a survey published Tuesday by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab.
As college students grapple with the rising costs of classes and books, mortgaging their futures with student loans in exchange for a diploma they’re gambling will someday pay off, it turns out many of them are in great financial peril in the present, too.
More than a third of college students don’t always have enough to eat and they lack stable housing, according to a survey published Tuesday by researchers at Temple University and the Wisconsin HOPE Lab.
Overall the study concluded 36 percent of college students say they are food insecure.
Whereas, middle class students “Wouldn’t be going through these issues if they weren’t in college” because “Their resources pale in comparison to those high college prices.”
While the survey did not include any University of California respondents, most of the findings in the current annual study parallel those found by researchers with the UC Berkeley’s Basic Needs Security Work Group, which, in 2016 determined 42 percent of student in the UC system were food insecure.
37 percent of community college students and 29 percent of four-year students reported the food they’d bought just didn’t last and they didn’t have money to buy more.
Among the most surprising findings in the survey, Goldrick-Rab said, “Is that homeless college students devote as much time to the classroom and to studying as do college students who are not homeless. However, they also work more, they commute more, spend more time taking care of other people and they sleep less.”

The orginal article.