Summary of “How to Introduce Your Kid to Studio Ghibli”

Studio Ghibli films have been a touchstone in my life for years.
Some young children may find elements in some of the Studio Ghibli films to be confusing or frightening.
Decorating your children’s bedrooms with beautiful art prints inspired by Studio Ghibli movies is an easy way to introduce younger children-especially infants and toddlers-to the films when they are too young to understand or pay attention to the animation or stories.
All Studio Ghibli films are distributed in North America by Disney or GKIDS, and you can easily purchase the DVD or Blu-ray versions on Amazon or other online retailers.
While children as young as two might appreciate these, both titles do have a leisurely pace, like all Studio Ghibli films.
Ages 8+: Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind is usually considered part of the Studio Ghibli filmography, but it predates the studio-it’s what led to Studio Ghibli being founded in the first place.
Studio Ghibli co-created The Red Turtle with a French animation studio, and it’s special because there is no dialogue.
There are many more movies and film shorts that well-known names-including Hayao Miyazaki, Isao Takahata, Yoshiaki Nishimura, and more-have worked on before or beyond Studio Ghibli.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hollywood Wanted An Edgy Child Actor. When He Spiraled, They Couldn’t Help.”

It had been years since Renfro had delivered a performance that caught the public’s attention, and at the time, he was treated as yet another addition to the mournful legacy of former child stars – Dana Plato, River Phoenix, Judy Garland – whose lives collapsed from Hollywood darling to death by overdose.
Renfro became an overnight star because he was a rowdy kid with natural talent who stood apart from more seasoned child actors.
10 years after Renfro’s death, interviews with Renfro’s former colleagues make plain that the mechanisms in place to protect child actors – mechanisms compromised by conflicts of interest and a dependence on parents and guardians – were scarcely capable of protecting kids like Renfro, and largely remain so today.
Renfro’s parents divorced when he was 5; his mother remarried and moved to Michigan, and Renfro’s paternal grandmother, Joanne Renfro, became the primary caregiver for an increasingly wayward child.
None of the adults who worked with Renfro as a child who spoke with BuzzFeed News said they suspected Renfro might be addicted to a drug like heroin.
With no boundaries off the set, Renfro kept getting pushed past perceived limits for child actors on the set, as well.
Instead, throughout the ’90s and Renfro’s early adolescence, Hollywood kept courting the child actor, trading on his name and fandom.
If the parent or guardian is checked out, and their child’s darker facets are what keeps them employed, it’s not in any way surprising that an actor like Renfro would slip through a system so ill-equipped to save him anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Made in China: every new video game you love”

For Zhu Jie, a 33-year-old with wireframe glasses and bright pink hair, credits are often the best part of a game, a rare moment of recognition for her and her colleagues at Virtuos Ltd, a company in China that builds 3D art and levels for the biggest game companies in the world: Sony, Microsoft, and Electronic Arts, among others.
In 2008, an anonymous poll of 200 major video game studios found that 86 percent relied on outsourcing for some aspect of development.
“It takes a village now, to build these games,” Peter Moore, then COO of EA, said in 2015 at the External Development Summit, “And I’m not just talking about the game itself. Because if games don’t have companion apps, if they don’t have websites – we have 450 different social media websites supporting all of our franchises, so we have requirements for integrated development that not only keeps the core game alive but keeps the ecosystem around that game humming, because if you’re not delivering content each and every day then the engagement drops.”
“We don’t place bets on certain IPs,” he said, referring to the intellectual property that constitutes a new game.
Costs for game development had been rising steadily throughout the 1990s, when the average budget for a PlayStation or Nintendo 64 title was between $1 million and $3 million, according to a presentation at the Game Developers Conference by Factor 5.
To ensure consistency across all the game’s outsourcers, van Beek and his team of artists at Guerrilla compiled a large library of reference photos of everything they wanted in the game.
Is there really a way to make a game of Horizon’s scale and complexity without someone being exploited along the way? Working conditions at many traditional game studios are already bad enough, with nightmarish crunch-time stories and frequent overtime, often without additional pay.
A recent report in Politico points to the fact that from 2005 to 2015, “The number of people in alternative work arrangements grew by 9 million and now represents roughly 16 percent of all U.S. workers, while the number of traditional employees declined by 400,000.” A 2016 IGDA survey found a similar force at work among game developers, only 66 percent of whom were full-time employees.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass Adds a Million Subscribers, Even if Theaters Aren’t Sold on It”

Under the MoviePass business model, theaters get paid full price for every admission.
The blistering growth has prompted new criticism from theaters and studio owners – namely that MoviePass will never be able to make money by charging $9.95 a month when a single ticket can cost almost twice that amount.
Mr. Lowe, who previously sparred with studios as president of Redbox, the kiosk company that rents DVDs for $1 a day, believes that ticketing can at least be a break-even business for MoviePass.
Mr. Farnsworth said, “When you apply computer science and machine learning to an industry that we believe has lacked significant innovation, useful patterns start to emerge.” If MoviePass gets big enough, it could try to demand that chain theaters sell tickets at a discount or share a slice of their concession revenue.
Helios recently raised $60 million for the expansion of MoviePass, which expects to have more than three million subscribers by the end of next year.
As the popularity of MoviePass demonstrates, theater owners may no longer be able to avoid fundamental change.
One small theater company that has become a MoviePass investor, Studio Movie Grill, which has 30 locations in nine states, credits the service with increasing attendance, especially on weeknights.
“Some people aren’t sure they want to pay $10 to $12 to see a movie like ‘Lady Bird.’ MoviePass takes out that hurdle.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cover Story: Inside Marvel’s Universe with Kevin Feige, Thor, Black Widow, Iron Man, Hulk, and More”

Marvel Studios, which kicked things off with Iron Man in 2008, has released 17 films that collectively have grossed more than $13 billion at the global box office; 5 more movies are due out in the next two years.
They came for Kevin Feige, the unassuming man in a black baseball cap who took Marvel Studios from an underdog endeavor with a roster of B-list characters to a cinematic empire that is the envy of every other studio in town.
On the wall of one of those early, drab offices hung a 1988 Technicolor poster by Marvel artists Ed Hannigan and Joe Rubinstein, crowded to the margins with hundreds of characters from all different story lines with the words MARVEL UNIVERSE emblazoned across the top.
Jackson signed an unheard-of nine-picture deal with Marvel shortly after Iron Man came out, ensuring his participation in the subsequent Avengers movies and other Marvel properties.
Feige doesn’t deny that directors need to play by a set of rules when they join Team Marvel, especially now that the concept of a single cinematic universe is non-negotiable.
Director Ryan Coogler’s upcoming Black Panther movie marks another major shift for Marvel: in February, the studio will launch its first movie with a black actor, Chadwick Boseman, in the lead. Captain Marvel, starring Brie Larson in the title role of a female air-force captain with superpowers, opens in 2019.
Critics sometimes forget that Feige announced Captain Marvel and Black Panther in 2014-during the Perlmutter era.
Feige has no worries about Marvel’s longevity, a point he illustrated by quoting one of his personal heroes: “On opening day, when people asked Mr. Walt Disney if Disneyland was finished, he said, as long as there’s imagination in the world, Disney will never be complete.” And as long as people are willing to watch superheroes save the world, Marvel-and Kevin Feige-won’t be done, either.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Hollywood Screenwriters Are Learning From Peak TV”

Hollywood film writers – along with everyone else – have noticed a simultaneous boom in Peak TV. Which means that, for Hollywood screenwriters, even as ­studio slates shrink and become more attuned to event blockbusters, opportunity on the small screen abounds.
There are ­lessons that Hollywood movie studios – and screenwriters – are learning from the rise of Peak TV. For starters: Sometimes writers work better in teams.
“Sometimes, you’re generating three movies and two TV series per property.” Many screenwriters actually enjoy these round-table sessions.
“Judd started on Freaks and Geeks, and his movies are made in a similar way – he treats each movie like a giant episode of television.” Max Borenstein, who’s written Godzilla movies, is ambivalent.
Another lesson Hollywood writers are taking from TV: As long as you get your story on a screen, don’t worry too much about what kind of screen it is.
Just as early Netflix series like House of Cards sparked a debate – “But is it really TV?” – that seems ludicrous in hindsight, screenwriters are learning that a movie is a movie, even if it premieres on a hard drive.
“If everyone’s writing TV specs, it becomes a supply-and-demand issue: Zig when everyone else is zagging. Write a movie. Streaming services are looking for them.” All over Hollywood, top-notch screenwriters who have spent their careers writing screenplays that never get produced are dusting off old scripts to see if they might work in this new ecosystem – if not as studio films, then as streaming originals.
She pulled images from ’90s studio hits The Best Man and Love Jones but says “There was nothing from the last decade.” She realized that “If you’re trying to make a black love story in the studio system, all of the black movie stars are over 40,” because Hollywood stopped making young black romances.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Not so super: why Hollywood’s cinematic universes are on the way out”

To spend more time reading works of fine literature and watching cult movies; to spend less time on Facebook and reading the gossip pages or football transfer news.
The big geek news of the past week is that Warner, the studio behind the DC Extended Universe – launched in 2014 with the presumed aim of competing with Marvel’s MCU – has decided it might also be quite nice to begin making superhero movies that have absolutely nothing to do with the aforementioned series of interlinked films.
We are hearing talk of a Joker origins movie starring Leonardo DiCaprio, which will be entirely separate from the DCEU movies featuring Jared Leto as the clown prince of Gotham.
You’ve just spent hundreds of millions of dollars setting up a shared universe for your much-heralded superheroes to inhabit, and your next move is to start making movies about the same characters that have nothing to do with the main saga.
Warner clearly feels far more comfortable making a standalone comic-book movie with an A-lister in the lead than it does with the considerably more troublesome Marvel format of a series of interlinked episodes featuring lesser-known stars.
The studio couldn’t resist giving Hugh Jackman his swan song as Wolverine in the almost completely standalone effort Logan, a movie that might just – at a major stretch – have taken place in the same universe as the main X-Men movies, but let’s face it, probably did not.
Faced with the choice of a Wolverine movie linked to its ongoing efforts in the 1980s, or one based on director James Mangold’s desire for a sombre, dystopian comic-book take on Unforgiven, the studio simply couldn’t resist the latter.
At a time when Hollywood is struggling to persuade us to switch off our TVs and head out to catch a movie, we surely need film-makers who really care about the big-screen visions they are presenting us with.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix’s ‘OITNB’ Leak: Larson Studios Breaks Silence”

Larson Studios president Rick Larson and his wife and business partner, Jill Larson, didn’t recognize the number that sent them these two short text messages via their personal cell phones two days before Christmas last year, so they simply ignored them.
In an exclusive interview with Variety, the Larson Studios principals are breaking their silence on an incident that threatened the existence of their family-owned audio post-production business.
Larson Studios chief engineer David Dondorf and director of digital systems Chris Unthank left their families on Christmas morning and rushed to the studio to examine the hackers’ claims.
So Larson Studios hired private data security experts to find out what had happened – and what to do next.
A few days later, the phones at Larson started to ring, with the security departments of various studios on the other end of the line.
In the email, the hackers argued that Larson Studios had broken the terms of the agreement by talking to the FBI. “So they decided to punish us.”
Larson Studios has spent months trying to mend relationships with its clients, and strengthening its security.
Work on security continues at Larson Studios, which is still undergoing audits commissioned by some of its major clients.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix’s ‘OITNB’ Leak: Larson Studios Breaks Silence”

Larson Studios president Rick Larson and his wife and business partner, Jill Larson, didn’t recognize the number that sent them these two short text messages via their personal cell phones two days before Christmas last year, so they simply ignored them.
In an exclusive interview with Variety, the Larson Studios principals are breaking their silence on an incident that threatened the existence of their family-owned audio post-production business.
Larson Studios chief engineer David Dondorf and director of digital systems Chris Unthank left their families on Christmas morning and rushed to the studio to examine the hackers’ claims.
So Larson Studios hired private data security experts to find out what had happened – and what to do next.
A few days later, the phones at Larson started to ring, with the security departments of various studios on the other end of the line.
In the email, the hackers argued that Larson Studios had broken the terms of the agreement by talking to the FBI. “So they decided to punish us.”
Larson Studios has spent months trying to mend relationships with its clients, and strengthening its security.
Work on security continues at Larson Studios, which is still undergoing audits commissioned by some of its major clients.

The orginal article.