Summary of “Streaming TV is about to get very expensive”

The most watched show on US Netflix, by a huge margin, is the US version of The Office.
Even though the platform pumps out an absurd amount of original programming – 1,500 hours last year – it turns out that everyone just wants to watch a decade-old sitcom.
Things are just about manageable – if you have a TV licence, a Netflix subscription, an Amazon subscription and a Now TV subscription, you are pretty much covered – but things are about to take a turn for the worse.
The former Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg is about to launch a platform called Quibi, releasing “Snackable” content from Steven Spielberg and others that is designed to be watched on your phone.
Watching television is about to get very, very expensive.
There’s a huge difference between not being able to watch everything because there’s too much choice and not being able to watch everything because you don’t have enough money.
Netflix didn’t become a monster because people wanted to watch a specific show; it became a monster because people wanted to watch everything.
When its streaming platform launched, people were spending more than £15 just to watch a single season of a show on DVD. So to be able to watch every season of a show – and every season of hundreds of others of shows – for a fiver a month was revolutionary.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s next for podcasting? – TechCrunch”

Based on numerous discussions I’ve had with top figures in podcasting over the last month, it’s clear that popular shows are getting large offers for exclusivity on podcasting platforms, major Hollywood players are entering the market and some top VCs are willing to back new streaming platforms taking a Netflix approach to podcasts.
Even with dramatic market growth, podcasting doesn’t have a comparative advantage in competing against the scale and ad-targeting of the duopoly.
Podcasting is just a content medium and should be filled with shows that appeal to all different types of people, just like music, TV, film, publishing sites and YouTube each have a vast range of content for everyone.
Spotify, Pandora, iHeartRadio and others have made podcasts a priority over the last year, promoting shows to millions of users who aren’t already into podcasting.
Life is admittedly getting good for the most downloaded shows now that the podcasting market is getting serious attention.
Schumer’s podcast isn’t exclusive to Spotify but it’s easy to envision the streaming service signing future podcast deals as exclusives as its base of podcast listeners grows.
Podcasting should embrace “Listener revenue”.
Incumbents moving into podcasting from music streaming have a distinct advantage here over startups dedicated to podcast streaming.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sneaky subscriptions are plaguing the App Store – TechCrunch”

Today, the majority of the Top Grossing apps on Apple’s App Store are streaming services, dating sites, entertainment apps or games.
This raises the question as to whether some app developers are trying to scam App Store users by way of subscriptions.
Scanner App – This No. 69 Top Grossing app is raking in a whopping $14.3 million per year for its document scanning utility, according to Sensor Tower data.
Legitimate developers have complained about this app for months, but Apple even featured it on its big screen at WWDC. *After speaking to Apple about this app, Weather Alarms was removed from the App Store over the weekend.
The app is also super aggressive about pushing its subscriptions.
The issue of scam apps may not always be the failure of App Store review.
In the App Store itself, you can navigate to subscriptions in fewer taps, but it’s not obvious how.
“The App Store has always been a great place, overseen and curated by highly intelligent and ethical people. I believe the App Store can stay as it always has been, if the right measures are taken to deal with those developers who trick the system,” Zhadanov adds.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How these brands won the subscription box wars”

While consumers experience all subscription boxes in largely the same way-they receive an unexpected selection of products in the mail-there are many ways to monetize the subscription experience.
Ipsy enlists beauty influencers to create videos that demonstrate how to use the products in the bag, which leads to ad revenue.
Subscription commerce is just a new way to engage with brands and get products. We’re all fundamentally different businesses.”
“Beauty products are inexpensive, and beauty brands rely on getting samples into the hands of new consumers, so they want to work with us. The unit economics would not work outside of beauty.”
Every season, subscribers pay $49.99 for a box of full-sized products, though the value of the products comes to four times that.
“Why not just create a box full of these curated products, and include a magazine that explained how to use them,” she says.
Subscribers are guaranteed to receive at least $200 worth of products in the box.
King purchases all the products in the boxes, and she sees her subscription as more of a personal shopping service for her customers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass is now forcing former users to opt out of new plan or risk being charged”

The latest attempt from struggling theater subscription service MoviePass to retain its dwindling user base comes in the form of yet another change to its monthly plan.
This time the company is automatically enrolling lapsed former subscribers into its service, saying its choosing those users to be part of a “Select test group” to try a version of MoviePass similar to its original one-movie-per-day plan.
In an email sent to select MoviePass customers who decided not to opt into the company’s revised three-movie monthly plan, first unveiled last month, the company says it’s decided to enroll those people into a new subscription because “We really hope you begin enjoying your MoviePass subscription.” If they don’t want to be charged for the service, MoviePass is demanding they proactively opt-out of the plan they were enrolled in without their consent by Thursday, October 4th. good end to the week.
I tried to kill my moviepass account by just not opting into the new plan last month and now there’s a new plan and they are trying to charge me money again unless i opt out pic.
Brian feldman September 28, 2018 MoviePass hit what can only as an inevitable brick wall back in July, when it basically ran out of cash, suffered a massive outage it had to borrow a loan to afford to fix, and began drastically limiting the benefits of its subscription for all users to avoid completely going under.
Being able to see 30 movies a month is useless when you can only see one movie per theater – the MoviePass app is telling me, an existing subscriber, that the only movie available to see at my local AMC theater is literally one 4:30PM PT showing of the animated film Smallfoot.
When MoviePass realized that it had to change the terms of its subscription for its annual members prior to the start of a new billing cycle – a move that opened it up to legal action – the company tried to make amends by offering refunds or the option to transition to a paid out monthly plan.
In August 2018, we announced a new offering for three movies a month for $9.95, giving subscribers the ability to opt-in to this plan if they wanted to continue as a MoviePass subscriber.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Subscription Model Takeover Is Nearly Complete”

On Wednesday, AMC announced it is launching a new subscription movie service called Stubs A-List on June 26.
AMC is throwing its hat in the subscription ring with a service that costs far more than MoviePass does, but it will likely be easier to use and already sounds more sustainable for AMC. $19.95 a month is a difficult number to swallow for customers who are accustomed to something closer to $10 a month for TV or music streaming plans, or who use MoviePass, which is a staggeringly low $7.95 a month.
MoviePass upended what was one of the last content industries that the digital subscription model hadn’t subverted.
The technology industry has long been using subscriptions to deliver content, and it’s a model that consumers are now used to.
The subscription services forced the legacy companies to alter how cable TV was sold to customers, further disrupting their own market.
The results have been mixed; cord-cutters’ dreams have yet to be truly realized, and between streaming platforms, cable companies, and even hardware makers launching subscription products, the options can be dizzying.
Users like subscription models-or at least are used to them by now-and most business sectors have received the message.
If there’s anything to be learned from the tech market that spawned the subscription model, it’s that this moment of affordably priced tickets won’t last.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Next Car Might Be A Subscription”

Four-figure down payments, cumbersome lease lengths, and skyrocketing insurance costs: it’s enough to send a would-be car shopper running for an Uber or Lyft.
That’s why more automakers are rolling out flat-fee programs that aim to make leasing a car as simple as buying a smartphone.
In a bid to keep potential customers from defecting to ride-hailing services and foregoing personal car ownership, brands like Volvo, Cadillac, and Porsche are upending the traditional retail model by developing app-based monthly subscription services that provide vehicles on demand.
Available in New York, Dallas, and Los Angeles, BOOK by Cadillac lets subscribers rent different cars up to 18 times a year, starting at $1,800 per month plus a $500 initiation fee.
In some cases, a subscription service’s annual costs could exceed the cost of actually owning a car, but automakers say users pay a premium for the convenience and variety.
The firm estimates that leasing and insuring a 2017 Cadillac Escalade SUV with similar mileage restrictions would cost an additional $75 over the monthly subscription fee and that renting a sports car like the Cadillac ATS for a weekend would run an extra $150 daily.
Klaus Zellmer, president and chief executive of Porsche Cars North America, says the program could appeal to parents who need an SUV during the week but want a sports car for the weekend, or to a Hollywood director in town for a three-month shoot.
Eventually, automakers will sell fewer private vehicles as shared, autonomous cars take hold, leading to less traffic and new life for land currently used as parking lots.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Car subscriptions: Ford, Volvo, Porsche, and Cadillac offer lease alternative”

Until recently, your only options with vehicle ownership were to purchase the car outright or to lease it from a dealership.
When you lease a car, you pay a monthly sum to rent that vehicle until your lease term expires.
A lease can allow you to drive a car you might not otherwise be able to afford.
The biggest difference is the time frame: Rather than being tied to a years’ long lease, subscriptions give you the ability to “Own” a car on a month-to-month basis.
You could theoretically not have a car for 10 months of the year when you’re working and using public transit and then get a car subscription for two months when you’ll be traveling more often.
“Car subscriptions” appear to be a clear bid to garner favor with tech-savvy millennials in busy metropolitan areas-a demographic that was erroneously pegged as avoiding car ownership.
Still, a subscription model-less commitment than a purchase, but more convenient than a car rental service like Zipcar-could fit the bill for drivers teetering on the edge of abandoning car ownership, or ones who can’t quite afford the car of their dreams.
These car subscription services seem like an excellent way to simplify the car ownership experience.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass drops pricing to under $7 per month, if you opt for the annual plan”

The deal is a limited-time promotion, as opposed to a permanent pricing change, but MoviePass didn’t say how long the offer is valid.
This is not the first time that MoviePass has dropped its pricing.
As of October, MoviePass had grown to over 600,000 subscribers.
MoviePass hopes to eventually convince theater owners it’s growing their customer base, so it can be cut in on profits, according to CEO Mitch Lowe, in a report from Variety in August.
In the meantime, MoviePass is a ridiculously cheap deal for movie-goers.
AMC specifically threatened the startup with legal action in August, and announced that MoviePass was “Not welcome here.” It said it would try to find a way to opt out, as it believes lowering the cost of ticket prices would devalue the theater-going experience overall.
“HMNY continues to be the biggest supporter of MoviePass, as it outpaces any other movie theater subscription service and continues to disrupt the movie theater industry,” said Ted Farnsworth, Chairman and CEO of HMNY, in a statement about today’s new, lower pricing.
“We look forward to helping MoviePass continue to broaden its reach and modernize the movie theater industry,” he added.

The orginal article.