Summary of “What Separates Champions from ‘Almost Champions’?”

Whereas super champions were playing in premiere leagues and/or competing on national teams, almost champions had achieved well at the youth level but were playing in less prestigious leagues as adults.
The researchers found that super champions were characterized by an almost fanatical reaction to challenge.
Almost champions also loved the thrill of competition, but they remembered having an aversion toward practice and at times felt forced to pursue their respective sport.
As one almost champion put it: “I loved fighting, but the training was just a chore.
Almost champions were focused on external benchmarks, like national rankings or how they compared to rivals, a mind-set the researchers speculate explains why almost champions got discouraged during rough patches.
The parents of almost champions were an ever-present factor, hovering over their every move.
“My parents, my dad especially, was always there, shouting instructions from the touchline, pushing me to practice at home,” remembers an almost champion.
” No surprise that almost champions changed coaches frequently whereas super champions maintained long-term relationships.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Da Story of Da Bears: How an ‘SNL’ Sketch Defined Sports Fandom”

Success, Smigel said, “Just allowed for the swagger to grow.” Around that time, he considered the possibility of dropping hardcore Chicago fans into a sketch.
With time on their hands, Smigel, Odenkirk, and SNL colleague Conan O’Brien starred in their own stage revue.
“Over and over, it was these labored connections they would make, in the most verbose way possible,” Smigel said, “In order to get back to reassuring each other that the Bears were gonna win the Super Bowl.” At one point O’Brien even popped up as one of their sons.
The Chicago native’s presence led Odenkirk to press Smigel to try pitching a sketch about the city’s special brand of fandom.
“Gleason had an incredibly thick Chicago accent. I can hear his voice in their take on the Chicago accent. Very nasal.” In fact, Smigel said that he was only in the sketch because SNL head writer Jim Downey, himself a Joliet, Illinois, native, thought that he had an authentic-sounding accent.
Smigel made a mistake that the Super Fans certainly wouldn’t have tolerated: He underestimated the power of Da Bears.
” In the original script, Smigel said it was written “The Bears.
In late December, the Bears invited Farley, Wendt, and Smigel to Soldier Field for Chicago’s wild-card matchup against the Cowboys.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I Am the One Woman Who Has It All”

I have two kids and the unspoken pressure to act like they don’t exist when I’m on a conference call.
I have a professional mandate to know what’s happening in pop culture and an eleven-year-old who tells me to “Stop trying to act so cool.”
I have no problem lying about “Being in a meeting” when I’m with my kids and no problem lying to my kids about “Needing to work” when I’m on Facebook.
I have kids who have forced me to do everything in my life with greater efficiency and the professional assumption that I’m now less efficient after having kids.
I have male colleagues who tell me I’m not aggressive enough and that I will never get what I want out of my team and female colleagues who tell me I’m too aggressive and that I make them sad. I have the perseverance to pump breast milk what feels like a thousand times a day while on a weeklong business trip and the audacity to expense the cost of shipping said breast milk home only to have that expense denied because what does being away from an exclusively breast-fed baby on a business trip have to do with work OH MY GOD DO YOU UNDERSTAND HOW VOLATILE I AM RIGHT NOW?
I have so much righteous anger, do you think maybe I’m a character in the Bible?
Do you think maybe I’ll end up on Oprah’s “Super Soul Sunday?”.
I have a fantasy that I’ll end up on “Super Soul Sunday” and the deep-rooted knowledge that if I ever met Oprah I would definitely ask her for money, even though that is definitely not in keeping with the tone of “Super Soul Sunday.” Like, at all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Eagles’ Offense Needed To Be Virtually Flawless. And It Was.”

In Super Bowl LII on Sunday night, the New England Patriots racked up 613 yards, the most ever for a team in the Super Bowl.
Forget Super Bowl records or even playoff records, that’s most total yards in any game in NFL history.
Between Foles’ downfield passing and the inside/outside power-running combo of LeGarrette Blount and Jay Ajayi, the Eagles piled up 538 total yards themselves and were able to counter the league’s most prolific offense each time it landed a punch.
After averaging just 5.3 yards per pass attempt across six regular-season appearances and three starts in relief of starter Carson Wentz, Foles burned the Minnesota Vikings in the NFC Championship for 352 yards at a 10.7 yards-per-attempt clip.
Whatever changed in Foles – or whatever magic spell head coach Doug Pederson cast – was still in force Sunday when Foles threw for 373 yards against the Patriots defense, averaging 8.7 yards per attempt.
Four Eagles combined to gain 164 yards on 27 carries, averaging 6.1 yards per attempt, while Foles completed 28 of 43 passes for 373 yards and a 88.6 Raw QBR. Pederson’s creativity shows up in the box score; five Eagles had at least seven touches – and two others had at least 70 yards, a receiving touchdown or both.
As expected, the Patriots still made halftime adjustments; the Eagles averaged over 2 yards more per play in the first half than in the second half.
According to ESPN Stats & Information Group, he became the first quarterback in NFL history to lose any game while posting 500+ passing yards, three touchdowns and no interceptions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Analogue remade the Super Nintendo”

Like all the best gaming stories, the project that would eventually lead to the Analogue Super Nt started with an obsession.
Analogue will release the Super Nt – a pristine, sub-$200 Super Nintendo clone that uses cutting-edge proprietary tech to replicate the original’s guts – that represents the culmination of Taber’s passion for high-fidelity retro gaming, which he describes as “Totally unreasonable, nauseating, all-consuming.”
While software solutions like ZSNES or Project64 might deliver the platforming perils of Mario or the beast blasting of Metroid basically as well as you remember, no matter how hard the developers try, the games will never be exactly the same as the browning lump of plastic in your closet.
Set their sights on bigger game: crafting the ultimate aftermarket Nintendo Entertainment System, the original “Analogue Nt,” with a price to match.
“The difference is exact cycle-timed gaming with zero lag,” says Horton, who Taber says spent over five-thousand hours designing the core that powers the FPGA at the heart of the Super Nt. Taber sums up the difference between the Super Nt and traditional software emulators: “Emulators are great, and the guys who make them work their tails off to get [them] to work.
To this end, Analogue employs a fleet of ultra-hardcore enthusiasts to serve as beta testers, including several who own complete collections of SNES and Super Famicom games.
Super Turrican is very important to me, because it was Factor 5’s big chance to go from a local European developer to make it out in the wide world, having a game in the U.S. and Japan.
That’s part of what Analogue is all about – respecting the history of games.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles’s Post-Game Interview Is a Powerful Lesson in Leadership”

Last night, Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles delivered one of the most spectacular Super Bowl performances of all time.
After Foles strung together a couple of good games, he proceeded not only to lead his team to the Super Bowl, but to outduel arguably the greatest quarterback of all time in the process.
As Foles stood for his interview as Super Bowl MVP, he could have told us that he knew all along he would make it here.
Foles even became the first player ever to both throw and receive a touchdown pass in the Super Bowl, when he completed a play that looked remarkably similar to one Brady and the Patriots failed to execute just a few minutes earlier.
There is no Super Bowl win without the protection of his front line.
There is no Super Bowl win without the amazing play-calling of Eagles head coach Doug Pederson.
There is no Super Bowl win without the defense that forced Tom Brady to fumble in crunch time, those final minutes when New England’s favorite footballer typically plays with the laser focus of a machine, programmed to dash the dreams of hopeful opponents, much as he did last year.
That’s the lesson Nick Foles taught us over the past several weeks, and the lesson he reminded us of last night, as he stood before the podium reserved for the newest Super Bowl MVP-a place no one ever predicted he would be, perhaps not even he himself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Winners and Losers From Super Bowl LII”

Welcome to the Super Bowl edition of Winners and Losers.
An Eagles field goal and a botched Patriots Hail Mary later, the Eagles were Super Bowl champions.
Brady’s wife Gisele yelled after Super Bowl XLVI that Brady could not throw and catch the ball at the same time, a knock on Patriots pass catchers who made critical drops in that Super Bowl loss.
In his time with the team, Adam Vinatieri hit two game-winning field goals in the last 10 seconds of the Super Bowl; there has been only one other such kick in the history of the game.
Winner: Every Eagles Fan, Everywhere Sunday was my first time covering the Super Bowl in person, so at first I didn’t think much of the fact every Eagles cheer in the stadium was significantly louder than every Patriots cheer.
Loser: Justin Timberlake Timberlake’s Super Bowl halftime show was OK. That’s the rudest thing you can say about a Super Bowl halftime show: They’re supposed to be over-the-top tours de force.
Loser: Head Safety The Patriots lost their best wide receiver during the Super Bowl.
Pats fans hate him for his two Super Bowl wins against New England; Eagles fans hate him because of the NFC East rivalry with the Giants.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Super Bowl 52 Super Bag”

The next year, I wrote Super Bag II: Half in the Bag in Indianapolis after nearly overdosing on bronchitis medication.
I can’t remember why Super Bag III didn’t happen in 2013, but the reason was probably, “I’m in New Orleans and there’s a casino two blocks from my hotel - Super Bag III can go to hell.” Super Bag III: Legacy Edition belatedly posted in 2014, followed by Super Bag IV: A Little Deflated in 2015.
Q: Just curious - how do you feel knowing that Giants fans will be rooting for the Pats in the Super Bowl?- Ned, Clark, N.J. BS: You mean, because you hate the Eagles so much? That’s the reason, right?
Go Pats!- Victor, Hoboken, N.J. BS: What the hell? Giants fans are ROOTING for the Patriots? I asked a few Giants fan friends and they confirmed that - thanks to Eli’s legacy, their last two Super Bowl wins, some residual affection for Belichick shutting down Montana’s Niners and Kelly’s Bills in back-to-back weeks in 1990, and, of course, their unabashed hatred for the Eagles - nearly all of them are rooting against Philly.
Why did the notoriously private Brady pick the two weeks before the Super Bowl to release his own infomercial/pseudo-reality show? Because he’s won five Super Bowls and thinks he’s invincible, that’s why.
Q: Time for your annual answer to the “What Super Bowl halftime show song will best represent how the game is going for the Patriots?” I know we peaked with “Beautiful Day” and “Free Fallin'”, but last year, Lady Gaga had an unbelievable entry with “A Million Reasons.” The Patriots were giving their fans a million reasons to “Quit the show,” to leave the game and give up on their team.
Q: Let’s pretend Foles wins the Super Bowl isn’t that a worst-case situation for Wentz? Has a backup QB ever won a Super Bowl after the starter was injured, then the starter maintained his status as a top-tier QB?- Charlie, Chicago.
Eagles over Patriots Of their 27 playoff victories during the Brady-Belichick era, the Patriots got lucky five times: 2006 in San Diego, 2012 against Baltimore, Super Bowl 49 against Seattle, last year’s Super Bowl against Atlanta and two weeks ago against the Jaguars.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Is the Best ‘Mario’ Spinoff Series?”

That got our staff thinking: What is the best Mario spinoff series? To qualify, a title had to have “Mario” in the title-so that means no WarioWare, Luigi’s Mansion, or Super Smash Bros.
While Mario made cameos in subsequent sports games, Mario Tennis-or, as its original Virtual Boy incarnation was called, Mario’s Tennis-was the first Mario-branded sports spinoff.
Super Mario Strikers is not only the best Mario spinoff, it’s the best soccer game I’ve ever played.
Mario Party is the seminal spinoff franchise because for nearly two hours, nothing mattered more to any of us than the fate of our digital companions and their virtual board game.
Mario Super Sluggers Jackson Safon: Mario Super Sluggers has everything you could possibly want in a Mario spinoff.
Plus, there’s over 40 characters you can play with, giving the game one of the broadest rosters in any Mario spinoff.
Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games Paolo Uggetti: The best kinds of video games, the ones that pulled me away from live sports and into their reality when I was a kid, were those that replicated the real stakes and competition.
My favorite spinoff asks something totally nonsensical: What if Mario were his normal self but everything is flat?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Shocking In-Game Moments in NFL History”

As for the most shocking development in an NFL playoff game, the Tyree play is still no.
X /. For instance, if the Browns had won a Super Bowl within a few years of Earnest Byner’s famous fumble that blew the 1987 AFC title game, that fumble would have transformed into a football nightmare with a “But” That’s what happened to Aaron Boone’s home run that murdered the 2003 Red Sox season; 12 months later, Boone’s homer went from “One of the Eight Worst Moments of My Life” to “An Absolutely Traumatic Moment, But”.
Malcolm Butler’s Interception A staggeringly unexpected play that single-handedly swung a Super Bowl, flipped the Brady-Belichick historical narrative, became Belichick’s single greatest moment and immediately turned into one of the most-discussed/most-dissected “What the F were they thinking????” play calls in football history.
Bonus points because it happened during the Twitter-GIF era, and every time Butler gets torched in a Pats game, my sarcastic buddy Hench makes some variation of the “I think the last good play Butler made was his Super Bowl pick” joke.
What’s left? Either becoming the first QB to win a Super Bowl against a team playing in its own stadium, beating Eli Manning and/or the Giants, beating Jimmy Garoppolo and the Niners, winning a Super Bowl on a Hail Mary, or hoping that Drew Bledsoe’s son, John, starts in the Super Bowl within the next five years.
Vikings vs. EAGLES Philly’s Worst-Case Pie Chart looks like this: the Jags winning the early game, then everyone realizing a Bortles-Foles Super Bowl could never happen unless it was accompanied by a hurricane and locusts; Foles falling apart against a good Vikings D; Minnesota’s excellent receivers doing damage; Mike Zimmer vs. Doug Pederson; the Philly crowd’s Debbie Downer DNA kicking in as soon as the Vikes go up seven; the Vikings officially turning into a Team of Destiny.
Four Playoff Manifesto rules are in play, and guess what? All four rules favor the Eagles: “Beware of the ‘Everybody Believed in Us’ team”; “Beware of all dome teams outdoors”; “Beware of any head coach named Mike”; and most important, “Beware of any team who celebrated the previous weekend’s victory like they just won the Super Bowl.” Kai Forbath, outdoors.
Our second straight weekend of saying, “Wait a second maybe on a very good team, if he’s practicing with the first string every week, Nick Foles isn’t that bad!” Minnesota might be a Team of Destiny or, it’s the team that blew a 17-point second-half lead at home in a playoff game, played scared and WAY too conservative on what seemed to be the game-deciding drive, couldn’t close out New Orleans’s defense on back-to-back clinching drives and needed one of the biggest miracles in football history to advance.

The orginal article.