Summary of “Brain Damage Saved His Music”

Galarza’s astonishment, like that of medical scientists and music fans, arises from the fact that Martino recovered from surgery with a significant portion of his brain and memory gone, but his guitar skills intact.
It looked like “a bundle of worms,” said Frederick Simeone, the surgeon who saved Martino’s life, in a 2009 documentary, Martino Unstrung: A Brain Mystery.
Paul Broks, a British neuropsychologist, co-writer of the documentary Martino Unstrung, and a co-author of the World Neurosurgery report, has said Martino’s surgery may have had “Nonspecific effects” on the areas that store and activate episodic memory, and those effects “Subsided as the brain readjusted physiologically post-surgery.”
In his 2014 report, “Jazz Improvisation, Creativity, and Brain Plasticity,” Duffau suggested that Martino’s language and music functions likely shifted from his left hemisphere to a more distributed orientation, incorporating part of the interior occipital lobe, which is normally dedicated to processing visual information.
Martino looked at a black void on one of his brain images.
Omigie echoes the point that Martino’s brain, long before it hemorrhaged or Martino even knew about his tangled veins, reorganized itself in a way that might shield it from damage.
Whatever brain mechanisms may have led to Martino’s revival, both Omigie and Broks, the neuropsychologist who spent months with Martino for the filming of Martino Unstrung, felt compelled to add that science couldn’t leave out the work and determination of the guitarist himself.
In a scene in Martino Unstrung, Martino looked at his MRI brain images.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Simple Blood Test Saved My Marriage”

For my husband and me, ORD was the scene of more than a stressful travel tiff-it saw the nadir of our marriage.
We were headed from L.A. to Paris to attempt a marriage reset.
Even the long transatlantic flight to follow appealed to me as glorious uninterrupted screen time.
We were wheels down in Chicago with plenty of time before our connecting flight.
We blamed each other for the missed flight and then we blamed each other for blaming each other.
On my flight home I thought about how my husband’s personality had evaporated over the past year.
A routine blood test showed so much calcium in my husband’s blood that his doctor assumed it was an error.
I still wonder about how neat and tidy this has all been, if it’s possible we both rallied around the same narrative of a blood test saving our marriage, and in doing so made it truer than it actually was.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Emilia Clarke, of “Game of Thrones,” on Surviving Two Life-Threatening Aneurysms”

I had just finished filming Season 1 of “Game of Thrones.” Then I was struck with the first of two aneurysms.
At some level, I knew what was happening: my brain was damaged.
Rather, using a technique called endovascular coiling, the surgeon introduced a wire into one of the femoral arteries, in the groin; the wire made its way north, around the heart, and to the brain, where they sealed off the aneurysm.
I went back to my life while I was in the hospital, I was told that I had a smaller aneurysm on the other side of my brain, and it could “Pop” at any time.
The growth on the other side of my brain had doubled in size, and the doctor said we should “Take care of it.” I was promised a relatively simple operation, easier than last time.
“See you in two hours,” my mum said, and off I went for surgery, another trip up the femoral artery to my brain.
Beyond my work as an actor, I’ve decided to throw myself into a charity I’ve helped develop in conjunction with partners in the U.K. and the U.S. It is called SameYou, and it aims to provide treatment for people recovering from brain injuries and stroke.
Donald Trump’s Unhinged Obsession with “a Man Named John McCain”During a speech in Ohio, Trump railed against the late Senator McCain, who died of brain cancer.

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Summary of “The Brain That Remade Itself”

Neuroplasticity allows the brain to strengthen or even recreate connections between brain cells-the pathways that help us learn a foreign language or how to ride a bike.
Her research question is twofold: To what extent can the remaining structures of Collins’ brain take over the functions of the part of his brain that was removed? And can science describe how the brain carries out these changes, all the way down to the cellular level?
Behrmann’s research is the first longitudinal study to look closely at what happens in the brain after the regions involved in visual processing are lost through surgery or damaged due to a traumatic brain injury.
As University of Toronto psychiatrist Norman Doidge notes in his 2007 book, The Brain That Changes Itself, the notion that there is a critical period of brain development is one of the most important discoveries in the area of neuroplasticity - and one for which we have kittens to thank.
Collins’ left brain not only looked and performed the way his left brain should; it also looked similar in scans to other kids’ intact right brains.
Throughout these experiments, Behrmann compared Collins’ brain function to a control group of kids his own age without brain abnormalities.
In scans, Collins’ left brain not only looked and performed the way his left brain should; it also looked similar in scans as other kids’ intact right brains.
Areas of the brain that weren’t connected before create new links, an example of neuroplasticity in action that may preserve brain functionality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Surgeon So Bad It Was Criminal”

In the end, it fell to the criminal justice system, not the medical system, to wring out a measure of accountability for Duntsch’s malpractice.
In 2010, Boop faxed a recommendation for Duntsch to Baylor-Plano, checking off “Good” or “Excellent” in boxes asking about his skills and noting, “Chris is extremely bright and possibly the hardest working person I have ever met.” Another supervisor, Dr. Jon Robertson, who was an old family friend of the Duntsches and an investor in DiscGenics, noted on his recommendation that Duntsch had an “Excellent work ethic.”
A vascular surgeon who operated at Baylor-Plano, Dr. Randall Kirby, said he met Duntsch soon after he started and found him to be an arrogant know-it-all.
At the request of a head-and-neck surgeon also on the case, the vascular surgeon assisting Duntsch was Kirby.
His previous surgeon testified at Duntsch’s trial that the procedure had left bone fragments in Morguloff’s spinal canal.
In truth, the night before the surgery Summers and Miller had dinner at a local restaurant and watched the University of Memphis basketball team play Southern Mississippi on the bar TV. In his 2017 deposition, Summers acknowledged he made up the pre-surgery cocaine binge because he felt Duntsch had abandoned him, as both his surgeon and his friend.
In May 2015, the Texas Observer published an article with the headline, “‘Sociopath’ Surgeon Duntsch Arrested for Shoplifting Pants.
Duntsch held up remarkably well, seeming calm in the certainty that he really was a good surgeon.

The orginal article.

Summary of “After century of removing appendixes, docs find antibiotics can be enough”

After more than a century of slicing tiny, inflamed organs from people’s guts, doctors have found that surgery may not be necessary after all-a simple course of antibiotics can be just as effective at treating appendicitis as going under the knife.
The revelation comes from a large, randomized trial out of Finland, published Tuesday, September 25, in JAMA. Despite upending a long-held standard of care, the study’s finding is not entirely surprising; it follows several other randomized trials over the years that had carved out evidence that antibiotics alone can treat an acute appendicitis.
Those studies left some dangling questions, including if the antibiotics just improved the situation temporarily and if initial drug treatments left patients worse off later if they did need surgery.
Nearly two-thirds of the patients randomly assigned in the study to get antibiotics for an uncomplicated appendicitis didn’t end up needing surgery in the follow-up time, the Finnish authors, based at the University of Turku, report.
For their initial look at the simpler appendicitis treatment, researchers led by Paulina Salminen randomly assigned 530 patients that showed up in the hospital with an acute, uncomplicated appendicitis to get either a standard, open surgery to remove their inflamed organ or a course of antibiotics.
A couple of patients were lost in follow-up, including one from an unrelated death, leaving 272 patients in the surgery group and 256 in the antibiotic group.
Still, going with antibiotics first meant fewer complications and faster recoveries overall.
Future studies could find that shorter, less intense courses of antibiotics could also do the trick, further reducing complication rates and treatment time.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tommy John Surgeries Are Down In MLB. Will It Last?”

For many seasons, it seemed like the number of pitchers forced to have Tommy John surgery each year was going to keep climbing forever.
If we narrow our view to only major league pitchers, surgeries are also down from record levels: The annual number of surgeries is down from its peak of 35 in 2012.
As you can see from the chart below, the number of surgeries so far is tracking below recent years as well, both among only major league players and among all professional pitchers.
There were 20,517 pitching appearances last season – about 1,200 more than there were in 2014.
The number of pitchers to throw at least 200 innings dropped from 28 in 2015 to 15 in each of the last two seasons.
Dr. Glenn Fleisig studies the stress on pitchers’ elbows and shoulders at the American Sports Medicine Institute, a center in Birmingham, Alabama, that was founded by Tommy John surgeon specialist Dr. James Andrews.
“The teams are getting better at the art of [knowing] when to back off.” He noted that at the major league level, pitchers sometimes skip starts, which, he said, “Gives the body more time to recover.” And last season, MLB replaced the 15-day disabled list with the 10-day disabled list, which allows teams to better manipulate rosters to rest pitchers.
A 2014 Henry Ford Hospital study found that pitchers who have had Tommy John surgery threw 7 percent more fastballs than pitchers who had not had the surgery.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dr. Death: The Shocking Story of Christopher Duntsch, a Madman with a Scalpel”

Then he gave Passmore the card of a neurosurgeon named Christopher Duntsch.
On paper, the 40-year-old man who arrived in Dallas in the summer of 2011 was a completely different Christopher Duntsch than the one who was introduced to the public after more than a dozen allegations of severely botched surgeries.
Duntsch filed patents for each discovery, and two companies were soon created.
There were two names on the top page: Kellie Martin and Christopher Duntsch.
Dr. William Rohr did editorialize in his conclusion: “The collection of blood was most likely the result of a therapeutic misadventure.” Duntsch blames the death on an allergy to fentanyl, a powerful narcotic often used in intubation.
Sproles issued a letter to Duntsch that read: “There have been no summary or administrative restrictions or suspensions of Dr. Duntsch’s Medical Staff membership or clinical privileges during the time he has practiced at Baylor Reg. Medical Center at Plano.”
“There is no way to communicate what happened there, without a 20-page document of disclosures and events and responsible parties,” Duntsch once wrote of Brown and Efurd.
In a statement, the hospital said it cooperated with the Texas Medical Board when asked, and did not file its own complaint because it was aware someone else already had. Baylor calls the allegations against it “Extremely frustrating and difficult” and reiterates that Duntsch came with “References from multiple sources who worked with him in his residency and fellowship training programs.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The robot will see you now: could computers take over medicine entirely?”

The robot was being controlled by Greg Shaw, a consultant urologist and surgeon sitting in the far corner of the room with his head under the black hood of a 3D monitor, like a Victorian wedding photographer.
In the 1990s the Pentagon wanted to explore ways in which operations at M*A*S*H-style field hospitals might be performed by robots controlled by surgeons at a safe distance from the battlefield.
The latest creators of robot surgeons see ways to move the technology into new areas.
In a celebrated instance, Dr Jacques Marescaux, a surgeon in Manhattan, used a protected high-speed connection and remote controls to successfully remove the gallbladder of a patient 3,800 miles away in Strasbourg in 2001.
Smith explained to me how his study was primarily to determine two things: first, latency – the tiny time lag of high-speed connections over large distances – and second, how that lag interfered with a surgeon’s movements.
His studies found that if the lag rose above 250 milliseconds “The surgeon begins to see or sense that something is not quite right”.
“Most of the time your internet connection is fantastic. Just occasionally your data slows to a crawl. The issue is you don’t know when that will happen. If it occurs during a surgery you are in trouble.” No surgeon – or patient – would like to see a buffering symbol on their screen.
He envisages three possible champions of telesurgery: the military, “If you could, say, create a connection where the surgeon could be in Italy and the patient in Iraq”; medical missionaries, “Where surgeons in the developed world worked through robots in places without advanced surgeons”; and Nasa, “At a point where you have enough people in space that you need to set up a way to do surgery.” For the time being the technology is not robust enough for any of these three.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Inside the surreal, probably inevitable world of plastic surgery apps”

The app, created by Bravo Kids Media, is one of dozens of similar plastic surgery games and apps currently available for download. Nose Doctor Fun Kids Game, an Android app apparently designed for anyone who searches for those keywords, claims boys and girls will “Learn a lot about medicine” by giving a cartoon character a nose job.
In 2013, an app called Plastic Surgery & Plastic Doctor & Plastic Hospital Office for Barbie was removed from the iTunes Store following backlash online.
One of the apps that the Butterfly Foundation’s petition singles out, Plastic Surgery Simulator, has been downloaded anywhere from 10,000 and 50,000 times.
Whether these conditions are the cause or the effect of self-modification apps like Plastic Surgery Simulator, it nevertheless describes a climate ripe for their proliferation.
While most of these plastic surgery apps are rated 17+ or T for Teen, there’s no way to prevent someone younger than 17 from downloading them, unless there are parental controls on the phone.
The relationship among filters, Photoshop apps, and plastic surgery apps is certainly correlative, if not causative.
Against a bright pink interface, you’re presented with several options, in which “Thin” becomes a verb: you can “Thin” your face, “Thin” your chin, and “Thin” your head. The plastic surgery app eBody provides a virtual tour of a surgeon’s office where you can “Perform a Lipo to your boyfriend and give him the six-pack you always wanted.” “For the girls, you can have a virtual breast augmentation, buttocks, or just a Liposuction.” As with many of these self-modification apps, the instructions are explicitly addressed to women.
In the digital era, medical professionals have begun designing and using legitimate plastic surgery apps that allow potential patients to envision or even plan for body-altering operations.

The orginal article.