Summary of “What Happens To Your Stuff When You Die? I Take Care Of That.”

In those days, they stored their antiques in a garage, and when they’d amassed enough stuff for a big sale, they’d rent a firehouse or church and hold an auction.
On auction day, after everything is catalogued, numbered, and put on display, both in the showroom and on our website, we open the showroom for “Preview” – when clients observe the upcoming sale the way one would walk through a museum.
We lay out carpets, hang chandeliers, line up rows of shotguns and rifles on the gun racks, and arrange swords and daggers in showcases.
It’s important for Bodnarczuk to come to the sale in person to feel the blades, see if the scabbards fit, and “Look in the nice little red eyes of the lion” on the handle of the Imperial sword.
“The idea with these swords,” he says, holding the handle against his chest so the sword points out, “Was when you were on your back on the ground, and the cavalry’s coming at you, you’d hold the sword up and hit the horse in the chest.”
The sale begins and most people follow William into the middle room where he takes his place at his podium.
William auctions off two hundred lots in two hours before reaching the portion of the sale where certain people are leaning forward, white-knuckled on their bidder number paddles, hoping to win their guns and swords of choice.
His place must be emptied, no evidence left of him whatsoever, to stage the house for sale.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I pulled a 1,500-year-old sword out of a lake”

Every summer, my parents, my six-year-old brother and I go to stay in a cabin by a lake called Vidöstern in Tånnö in southern Sweden, not far from where we live.
The sword felt rough and hard, and I got some sticky, icky brown rust on my hands.
I was yelling, “I found a sword, I found a sword!” Daddy went to show it to our neighbours, whose family has lived in the village for more than 100 years, and they said it looked like a Viking sword.
I did tell one of my best friends, Emmy, and now I know I can trust her because she didn’t tell anybody, except her parents – but they promised not to tell anybody else, so that’s OK. This month, the archaeologists finally came to search the rest of the lake and they found a brooch that is as old as my sword, and a coin from the 18th century.
I had to give the sword to the local museum – Daddy explained that it’s part of history and important to share it with others.
I’m going to try to raise some money to make a replica sword that I can keep.
People on the internet are saying I am the queen of Sweden, because in the legend of King Arthur, he was given a sword by a lady in a lake, and that meant he would become king.
I am not a lady – I’m only eight – but it’s true I found a sword in the lake.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Seven Best and Worst Fighters on ‘Game of Thrones'”

Via titles, costumes, and scripts, Game of Thrones tells us who its most fearsome fighters are supposed to be.
One such pair of practiced eyes belongs to my soon-to-be-brother-in-law, Alec Barbour, a fight director and an advanced actor/combatant with the Society of American Fight Directors-that is, the type of person who would work on a show like Thrones and ensure that the fight scenes are both entertaining and moderately realistic.
With that variable combat quality in mind, I asked Alec to rank the best and worst warriors on Game of Thrones, in terms of how effective and realistic their fighting technique appears from a fight director’s perspective.
Seven is a special number in Westeros, so with apologies to Pod, Bronn, Sers Loras and Barristan, and other “Middle-of-the-road” warriors who didn’t make the cut, we present the best seven and worst seven fighters on Game of Thrones, accompanied by Alec’s comments and critiques.
Second, Syrio’s on-screen fighting style-the look of which was crafted by legendary British sword-master William Hobbes, who choreographed amazing fights for Rob Roy, The Duellists, and The Three Musketeers, among other films-was our first introduction to water dancing, and I far prefer his style, which is solidly grounded in historical rapier fencing, to the altogether-too-showy juggling style we were introduced to by Jorah’s Season 5 opponent in the fighting pits of Meereen.
Brienne of Tarth Fight Director’s Verdict: If there’s a “Most Improved Fighter” award in Westeros, it should go to Brienne.
Ultimately, one of the most celebrated fighters in Westeros ends up looking like a rank amateur, although admittedly, being imprisoned and poorly fed for a year didn’t set him up for success.
The Unsullied Fight Director’s Verdict: For my money, the most overrated fighters in Westeros are the Unsullied, Game of Thrones’ answer to elite shield and spear regiments like the Spartans from 300 or the Myrmidons from Troy.

The orginal article.