Summary of “‘Roma’ star Yalitza Aparicio is so much more than her Oscar fairy tale”

‘Roma’ star Yalitza Aparicio is so much more than her Oscar fairy tale – Los Angeles Times.
It’s a story that reads like a fairy tale: Yalitza Aparicio, a young teaching college student, attends a casting call in her hometown of Tlaxiaco, Mexico, at the urging of her older sister.
Aparicio not only lands an Oscar nomination for leading actress, she becomes only the second Mexican actress and the first indigenous woman ever to do so.
For her turn as the timid Cleo, a housekeeper contending with heartbreak and personal loss as she tends to the needs of a fractured middle-class family in 1970s Mexico City, Aparicio has been nominated for more than two dozen awards.
“She’s super sharp,” says Cuarón, who makes the point that to confuse Aparicio with the docile household worker she plays on screen would be a mistake.
Cinema’s lousy history of indigenous representation didn’t have much on Aparicio’s older sister, who prodded Yalitza to see what the casting was all about.
Less than six months later, Aparicio was in Mexico City, meeting with Cuarón on the day he offered her and costar De Tavira their parts.
Aparicio not only had no acting experience when she took the role, she hadn’t watched a single one of Cuarón’s films.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The New Teacher Project says low expectations hurt kids”

A new study from The New Teacher Project, a national nonprofit focused on teacher development and educational programming, aims to dispel this idea.
“They’re planning their futures on the belief that doing well in school creates opportunities-that showing up, doing the work, and meeting their teachers’ expectations will prepare them for what’s next,” the study notes, but something, along the way, is not working.
“As we visited classrooms around the country, we found teachers working hard individually to help their students, but we also saw pretty low-quality assignments kids were getting, and instruction that doesn’t give them a chance to do deep thinking and the type of work they’re going to need to do in order to succeed,” Weisberg says.
There’s no one cause for this gap, but one is low expectations on the part of teachers: Less than half surveyed by TNTP believe their students could work at grade level, so they assign them work that doesn’t require them to stretch.
Teachers themselves are not solely responsible for this problem: Teacher prep programs in the U.S., TNTP found, are often too focused on cookie-cutter curricula or standardized test scores, and doesn’t prepare them to lead nuanced and engaging lessons or deal with students as individuals.
“What we prioritize is operational efficiency-getting large volumes of kids through the system,” he adds, but The Opportunity Myth calls for an approach that not only gets kids through high school, but ensures that they succeed afterward.
Weisberg wants to start seeing teachers and schools re-engage with students’ experience of the work-are the engaged throughout the whole time in a classroom? Are they asking questions, or zoning out during a lecture that requires no participation?-and ensure that their lessons are pulling kids forward, not letting them stay stuck.
TNTP does not yet have a full set of recommendations for what exactly this new approach might look like-the organization compiled The Opportunity Myth to understand why so many kids were struggling, despite finishing high school, and their next step will be to build a system that ensures that they succeed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why are teachers in Europe paid so much better than those in the United States?”

On both sides of the Atlantic, the vast majority of people tend to agree that teachers are important – and that they deserve to be paid well.
Somehow, the wages of American teachers – unlike anyone else in the top ranks of that list – have dropped over the past decade.
That’s a long way from similarly wealthy European nations such as Germany, for example, where teachers are among the nation’s top earners and can make more money than Web developers or sometimes even entry-level doctors.
Besides the United States, no other developed country has such a large gap between salaries paid to teachers and to professionals with similar degrees.
While teachers in Luxembourg earned almost three times as much as the average employee there in 2004, American teachers already ranked at the bottom of the list at the time.
Now, one could argue that among the nations that ranked even worse in terms of teacher pay than the United States were Denmark and Norway – countries that still regularly top education quality rankings.
Regardless of gender, two-thirds of Americans think that the country’s teachers are underpaid.
2 in 3 Americans say public school teachers are underpaid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How LeBron James’ new public school really is the first of its kind”

James’ I Promise School opened Monday to serve low-income and at-risk students in his hometown, and the public school could be an agent of change in the eastern Ohio city.
I Promise is building from a model that’s shown success I Promise will feature longer school days, a non-traditional school year, and greater access to the school, its facilities, and its teachers during down time for students.
It does not go as far as KIPP or Rocketship in those charges, but it’s clear I Promise is designed to operate at a level beyond the typical public school by creating a more comprehensive experience for students, not just one that begins at 7 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. I Promise is a regular public school, not a charter or a voucher-receiving private school This kind of wide reform is rare to see at a traditional neighborhood school.
That shows how badly James wanted his school to be a no-exceptions public school.
In either case, the school would have operated as a separate entity from the school system in which James grew up.
That’s not a lot of money to operate a school with such grand aspirations, which is where the LeBron James Family Foundation comes in.
Last December, James laid the mission for his school out to Theresa Cottom of the Akron Beacon-Journal, painting a broad strokes explanation of why his school would be different.
“We’re going to be on ’em like a school should be because we want them to be successful not only in the school, but successful in life,” James said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hollywood Wanted An Edgy Child Actor. When He Spiraled, They Couldn’t Help.”

It had been years since Renfro had delivered a performance that caught the public’s attention, and at the time, he was treated as yet another addition to the mournful legacy of former child stars – Dana Plato, River Phoenix, Judy Garland – whose lives collapsed from Hollywood darling to death by overdose.
Renfro became an overnight star because he was a rowdy kid with natural talent who stood apart from more seasoned child actors.
10 years after Renfro’s death, interviews with Renfro’s former colleagues make plain that the mechanisms in place to protect child actors – mechanisms compromised by conflicts of interest and a dependence on parents and guardians – were scarcely capable of protecting kids like Renfro, and largely remain so today.
Renfro’s parents divorced when he was 5; his mother remarried and moved to Michigan, and Renfro’s paternal grandmother, Joanne Renfro, became the primary caregiver for an increasingly wayward child.
None of the adults who worked with Renfro as a child who spoke with BuzzFeed News said they suspected Renfro might be addicted to a drug like heroin.
With no boundaries off the set, Renfro kept getting pushed past perceived limits for child actors on the set, as well.
Instead, throughout the ’90s and Renfro’s early adolescence, Hollywood kept courting the child actor, trading on his name and fandom.
If the parent or guardian is checked out, and their child’s darker facets are what keeps them employed, it’s not in any way surprising that an actor like Renfro would slip through a system so ill-equipped to save him anyway.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Building Skills Outside the Classroom With New Ways of Learning”

“Especially compared to when I was in school.”
Keith Kelly, superintendent of the Mayfield City School District, said the center was “About getting kids involved in inquiry, in solving problems, in partnerships, in authentic projects that may be of interest to them.”
Career Academies in PasadenaThe Pasadena, Calif., Unified School District – a district in which 65 percent of the students qualify for free and reduced-price lunches – has nine career-themed “Academies” for its high school students.
Engineering Innovation at ToyotaToyota has a number of initiatives aimed at funneling students into careers with the automaker, via partnerships with 256 high schools, summer internships for high school students, specialized degree tracks, and part-time employment at the college level and eventually, for those who finish the pathway, jobs.
“As the number of students continues to diversify in terms of race, language and ethnicity, the teachers are still about 90 to 92 percent white,” said Claudia Rinaldi, the director of the education department at Lasell College in Newton, Mass.Lasell’s “Pathways to Teacher Diversity” – part of a statewide effort supported by a Gates Foundation grant – is a partnership with four school districts in the state intended to encourage more high school students of color to pursue careers in education.
The long-term goal, she said, is to get these students to return, as certified teachers, to K-12 schools like the ones they attended.
A Forerunner in New York CityIn 1972, City-as-School High School was established by New York City’s Board of Education, as a “School without walls.” According to a Bank Street College of Education paper on the alternative school’s history, prospective students were invited to “See the city as your curriculum” and to “Imagine yourself” in various and glamorous-sounding professional settings.
There, the students are supervised by employees of the organization, and also by City-as-School teachers who help their students work through the new and daily challenges of work life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Fight Over Teacher Salaries: A Look At The Numbers”

The Fight Over Teacher Salaries: A Look At The Numbers : NPR Ed Teachers in many states are angry after years of stagnant wages.
The teachers strike in West Virginia may have ended last week when Gov. Jim Justice signed a law giving educators a 5 percent pay increase, but the fight in other states is just warming up.
“It’s gotten so bad that the state Department of Education has had to issue emergency teacher certifications to replace teachers as quickly as possible,” reported Emily Wendler of member station KOSU in July.
Even Shawn Sheehan, a math teacher in Norman, Okla., and the state’s 2016 teacher of the year, decided he simply couldn’t afford to stay.
Sure, life can be done on $400, $450 a month, but I would challenge others out there to buy diapers, groceries and all the things that you need for a family of three on $400. That is why we reached out to EdBuild, to see whether they could help bring more clarity to the conversation about teacher salaries.
EdBuild used 2015-16 average teacher salaries as reported by the National Center for Education Statistics and a cost-of-living index produced by the Council for Community and Economic Research.
In some cases, deep pockets of veteran teachers may also conceal low pay for young teachers.
Oklahoma ranks 49th in average teacher salary but jumps to 40th. Still low, to be sure, and cold comfort to Oklahoma teachers, but it’s nuance worth knowing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Good Leaders Make Good Schools”

After a contentious strike in 2012, Emanuel managed to extend the school day.
We’ve spent a lot of time over the past few decades debating how to restructure schools.
Researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of Toronto studied 180 schools across nine states and concluded, “We have not found a single case of a school improving its student achievement record in the absence of talented leadership.”
How do students feel about their schooling? How do they understand motivation? Do they have a growth mind-set to understand their own development?
These attitudes are powerfully and subtly influenced by school culture, by the liturgies of practice that govern the school day: the rituals for welcoming members into the community; the way you decorate walls to display school values; the distribution of power across the community; the celebrations of accomplishment and the quality of trusting relationships.
In some schools, teachers see themselves as martyrs in a hopeless cause.
At Independence Middle School in Cleveland, principal Kevin Jakub pushes a stand-up desk on wheels around the school all day.
A lot of teachers want to be left alone and a lot of principals don’t want to give away power, but successful schools are truly collaborative.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The ‘Problem Child’ Is a Child, Not a Problem”

Jessica found another school that uses C.P.S.C.P.S. was developed in the late 1990s by Dr. Ross Greene, now the director of a nonprofit called Lives in the Balance, and later expanded upon by Stuart Ablon, a psychologist who runs the Think:Kids program at Massachusetts General Hospital.
Many kids flounder when schools use the popular “Token economy” approach, which gives checkmarks or tokens for good behavior that students cash in for rewards.
The school recommended a special education classroom that used physical restraints and a plywood closet with padded walls for students to “Work out” their anger.
Christine ultimately got the school district to pay for Quinn to attend a private school that uses C.P.S., but it took an expensive lawsuit for which she had to borrow money from friends and hold public fund-raisers she found embarrassing.
Rea Powell, who teaches kindergartners with special needs at the Albert Bridge School, a public school in Brownsville, Vt., agrees.
Her colleague, the school counselor David Gale, sees our penchant for quick fixes as part of the problem.
Jessica Hannon believes Matt’s struggles in school could have been prevented if his teachers and family had built up his self-regulation skills in the early years.
Now an eighth grader, Matt has adjusted well to his new school and hopes to attend the local public high school next year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lawnmower parents are raising a generation of kids who struggle with adversity”

Much of our job as parents is to protect them from harm by being that filter that they don’t yet have for themselves.
In essence, these parents hover over their children, constantly pressuring them to accomplish tasks to perfection.
A newer, and in my opinion, more damaging parenting style has developed over the past decade and become kindly known as Lawnmower Parenting.
These are parents who constantly clear all obstacles from their children’s paths so they never have to deal with problems for themselves.
Second, because our kids grow up without experiencing much or even any failure in their lives, they have no coping mechanisms to overcome adversity.
If parents continue to lawnmower and insist that we teachers serve as their lawnmower liaisons in the classroom, nobody wins.
If we all recognize the need to let kids struggle in a safe, recoverable environment, we can all work together to best prepare them for an increasingly unapologetic world.
If we can learn to stop deflecting failure, to stop mowing that lawn, educators and parents can collaboratively support our kids as they build the confidence to knock those weeds over themselves.

The orginal article.