Summary of “New Managers Should Focus on Helping Their Teams, Not Pleasing Their Bosses”

When I first became a manager – an unexpected promotion soon after taking a new job – I found myself feeling awkward about the fact that I had been elevated above my peers.
The irony for most newly appointed managers is that the skills and qualities that earned them the promotion are very different from those that will serve them well as a leader, and they’re often left to figure it out on their own, like I was – and not always successfully.
You can’t help but wonder how many of the managers at rapidly growing companies, such as Uber, had any management experience and training before they assumed positions of power.
Harvard Business School professor Francis Frei, who was recently recruited by Uber to help with the company’s leadership and sexual harassment scandals, points out that the instant conclusion might be that the transportation company has bad managers.
She told Marketplace, those managers haven’t been given the guidance they need.
“It turns out we have not been giving leadership training to our managers,” she observed.”So the managers haven’t been set up for success.
When I finally focused on being a real leader, instead of a nervous new manager, I started asking my colleagues how we could best get the work done rather than simply figuring it out by myself.
“You’ll probably be feeling pretty overwhelmed as a new manager,” Hill says.”You’ll need to make sure you take care of yourself emotionally too, so you can be available for other people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Sean Marks Is Lifting the Nets Out of the Abyss”

Over the weekend, the Nets landed DeMarre Carroll and the Raptors’ first- and second-round picks in 2018 for Justin Hamilton, an NBA rotation player who, if we’re being honest, is probably better known as an unlikely narrative device in Zach Lowe’s column on the NBA’s scoring explosion last season than he is as a Nets big man.
To understand what GM Sean Marks has accomplished in his year and a half with the team, you have to hold your nose and take a dive back into that abyss.
In a short time Marks has constructed an identity for the Nets from a transactional perspective: They might be the pettiest little team in the league.
Since Marks took office, the Nets have signed offer sheets with four different restricted free agents and haven’t landed a single one.
The Nets still have one more year of purgatory left to go - no matter how well or how poorly they play next season, they will forfeit their first-round pick to Boston - so loading up on expensive, ineffective players doesn’t exactly affect what the Nets are hoping to achieve.
“So it’s not like last year when there were a couple dozen teams that could offer big salaries. It’s shrinking as it goes. There’s no secret out there now. Every team knows we’ve got plenty of cash to spend and maneuver around. We’ll just be strategic in how we do it.”
Three years ago, a painfully mediocre Brooklyn Nets team paid nearly $90.6 million in luxury tax, a record-obliterating figure that, despite a windfall in team spending power over the past two seasons, has yet to be matched, let alone topped.
True to their strategy, in proving that there is no such thing as an untradable contract, the Nets are also proving that there is no such thing as an unsavable team.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA’s Salary Cap Is Normalizing. How Will Teams Adjust?”

In 13 years, the cap rose about as much as it did just last summer, when the NBA’s big cap boom rocketed the figure from $70 million in 2015-16 to $94.1 million in 2016-17.
You could say those teams were negligent - and you’d be right - but they operated under the assumption that the cap would keep surging.
If teams do want to splurge in free agency, they’ll need to strategically create cap space, just like they did not too long ago.
As Adrian Wojnarowski said on The Ryen Russillo Show, teams are already trying to figure out how to get Giannis Antetokounmpo out of Milwaukee, and the same can be applied to Anthony Davis, or even John Wall after he hesitated signing an extension this summer with the Wizards.
How Strong Is Your GM’s Investment Portfolio?In the meantime, teams will need to spend smartly and sign contracts that maximize their position, given the cap climate.
Teams that will be under the cap, including the Lakers, Hawks, and Suns, are loading up on cap space, putting themselves in position to pounce on opportunities.
Teams over the cap, such as the Rockets and Celtics, retain similar flexibility, even after their splash acquisitions this summer, with their mixture of assets and movable contracts.
The smartest teams that cleverly manipulate their contracts to best take advantage of the new cap will be rewarded.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe’s NBA free agency winners and losers”

Next summer, we could enter free agency with only three or four teams hoarding that much space.
Meet the new NBA, same as the old NBA. Teams will have to get more creative, and perhaps take on more risk, in swaps of players making big money over multiple years.
Internal development matters more than ever; teams can go over the cap to re-sign their own players, and for most of the league, that will be the most accessible path to improvement.
Nabbing Paul Millsap on a three-year deal, with a team option in Year 3, is a home run for Denver.
Three seasons ago, Suns owner Robert Sarver proposed seeding postseason teams 1-16 by record regardless of conference.
“The Eastern teams don’t like it.” The league has argued that schedule imbalance and over-long travel make a 1-16 system too cumbersome.
The Blazers are coming off a.500 season, and at least two teams below them – the Wolves and Nuggets – are primed for a leap.
The Clips are also one of many teams that talked with the Celtics about three-team deals in which they would snag one of Boston’s cap casualty wings, sources say.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The NBA’s Treadmill of Mediocrity”

No Sixers player in Game 4 had more than 16 points, the team took 11 3-point shots, Turner did not look like a no.
Collins stepped down at the end of the 2012-13 season, Sam Hinkie fully took over the team, and the rest is the Process.
A player like LeBron James and a team like the Warriors asks us to look outside of the moment, I guess.
So a capped-out Sixers team that was paying Elton Brand $16 million tanked its way to multiple lottery picks, hoping at least one hit the jackpot.
Portland is good but not great; Toronto is great during the regular season and good during the playoffs, which is ultimately bad. There are already rumors about teams trying to pry Giannis Antetokounmpo from Milwaukee, and we’re already making preparations for Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins’s exit from New Orleans.
The Thunder are a six- to 12-month experiment, LeBron could exit Cleveland next summer, leaving the team as it was before he returned.
Only five teams can look themselves in the mirror and say that the Finals are a realistic goal.
Such is our disdain for competence, for OK, for actually not bad that we are more enamored with a Phoenix roster, half of which is made up of people who can’t legally buy a beer, than we are a Wizards team that features one of the best backcourts in basketball - a Wizards team that will be screwed if it chooses to keep its third-best player.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Manage Your Star Employee”

How do you manage someone who is knocking it out of the park? How do you keep stars excited about their work? And what risks should you watch out for?
Whether your star performer has just joined your team or has been working for you for a while, here are some tips on how to manage her.
Another way to ensure your star employee stays engaged and excited about coming to work is to “Give her more autonomy,” Shapiro says.
“Ask your rock star to work with other people on the team to mentor them and develop them.”
You don’t want to “Get into the habit of feeding an ego.” She recommends giving your stars “The appropriate amount of feedback” by “Acknowledging their contributions.” If your star executed a project beautifully or made a stellar presentation, say so.
“You want to give [all] the tasks to the rock star, because you know the rock star will get the job done,” Shapiro says.
Demonstrate trust by delegating responsibility over certain projects and letting your star decide how she does the work.
Overload your star employee – otherwise you risk burning him out.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 10 Best Teams in a Wild Western Conference”

Despite a commanding 2016-17 season that vaulted Golden State into the discussion of the greatest team of all time, the league isn’t bowing out.
The West has loaded up on weapons and teams are charging back at the Warriors in full force.
The West is going to be an 82-game joyride, and there are as many as 12 teams with a legitimate claim to one of the conference’s eight playoff slots.
San Antonio GM R.C. Buford saw Jimmy Butler, Chris Paul, and Paul George all switch teams, blinked once, and re-signed Patty Mills to a four-year, $50 million deal.
True to the way they’ve moved in the shadows as a team of the future over the past couple of seasons, they agreed to a deal with Paul Millsap, a star player so nondescript it’s fair to wonder if he even has a pulse.
The Millsap signing is significant; early last season, I asserted that, regardless of his on-court personality, “Millsap is just plain really good - LeBron, but cut from limestone instead of marble.” He fills all the holes the Nuggets had last season, immediately becomes the team’s best defender and most versatile offensive player with Danilo Gallinari gone to the Clippers.
The Nuggets will be in a rare situation where their two starting frontcourt players in Millsap and Nikola Jokic are the two best passers on the team, so you can expect a lot of high-low action and dribble handoffs to free up their excellent spot-up shooters in Jamal Murray and Gary Harris.
At least five of these teams would make it in the East.For what they are, I’m still bullish on the Clippers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe, Brian Windhorst on Milwaukee Bucks ownership and Giannis Antetokounmpo”

In the modern NBA, that means the Milwaukee Bucks are now on the clock.
For the Bucks to reach their potential and maximize the impact of Antetokounmpo’s prodigious talent, they have to navigate a sticky ownership situation that manifested itself over the past few weeks.
The Bucks made the playoffs and had quite the moment just Monday when Antetokounmpo was awarded Most Improved Player and Malcolm Brogdon was named Rookie of the Year, marks of an ascendant team.
Bucks ownership declined to comment for this article.
With the cost of franchises ballooning, it can be hard to find owners with pocket as deep as those of the Clippers’ Steve Ballmer, and coalitions are sometimes needed, as was the case when Herb Kohl wanted to sell the Bucks to a new owner who wouldn’t move the team from Milwaukee.
Still, he saw the writing on the wall, especially after the Bucks granted permission for him to interview for team president with the Orlando Magic in May. Hammond didn’t get that job, but longtime friend Jeff Weltman did, and soon Hammond was joining him as Magic GM on a five-year contract Milwaukee wasn’t willing to match.
With the search bogged down and complicated, NBA commissioner Adam Silver advised the Bucks, according to sources, to consider former Cavs and Hawks GM Danny Ferry, who is currently a consultant for the Pelicans.
The Bucks reached out to Ferry, and he was open to discussing the job, but a formal interview was never scheduled, sources said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An 11-Step Guide to Saving the Clippers”

Kudos to Doc for saving the Clippers franchise during the Sterling debacle; without him, a rudderless and distraught organization would have imploded.
Anyone who coaches an NBA team AND runs an NBA team fails miserably.
You want the Banana Boat reunion? You want LeBron, Paul George, and Russell Westbrook? Pick your superteam! Pick your coach! Pick your GM!The Clippers couldn’t win a title last season, and they definitely couldn’t win one this season.
The city’s love for the Lakers became more pronounced - you could feel it every time a Clipper got booed at a Dodgers game, or every time a more famous NBA team passed through Clipperland and drew 6,000-7,000 fans.
In the old days, people bought Clippers season tickets because it was a cost-effective way to see NBA basketball, and stars on other teams.
Two NBA teams, two baseball teams, two NFL teams, two MLS teams, two NHL teams, two major college football/basketball programs, and every conceivable musical act you’d ever want to see.
Seattle not having an NBA team is dumber than James Dolan having an NBA team.
The truth is, Los Angeles shouldn’t have two basketball teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Analytics Are Used in the NFL”

SMARTER FOOTBALL WEEK: A series examining the cerebral side of the sport, including technology, analytics, how a brainy linebacker prepares and just what goes into a typical NFL play.
So here’s where you start: The reason there isn’t an NFL team ignoring analytics is because analytics has been done in football since Paul Brown came along.
How is that possible? Well, as Jaguars SVP of football technology and analytics Tony Khan-the son of owner Shahid Khan-explains it: “The adoption rate is far behind other sports.” More than three-quarters of NFL teams employ either a director of analytics or have a full-blown analytics department.
“So let’s say you’re playing Cincinnati, and you want to look at their tendencies when they’re in base personnel. You might wind up with 40 snaps out of 280. And then you’ll make a judgment. Well, of those 40, how many were on third down? How many came on second down?”.
HOW PRO FOOTBALL FOCUS CAME TO BE: In 2015, Jenny Vrentas told the story of how an Englishman who never played the game abandoned a profitable business to run an NFL advanced stats website.
“There are very, very few examples of an NFL player who produced a lot of sacks that wasn’t able to run a 10 time around 1.6,” says Banner, who established an analytics department in Philly in 1995.
Along those lines, ex-Browns GM Phil Savage used to send his scouts out for school visits after they were in-house for training camp with the warning: Now, remember, you were just watching NFL players.
As Kelly’s teams used it, individual profiles were built on players to provide coaches a roadmap for how hard guys were working, how far they could be pushed, and when they were at risk to suffer soft-tissue injuries.

The orginal article.