Summary of “The Little Parts of a Basketball Game Are What Make the NBA So Fun”

The way some players have little routines or habits that you can grab ahold of and mimic.
When my wife gave birth to our twin sons, the first thing I did when the doctor handed me one of the boys was hold him the way Tim Duncan would hold the basketball before every Spurs game.
The way a player will solemnly tap himself on the chest twice on the way back down the court as a way to acknowledge the mistake he’s just made.
This is a good way to acknowledge a mistake on a basketball court, yes, but that’s it.
The way a player will give low fives to the other players on his team after he shoots his first free throw.
The way a player will point to someone on his team after a made bucket as a way to acknowledge an assist.
If you were to gather every one of the little parts of watching basketball that make it great and so much fun, the thing where you read a player’s lips and can figure out what he’s saying is hands down, far and away, no question about it, the very best thing.
The two lined up next to each other during free throw shots, and Randolph, who is perfect in every way, said to Cousins, “Where I’m from, the bullies get bullied. In my hood, bullies get bullied.” And, definitely, it was excellent because that’s such a fucking gnarly thing to say DeMarcus, who is a wonderful NBA bully.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jony Ive Dishes On Apple Rumors And His Design Team In Rare Interview”

The topics covered ranged from how Apple really designs its next iPhone to what it’s like building the future while the blogosphere shares Apple rumors and rants.
Apple is the most valuable company in the world, but Ive has kept his design team small.
The industrial design team still numbers just 20 in all.
That’s the point that’s so important you get to as a team.
So just what is that small design team doing that makes it so successful? It’s entirely a matter of process, Ive insists, built upon multi-decade relationships of respect and trust.
Criticisms have come from all angles on Apple’s new $5 billion “Spaceship.” The most notable, to me, was by the original Googleplex designer Clive Wilkinson, who questioned whether Apple could really conceive of the practicalities of working inside a 2.9 million-square-foot ring.
Ive drew a line on this topic, for the first and only time in the interview, insisting that it was a scenario where Apple knew best.
Ive points out that the new building will allow the entire design team-not just the smaller industrial design arm-to be unified for the first time in Apple’s recent history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Miami Marlins’ Giancarlo Stanton Trade Is a Baseball Disgrace”

On Saturday morning, the Marlins reached an agreement to trade Giancarlo Stanton – or more accurately, trade a reported $265 million of his contract – to the New York Yankees for second baseman Starlin Castro and prospects Jorge Guzman and Jose Devers.
At a time when good relief pitchers can net teams multiple top-100 prospects, the Marlins have ripped their team up by the roots to trade Stanton, and received only two underwhelming prospects in return, along with Castro, an OK big league second baseman, who will no doubt soon be traded himself, because he’s due almost $24 million over the next two years, and the Marlins brass has promised investors that the team’s payroll will shrink from about $115 million last Opening Day-already in the bottom third of the MLB payroll rankings-to somewhere in the neighborhood of $55 million, which is about a third of the MLB median.
Miami is now without not only Stanton but Dee Gordon, sold to Seattle along with $1 million in international bonus money-the cheapest way for savvy teams to acquire talent-for a bag of magic beans.
Where’s the path back to the playoffs for Miami, particularly when they’re committed to running a payroll that wouldn’t keep the lights on in the NHL? There are situations in which the best thing a team can do for its own medium- and long-term competitive interest is rebuild.
Not only is that contrary to what we know about the Bruce Sherman-led investment group that bought the team in September-where should they spend that money if not on the NL MVP? Nor should we take at face value-or worse, repeat-claims that the Marlins can’t afford to keep Stanton.
Sherman has broken faith with the city that supports his franchise-and for all the jokes about Marlins Park being empty all the time, the team sold 1.65 million tickets last year, which was 27th in baseball but still actual millions-for the purpose of paying down some $400 million in debt resulting from the purchase of the team, and presumably selling the club for a profit when that’s done.
The baseball world should have known better than to greet Sherman’s purchase of the team as a relief.
Sherman, for all the immense consequence of his investments over the years, maintains a low public profile-his public persona is mostly his lack of a public persona-and is described as “Shy” and “Publicity-averse.” What a savvy strategy: If you’re making billions torching newspapers and baseball teams, why would you want publicity?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Patriots May Have Fixed Their Fatal Flaw”

A 16-0 season was always going to be a long shot-the NFL season is long and a lot of wild things can happen-but the dream of the Patriots running the table died an early death when they lost their opener to the Chiefs in Foxborough.
Fast-forward nine weeks and the early-season concern that an uncharacteristic, historically bad Patriots defense would foil New England’s shot at its sixth championship has been quashed.
The Patriots have won eight in a row, and, in that stretch, the defense has given up just 11.8 points per game-best of any team in the league.
The Patriots have made their money over the past nine weeks in that area, and in that stretch they’ve been the third-best defensive red zone in the NFL. On the year, New England’s given up a touchdown on just 45 percent of its opponents’ red zone trips-seventh best leaguewide.
The Patriots defense benefits from playing with one of the league’s top offenses and a very good special teams group.
With Brady at the helm, an average defense could be good enough to make the Patriots the clear AFC favorites.
There’s a two-week overlap here, but consider this: The Patriots have transformed from the first team in NFL history to allow a 300-yard passer in six straight games to the first group in Belichick’s tenure in New England to hold eight straight opponents to under 20 points.
Early in the year, it seemed that for the Patriots and their league-worst defense to make any postseason noise, they’d need a 40-year-old Brady to drag them along, scoring 35 points a game-with little margin for error.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Golden State Warriors’ Go-to Guy Doesn’t Play a Minute”

Housen spent the second half in the locker room, where he supervised the caterers who were assembling dinner.
Housen took a seat and sent his daily group text, complete with bus and airplane emojis, that detailed the team’s schedule for the next day.
After a pair of buses delivered the players and staff to their downtown hotel, Housen headed to the arena, where he spent the next three hours unloading equipment in the visiting locker room.
Housen wanted to be back at the hotel so he could check in with the chef before any of the players arrived for breakfast.
Housen, who does not consider himself a sommelier, leans on Stephen Curry and Shaun Livingston for wine expertise.
Housen knows his players’ habits and daily rhythms.
“He’s the only guy I’ve ever had who uses a blow dryer,” Housen said.
So Housen tucks one into Pachulia’s locker before every game – and keeps a spare on hand in case the first one breaks.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s It Like to Watch a Chargers Game at the StubHub Center?”

If the Chargers cannot fill a 27,000-seat stadium to the brim, how the hell will they fill the 70,000-seater they have coming in 2020? The Chargers fans who were there were louder than you’d think, and this is not meant to besmirch them.
Despite having a large fan base in San Diego that, at the very least, was aware the team played in the city, the Chargers left to chase L.A. revenues.
The Los Angeles Times counted 24 fans at a training camp practice when the Chargers visited Carson in 2003.
“But I had no idea the Chargers had that many fans here.” Essentially, the Chargers knew what they were getting themselves into and did it anyway.
When something bad happens to the Chargers and the visitors cheer, the Chargers fans boo in retaliation.
When kicker Travis Coons knocked a field goal off the upright to miss in the first half, Browns fans rejoiced and Chargers fans booed, but it soundly simply like Chargers fans were booing Coons mercilessly.
On Sunday, Browns fans proved to be more entertaining and organic than the Chargers fans.
So maybe the only way the Chargers can make this work is to be counterintuitive: never leave the StubHub Center.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Build a Successful Team”

Building a successful team is about more than finding a group of people with the right mix of professional skills.
Over the course of interviewing over 500 leaders for Corner Office, I asked them all about the art of fostering a strong sense of teamwork.
Their insights can help you lay the groundwork for a highly productive team that can communicate, cooperate and innovate in an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Jayson Tatum’s Success Tells Us About the Future of NBA Drafting”

Stevens has gone deep into his bench without Hayward, with 11 players getting regular playing time.
The wings in Boston are playing more than the big men and point guards combined.
Big men played at the 4 and 5, wings played at the 2 and 3, and point guards played all of the minutes at the 1.
In today’s more fluid era, wings get most of the playing time at the 2, 3, and 4 positions, and there are even situations when they play at the 1 and 5.
With so many teams playing wings at the 4, there are fewer minutes available for bigs than ever before.
Logjams up front form quickly, and big men who can’t get playing time have no trade value.
Regardless of whether those wings are better players in a vacuum than their peers, their value is going to rise on draft night because it will be easier for teams to fit them into their system.
Most lottery teams don’t have All-Stars at point guard and center, and he has benefited immensely from playing with Kyrie and Horford.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Robert Covington Is the NBA’s Best Undrafted Player”

No one is more inextricably tied to the Process than Robert Covington.
Through a quarter of the young season, Covington, who will turn 27 next month, has transformed into one of the league’s premier 3-and-D wings - the perfect complement to ball-dominant rising stars Embiid and Ben Simmons.
Currently averaging 14.9 points, 6.2 rebounds, 1.7 assists, and 1.7 steals per game, Covington is among the league leaders in made trifectas and 17th in steals per game.
Following the 2013 draft, Covington signed with the Houston Rockets but spent most of the season with the 3-point-heaving Rio Grande Valley Vipers, a team that served as a petri dish for Daryl Morey’s grand analytical experiment.
Ben Falk, who was the Sixers’ vice president of basketball strategy during Hinkie’s tenure, recalled when Covington first joined the relatively barren Philly roster.
Covington is tied for 17th in the league in steals per game and was, respectively, sixth and 14th in steals percentage over the two prior seasons.
Covington credits the Sixers coaching staff, along with his time in the weight room and studying film, for his defensive improvement, and said he wasn’t even aware of his freakish ability to clamp mitts on the ball until the team started monitoring deflections.
Robert Covington is not only part of the story, but someone who deserves a ballad of his own.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Westbrook, Durant, and the Rules of NBA Revenge”

Which brings us to a sacred event in sports: the Revenge Game, in which the primary motivation for winning, or performing in outstanding fashion, is a grievance.
In a world where money rules the day and titles are the ultimate measure of success, where the respective goals of athletes, teams, and fans are rarely aligned, where big-market superteams run roughshod over the competition, the Revenge Game offers something vital and rare: justice.
The best way to simulate the deceit vital to a satisfying act of revenge is to constantly deny that the game in question is in any way about revenge.
For a game to be considered a Revenge Game, vengeance must be the primary motivation.
Counter-counterintuitively to what I just wrote, elimination games are the best Revenge Games.
The You Didn’t Believe in Me When a team trades a player against his will, and that player returns to torch his former employer, that’s a YDBiM. Fear of this type of Revenge Game is why many teams take care to deal star players only to teams outside of their division and conference.
The You Talkin’ to Me? When a player or coach, on purpose or by accident, through word or deed, insults another player, causing that player to seek revenge, that’s a YTtM. Example: In January 1997, Michael Jordan avenged himself on Jeff Van Gundy and the Knicks after JVG referred to MJ as “a con man.” Jeff’s reasoning was that MJ “Used” his relationships with other players as a way to charm and disarm them, thus making them easier to beat.
The Lawn Mower When a coach or team executive maligns a player - or, if the player perceives that to be the case, even if that’s not accurate - the ensuing Revenge Game is known as a Lawn Mower.

The orginal article.