Summary of “The Secret History of Black Baseball Players in Canada’s Great White North”

“The Negro Leagues were employing a lot of guys,” says Bob Kendrick, President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, “But with the integration of our game, a lot of older players lost their jobs.”
The Negro Leagues toiled, and though the last teams held out until the mid-1960s, many baseball historians and former players consider 1950 – when the Negro National League folded – to be the last year of high-quality play in the league’s proud history.
“People don’t really think about what happened after Jackie Robinson integrated baseball, beyond that the race barrier disappeared and the Negro Leagues started to decline,” says Leslie Heaphy, a history professor at Kent State University who has written and edited six books on baseball.
Jay-Dell Mah, who co-wrote a book with Barry Swanton titled Black Baseball Players in Canada, says, “Tons of baseball leagues started to form, just about everywhere you went, all through the prairies.”
Canada’s black population was still miniscule, but as Western Canadians became baseball-crazy over the next few decades, African American ballplayers went north during Negro League off-seasons to play in exhibition games and tournaments – a practice called “Barnstorming” – usually against all-white local teams.
The Buffaloes’ party, thrown at a deluxe hotel in Downtown Winnipeg, on the dime of their cigar-chomping, white owner Stanley Zeed, saw nine aging Negro League veterans – averaging 35 years old – celebrate with black up-and-comer teammates, taking advantage of the opportunity for baseball seasoning up north.
“Like in the States, Canadian owners simply wanted to put the best team forward,” Leslie Heaphy says, “And they were very willing to look anywhere.” Dr. Layton Revel of the Center for Negro League Baseball Research says during this era about five hundred African American ballplayers found their way up to Canada, where teams like the Buffaloes were so well-funded that – in contrast to the Negro Leagues at that time – players above the border “Didn’t have to worry about their team folding or getting their paychecks on time. They just worried about playing baseball.”
Ron Teasley, a Detroit native who played for the Dodgers organization in the minor leagues, and the New York Cubans of the Negro Leagues, says he earned some of the best money of his career with the Carman Cardinals in the Great White North.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Things Leaders Do That Make Employees Quit”

Perhaps their most impressive, and relevant, capability is predicting which employees will quit.
The good news is that only about a quarter of employees that leave do so within their first year.
When employees are forced to choose between tasks in order to meet competing expectations, the result is a team of stressed out people without clear priorities.
Employees who are constantly crunched for time tend to get burned out faster, which impacts the quality of their deliverables.
It’s not uncommon for employees in this situation to leave and seek out a company with a more sustainable work culture.
The net result is a lack of work satisfaction and engagement, forcing employees to finally ask whether this job is the right fit for them.
Employees who do not feel psychologically safe are more prone to error, and less likely to take risks, participate in healthy conflict, or grow in their roles.
Leaders who are fair – without bias – are leaders who employees can trust, and a trusting manager-employee relationship “Defines the best workplaces,” improves performance, and is good for revenue.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Football League Was Built For Girls Who Love To Hit”

Her husband is a coach on the West Jordan boys high school football team and now her two daughters and three nieces are all signed up in the Utah Girls Tackle Football League.
The girls love football and they love the league, but when I ask them about playing sports at school, a lot of them look less happy.
That’s why the members of the Utah Girls Tackle Football League are suing their school districts.
If a school, for example, has one sport for boys and one sport for girls but 10 boys play that one sport and only two girls play, that school is not Title IX compliant.
There’s no other league of 500 girls playing tackle football in the entire country.
Football is a contact sport, and the girls’ tackle football league knows that.
“You always know who is going to stay in the sport after you start full hitting. Some girls thrive on that. They don’t just love to play football, they love to hit.”
All of the parents and all of the girls in this league say that they’ve faced criticism from people who don’t think girls should be playing football, and don’t like that they hit each other.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Books Every New Graduate Should Read, According to a Dozen Business Leaders”

We asked a dozen business leaders-from CEOs of big companies and startups, to deans of leading business schools-what books they would put in the hands of a newly minted graduate.
The Boys in the Boat Daniel James Brown’s account of an underdog rowing team beating the elite squads of the US and Europe on its way to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin is “a vivid description of grit, hustle and, perseverance,” said Mark Hoplamazian, CEO of Hyatt, the hotel company.
Team of Teams Retired general Stanley McChrystal, who led US special operations in Iraq between 2003 and 2008, makes the case for a new way of organizing companies and work around small, nimble teams.
McCrystal shows “How the sum is greater than the parts,” said Bill Clough, CEO of CUI Global, a small industrial conglomerate, and a former police officer and air marshal.
“You can’t possibly know what happened unless you were there, and people don’t always act in rational ways,” said Kathryn Minshew, CEO of The Muse, a job-search site that targets millennials.
“It’s about the mythology of life,” said Rick Goings, former CEO of Tupperware, the houseware company.
“New graduates are charged with developing their relationships with society: family, co-workers, government,” said Jeff Jonas, CEO of SAGE Therapeutics, a biotechnology company.
“If you were a college student and you read that talked about it in a job interview, they’d be really impressed,” said Catherine Engelbert, former CEO of Deloitte, an accounting and consulting firm.

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Summary of “When Teamwork Is Good for Employees”

From studying the effects of teamwork on employee wellbeing, I’ve found that a lot of this stress stems from the pressure that managers put on employees.
In workplaces where employees relied on each other to do their work, managers reported financial performance had improved, while employees expressed an increased sense of organizational commitment.
If employees felt a sense of pride in working for the organization, or if they shared many of the organization’s values, they reported feeling less stressed by teamwork than others who were not as committed to the organization.
In these cases, managers did not afford employees enough opportunities to develop their skills through training, nor did they give employees the freedom to influence their work responsibilities.
In short: the main barriers to team performance were poor relations between managers and employees, which caused constant disputes and made employees feel more stressed at work.
Teamwork isn’t going away any time soon, but it’s important for managers and employees to understand the potential ‘dark side’ that comes with having to work closely alongside others.
In cases where employees are faced with conflicting demands, managers should highlight possible areas of concern – like time constraints, strict deadlines or any other issues that may come up- so that employees have a better understanding of their roles or what is expected of them.
If teamwork is done properly, employees will be happier and the benefits of working together will be more sustainable.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to address the pitfalls of remote work”

The 2019 State of Remote Work report published by social media management platform Buffer found that 99% of respondents want to work remotely at least part of the time for the rest of their careers.
Even though remote work is popular, it’s still not perfect.
“One of the things people miss out on the most is that communication and connection, especially in a situation where you have a company that has both office workers and remote workers, because they might not be considering this,” Griffis says.
While in-office employees have the physical separation of an external workplace as well as the psychological cues of shutting down work and leaving the office, people who work from home may feel like they never leave work.
The Buffer survey found that 22% of workers struggle with disconnecting from work.
Left to their own devices, remote workers can respond more negatively about work than in-office peers.
An August 2019 report from HR software firm Ultimate Software titled “The Remote Workforce Becomes the Empowered Workforce” found that remote workers are 40% more likely to have been promoted within the past year.
To quell those fears, remote workers need to be informed of performance expectations and the opportunities for growth that exist, says leadership expert Kevin Eikenberry, author of The Long-Distance Leader: Rules for Remarkable Remote Leadership.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Ways Leaders Delegate Successfully”

A 2015 Gallup study of the entrepreneurial talents of 143 CEOs on the Inc. 500 list showed that companies run by executives who effectively delegate authority grow faster, generate more revenue, and create more jobs.
According to John C. Maxwell, author of Developing the Leaders Around You, “If you want to do a few small things right, do them yourself. If you want to do great things and make a big impact, learn to delegate.”
Senior leaders often struggle with knowing what they can delegate that would actually feel helpful to them, or how to delegate responsibility and not just tasks, or what responsibilities could serve as a learning and growth opportunity for others below them.
Senior executives may not have had role models along the way to show them how to delegate successfully.
In his book, The Art of Being Unreasonable, author, philanthropist, and billionaire CEO Eli Broad writes, “The inability to delegate is one of the biggest problems I see with managers at all levels.”
Before leaders can successfully and effectively delegate, they need to understand their own resistance.
A senior sales leader might want to delegate follow-up calls to big customers to his sales team, but realizes that he hasn’t updated his notes in the CRM database, or he might simply be in the habit of making the follow-up calls himself before members of the team can get to them.
Delegating well helps leaders maximize their resources, ensuring that they’re focusing on their highest priorities, developing their team members, and creating a culture where delegation isn’t just expected – it’s embedded in the culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Dad Taught Me How To Deal With Bullies, Because He Was One”

Experiences like learning my multiplication tables taught me a lot about bullying.
Bullies bully to be in control because they feel powerless themselves.
I came to realize that bullying is situational; bullies usually only bully under certain circumstances.
Bullies follow patterns of their own design, inevitably turning their victims into skilled observers of human behavior.
My father’s bullying was out in the open, overt and aggressive.
Bullying to Hide Insecurity Paul is an account director with a bad habit: He makes creative commitments to clients without consulting his team, earning him the nickname “PowerPoint Paul,” because he once went into a slide deck overnight to change a design to something he thought the client would like better.
Whenever my father was bullying me, I was unable to do anything but shut down and take it.
Bullies can leave you feeling ashamed or unworthy of others’ respect, and the tendency is to isolate yourself so others don’t see that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My Dad Taught Me How To Deal With Bullies, Because He Was One”

Experiences like learning my multiplication tables taught me a lot about bullying.
Bullies bully to be in control because they feel powerless themselves.
I came to realize that bullying is situational; bullies usually only bully under certain circumstances.
Bullies follow patterns of their own design, inevitably turning their victims into skilled observers of human behavior.
My father’s bullying was out in the open, overt and aggressive.
Bullying to Hide Insecurity Paul is an account director with a bad habit: He makes creative commitments to clients without consulting his team, earning him the nickname “PowerPoint Paul,” because he once went into a slide deck overnight to change a design to something he thought the client would like better.
Whenever my father was bullying me, I was unable to do anything but shut down and take it.
Bullies can leave you feeling ashamed or unworthy of others’ respect, and the tendency is to isolate yourself so others don’t see that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Put the Right Amount of Pressure on Your Team”

Somewhere in between these two extremes is the ideal level of stress; one that creates positive pressure in the direction of change without causing debilitating worry.
This magic zone is what John Kotter referred to as the “Productive Range of Distress.” This is an extremely useful concept for managers who are leading through change, but how do you take it from being conceptual to being real? How can you alter the levels of stress on your team? How do you know when you should intervene?
There are signs that the stress levels on your team aren’t sufficient to create meaningful change.
It’s tricky because some people will have an obvious, frenetic, or panicked stress response, whereas others will withdraw and direct their stress inward.
If you believe there is too little stress on your team and that it will take a little more discomfort before your employees are in the productive range of distress, you have a variety of options to choose from.
One of the worst things you can do when stress levels get too high is to jump in and solve the problem for your team.
In some cases, the stress levels of your team members will be uniformly high or low.
When different team members are experiencing the stress of the change differently, you’ll need to have more targeted one-on-one conversations that give you the opportunity to adjust the heat.

The orginal article.