Summary of “How Do You Talk to Your Patients About Death?”

Instead of admitting patients from the emergency room and addressing all of their medical problems throughout their hospital stay, I saw patients only when another doctor requested a consultation for a patient, usually to treat certain symptoms and to talk with patients and families about their treatment goals-what patients considered most important and dear to them when living with a serious illness.
I’d gone from assuming that many of my patients would live for years after their hospital stays to knowing that some of my patients would die within the coming weeks or months after returning home.
“No, it’s your first day! So on our team we have two nurses and an attending physician and me. Everyone usually shows up for rounds at 9:30 or so, and we will talk about each of the patients on our list. The attending this month is Dr. Harris, and she’ll assign you a few patients to see. Oh, and you’ll need that,” she said, motioning to a pager on the corner of my cubicle.
Businesslike and efficient as she introduced herself, Dr. Harris told me that her day was packed with meetings, but that she would assign me several patients to see and we would talk about them later in the afternoon.
Almost all of our patients required family meetings, and some also required better control of pain.
The biggest shift was my new relationship to language, my attention newly focused on the words I used with patients and colleagues, and the words I heard them use.
“Take note of how long the oncology fellow talks before allowing the family to speak.” The oncologist, a brown-haired man with a kind face, spoke for twenty-five minutes about the gravity of the patient’s diagnosis, the chemotherapies that theoretically could be used, and all the reasons why the patient was too sick to qualify for them.
A patient with a failing liver asked me how much time I thought he had to live and begged me not to mince my words.

The orginal article.

Summary of “It’s Time To Get Real About Digital Transformation”

For these leaders, and others like them, the challenge has been to use digital transformation to establish or maintain product leadership.
Declarations like, “Many factors, such as the economy or the desirability of your products, that can affect a company’s success as much or more than its digital capabilities” or “It is multi-faceted and diffuse, and doesn’t just involve technology” don’t tell us how to do things differently.
It’s my strong opinion, backed by dozens of interviews, that companies embarking on a digital transformation are trying to apply company level strategies to a product level problem.
Once the product organization has established it’s own Product Vision and Product Strategy, the executive leadership needs to support that with the company-level capabilities and resources.
In the first year or two of a companies life, it’s very common for the CEO to also have the original product vision and to lead the day-to-day product conversation.
With the support of the CEO the company needs to focus it’s transformation efforts on the product level.
Cognitive bias is at the root of many of the poor product decisions that get made by product companies.
Warning: Product Experience Teams will only work if you have a clear Product Vision, a Product Strategy, Priorities and Metrics to measure outcomes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Talented People Don’t Use Their Strengths”

It might never have been built, or at least Cave wouldn’t have built it, had it not been for his boss, Michelle McKenna-Doyle, CIO of the NFL. When McKenna-Doyle was hired, she observed that a number of her people were struggling, but not because they weren’t talented – because they weren’t in roles suited to their strengths.
Experts have long encouraged people to “Play to their strengths.” And why wouldn’t we want to flex our strongest muscle? But based on my observations, this is easier said than done.
Notice these moments: They can point to strengths that you underrate in yourself but are valuable to others.
When people bring up new ideas, you can ask them, Will this leverage what you do well? Are you doing work that draws on your strengths? Are we taking on projects that make the most of your strengths?
Brett Gerstenblatt, VP and creative director at CVS, has his team take a personality assessment, then post their top five strengths on their desk.
Brett wants people to wear their strengths like a badge.
As with McKenna-Doyle, building a team that can play to their strengths begins with analysis.
Then you can measure new ideas, new products, and new projects against these collective superpowers, asking: Are we playing to our strengths? When people feel strong, they are willing to venture into new territory, to play where others are not, and to consider ideas for which there isn’t yet a market.

The orginal article.

Summary of “NASA’s Mars rover Opportunity has died. Here’s what it gave humanity.”

After more than 14 years driving across the surface of Mars, the NASA rover Opportunity has fallen silent-marking the end of a defining mission to another world.
At a press conference at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, NASA bid farewell to the rover it placed on Mars on January 25, 2004: before Facebook, before the iPhone, and even before some of the scientists now in charge of it graduated high school.
NASA had not heard from the rover since June 2018, when one of the most severe dust storms ever observed on Mars blotted out much of the red planet’s sky and overtook the solar-powered rover.
Now, as Martian fall and winter overtake it, NASA says that the rover will remain forever paused halfway down a windswept gully, named Perseverance Valley for the rover’s dogged effort.
The announcement marks the end of the record-smashing Mars Exploration Rovers mission, which built and operated Opportunity and its sibling rover, Spirit.
Opportunity went farther for longer than any other vehicle on another world-and all other Mars rovers combined.
The children of mission scientists would hear of Opportunity almost as if the rover were a distant cousin.
Many alumni from Spirit and Opportunity are hard at work on the upcoming Mars 2020 rover, which will search for signs of past life and cache rock samples for future return to Earth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Highly Efficient Leaders Fail”

The high levels of efficiency that allow highly task-focused leaders to be so productive often come at the expense of a more people-based focus.
Highly efficient leaders often lose their focus on people due to a limiting belief that more people-focused activities will slow them down and impede their ability to execute, and to ultimately be successful.
The irony is that an intense focus on efficiency and getting things done makes these leaders less effective overall.
Great leaders are able to balance task-focus with people-focus.
Highly task-focused leaders tend to have tunnel vision in their drive for results, rather than applying a broader lens that recognizes the need to sometimes “Go slow to go fast”.
Leaders who balance task- and people-focus are equally driven and also strive for results, but they keep the broader organizational needs in mind.
In research conducted by Robert Anderson and William Adams for their book Scaling Leadership, they identified that the number one differentiator of effective leaders is strong people skills, and that six out of ten of their biggest strengths related to people skills such as listening, developing others, and empowering their team members.
Overly task-focused leaders also tend to be more reactive, operating from a position of fear, and often displaying highly directive, controlling, or perfectionist behaviors that can alienate others and be disempowering to their teams.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Leaders Can Open Up to Their Teams Without Oversharing”

We typically find leaders asking themselves how much of their own worries they should reveal when leading their team down a challenging or unfamiliar road. The best leaders are honest about how they feel while simultaneously presenting a clear path forward.
Once you identify your feelings, you need to know how to manage them.
Address your feelings without becoming emotionally leaky.
“The best thing to do is to cop to it. Say to your team, ‘I’m having a bad day, and I’m trying my best not to take it out on you. But if it seems like I’m having a bad day, I am. But it’s not because of you that I’m having a bad day. The last thing I want is for my bad day make your day worse.” You don’t have to go into more detail, but acknowledging your feelings helps you avoid creating unnecessary anxiety among your reports.
A good formula to follow is: “Because of , I’m feeling and. But here’s what I’m planning to do next to make it better:. And here’s what I need from you:. What do you need from me?” This will help you address your anxiety without projecting negative emotions onto your team.
A good rule of thumb for figuring out if you’re about to overshare is to ask yourself: “How would I feel if my manager said this to me?” If it’s something that you’d be thankful to hear, chances are your reports will feel similarly.
If you think members of your team might be feeling anxious about the project, it’s okay to surface those feelings to help them feel less isolated.
If everyone has been working long hours to meet an impending deadline, you might say something like, “I’m feeling a little tired today, but I’m grateful for how well we’ve worked together and that we’re set to send the client a proposal we can all be proud of.” Again, always try to pair realism with optimism, and share when you sense it will be helpful to others.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This new fabric will automatically cool you down when you get hot and sweaty”

A new fabric, developed by a team at the University of Maryland, is the first to automatically warm wearers up or cool them down as needed.
When you’re feeling hot and sweaty-when playing sports, say- the fabric lets infrared radiation pass through.
Each fiber expands or contracts when the temperature changes.
This process activates the nanotube coating, which lets heat pass through, almost like the body’s pores.
“It recognizes the way your body changes heat in different environments,” says study coauthor YuHuang Wang.
A team at Stanford created a similar fabric in 2017, but you had to reverse the garment to feel the effect.
There are yet to be full user tests, but the team says it feels like normal fabric.
One thing that might make that more likely: the material can be knitted, dyed, and washed just like any other fabric, which should make it more attractive to the average consumer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “An Unprecedentedly Thorough Evolution Experiment”

Once the team had Bill Ward on board, they ended up buying 30,000 pounds of stainless steel plates from a local hardware store, and carting them over to the farm using flatbeds and forklifts.
Mice could neither dig beneath the plates nor climb over them.
They were exceptionally good at sneaking through gaps where adjacent plates didn’t quite meet, so the team had to dig everything back up and pour concrete around the joints.
Nature itself seemed eager to select against the team.
On one trip, high winds almost flipped the truck carrying the steel plates.
Once, a team member fainted and cut himself on a piece of steel.
During winter, ramps of snow would accumulate along the walls, so the team had to add an extra layer of mesh along the plates.
As time passed, many of the mice fell prey to owls, but after three months, the team returned and recaptured the ones that were left.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Unlock Your Team’s Creativity”

If a team is creatively blocked, a first step for leadership is to examine whether the processes that surround people are holding them hostage in their thinking.
Reveal “Sticky floors.” Everyone possesses the foundation to become creative, which starts with team members believing in themselves as idea generators who have the ability to become a compelling voice for creative concepts.
As a leader, part of your role in managing teams is to use emotional intelligence to determine whether any team members are unknowingly holding themselves back from tapping into their talents and full potential.
If even one person hides their creative light under a bushel, the whole team suffers.
Take a proactive approach to address this issue: help the team member become aware of the sticky floor, and offer coaching and support around expressing innovative ideas within the team setting.
As part of coaching team members off of their sticky floors, it’s key to help them understand how to develop a growth mindset.
When encountering a sticky floor related to creativity, leaders should coach team members, explaining how the internal belief that they can become more creative helps them continue to develop their skills over time, learning from their mistakes and making improvements.
The goal of getting your team to think beyond the box is a no-brainer, but figuring out how to actually achieve greater group innovation isn’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why The NFL Can’t Rely On Defense”

A week later, Joey Bosa and the emerging Chargers defense were dismantled by the Patriots, and the Cowboys – perhaps the best defensive team left in the divisional round based on their end-of-season play – lost to the Rams.
Extracting the strong defensive teams with relatively weak offenses led to historically exciting playoff football, producing two overtime games in the championship round for the first time in NFL history.
Teams are more reliably good – and bad – from game to game and year to year on offense than on defense.
Home teams win about 73 percent of their games when they are plus-1 in turnover differential, according to data from ESPN’s Stats & Information Group, and the home team win rate climbs to more than 86 percent when it’s plus-2 or better.
Despite their clear importance, the number of turnovers a team creates in one season has no bearing on how many turnovers the team will create in the next.
Casting even more doubt on their ability to field an elite defense in back-to-back years, Chicago also lost its defensive coordinator, Vic Fangio, who left to become the head coach in Denver, further destabilizing the strength of the team.
Philadelphia led the league in QB hits but not sacks Total quarterback hits, sacks and expected sacks for teams’ defensive lines in the regular season, 2018.
If these teams generate similar pressure next season, we shouldn’t be surprised to see their sack totals rise just based on reversion to the mean.

The orginal article.