Summary of “The Digital Athletes of the Future: Earning $1.6 Million Behind a Keyboard”

If you’ve never watched a game of Dota 2 before, you might be overwhelmed at first.
In 2017, the premier competition, The International, hosted by the game’s creator, Valve, had over 92 million online viewers, the majority based in China.
While collectively over 509 million hours of play were watched, 465 million hours came from viewers there.
Earning a Living As a Professional GamerIvanov, who is based in Estonia, is better known in the professional gaming world as Puppey, captain of Team Secret.
While most professional athletes had trainers to help them gain the skills to go pro, most gamers who have reached the professional level did so without coaches or trainers.
While there are varying paths to success as a professional gamer, as Ivanov puts it bluntly, you just have to be really good.
“It’s similar for Dota, which has a very small window for success. There are 10 million players, and about 50 are kind of earning a good living right now. The others are in the middle.”
What’s changing is the acceptance of the career path and the profile of the professional gamer.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is Fandom Really Worth It?”

Following a loss, fans are more likely than usual to eat unhealthy food, be unproductive at work, and-in the case of the Super Bowl-die from heart disease.
What about fans of the winning team? Well, their testosterone levels tend to increase, which may account for why triumphant fans are more likely than other fans to suffer a postgame traffic fatality if the score was close.
Rival fans’ treatment of one another is hardly more reassuring.
A recent neuroimaging study found that fans experienced greater pleasure when watching a rival team fail, as opposed to non-rivals.
The same subjects were significantly more willing to heckle, threaten, or hit rival fans.
Fans in another study reported feeling schadenfreude when reading about the injury of a rival team’s player, and gluckschmerz when later reading about the player’s unexpectedly speedy recovery.
A landmark 1976 study described fans’ tendency to embrace a winning team as “Basking in reflected glory,” or birg.
Sports fans are inclined to respond to reminders of mortality with optimism, and to remember victories much more clearly than defeats.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Great Teams Are About Personalities, Not Just Skills”

If team fit were only about skills and experience, Donald Trump might invite Bernie Sanders to serve in his administration – yet it is unlikely that they would work together well.
A study of 133 factory teams found that higher levels of interpersonal sensitivity, curiosity, and emotional stability resulted in more-cohesive teams and increased prosocial behavior among team members.
Along the same lines, a large meta-analysis showed that team members’ personalities influence cooperation, shared cognition, information sharing, and overall team performance.
A useful way to think about teams with the right mix of skills and personalities is to consider the two roles every person plays in a working group: a functional role, based on their formal position and technical skill, and a psychological role, based on the kind of person they are.
In our own work we found that psychological team roles are largely a product of people’s personalities.
As the renowned teams researcher Suzanne Bell, who is working on the Mars project for NASA, put it: “We assume that astronauts are intelligent, that they’re experts in their technical areas, and that they have at least some teamwork skills. What’s tricky is how well individuals combine.”
The most successful teams get this mix of personalities right.
Dave Winsborough is the managing director of Winsborough Limited and the head of Hogan X. He has done extensive research on the role and performance of senior leadership teams and the personalities of chief executives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Will Cities Ever Outsmart Rats?”

Cities have entire teams dedicated to controlling the rat population, and for good reason.
Some cities are shifting gears to get one step ahead of the rats.
As program manager for Washington, D.C.’s Rodent Control Division, he’s considered a local rat guru-but the answer to his challenge may just come from someone who didn’t know anything about rats before this year.
The city of Chicago is still running Neill’s predictive analytics approach and has touted that it’s 20 percent more effective than the traditional method of baiting rats after they’ve been discovered.
His lab has captured more than 500 rats from almost all of the borough’s 40-some ZIP codes, and sequenced the genome of around 250 of them, looking to see how the rats relate to one another.
Rats in northern Manhattan are more closely related to one another than to rats farther south, and vice-versa.
“Rats start to split into two major groups right around Midtown, where you have kind of an uptown set of rats and a downtown set of rats,” Munshi-South tells CityLab.
Trapping rats is a feat in itself: rats are clever and don’t easily fall for new traps.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Speedgate, the sport invented by artificial intelligence – Experience Magazine”

Computers and games have enjoyed a wildly successful partnership for decades, and now comes word of a new collaboration: A field sport that combines elements of soccer, basketball, and Ultimate Frisbee.
Earlier this year, a team of designers in Portland, Oregon, tasked their artificial intelligence system with building a new team sport for us humans.
The designers wanted a game that was fun, easy to learn, and accessible for a broad range of players.
“For instance, the AI might say: ‘Game where for to hand ball throw two players jump and kick,'” Jenkins says.
“You take the output and tell the computer: ‘Say it like this: A game where two players kick and push a ball.’ You give that back, and the computer starts thinking that way. Eventually, the AI starts making suggestions like: ‘A game where anyone can pass and kick.'”.
Played by two teams of six, Speedgate is a fast-moving game in which players throw or kick a rugby training ball to teammates, but can’t run with or carry the ball.
Rew Wilson, a 22-year-old electrical engineer in Phoenix, read about Speedgate earlier this year and started a weekly game at a local park with friends from college.
Jenkins says it’s important to note that, while the game was technically “Invented” by artificial intelligence, it’s really more of a human-machine collaboration.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Secret History of Black Baseball Players in Canada’s Great White North”

“The Negro Leagues were employing a lot of guys,” says Bob Kendrick, President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, “But with the integration of our game, a lot of older players lost their jobs.”
The Negro Leagues toiled, and though the last teams held out until the mid-1960s, many baseball historians and former players consider 1950 – when the Negro National League folded – to be the last year of high-quality play in the league’s proud history.
“People don’t really think about what happened after Jackie Robinson integrated baseball, beyond that the race barrier disappeared and the Negro Leagues started to decline,” says Leslie Heaphy, a history professor at Kent State University who has written and edited six books on baseball.
Jay-Dell Mah, who co-wrote a book with Barry Swanton titled Black Baseball Players in Canada, says, “Tons of baseball leagues started to form, just about everywhere you went, all through the prairies.”
Canada’s black population was still miniscule, but as Western Canadians became baseball-crazy over the next few decades, African American ballplayers went north during Negro League off-seasons to play in exhibition games and tournaments – a practice called “Barnstorming” – usually against all-white local teams.
The Buffaloes’ party, thrown at a deluxe hotel in Downtown Winnipeg, on the dime of their cigar-chomping, white owner Stanley Zeed, saw nine aging Negro League veterans – averaging 35 years old – celebrate with black up-and-comer teammates, taking advantage of the opportunity for baseball seasoning up north.
“Like in the States, Canadian owners simply wanted to put the best team forward,” Leslie Heaphy says, “And they were very willing to look anywhere.” Dr. Layton Revel of the Center for Negro League Baseball Research says during this era about five hundred African American ballplayers found their way up to Canada, where teams like the Buffaloes were so well-funded that – in contrast to the Negro Leagues at that time – players above the border “Didn’t have to worry about their team folding or getting their paychecks on time. They just worried about playing baseball.”
Ron Teasley, a Detroit native who played for the Dodgers organization in the minor leagues, and the New York Cubans of the Negro Leagues, says he earned some of the best money of his career with the Carman Cardinals in the Great White North.

The orginal article.

Summary of “8 Things Leaders Do That Make Employees Quit”

Perhaps their most impressive, and relevant, capability is predicting which employees will quit.
The good news is that only about a quarter of employees that leave do so within their first year.
When employees are forced to choose between tasks in order to meet competing expectations, the result is a team of stressed out people without clear priorities.
Employees who are constantly crunched for time tend to get burned out faster, which impacts the quality of their deliverables.
It’s not uncommon for employees in this situation to leave and seek out a company with a more sustainable work culture.
The net result is a lack of work satisfaction and engagement, forcing employees to finally ask whether this job is the right fit for them.
Employees who do not feel psychologically safe are more prone to error, and less likely to take risks, participate in healthy conflict, or grow in their roles.
Leaders who are fair – without bias – are leaders who employees can trust, and a trusting manager-employee relationship “Defines the best workplaces,” improves performance, and is good for revenue.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Football League Was Built For Girls Who Love To Hit”

Her husband is a coach on the West Jordan boys high school football team and now her two daughters and three nieces are all signed up in the Utah Girls Tackle Football League.
The girls love football and they love the league, but when I ask them about playing sports at school, a lot of them look less happy.
That’s why the members of the Utah Girls Tackle Football League are suing their school districts.
If a school, for example, has one sport for boys and one sport for girls but 10 boys play that one sport and only two girls play, that school is not Title IX compliant.
There’s no other league of 500 girls playing tackle football in the entire country.
Football is a contact sport, and the girls’ tackle football league knows that.
“You always know who is going to stay in the sport after you start full hitting. Some girls thrive on that. They don’t just love to play football, they love to hit.”
All of the parents and all of the girls in this league say that they’ve faced criticism from people who don’t think girls should be playing football, and don’t like that they hit each other.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Books Every New Graduate Should Read, According to a Dozen Business Leaders”

We asked a dozen business leaders-from CEOs of big companies and startups, to deans of leading business schools-what books they would put in the hands of a newly minted graduate.
The Boys in the Boat Daniel James Brown’s account of an underdog rowing team beating the elite squads of the US and Europe on its way to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin is “a vivid description of grit, hustle and, perseverance,” said Mark Hoplamazian, CEO of Hyatt, the hotel company.
Team of Teams Retired general Stanley McChrystal, who led US special operations in Iraq between 2003 and 2008, makes the case for a new way of organizing companies and work around small, nimble teams.
McCrystal shows “How the sum is greater than the parts,” said Bill Clough, CEO of CUI Global, a small industrial conglomerate, and a former police officer and air marshal.
“You can’t possibly know what happened unless you were there, and people don’t always act in rational ways,” said Kathryn Minshew, CEO of The Muse, a job-search site that targets millennials.
“It’s about the mythology of life,” said Rick Goings, former CEO of Tupperware, the houseware company.
“New graduates are charged with developing their relationships with society: family, co-workers, government,” said Jeff Jonas, CEO of SAGE Therapeutics, a biotechnology company.
“If you were a college student and you read that talked about it in a job interview, they’d be really impressed,” said Catherine Engelbert, former CEO of Deloitte, an accounting and consulting firm.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When Teamwork Is Good for Employees”

From studying the effects of teamwork on employee wellbeing, I’ve found that a lot of this stress stems from the pressure that managers put on employees.
In workplaces where employees relied on each other to do their work, managers reported financial performance had improved, while employees expressed an increased sense of organizational commitment.
If employees felt a sense of pride in working for the organization, or if they shared many of the organization’s values, they reported feeling less stressed by teamwork than others who were not as committed to the organization.
In these cases, managers did not afford employees enough opportunities to develop their skills through training, nor did they give employees the freedom to influence their work responsibilities.
In short: the main barriers to team performance were poor relations between managers and employees, which caused constant disputes and made employees feel more stressed at work.
Teamwork isn’t going away any time soon, but it’s important for managers and employees to understand the potential ‘dark side’ that comes with having to work closely alongside others.
In cases where employees are faced with conflicting demands, managers should highlight possible areas of concern – like time constraints, strict deadlines or any other issues that may come up- so that employees have a better understanding of their roles or what is expected of them.
If teamwork is done properly, employees will be happier and the benefits of working together will be more sustainable.

The orginal article.