Summary of “How U.S. Soccer ignores talented Hispanic players like Jonathan Gonzalez”

All across the country, there are thousands of talented youth soccer players who never get spotted by the professional soccer apparatus.
Perhaps more concerning, many of the disadvantaged players who do find their way into the American soccer system against the odds eventually leave it after discovering they’re not valued as highly as players who were on a path towards a place in the Development Academy – the league for U.S. Soccer’s designated elite youth soccer clubs – from a young age.
“How many people in charge can relate to what’s going on with players? You have Hugo Perez – who was let go by the U.S. Soccer federation – who discovered Jonathan Gonzalez and valued him,” he says.
“The perception of Alianza is that they help Mexican teams, but I don’t think that’s true. They provide an opportunity for Hispanic players who are being passed up by our own system. MLS teams have forbidden players who play for their academies to go to Alianza and I don’t agree with that. We need to do what’s best for the players. I think U.S. Soccer should work with Alianza.”
“Right from the start, we showed those players how serious we are. The transition from the academy to the first team is clear to see with the players that we play and the players that we sell.”
Major League Soccer has a deep history of Hispanic outreach, especially with securing talented players and developing those athletes in MLS academies.
“You can look at Hispanic players and say they’re more technical and less athletic, but we’ve lost sight of how valuable those players can be.
How come these players are integral players in different teams, in different styles of soccer, but American soccer doesn’t see value in them?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “We Don’t Have the Numbers to Fully Appreciate the Patriots’ Dynasty”

Let’s run through the numbers of the Pats dynasty that you haven’t heard.
The Patriots are the most winning team of the Tom Brady-Belichick era and looking at their regular-season point differential, a simple metric that can be more informative than a team’s record, paints a picture of even greater dominance.
The Patriots are in a different galaxy at plus-2,534-more than double every team except no.
Yes, counting the playoffs, the Patriots are 82-24 against the AFC East since 2001, the best divisional mark in the league.
The Patriots are better against the AFC North, which includes rivals Pittsburgh and Baltimore, than they are against their own division.
The Patriots are nine-point favorites against Jacksonville, the biggest spread in a conference championship game since 2007, when the Chargers were 14-point underdogs against New England.
In the past 10 years, the Patriots have been an underdog a league-low 20 times, and that number should probably be lower.
Sin City is finally catching on: This season, the Patriots became the 19th team in a 16-game season to be favored in every game.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Best Restaurants in the World Balance Innovation and Consistency”

To receive three Michelin stars – the highest rating given by the prestigious Michelin Guide – restaurants must deliver a consistently flawless experience over many visits.
This kind of rigorous repetition would seem to stymie innovation – by limiting opportunities to learn from mistakes, to quickly prototype, or to search for new ideas – and innovation is another critical dimension for success in the high-end restaurant world.
It’s a main consideration for the similarly influential 50 Best Restaurants of the World list, which occasionally leads it to rewards different restaurants than Michelin.
Noma obtained the top spot in the 50 Best for its reinvention of Nordic Cuisine, while it was only granted two Michelin stars; and Paul Bocuse’s restaurant, the oldest restaurant with three Michelin stars, has served virtually the same menu for decades and has never made the 50 Best list.
A handful of extraordinary restaurants have managed to deliver both the flawless standards of three Michelin stars and the innovation demanded by the 50 Best list – and they’ve managed to leverage this acclaim to achieve growth.
Though the main restaurant closed in 2011, they subsequently reopened it as the ElBulli Foundation, while the other restaurants and business lines are still operating today.
While a dedicated lab expands a restaurant’s capacity for R&D, innovation more importantly has to be embedded in the DNA of the organization.
High-end restaurants that cannot afford a team and space solely devoted to R&D still make innovation a key value alongside consistency.

The orginal article.

Summary of “You Don’t Just Need One Leadership Voice”

We often equate developing a leadership voice with finding ways to come across or sound more confident.
You can build true confidence by more intentionally focusing on cultivating many different parts of your leadership voice each day.
Ultimately, you should cultivate enough parts of your voice so that, no matter the leadership situation or audience you find yourself facing, you can respond in an authentic, constructive, and effective way.
We often equate developing a leadership voice with finding ways to appear more confident.
Rather than living with imposter’s syndrome, or feeling exhausted by wearing your game face all day, you can build a truer confidence by more intentionally focusing on cultivating many different parts of your leadership voice each day.
Ultimately, you should cultivate enough parts of your voice so that no matter the leadership situation or audience you find yourself facing, you can respond in an authentic, constructive, and effective way.
What are the various voices to access within yourself and cultivate over time? And what are the situations that warrant each voice?
Use each situation as an opportunity to access more parts of your voice, rather than having a one-size-fits-all approach.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How the Rising Salary Cap Explains the 2017 NFL Playoffs”

“With the excessive amount of available cap space, close to a billion dollars-some teams can’t mentally keep up with that.”
The second-biggest change was a clause in the 2011 CBA that allowed teams to roll over unused cap space from year to year.
It may sound simplistic, but the cap is rising at such a rate, and the carryover money is so great, that most teams can do anything they want within reason to their roster.
“Any team who was bad with their salary cap in the past now has a get-out-of-jail-free card,” said Jason Fitzgerald, who runs Over the Cap, a salary cap website, and has consulted for NFL teams.
Even though the rising cap has allowed mismanaged teams countless do-overs, it’s also allowed the rich to get richer.
“Teams are more likely to trade than ever before-the teams that trade the player can better absorb the signing bonus they’d eat on the cap and the teams that get the player can carry the money on the cap. You’re also getting younger general managers who are more inclined to take risks.” Corry also points to the fact that stars like Sheldon Richardson, who went from the Jets to the Seahawks, can be traded on cut-down day.
In addition to giving top-tier contenders the ability to add a missing piece and encouraging thrifty teams to spend, the rising cap has also made, as Corry said, “Complete teardowns much easier.” Fitzgerald said that most teams now can pay so much to players that they can front-load contracts into two-year deals instead of three for the same amount of guaranteed money.
Banner points out that Roseman is smart enough to use his cap space to sign his current players to deals that work for both sides-maybe they seem like slight overpays now, but they will be a bargain compared to what would happen if they hit the open market and teams with $100 million to spend got to bid.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ranking easiest, toughest paths to Super Bowl LII win”

Getting to the Super Bowl can be as much about which teams you avoid as it is how you play.
After a wild-card round with two upsets, a back-and-forth shootout in New Orleans and a playoff game straight out of 1977 in Jacksonville, let’s plot out each team’s path to the Super Bowl and figure out who has the most generous route to Minneapolis for Super Bowl LII. I’ll include each team’s chances of winning the Super Bowl, according to ESPN’s Football Power Index, as well as one result that would make their lives much easier.
Tennessee also would be a comfortable underdog against any of the remaining NFC teams in the Super Bowl, barring an Eagles win combined with a season-ending injury to Nick Foles.
Foles & Co. will be underdogs against any non-Titans team in the Super Bowl and would likely be a double-digit underdog against the Patriots or Steelers.
Their 70.2 percent shot of playing the Steelers in that game makes it a little less exciting, but the Pats were favored to win in Pittsburgh by 2.5 points, which implies that they would be expected to win by more than a touchdown at home barring any new injuries.
Minnesota is laying 3.5 points at home against New Orleans this week in a game FPI projects them to win 68.1 percent of the time; the Vikings will almost surely be larger favorites in the NFC Championship Game if they win on Sunday.
The Vikings would be the first team in league history to play in the Super Bowl at their home stadium, which raises all kinds of questions.
The only game in which the Vikings are likely to be underdogs from here on out would be in the Super Bowl against the Patriots.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Treating Disease by Nudging the Microbes Inside Us”

The links between microbes and poor health can be more complicated.
For a start, it’s often unclear if the enteros cause the inflammation, if the inflammation changes the microbes, or both.
Even if the microbes are responsible, how do you fix that? Dietary changes are typically too imprecise.
Antibiotics are too crude, killing off beneficial microbes while suppressing the problematic ones.
By feeding mice small amounts of tungsten salts, Winter’s team managed to specifically prevent the growth of enteros, while leaving other microbes unaffected.
Many teams, for example, have shown how enteros both bloom in inflamed guts, and trigger inflammation themselves.
These microbes are typically found in low numbers because they need oxygen to grow, and the gut is an oxygen-free world.
Oxygen leaks through, and its presence allows enteros to devour a chemical called formate, produced by other gut microbes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Zach Lowe 10 things I like and don’t like, including LeBron James and Kevin Love”

You’re shooting 44 percent from deep! Things are going great!
The Clippers have scored 1.24 points per possession when Williams shoots out of an isolation play, or passes to a teammate who launches after one or zero dribbles – the third-highest figure among 91 guys who have run at least 50 isos, per Second Spectrum data.
LeBron James and Kevin Love, finally working together.
When Love played power forward, like-sized defenders switched this play, stalling it out.
The Cavs are running about 12.5 LeBron-Love pick-and-rolls per 100 possessions, up from 6.7 last season, per Second Spectrum data.
It’s just suboptimal for that player type to log two-thirds of his minutes alongside Zach Randolph or Kosta Koufos – dinosaurs who inhabit the same real estate.
Cauley-Stein is shooting 56 percent as the solo center, and 48 percent in all other minutes, per NBA.com.
The Blazers are down to 28th in passes per game, tossing about 15 fewer than they did two and three seasons ago, per NBA.com.

The orginal article.

Summary of “In a Top-Heavy Premier League, More Teams Rush to the Bunker”

On the first day of 2018, Sam Allardyce, the club’s freshly installed manager, sent his team out not to stand toe-to-toe with Manchester United, but simply to stand firm: to absorb pressure and cling on.
Of course: Most Everton fans would accept that his team does not have the offensive firepower to match Manchester United.
Mark Hughes, Stoke’s manager, sent out a drastically weakened team at Stamford Bridge with the aim of saving his best side for Monday’s meeting with Newcastle, a direct rival in the battle to avoid relegation.
It has always been this way: The best teams monopolize possession, which means their opponents have always focused on damage limitation.
His decision forced the Premier League to alter its rules regarding the fielding of weakened teams.
The Premier League has long sold itself as the most competitive league in the world, as a division where might does not make right, in which teams never know when they are beaten, where the emphasis is always on attacking.
When Manchester United – or the great Arsenal or Chelsea sides of earlier this century – “Had opponents beaten in the tunnel,” as Hughes, a former United player, once said, only one or two teams inspired such fear.
The alternative, when faced with teams with vastly superior players and resources, remains unclear.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Playoff Gambling Manifesto 5.0”

1-ranked DVOA team made only one Super Bowl; the 1-seeds met in only one Super Bowl; seven played-in-all-four-rounds teams made the Super Bowl; and three teams won the Super Bowl without a home playoff game.
From 2007 through 2011, a team beat a playoff opponent that won four-plus games more than it did an astonishing seven times, as captured in Jason Hehir’s unforgettable 30 for 30 documentary, Seven Teasers From Hell.
No wonder the Manifesto never worked: that eight-year stretch was more messed up than the marriage in Phantom Thread. WERE YOU SENT HERE TO RUIN MY EVENING AND POSSIBLY MY ENTIRE LIFE??? My favorite 2005-to-2012 fact is that the following QBs won a Round 2 and/or Round 3 playoff game: Jake Plummer, Jay Cutler, Alex Smith, Matt Hasselbeck, Rex Grossman, Colin Kaepernick, and Mark Sanchez.
Screw it, let’s go! It’s time for Playoff Gambling Manifesto 5.0! Please heed these rules wading into Round 1 and beyond.
RULE NO. 4: Beware of any team that might use a major off-field distraction as a galvanizing force leading up to a big playoff game.
I loved Buffalo breaking its playoff drought; I loved Andy Dalton finally making someone else’s playoff dreams come true; I loved Baltimore getting screwed over by strength of schedule because Cleveland won zero games; I loved Kyle Williams’s kids; I loved all the awesome locker-room celebration videos; and I even loved celebrity Bills fans that I’ve never heard of taking their media victory laps.
RULE NO. 14: Before every playoff game, rate the coaches and quarterbacks from 1 to 10, add up their scores, then make sure you’re OK backing a team with said score.
My case included tidbits like “Could Adam Gase put himself on the map as this year’s Hot New Coach?” and “Could [Matt] Moore manage the game, avoid turnovers and make a couple of big throws?” before I ultimately and hilariously decided, “I’m grabbing the 10 points even if it violates about four different Playoff Manifesto rules.” The Dolphins lost 30-12.

The orginal article.