Summary of “A Brutal Murder, a Wearable Witness, and an Unlikely Suspect”

A 10-minute drive from the deli, Adele and Dominic Navarra lived with their two children, Stephen and Karen, in a ranch house in a subdivision called Warner Heights.
Lavoie said Karen’s brother, Stephen, was the outgoing one-much like their “Jovial, larger than life” dad-while Karen took after Adele.
Karen studied science at nearby San Jose State University for three years, moved into her own apartment, and became a pharmacy tech at a regional hospital.
“If Karen had even thought about having a future with a family, after that, I think she really wanted to take care of her mom and dad.” Dominic died in 1996.
About a decade later, Karen inherited her grandmother’s home on Terra Noble Way.
A few years later, in 2010, Adele married Tony in a City Hall ceremony, and Adele moved into Tony’s place, a cream-colored house with a garden of basil and tomato plants.
The Aiellos were living in Silicon Valley, but Adele said she only knew a little about computers and Tony said he knew “Zero.” A four-bedroom ranch house that was once a first step into the middle class sells for more than $1 million.
According to Adele, Karen used to say she was “The loner of the family,” her life revolving around work and home, where she cared for her cats and grew roses in her yard.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rebecca Solnit on Hope in Dark Times”

“There is no love of life without despair of life,” wrote Albert Camus – a man who in the midst of World War II, perhaps the darkest period in human history, saw grounds for luminous hope and issued a remarkable clarion call for humanity to rise to its highest potential on those grounds.
The language in which we tell ourselves these stories matters tremendously, too, and no writer has weighed the complexities of sustaining hope in our times of readily available despair more thoughtfully and beautifully, nor with greater nuance, than Rebecca Solnit does in Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities.
Though hope can be an act of defiance, defiance isn’t enough reason to hope.
Solnit’s conception of hope reminds me of the great existential psychiatrist Irvin D. Yalom’s conception of meaning: “The search for meaning, much like the search for pleasure,” he wrote, “Must be conducted obliquely.” That is, it must take place in the thrilling and terrifying terra incognita that lies between where we are and where we wish to go, ultimately shaping where we do go.
Solnit herself has written memorably about how we find ourselves by getting lost, and finding hope seems to necessitate a similar surrender to uncertainty.
How the transformation happened is rarely remembered, in part because it’s compromising: it recalls the mainstream when the mainstream was, say, rabidly homophobic or racist in a way it no longer is; and it recalls that power comes from the shadows and the margins, that our hope is in the dark around the edges, not the limelight of center stage.
Which is where hope comes in, and memory, the collective memory we call history.
Hope in the Dark is a robust anchor of intelligent idealism amid our tumultuous era of disorienting defeatism – a vitalizing exploration of how we can withstand the marketable temptations of false hope and easy despair.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be a Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
Bad Habit No. 1: Giving Too Much Background Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
Bad Habit No. 4: Not Including Any Dialogue You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
Bad Habit No. 5: Taking Your Audience Through Unnecessary Detours Don’t go off on tangents when you’re building up the action of your story.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Want to Be a Great Storyteller? First, Break These Habits”

You’ve heard dozens of times that you’re more likely to engage your audience when you tell a story in your presentation.
Bad Habit No. 1: Giving Too Much Background Your audience won’t understand your story without at least some background information.
Even small doses of narrative evidence can go a long way to backing up the point you want your story to make.
If your story is too drawn out, you risk losing your audience’s attention.
Bad Habit No. 4: Not Including Any Dialogue You need dialogue to bring a story to life, and one line can make for a great climax.
Bad Habit No. 5: Taking Your Audience Through Unnecessary Detours Don’t go off on tangents when you’re building up the action of your story.
You’re telling a story to make your presentation engaging, which means that how you tell it matters just as much as what the narrative entails.
Avoid these traps, and you won’t just tell better stories, you’ll maximize the impact of your overall message, and maybe even leave your audience wanting more.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Story time: the five children’s books every adult should read”

My adult self wants all those things, and also: acknowledgments of fear, love, failure.
When you read a children’s book, you are given the space to read again as a child: to find your way back, back to the time when new discoveries came daily and when the world was colossal, before your imagination was trimmed and neatened, as if it were an optional extra.
For that we need books that are specifically written to give the heart and mind a galvanic kick – children’s books.
The books say: look, this is what bravery looks like.
WH Auden wrote, in an essay on Lewis Carroll: “There are good books which are only for adults, because their comprehension presupposes adult experiences, but there are no good books which are only for children.” I would not suggest that adults read only, or even primarily, children’s fiction.
The harpies make a bargain: if each soul has paid heed to the world and has a story to tell of it, and they tell it truly, they will be led through the darkness to the other side.
We must learn to tell stories, his books say, whether it comes naturally or not – because it is the best and sometimes the only way we have to exchange truth.
In One Dog and His Boy, Hal, a child with everything he could wish for except love and care, releases five dogs from the cruel Easy Pets agency.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Science of Attraction – Experience Magazine”

Ideas Can feeding strangers while blindfolded help people find love?
We’ve gathered at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum for a two-hour, speed-dating-style event called The Science of Attraction.
The group is an eclectic mix of people, mid-20s through late 30s, some with a bent towards science, some just looking for an outside-the-box activity.
Four people are seated at each of the 20 or so tables, half which house single folks like myself; the other half are couples.
Olivia Koski, head of U.S. Operations for Guerrilla Science, tells us the goal is to “Help people think about how all of their senses are involved in human attraction and behavior, and how much they rely on their sight when choosing a partner rather than using their other senses.”
“Early romantic relationships have made indelible imprints on my brain, so I find I go back to similar women, in a self-reinforcing way.” Attraction is indeed complicated, because even though David is a nice guy, and I’ve just fed him blindfolded, I’m not feeling it.
During the starting exercise, we learn that it only takes 0.2 seconds of visual contact to fall in love – hence the expression “Love at first sight.” We’re also told that anything more than a mere 3.3 seconds of staring from a stranger can make people uncomfortable – and make that stranger seem like a stalker.
After a brief Q&A session where only a few people ask questions, everyone is invited to an after-party a few blocks away.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Predict Your Future”

“I want to have a close family.”
“I want to help and inspire people.”
No matter what you want to achieve in life, your actions must back up your words.
It’s not about what you want – it’s about what you do.
Still, I keep adding new things to my daily habits.
There are a lot of other things that I can do better.
What useful and helpful things are you doing today?
The point is that all those little useful things like reading books, taking courses, making tough calls, sending emails, looking at real estate, going for a walk, spending quality time with people you love, ALL ADD UP. But when you do useless things, they add up to nothing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The transformational power of how you talk about your life”

One of McLean’s collaborators, personality expert and pioneer in the field Dan P McAdams at Northwestern University, explained this in his seminal paper The Psychology of Life Stories: “People differ from each other with respect to their self-defining life stories in ways that are not unlike how they differ from each other on more conventional psychological characteristics such as traits.”
Each provided stories of particular episodes from their lives or an overarching narrative summarising their entire life story.
Based on a thorough analysis and coding of the narratives they produced, McLean and her colleagues believe there is a “Big Three” of key features that represent the characteristic way we tell our life stories.
The first is “Motivational and Affective Themes”, which look at how much autonomy and connection with others the narrator expresses, as well as how positive or negative the stories are overall, and whether they are dominated by good situations turning sour, or bad situations working out well in the end.
People who tell more positive stories and stories with more elements of redemption tend to enjoy greater wellbeing, at least based on research with Western samples, in terms of more life satisfaction and better mental health.
So do people whose stories express a greater sense of being a protagonist in the events of their life and having more meaningful communion with others.
Engaging in more autobiographical reasoning and having greater structure to one’s life story also correlates with greater wellbeing.
There is some limited evidence that increases in the positive features of one’s life story precede subsequent beneficial consequences for wellbeing, rather than simply reflecting life going better – although Adler and his colleagues caution that more long-term research is needed to establish causality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Forget Your Feelings”

Your Tricky Brain So we should just ignore our feelings and just do what is good/right all the time then, right? It’s simple.
Everything that’s screwed up in your life, chances are it got that way because you were too beholden to your feelings.
Feelings have a way of doing that, you know? They make you think you’re the center of the universe.
A lot of young people hate hearing this because they grew up with parents who worshipped their feelings as children, and protected those feelings, and tried to buy as many candy corns and swimming lessons as necessary to make sure those feelings were nice and fuzzy and protected at all times.
Your feelings cannot tell you what will be good for you in a week or a year or 20 years.
Why It’s Hard to Get Over Your Own Feelings Now, none of what I’m saying is really that surprising or new.
This is because we don’t just have feelings about our experiences, we also have feelings about our feelings.
There are four types of meta-feelings: feeling bad about feeling bad, feeling bad about feeling good, feeling good about feeling bad, and feeling good about feeling good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Lizzo Loves You Like She Loves Herself”

If you listen to more than just the slick beats and the hooky choruses, Lizzo’s music tells a deeper story.
In her song “1 Deep,” she talks about her rocky relationship with her mother: “I stopped talking to my mama for three months / No eye contact during lunch / Wasn’t nothing else around us but mountains and trees / And my guilty worthless screams, ‘What was wrong with me?'” She is not always a bombastic, positive person, and even when she is on songs like “Good as Hell,” there’s a layer of sadness to it, the difference between telling your friend she’s beautiful and deserves better and telling it to yourself in the mirror.
She’s crying because she loves you, and later she cries like a girl.
She’s saying a lot of goodbyes and letting herself feel everything that comes with that, with the knowledge that it’s all for the best.
Lizzo doesn’t love to dwell on negativity, but some of the vulnerability of the new album was born out of a crisis.
She asked herself why she didn’t feel comfortable opening up to the people she loved.
One way Lizzo has done that is to open herself up to the spiritual unknown by communicating with her father, and others, through a medium, whom she also recently took on a vacation to Jamaica because they’re friends now.
The cards themselves seemed to know that-she tells a story of getting her tarot read once, where the tarot reader pulled a blank card and told her that it only comes up for people who already know their destiny.

The orginal article.