Summary of “Buc-ee’s: The Path to World Domination”

The Bastrop Buc-ee’s opened in 2012, and it has more or less the same relationship to the first Buc-ee’s store that a Boeing 747 has to the biplane the Wright brothers flew at Kitty Hawk.
“We’ll have people come from out of state and say, ‘I was told that we couldn’t go to Texas without stopping here.’ ”. The Buc-ee’s store in Bastrop may be staggeringly oversized in just about every way, but in the Buc-ee’s empire, it’s not particularly special, just one of fourteen enormous stores and not even close to the biggest.
Their regular stores became ever spiffier too, with Aplin enlisting the well-known convenience-store designer Jim Mitchell to help make Buc-ee’s both more welcoming and more profitable.
The Katy Buc-ee’s, which opened in late 2017, has been certified by the Guinness Book of World Records as having the world’s longest car wash.
As Buc-ee’s has become an ever bigger part of Texas, Aplin has gotten more active in the politics of the state.
In the early days of Buc-ee’s, Aplin served on the local school board.
Over the past six years, Buc-ee’s has pursued trademark-infringement lawsuits against a series of smaller convenience stores-Chicks, in Bryan; B&B Grocery, in Uvalde; Irv’s Field Store, in Waller-all of which Buc-ee’s believed had ripped off part of its brand.
Last year, a Buc-ee’s lawsuit against an Atascosa travel center called Choke Canyon made it all the way to trial in federal court, where Buc-ee’s accused its rival of stealing key parts of the Buc-ee’s brand, among them a “Friendly smiling cartoon animal similarly oriented within a circle and wearing a hat pointed to the right” and even Beaver Nuggets themselves, which Choke Canyon passed off as “Golden Caramel Corn Nuggets.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tex Mex Is Actually More Important to Texans Than Barbecue”

Chili con carne, even if it’s now out of style, has had the kind of cultural impact Texas barbecue brisket is only beginning to dream of: Chili was the first and most famous manifestation of the robust, misunderstood, supposedly inauthentic and staggeringly influential cuisine that we now call Tex-Mex.
Along with the crispy tacos and burritos of Cal-Mex, Tex-Mex became one of America’s most beloved and important regional cuisines, even if most Americans didn’t realize that was what they were eating.
Ask Texas to choose between barbecue and Tex-Mex, and all but the most dedicated partisans will quail.
To be honest, I did not realize how important Tex-Mex had become to me while I was in Texas.
What does barbecue have that Tex-Mex doesn’t? It has meat, it has fire, it has an aura of mastery – and, currently, it’s associated primarily with Anglos, and the area in and around Texas’s famously progressive, and also profoundly segregated city, Austin.
Arellano notes that Tejanos have smoked Texas-style barbecue for as long as Anglos; a smoked brisket is just as beautifully accompanied by a flour tortilla and an acidic salsa as it is by barbecue sauce and white bread. Though if the next dish to sweep across America might be brisket tacos, within Texas the larger trend is, as Dallas-based writer and editor José R. Ralat says, Tex-Mex becoming more Mexican.
There is nothing more Tex-Mex than a migas taco, eggs and tortilla chips or leftover tortilla scrambled together, then folded into a fresh tortilla, and the Veracruz All Natural version, with its handmade tortilla and fresh avocado, is the current pinnacle.
Co-owner Reyna Vazquez, the truck and now restaurant’s head chef, says she develops her recipes using fresh, and more Mexican ingredients, and wouldn’t call her food Tex-Mex, just her own spin on Mexican.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Beto’s consolation prize: Running for president”

O’Rourke’s narrow loss to Cruz instead sets him up to run full time for president – and jump immediately into the top tier of Democratic contenders.
O’Rourke has not yet indicated his intentions, but he has built, in the course of a few short months, a national brand and a national fundraising base that few Democrats can match.
Conveniently, the chief knock on O’Rourke’s campaign, that he embraced staunchly progressive positions that played poorly in Texas, only heightens his appeal in a national primary for a Democratic Party that has been tacking leftward.
O’Rourke ultimately performed poorly in rural Texas, a shortcoming that sealed his 2½ point defeat.
The voters O’Rourke drove to the polls helped Texas Democrats flip two House seats and make gains in the state Legislature.
Texas Democrats can keep going back to the new voters identified and mobilized by O’Rourke as they continue their efforts to turn the state purple, said Wendy Davis, a former Democratic state senator who ran for governor in 2014.
Without having visited, O’Rourke has already captivated the state’s Democrats.
“The loudest cheer of the night so far was when ABC showed Beto O’Rourke leading.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The untold 1999 Texas-Oklahoma story of Mike Leach’s fake play script”

Now, thanks to Mike Leach, the 1999 game can officially be added to that same legacy.
On the Wednesday night of game week, Leach was with OU offensive assistant Cale Gundy when the two began laughing about how funny it would be to create a decoy script for the Longhorns.
For the decoy script, Leach began inputting plays the Sooners didn’t even have in their system.
When he’d finished his masterpiece, Leach put Gundy’s name at the top of it, as if it were Gundy’s copy of OU’s offensive play script.
Next, Leach had to figure out how to lure Texas into taking the bait.
Leach then handed the script to Smith and ordered him to execute the plant, which he did to perfection.
Off to the side, Leach kept the discarded script within his peripheral vision.
The Texas assistants were suspicious that Leach had been the one to plant the decoy script.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Is Brooklyn Barbecue Taking Over the World?”

The barbecue being assimilated in places like Colombia, Spain, Panama, Sweden, England, and Japan is not the killer ‘cue from fabled Texas BBQ cities like Lockhart or Austin.
It’s an adapted form of Southern barbecue from Brooklyn.
Fette Sau’s BBQ. It really doesn’t matter where the hell I go now.
There’s a barbecue restaurant that reminds me of North Brooklyn.
“Brooklyn BBQ is more stylish, more loose,” he said.
In Williamsburg to help them set up and create their own style of Colombian BBQ. “The whole La Fama experience was so weird and awesome,” said Mylan.
Few would argue that the barbecue being served in Brooklyn is better than in Texas, so why is a Kings County adaptation that is already a bastardized adaptation the one that is furthering the cause?
“In the last ten years Brooklyn has really loved taking something with a long tradition elsewhere and fucking with that trope, whether you’re talking the dive bar, soul food, French bistro, Mexican cantina, diner, or BBQ. Results are variable and some things perhaps are better left unmolested through Brooklyn, a pathological desire to rework these tropes has given the rest of the world carte blanche to fuck with things like BBQ as well, and adapt that type of food to the local diners preferences.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dark Bounty of Texas Oil”

For more than a century, the economic fortunes of Texas have depended on oil.
Between January, 2015, and December, 2016, more than a hundred U.S. oil and gas producers declared bankruptcy, nearly half of them in Texas.
The grand story of Texas oil is really about three wells.
In the nineteen-thirties, oil prices crashed, to the point that in some parts of the United States oil became cheaper than water.
“And yet the more the oil companies drill in it the more oil they find.” Nearly thirty billion barrels of low-sulfur, or “Sweet,” oil, known as West Texas Intermediate, have come out of this field, which is roughly the size of South Dakota, and much more oil remains.
They carry crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, aviation fuel, and natural gas all over the U.S. More than forty per cent of the refined product from the Texas Gulf Coast moves through the Colonial Pipeline, which originates in Houston and travels fifty-five hundred miles to New Jersey, with stops in communities along the way.
Although the price of oil has been floating above fifty dollars for more than two months, and oil-and-gas exports are now at the highest level in American history, more than seventy thousand oil-and-gas jobs have been lost in Texas since December, 2014, and many of them aren’t coming back.
Maybe God, in His wisdom, will decide not to send Texas one more oil boom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Beto O’Rourke Stand a Chance Against Ted Cruz?”

The news reports had gone from bad to catastrophic, with the National Weather Service declaring, “This event is unprecedented and all impacts are unknown.” And Beto O’Rourke was headed toward the storm.
His time playing in punk-rock bands during his high school and college years has proved irresistible for headline writers, who have identified him as “Ted Cruz’s Punk-Rock Problem” and asserted that his “Punk-Rock Past Could Help Him.” An in-production documentary titled Beto vs. Cruz promises that the coming Senate race will be the “Most outrageous and consequential political fight of 2018.” O’Rourke’s fund-raising has been robust, with $3.8 million raised in the second and third quarters of 2017-more than Cruz-and his campaigning has been relentless.
There are three phrases that O’Rourke repeats at nearly every campaign event: The first is “Texas isn’t a red state or a blue state, it’s a nonvoting state,” which is O’Rourke’s way of saying that he needs a lot of first-time voters to come to the polls in order for him to have a chance.
As O’Rourke finished summarizing his recent Washington business to his constituents at the town hall, it was mostly veterans who rushed to the front of the aisles for their chance to speak with their congressman.
After an independent ethics-review commission dismissed the charges against him, O’Rourke denounced what he saw as a coordinated campaign of “Character assassination and political intimidation.”
Romo refuses to call O’Rourke Beto, because he sees the name as an act of cultural appropriation by “Someone who betrayed our trust.” O’Rourke’s many supporters see him as someone who genuinely, even idealistically, thought the plan would be good for the city and got badly mischaracterized.
O’Rourke said to the El Paso Times that Reyes’s idea “That we stand back and let people duke it out is not showing leadership.”
O’Rourke talked openly about running against Reyes in the Democratic primary in 2010, but he decided against it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Progressive Voice Bursting From Texas and Spreading Everywhere”

What he had to say most recently was a bit about the national anthem protests in the N.F.L. But what has made Hansen’s words reverberate, both in conservative North Texas and elsewhere, is that his resounding voice often delivers a point of view one might not expect from a local TV newsman: a progressive one.
Hansen’s latest commentary – in which he presented his Texas audience with a heartfelt defense of black Americans’ protests and an indictment of “White privilege” – was just the latest in a recurring segment, called “Hansen: Unplugged,” that has run on WFAA for years.
For Hansen, that’s about eight to 10 times a year.
The riffs have made Hansen something of an outlier: a local newsman with a national voice, a champion for social issues in a stick-to-sports world, a liberal voice in a deeply red state that’s as passionate about its sports as it is its politics.
Here in Texas, mixing those two religions is nearly a sin, but the cocky Hansen revels in taking on sacred cows, saying, “Oh, well, I’m agnostic anyway.”
Hansen has done little to promote, or embrace, his rising social media celebrity, though it seems to grow a little every time he opens his mouth.
Hansen, who served a stateside hitch in the Navy back then, wiped away tears as he called his friend the best third baseman that ever lived.
Hansen has been around long enough, and has seen enough, to know that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “America’s Future Is Texas”

One can drive across it and be in two different states at the same time: FM Texas and AM Texas.
Bill Miller, a lobbyist in Austin and a longtime student of Texas politics, dates the change to May, 1976, when Ronald Reagan beat Gerald Ford in the Texas Republican primary.
The newspapers often feature gloating stories about the number of Californians fleeing to Texas, as an indication of the vast superiority of the Texas way of life.
In 2014, a federal judge, Nelva Gonzales Ramos, in the Southern District of Texas, struck down the law, calling it “An unconstitutional poll tax.” Texas appealed, but the appeal was rejected, in part because there was no actual evidence of voter fraud.
Every Democrat in Texas believes that, if Latinos voted at the same rate in Texas as they do in California, the state would already be blue.
In Texas politics, he says, “Everything is about race-it’s veiled as public policy, but it encourages people to believe that their tax dollars are going to support lazy black and brown people.” Political views have become more entrenched because of redistricting, and yet the demographic majority in Texas is far more progressive than its representatives.
A month after the Texas legislature began the 2017 session, the Super Bowl was held in Houston, and the National Football League intimated that, were S.B. 6 to pass, the championship might not be held in Texas again.
In a video endorsement, he stood next to Patrick and said, “Dan Patrick’s leadership will keep Texas the most conservative state in the country.” Patrick added, “The Democrats understand that, if they can take Texas, we will never have a Republican in the White House again. They will control the country. There’s not another Texas to move to, folks. This is it.”

The orginal article.