Summary of “Lauren Gunderson profile: America’s most popular playwright is ready for Broadway. But is New York ready for her?”

“I think in New York they think, Danger danger, this is getting into cheesy love story mode.” – Lauren Gunderson.
In 2009, Lauren Gunderson left New York for the West Coast, and since then, she’s made a career in America’s regional and repertory theaters, writing brisk comedies about plucky women, classical literature, romance, and the history of science.
At one point in her career, Gunderson was on the path to being a New York playwright.
The inspiration for the show was a long drive Gunderson and Melcon took together in which they posed the question, “What sort of show did the American theater most need so that people could add it to the season planning processes?” Gunderson told the New Yorker that by the end of the trip, they had the show outlined on Starbucks napkins.
The lesson of Gunderson’s career is that New York doesn’t have to matter, but the way Gunderson talks about her New York experience-and her upcoming premiere-makes it clear that New York still matters to her.
David Cote, who was for many years the head critic at Time Out New York, noted that “New York’s theaters at this moment are interested in dealing with identity politics and messy intersectional issues.” Maybe Gunderson, he speculated, “Is simply not an edgy enough feminist?” Minadakis, the Marin Theatre AD, hears New York theater people dismiss Gunderson’s plays as “Not serious” because of their inveterate optimism.
To McNulty, the issue keeping Gunderson out of New York is not taste but sexism.
“I could be a total snob,” he said, “And say New Yorkers are far too intelligent to have this middlebrow stuff flatter them. But tons of middlebrow stuff gets produced in New York.” Cote compared Gunderson with a writer whose once-edgy work now seems much less provocative: “She’s a much better playwright than Neil LaBute, and for a while everything he wrote was being produced.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “How 2 Million People Loved MoviePass Nearly to Death”

Eight months after slashing its price and expanding membership past 2 million users, MoviePass is now at risk of going bust.
The parent company, Helios & Matheson Analytics Inc., which now owns 92 percent of MoviePass, said last week that it had just $15.5 million in cash at the end of April and $27.9 million on deposit with merchant processors.
MoviePass has been burning through $21.7 million per month.
Farnsworth’s penny-stock firm, Helios & Matheson, bought 51 percent of MoviePass for $27 million and provided the financing to slash the membership price from about $35 a month to $10. It’s pure Silicon Valley logic.
Here’s how MoviePass explains its model, using cocktail-napkin math.
The challenge of using MoviePass to actually see a movie has already been a hallmark of the MoviePass experience.
The failure of MoviePass would knock out some chunk of box-office revenue-theater owners say it accounts for less than 5 percent of traffic-but the prospect of MoviePass somehow surviving could be even worse for big multiplex companies.
If MoviePass gets close to its yearend goal of 5 million members, marketing messages offered on the MoviePass app may start subtly-or not so subtly-shifting customers to the theaters and films the company prefers.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Marvel Annihilated Counterprogramming”

In its third weekend of release, it’s still outpacing the opening weekend grosses of the five biggest non-Marvel movies of the year so far: A Quiet Place, Ready Player One, Fifty Shades Freed, Rampage, and A Wrinkle in Time.
Since Infinity War arrived, the major studios have released just two movies: Warner Bros.’ Melissa McCarthy comedy Life of the Party, which made $18.5 million in its opening weekend, the lowest total for a McCarthy vehicle since she became a movie star; and the $16.5 million-earning Breaking In, a Gabrielle Union thriller from Universal and Will Packer Productions, the company that has delivered two textbook counterprograms, Girls Trip and the Ride Along films.
Marvel has mastered movie blanketing, stretching the dominance of its products across a month-plus.
As a point of comparison, on the weekend when The Dark Knight was released, Fox also put an animated movie in 2,500 theaters.
Since Thanos disappeared half the competition, only three other movies besides Life of the Party and Breaking In have hit more than 1,000 theaters: the Charlize Theron dramedy Tully, the Overboard remake, and the utterly ignored action film Bad Samaritan.
The entire concept of counterprogramming hinges on seeing just one movie over a weekend, presenting an alternative to the noisiest release of the week.
Reitman suggests that-gasp-maybe some people want to see more than one movie in a weekend.
Though the ever-imperiled gambit of the ticket service MoviePass allows for more viewing opportunities for regular movie fans, the likelihood of an average person seeing two movies in a day, let alone a weekend, are small and dwindling.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Avengers: Infinity War marathon marks the end of a 10-year journey”

After 11 consecutive Marvel movies, they’re ready to cap off a 31-hour marathon with a conclusion they’ve all been waiting for: Avengers: Infinity War.
Though the marathon began just a day before, the start of the kickoff movie, Iron Man, feels like it was a fever dream.
Infinity War unites characters and ties together plotlines from more than a decade of Marvel movies, from Iron Man to this winter’s Thor: Ragnarok and Black Panther.
For the first few movies, the marathon feels easy to sink into.
“It’s not just a trip to the movies.” Walker is new to marathoning, while Hearn is an old hand; he also attended the 29-hour Avengers: Age of Ultron marathon in 2015.
“But each audience is different. When you’re in a marathon like this, you’re with literally a large group of like-minded people. We’re all geeking out about it. We all love the movies so much. We all love Marvel. It’s just fun, the vibe is always good, you meet really great people. We’re all just one big group of people that love these movies. One big nerdy family.”
Black Panther has finished, and in just an hour, Infinity War will begin at 6, an hour earlier than the film’s other screenings.
Infinity War isn’t just another Avengers movie.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A 31-hour Marvel marathon became a lesson in temporary beauty”

The human machines who can power through all 31 hours with no sleep are rare – almost as rare as the available outlets people flocked to when they entered the theater.
“People are talking about which movies they’re going to sleep through,” Courtney told me while charging her phone, gash still visible.
We became friends while hovering around an outlet at the top of the theater, talking to other people who came by looking for a free plug.
Limited charging options and a room full of heavy cellphone users meant there were ample opportunities to meet the people we were sharing a theater with for 31 hours.
As The Avengers, Guardians of the Galaxy and Avengers: Age of Ultron played, the theater erupted into people coming up with impressive ways to get comfortable, while the rest of us warred over real estate.
Other people, like Jailene, Korina and Joseph, were too young to have done that, citing other films like Captain America: The First Avenger as their first big-screen foray into the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
“It’s so weird to hear people say, ’10 years of Marvel movies.’ It’s been 10 years. It’s a fun way to celebrate a kind of moment that we’ll talk about for the rest of our lives.”
A few minutes before Infinity War started, people counted down until the movie started.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Netflix Apparently Wants to Buy Its Own Theaters, and That’s Honestly a Good Idea”

Netflix wants to get into the movie theater business, according to a new report from The Los Angeles Times.
Look at it this way: Last year, Netflix spent over $8 billion producing its own content-movies and TV shows that can only be watched on Netflix-but the fact that there are no theater runs for the feature films disqualifies Netflix from winning major awards like an Oscar.
The theater lockout isn’t just because Netflix is Netflix, either.
Sarandos and his Netflix buds won’t budge on their idea that movies should be released on streaming services the same day they’re released in theaters.
Theaters won’t agree to this, thus no Netflix movies in theaters.
If Netflix owned its own theaters the company could do a big theatrical release for those who love the big screen and a streaming release for lazy people who love convenience.
If you’re thinking that no fool would pay money to see a movie they could watch at home through their Netflix subscription, you’re being closed-minded.
Sometimes it’s just more fun to go to the theater, and oftentimes, watching movies on the big screen is a far superior experience than watching it on your flatscreen TV. Heck, Netflix could even offer binge-watching sessions and screen its very good shows.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Laurie Metcalf Was Hiding in Plain Sight”

At 62, Metcalf is now being widely recognized for what she has always been, an actress of remarkable power, range and skill, a pre-eminent chronicler of the American working woman.
Metcalf would be the first to say that her current tear – which includes three Emmy nominations in 2016 for “Getting On,” “Horace & Pete” and “The Big Bang Theory”; that Tony Award in 2017; the current Oscar nomination; “Three Tall Women”; and a new season of “Roseanne,” the first in two decades, arriving in March – all goes back to being given such meaty parts at an age when most actresses are being forced into retirement.
The first play Metcalf ever appeared in was a high school production of “Auntie Mame.” She had only a few lines, but on the first night, she accidentally got a laugh on one of them.
In 1976, Metcalf joined them and five other actors in a theater company housed in a church basement in Highland Park, outside Chicago.
In a 20-minute monologue in “Horace & Pete,” Metcalf uses only her face to tell a genuinely erotic tale of middle-aged desire.
In “Lady Bird,” Metcalf plays Marion McPherson with enough verve and eye rolls to transcend the cliché of the nagging mother, suggesting with her performance that adolescent energy may not fade, so much as age into a more potent vintage.
“I’m not trying to blow out a camera lens or make the audience’s hair go straight back from my sheer volume, sheer energy level,” Metcalf says, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t hold onto your hat.
At the end of the first week of rehearsal for “Three Tall Women,” I met Metcalf in a Theater Row restaurant, the kind that has a mad dinner rush before the shows start at 8.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass Adds a Million Subscribers, Even if Theaters Aren’t Sold on It”

Under the MoviePass business model, theaters get paid full price for every admission.
The blistering growth has prompted new criticism from theaters and studio owners – namely that MoviePass will never be able to make money by charging $9.95 a month when a single ticket can cost almost twice that amount.
Mr. Lowe, who previously sparred with studios as president of Redbox, the kiosk company that rents DVDs for $1 a day, believes that ticketing can at least be a break-even business for MoviePass.
Mr. Farnsworth said, “When you apply computer science and machine learning to an industry that we believe has lacked significant innovation, useful patterns start to emerge.” If MoviePass gets big enough, it could try to demand that chain theaters sell tickets at a discount or share a slice of their concession revenue.
Helios recently raised $60 million for the expansion of MoviePass, which expects to have more than three million subscribers by the end of next year.
As the popularity of MoviePass demonstrates, theater owners may no longer be able to avoid fundamental change.
One small theater company that has become a MoviePass investor, Studio Movie Grill, which has 30 locations in nine states, credits the service with increasing attendance, especially on weeknights.
“Some people aren’t sure they want to pay $10 to $12 to see a movie like ‘Lady Bird.’ MoviePass takes out that hurdle.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Theater chains are terrified of MoviePass because of subscribers like me”

MoviePass still pays theater chains full price for the tickets it passes on to its own customers.
Problem is, AMC and other chains have to worry about MoviePass going belly-up.
MoviePass is banking on some subscribers seeing only one movie per month, or none at all.
MoviePass changes almost everything about the theater experience, when the cost of entry is virtually zero.
I can imagine other subscribers writing off theaters until something similar to MoviePass pops up again – especially with so many other, cheaper entertainment options available.
So MoviePass poses a kind of existential threat to theater owners, because its model devalues access to the theater experience.
MoviePass is harming how much studios and exhibitors can control their own destiny There is a silver lining in MoviePass’ risky gamble.
So friends and family members can share a MoviePass card just as they do with a Netflix or HBO Go login, spoiling the usage data MoviePass is banking on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MoviePass drops pricing to under $7 per month, if you opt for the annual plan”

The deal is a limited-time promotion, as opposed to a permanent pricing change, but MoviePass didn’t say how long the offer is valid.
This is not the first time that MoviePass has dropped its pricing.
As of October, MoviePass had grown to over 600,000 subscribers.
MoviePass hopes to eventually convince theater owners it’s growing their customer base, so it can be cut in on profits, according to CEO Mitch Lowe, in a report from Variety in August.
In the meantime, MoviePass is a ridiculously cheap deal for movie-goers.
AMC specifically threatened the startup with legal action in August, and announced that MoviePass was “Not welcome here.” It said it would try to find a way to opt out, as it believes lowering the cost of ticket prices would devalue the theater-going experience overall.
“HMNY continues to be the biggest supporter of MoviePass, as it outpaces any other movie theater subscription service and continues to disrupt the movie theater industry,” said Ted Farnsworth, Chairman and CEO of HMNY, in a statement about today’s new, lower pricing.
“We look forward to helping MoviePass continue to broaden its reach and modernize the movie theater industry,” he added.

The orginal article.