Summary of “How Derren Brown Remade Mind Reading for Skeptics”

Brown spent the next two and a half hours performing a series of increasingly inconceivable set pieces, organized around the theme of how susceptible we are to hidden influence.
Off the clock, Brown neither reads anyone’s mind nor, despite being a world-class card magician, performs tricks of any kind.
Over time, Brown found himself more and more drawn to mentalism and started developing his credo of letting audiences see what the process of mind reading looked like in action.
Brown no longer does cold reading and, in his shows, has ridiculed psychics and discredited their techniques.
After introducing us to her dog and showing us framed photos of its two predecessors, which, she told us, “Are in spirit now,” she led Brown upstairs for his reading.
“Yeah, it’s hypnosis and suggestion and mind reading and so on,” Brown explained.
“I’m interested in how it sort of blurs into other things and other people’s take on it,” Brown said.
As soon as we were outside, Brown started analyzing Chrissy’s reading.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Frank Ocean Makes Moves Like Nobody Else”

In 2012, the year he released his major label debut album, Channel Orange, and was nominated for six Grammys, he revealed in a Tumblr letter that his first love had been a man, an unusually open admission for a black male artist at the time.
To book studio time, he worked various odd jobs before heading to Los Angeles, where he began writing songs for Justin Bieber, John Legend, and Brandy.
As to whether he had any release dates in mind, he simply answered, “No.” One thing he made certain: He’s on Frank Ocean time, and so are we.
My cousins would be at the house with me for that time.
I’m working with a string arranger right now in Rio, and every time we go back and forth, because I don’t put things on the Internet, I have to send a drive with someone to Rio, or I have to go myself.
Because technology for a long time has dictated what the format is, and as punk as we want to be, we’re all kind of existing as recording artists inside of a technology, whether it’s the software we record and edit our music on, or whether it’s the medium that we press our music to distribute it.
I’ve never been in a band or had a songwriting partner or been with a group, so it’s always been a lot of time on my own writing and doing the work.
I’ve been trying to make time to do more of that sort of thing, and be in spaces where I’m not the expert.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why I Don’t Believe In Work-Life Balance”

Do you get drained trying to find a balance between activities in your life and career?
When we talk about work-life balance, we talk about the prioritizing between work related things and lifestyle related things.
Research even shows that people who believe they don’t have time for their personal life, feel drained and distracted at work.
Ninety percent of his time goes to family, work, and himself.
You want to leave early and you finish up work at 5.30pm. It’s 6.30pm before you get home.
Plus, we spend most of our free time thinking, worrying, and talking about work.
If work is holding back your personal or spiritual growth, find different work.
If work is fucking up your relationships, again, find different work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘I gave away our stuff’: the minimalists doing more with less”

Georgina Caro downsized the family home, gave away three-quarters of their possessions and now thinks much more carefully about every purchase.
“If you are someone who feels a constant pressure to keep up with things, bigger house, better car, more expensive clothes, then minimalism could be that breath of fresh air which allows you to step off the consumer treadmill,” she says.
In the US, advocates such as Joshua Fields Milburn, Ryan Nicodemus and Joshua Becker explain online how they have turned their back on the pursuit of material goods, extolling the virtues of minimalism and how it enables individuals to live more intentionally and focus on the important things in life, people and experiences, rather than possessions.
“We had this fantastic big house and we were filling it with lovely things, but I could feel my anxiety levels rising. We were spending money and accumulating more and more stuff – but we didn’t need it all. It started to feel meaningless. I realised I just wanted to live a different kind of life.”
“Shopping used to be a leisure activity but now we only shop if we need something specific. When you have spent a lot of time and effort decluttering your home, the last thing you want to do is fill it with more stuff. We have a ‘one thing in, one out policy’,” she says.
“In the worst cases people might be buying things on credit or getting into debt and it could be stuff they just don’t really need,” says Hannah Robinson, financial planner at Ellis Bates in Harrogate, North Yorkshire.
“People think minimalism must mean living like a monk, with no enjoyment. But it isn’t like that at all. Minimalism is about being more considered and mindful about what you buy, stopping the compulsive or impulsive spending, which so often leads to debts and stress – and more clutter,” she says.
Colins continues: “Where there is a gap or something needs replacing I can shop to do this. It’s not about denying yourself things. It is just about being more conscious with your spending.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jenny Odell on why we need to learn to do nothing: ‘It’s a reminder that you’re alive'”

Nearly two years ago, the artist and academic Jenny Odell gave a keynote address on “How to do nothing”.
Odell writes of feeling compelled to seek refuge in her local rose garden in the days after Donald Trump became president, “Like a deer going to a salt lick”: “It really did feel necessary, like a survival tactic.”
“What we are left with,” Odell writes, with no small sadness, “[are] 24 potentially monetizeable hours that we can no longer justify spending on ‘nothing’.
Odell herself finds this state of mind most easily accessed in nature, losing herself in the study of a single leaf or patch of earth, or going on meandering hikes.
A keen birdwatcher, Odell recalls in great detail specific experiences in nature – happening upon a clearing full of sage plants and its “Amazing smell”, or seeing a “Really amazing warbler”.
Finding solace in nature is not a new idea, but its sense of escape is increasingly necessary for our survival, says Odell.
Odell has said How To Do Nothing is not a self-help book promising simple steps to a lasting new way of life : “You have to know that you’re going to keep getting sucked back in, and be realistic about that.”
I catch myself asking Odell what she sees as the benefit or the outcome of doing nothing – is it increased creativity? Greater empathy, improved mental health?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Shut Up and Be Patient”

People who were bullied growing up and go on to become the smartest, nicest, and most interesting dude at the company Christmas party, yet they still harbor this overwhelming sense that nobody really likes them, that it’s all fake and unreal and unearned and undeserved, and that in the end, everybody’s going to wind up hurting them.
People who grew up thinking they were dumb but then go on to get a PhD in molecular astro-chemo-bio-physics yet still feel like they have to prove themselves over and over, that they can’t be wrong about anything, ever, that any sign of doubt in others is a secret sign of inner laughter, that the simplest of mistakes or a poor decision will bring down their whole life like a house of cards.
Maybe your neurotic mother conditioned you to feel guilty about every fucking thing that ever goes wrong in her or anybody’s life, so you’ve learned over the years to always believe you’re not good enough.
These habits – a.k.a. your identity – have been built up over the course of decades of living and breathing, laughing and loving, succeeding and failing, and through the years, they have built up a cruising speed of 40 knots or so in the freezing Atlantic.
Life’s not like a Smart Car where you can just jack the thing into reverse and veer onto a pedestrian-strewn sidewalk whenever you please.
Life moves at the pace it wants, not the pace you want, bucko.
Maybe that is why we are so afraid, because we know that once we chart that course and fire up those furnaces, it’s so fucking hard to turn things around, it’s so hard to move and change and we’re afraid we may end up like the spoiled rich girl, stranded in the icy Atlantic, screaming, “Jack! Jack!” even though there was totally room for Jack on that piece of plyboard, the dude clearly had some martyr complex and wanted to feel like he was dying for her, dying for something beyond his own selfish desires, which ironically, is still dying for your own selfish desires, asshole.
It would be easy for me to say, “I want the answer NOW! I want to know what my life will be like NOW! I want to know what I should do, how I should feel NOW!” But I’ve lived long enough and fucked up enough to know that that doesn’t help things.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Go From Procrastinate Hero To Procrastinate Zero”

In this guide, I will give you an example of how you can improve every single step of the Procrastinate Zero framework.
How do you keep an activity log? Watch this video to learn how I do it.
Track your movements and diet Do you know how many calories you eat during your work-week? How many calories do you burn? How many calories does your body need? Use apps like Myfitnesspal or step counters to measure yourself.
Once you start using these apps, you will get a clear picture of how much you walk and how much you eat on an average day.4.
If we want to get anywhere in life, we have to understand the basics of how to communicate with people.
One of the best books about this subject is How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie.
No matter how many times you read Influence by Robert Cialdini, if you’re an idiot, you will remain an idiot.
At the same time understand how you should get your product, yourself, or services out there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Predict Your Future”

“I want to have a close family.”
“I want to help and inspire people.”
No matter what you want to achieve in life, your actions must back up your words.
It’s not about what you want – it’s about what you do.
Still, I keep adding new things to my daily habits.
There are a lot of other things that I can do better.
What useful and helpful things are you doing today?
The point is that all those little useful things like reading books, taking courses, making tough calls, sending emails, looking at real estate, going for a walk, spending quality time with people you love, ALL ADD UP. But when you do useless things, they add up to nothing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Planning Your Future Is Pointless. The How And Why Of Embracing Uncertainty”

The best things in life are often hard, and if you shy away from difficulty and discomfort, you’ll miss out.
How do you get good at this? Do things now that are uncomfortable and hard, on purpose.
Starting a business, for example, is an amazing thing to do but if you’re afraid of uncertainty, you’ll skip it.
You can’t know how things will turn out, and so if you need to know how things will turn out, you’ll avoid great projects, businesses, opportunities.
You might seize an opportunity because you’re good at uncertainty and discomfort, but then not make the most of it because you’re too busy on social media and watching TV. Actually, distraction and procrastination are just ways of avoiding discomfort, so if you get good at discomfort you’re way ahead of most people.
It’s hard to change mental habits because you don’t always see what’s going on in your head. Learn about how your mind works, and you’ll be much better at all of this.
If you did a sketch every day, or started writing web app, or created a blog or a video channel that you update regularly, or started building a cookie business at the end of a year you’ll have something great.
Finally: The idea behind all of this is that you can’t know what you’re going to do with your life right now, because you don’t know who you’re going to be, what you’ll be able to do, what you’ll be passionate about, who you’ll meet, what opportunities will come up, or what the world will be like.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Kids Want Things”

It’s really a fraught time, and there’s all this insecurity that kids have about Who am I? Do people like me? What kind of person am I? So how do we navigate that? Well, our appearance is one of the things we navigate with.
Pinsker: Can you talk a bit about what the alternative is to dwelling on physical stuff-the “Intangible resources” that kids have for making conversation, like who they are and things they’re good at?
So if kids have more things like athletic skills or activities that they can talk about or form connections with friends over those things, they can feel good about themselves through many different kinds of things.
She gives them words on paper and asks, “How important are these things to you?” And then they put the most important things on their collage.
As the kids get to middle-school age, more and more tangible things get on there and a larger percent of them are actual things, as opposed to activities or other people.
The helpful thing for parents here-and also the harmful-is yes, peers are really important, but our kids are watching us.
So that’s another reasonably strong association: Children who recall that their parents just bought them stuff when they wanted it, or who paid them money or bought them things when they got good grades, there’s a very consistent association that when these things happen in childhood, when that person is an adult, they’re more likely to be materialistic.
I never thought it was a good idea to reward children tangibly for the things that they do, because I don’t think life works that way-there are a lot of things you have to do and you don’t get any reward for them.

The orginal article.