Summary of “Having the best mattress, suitcase, and vitamins nearly broke me”

Day one: Friday I wake up on my Casper Wave mattress in my Brooklinen sheets.
I’ve just come from a few days in DC having used an Away suitcase, which is millennial pink and is extremely fun to zag around on the cobblestones of Brooklyn and between the insufferable crowds at Penn Station.
I’m more easily annoyed about tiny imperfections – the way my feet are still clammy when I wake up, that tumbleweed of blonde hair on the floor, an annoying text that I’ll feel bad about ignoring all day.
Day two: Saturday I wake up on my Casper mattress in my Brooklinen sheets feeling absolutely miserable.
Day three: Sunday The first thing to go is the bullet journaling.
What I did not know about Care/of is that based on your answers, you can easily end up having to take nine vitamins a day.
Day six: Wednesday On the subway on the way to work, I catch a glimpse in the reflection of the door: the headless body of a woman wearing an Everlane trench coat and a tasteful $200 bag.
The last day: Friday again I wake up in my Casper mattress in my Brooklinen sheets far too early for having gone to bed at 2 am.

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Summary of “What I Do When I Can’t Focus”

I have to admit that I can’t maintain my focus all the time.
What can you do to improve your focus? Here are 2 things that I always do when I find myself not being able to focus on what matters.
“What thing(s) should I eliminate to make my life so simple that it’s easy to focus?”.
If you find yourself struggling to focus, try this strategy.
Here’s why serotonin matters to your focus.
When your serotonin activity goes down, it can lead to a lack of focus on the long-term.
To improve your focus, boost your serotonin activity.
Go Deeper Do you want to hear more about improving your focus? Listen to my podcast episode about it.

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Summary of “Do you know your stuff? The ethics of the material world”

Are you sitting comfortably? If so, how much do you know about the chair that’s holding you off the ground – what it’s made from, and what its production process looked like? Where it was made, and by whom? Or go deeper: how were the materials used to make the chair extracted from the planet? Most people will find it difficult to answer these basic questions.
The slow and pervasive separation of people from knowledge of the material world brings with it a serious problem.
Until about a century ago, most people knew a great deal about their immediate material world.
Social structure itself tells of our increasing alienation from the material world.
Why? Not only because they can’t be objectively tested: these skills might be hard to set down on paper, or quantified, but proof of material intelligence is easy enough to see.
It’s as good a point of departure as any for an exploration of the material world.
Material things can even operate independently of language; they don’t require translation.
The good news is that, though it might appear otherwise, we actually are all in it together – together with one another, and with material things, which can give us purchase in an increasingly disorienting world.

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Summary of “Rocko’s Modern Life creator Joe Murray: Nickelodeon was “loose and crazy””

Joe Murray, creator of classic Nicktoon Rocko’s Modern Life, was there during one of the most interesting steps in the network’s evolution.
It’s easier than ever to compare “Nickelodeon then” and “Nickelodeon now,” in part thanks to the newly released complete-series DVD box set of Rocko’s Modern Life.
Rocko was meant to be in his early 20s. I just kept saying to Nickelodeon, “It’s modern life.”
What kinds of things did Nickelodeon offer notes on? Rocko seemed to get away with a lot, but what about those other adult stories about consumerism, etc.
I think a lot of the satire, things we were saying about lots of different aspects of modern life.
It wasn’t really until the corporate machine started building up with Nickelodeon – at the time, it was kind of a different mentality of, suddenly we have to be earning the right kind of money with the right kind of sponsors.
What seemed to be the priorities of the channel creatively back then, at such an early stage of its life making cartoons? Did Rocko meet Nickelodeon’s apparent needs and requirements?
We snuck in there when things were still kinda loose and crazy – I call it the “Wild West” sometimes, because there was a lot of people that we were getting now starting to work in television.

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Summary of “9 CEOs share their favorite productivity hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70% to 80% of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

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Summary of “The truth about time management: how I went from chaos to punctual calm in one week”

She says, is never entirely unchosen: when you are always 17 minutes late for everything, constantly procrastinating because you don’t even want to start looking for a vital scrap of paper in case you can’t find it, it feels like a triumph every time you are punctual.
The principle of time is like the principle of space.
“The biggest obstacle we have to organising time is our perception of it,” Morgenstern says.
On Saturday, I hit the Gordian knot: I couldn’t organise anything bigger than my coat because I didn’t have time and I couldn’t organise my time until I had done my space.
“A day is a limited amount of time. We have 24 hours. You’re sleeping eight hours. Let’s say you’re spending 10 hours at work; you have six hours of personal time. If you plan more than will fit, you’re just shoving things in. That haphazard arrangement, like a closet, becomes chaotic and intimidating. You don’t even look at your to-do list, you’re just freestyling, because you already know your day is impossible.”
“It’s very important; it comes out of eight years of research. How much time and attention do kids need to feel loved and secure? The answer is this: short bursts of five to 15 minutes of truly undivided attention delivered consistently – not big blocks of time delivered erratically.”
Sod it, borrow Morgernstern’s: “I’d love to do it, but my time is accounted for right now.” If it makes you sound like a robot with an American motherboard, the upside is that at least you reply to people fast, rather than leaving them hanging for six weeks, agreeing, then pulling out at the last minute, which is my current MO. By Tuesday, I knew not only what that day held, but more or less the entire week: I knew that I was free to go on a school trip with my daughter.
I am deviating here from the time-management point, but if you think of Holbein’s core message as being that all things will crumble to dust and that the only everlasting truth is death, it brings us back neatly to Morgenstern: “How we spend our time is how we spend our life. This couldn’t be more important.”

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Summary of “The 21 Most Important Questions Of Your Life”

One of the most important lessons I’ve learned from reading books, interviewing smart people, and having conversations with my mentors is that questions are more important than answers.
“Judge a man by his questions rather than his answers.”
The right question at the right time can spark the right answer that changes your life.
In this article, I want to share 21 questions across four areas that have the potential to change everything about what you do.
Life In General Let’s start with a few yes/no questions to assess how you feel.
I have simply made a note in my note-taking app with these 21 questions.
The reason why these quick questions are important is that you want to adjust your strategy if you answer no to any one of them.
What questions am I not asking myself? There are a lot of things in the universe that we don’t know that we don’t know.

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Summary of “How To Be Productive According To Ancient Philosophy”

Productivity has been a topic of discussion ever since ancient eastern and western philosophy started.
It’s time to say “No” to wasting time on useless things that do not bring you anything but short-term pleasure.
It’s time to say “Yes” to a life of productivity that will bring you a better health, wealth, and more inner satisfaction.
Who else could give this monumental piece of advice other than Socrates? The founder of Western philosophy realized that it’s easy to fill your life with meaningless tasks.
That’s why the most important productivity lesson is to understand that it’s not about doing more-it’s about doing the same in less time.
Never underestimate how difficult it is to live a productive life.
The first thing you do when you wake up, what you do when you start working, how much you work, where you work, what you eat, whether you work out or not, and so forth.
Will you get good or bad outcomes? The latter requires wasting your time, the former requires productive action-every day.

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Summary of “How to manage your biggest distractions when working from home”

The benefit for employers is that people who work from home tend to be more productive and happier, according to a new study by Porch, a website that matches homeowners with home service professionals.
According to Porch, the biggest distraction is the television; 76.1% of remote employees have worked with the TV on.
Here are a few ways to stay productive while working from home.
Flexible working arrangements can mean flexible hours, but if you’re not good about getting your work done and your performance is slacking, you’ll need to treat your home office like a regular office and set structured working hours, says Stack.
Create a contract with yourself, such as “Work begins at 8 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m., and I will take one hour for lunch,” she says.
Whether you work from home or in an office, the problem with distractions is that we’re conditioned to seek them out, says productivity expert Maura Thomas, author of Work Without Walls: An Executive’s Guide to Attention Management, Productivity, and the Future of Work.
“If other people are home when you’re working, make sure they know when you’re not to be disturbed,” she says.
Reclaim your ability to focus by closing out email and working in offline mode, suggests Thomas.

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Summary of “Schwarzenegger’s Plans for 2020 Gerrymandering Reforms”

Read: Schwarzenegger is back in a wonky campaign fight against gerrymandering.
Schwarzenegger became obsessed with redistricting reform after successfully pushing a ballot initiative in California, which passed narrowly in 2008 for statehouse races followed by another in 2010 for House seats, with opposition from both Republicans and Democrats.
After the four ballot questions Tuesday and the federal judge who on Wednesday threw out the Maryland congressional map on the grounds that it violated the Constitution through excessive partisanship, Schwarzenegger said he sees “a wave” of its own, albeit one that most election coverage has missed.
Last month, Schwarzenegger hosted a raffle that raised $50,000 on Crowdpac for redistricting reform.
He also spent a day in mid-November campaigning at rallies and fundraisers in Michigan and Colorado for the ballot amendments there.
Schwarzenegger said he’s ready to do more of that.
“If that’s what it takes to get the signatures, I will be the one to do it. I’m not ashamed of standing in a mall and asking people for signatures,” Schwarzenegger said.
He was previously chief Washington correspondent at Politico.

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