Summary of “The People Who Eat the Same Lunch Every Day”

Almost invariably, I see the same colleague in our communal kitchen, who asks with delight, “Joe, what are you having for lunch today?” The types of bean and cheese rotate, as does the fruit-which depends on the season-but I do not inform my co-worker of these variations when I laugh off her very clever and funny question.
The people I talked with recounted similar experiences of having co-workers harmlessly joke about their meals, like “How was that sandwich today, Vern? Did you use crunchy or plain?” Currie Lee’s former colleagues, aware that she adored horses, found her regular meal particularly amusing, saying things like “Oh, there’s Currie with her oats.”
Perhaps there is more to them, and eating the same thing each day reveals something deeper about who people are, or at least perceived to be.
Amanda Respers, the yearlong eater of salads, says that “We bring a little bit of home when we eat lunch at work,” and naturally people’s outside-of-work identities are a subject of interest.
What does eating the same thing each day say, then? “No offense, but it gives the impression that you’re a little bit boring,” she says.
The daily rituals of office life are characterized by their monotony and roteness, and bringing a different lunch each day is a sunny, inspired attempt to combat all the repetition.
In my mind, eating the same thing for lunch each day represents a sober reckoning with the fundamental sameness of office life.
Ultimately, I am partial to Vern Loomis’s analysis of what prompted his co-workers to poke fun at his peanut-butter sandwich: “Maybe just out of good humor, or maybe guilt that they’re not eating as healthy-that they’re eating a greasy burger or something-or going out and spending $15 for a lunch when mine only cost 80 cents.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Financial planner: 8 money strategies crucial for building wealth”

People who built good habits, grew their income, and learned to manage the money they earned so they could grow it into wealth over time – and “Wealth” means enough money to meet your long-term goals while still getting to enjoy using some of that money on stuff you want to do today.
Right? Here’s what’s even better: This is actually attainable for most people, and often what separates real-life wealthy people from those who struggle with money are habits and practices that you can pick up for yourself right now.1.
They ask questions Whether they implement do-it-yourself financial planning and money management, have an accountability buddy, read financial blogs and listen to podcasts, or hire a financial planner, wealthy people always seek to learn new things, and they never stop asking questions.
Once you consistently nail these fundamentals and start increasing your net worth, you may want to look for sophisticated ways to manage your money and continue adding to your assets – but if you don’t understand how something works, it’s not a good thing to put your money in.
They understand their cash flow – or money coming in and money going out – extremely well.
Wealthy people pay themselves first by making sure they save money each month before doing anything else, and if they feel they’re not earning enough to generate the cash they need to save to meet their goals, they work to raise their income.
You can do the same, and instead of getting caught up in making tiny tweaks to your money or your investments, consider the big-picture actions that will truly move the needle when it comes to building wealth.
If you can manage to do these things, you’ll start mirroring what wealthy people do with their money and find yourself well on the way to your own financial success.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your Speech, Their Rules: Meet the People Who Guard the Internet”

What do you think most people don’t understand about working in trust and safety at a platform with tens or hundreds of millions of users?Rob: People are quick to dismiss our policies and decisions as a product of a bunch of college students sitting around in flip-flops and not really thinking about the impact of this stuff, which could not be further from the truth.
Martin: For the most part, the people who are lifers are caring people who just want to make their sites work.
Y.X. Yang: My sense is that a lot of people who work in trust and safety are usually not part of the dominant group, which also makes for a very interesting and kind of sad dynamic when you have people reading things like, “Oh, this company just doesn’t care about women,” or, “This company just doesn’t care about gay people” like, half this team is underrepresented, and they do care.
Adam: Creators and product people want to live in optimism, in an idealized vision of how people will use the product, not the ways that people will predictably break it.
The separation of product people and trust people worries me, because in a world where product managers and engineers and visionaries cared about this stuff, it would be baked into how things get built.
What about the working conditions and pay among people doing this work?Remy: It only makes sense that whatever negative and toxic effects ordinary people get from heavy internet use will only be multiplied in people whose job is to deal with the worst of it.
How do you explain to people what you do for a living?Martin: As a joke, I say I’m an internet janitor.
My real answer is, “I work for this website. And most people use it for good, but the people who don’t use it for good, I kick them off the website.” And it’s that simple.

The orginal article.

Summary of “14 Things About Life I Need To Remind Myself Of Every Day”

No matter how much I read, journal, and process all the wisdom of life, I keep on forgetting the things that make life better.
You also nurture your brain by reminding yourself of all the things that make life better.
What matters is that you have good intentions and that you do your best to make today the best day of your life.
The funny thing is, that the middle IS our life.
Who are you? What kind of life do you want? Shape your life by your decisions.
Believe me, I try hard to convince myself that I don’t need to work out every day.
So you want to wake up, meditate, read, go to the gym, work, have lunch with a friend, pick up a few things from the store, work on your hobby, AND go to the movies?
All of a sudden, we think we can do 10 things on one day instead of the regular 4/5. Make a decision.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How ’30 Rock’ Made Tracy Morgan’s Fake Award Into a Real-Life Goal”

Part 1: Tracy Learns What an EGOT Is Kay Cannon: In the 30 Rock writers’ room, we had a group of people who really had their finger on the pulse of what was going on in pop culture and just things that have happened in the past.
Part 2: Tracy Gets His EGOT Necklace Cannon: Tracy already wore a lot of necklaces and chains and stuff like that in general, so it just seemed natural for him to put on the EGOT necklace.
Part 3: Tracy Meets Whoopi After purchasing the necklace, Tracy seeks advice from Whoopi Goldberg, a real-life EGOTer, about how to EGOT. On his way out, he attempts to steal her Oscar.
Part 5: Tracy Gets a Tony Tracy stages an improvised one-man Broadway show and receives rave reviews.
Ceraulo: The one-man show came from looking at it as, “OK, it’s Tracy Jordan, and he’s gonna try to win a Tony award. Again, he’s not gonna do it correctly. He’s gonna do it in a Tracy Jordan way, so what would he do?”.
Morgan: The phone book thing came from Chris Rock saying one time that Tracy Morgan could make the phone book sound funny.
Scardino: As unlikely as it is for Tracy to become an EGOT, then there was the additional problem of “Well, now you actually have a standard you are going to be held to and live up to.” And that was fun to shoot, because any time Tracy gets to act like a big baby and complain was funny.
I’ve got two Emmy awards, but ultimately, the truth is 30 Rock was a great, great, creative expression by so many people and made so many people laugh, and who cares if we won awards or not? That’s not really the point, so I think that’s what we’re finally saying with the Tracy story is like, it’s kind of baloney.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Use these tools to help visualize the horror of rising sea levels”

By now, everyone knows: the climate is changing, sea levels are rising, and the crises are likely to happen sooner than expected.
Still, it’s one thing to know, and another thing to really see these potential disasters.
Luckily, there’s no lack of tools to help the apathetic develop a visceral sense of what could be at stake.
First, Information Is Beautiful has used data from NASA, Sea Level Explorer, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to create the aptly named “When Sea Levels Attack,” which shows how many years are left until major cities are underwater.
Next, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration offers a tool that helps visualize “Community-level impacts from coastal flooding or sea level rise” up to 10 feet above average high tides.
You can zoom in to a particular area, run different scenarios, and see what happens when the water goes one feet, two feet, 10 feet higher than normal.
The Mapping Choices tool from Climate Central does essentially the same thing with an extra level of guilt because it shows you two scenarios and asks which sea level we will lock in.
Then there’s a new map that lets users peer 60 years into the future of North American cities.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Is the Insect Apocalypse Really Upon Us?”

They say that 41 percent of insect species are declining and that global numbers are falling by 2.5 percent a year, but “They’re trying to quantify things that we really can’t quantify at this point,” says Michelle Trautwein from the California Academy of Sciences.
“I don’t see real danger in overstating the possible severity of insect decline, but there is real danger in underestimating how bad things really are. These studies aren’t perfect, but we’d be wise to heed this warning now instead of waiting for cleaner studies.”
The factors that are probably killing off insects in Europe and North America, such as the transformation of wild spaces into agricultural land, are global problems.
Insects, though diverse, are also particularly vulnerable to such changes because many of them are so specialized, says May Berenbaum from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
“So what happens if the island goes, or the crab goes? That’s the kind of danger that insects face. Very few of them can opportunistically exploit a broad diversity of habitats and supplies.”
The loss of even a small percent of insects might also be disproportionately consequential.
Doing something is hard because insect declines have so many factors, and most studies struggle to tease them apart.
In their review, Sánchez-Bayo and Wyckhuys point the finger at habitat loss above all else, followed by pesticides and other pollutants, introduced species, and climate change, in that order.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Use the KonMari Method to Tidy Your Mind”

A recent DePaul University study found that physical clutter is linked with procrastination and, in turn, lower life satisfaction.
“We have taken our wants and been told they are needs,” Joseph Ferrari, the lead author in the DePaul study, recently told The New York Times.
As the best marathoner of all time, Kipchoge has countless opportunities to make media appearances and live the life of a celebrity.
“In life, the idea is to be happy,” Kipchoge says in the documentary Breaking2.
“So I believe in calm, simple, low-profile life. You live simple, you train hard, and live an honest life. Then you are free.”
Decluttering your life doesn’t just improve happiness; it improves performance, too.
Decluttering your life may be effective, but that doesn’t make it easy, especially in a world characterized by hyperconnectivity and endless opportunities to do more.
What percentage of your time and energy is spent on activities that align with your core values? Which of the activities that do not align with your core values can you reasonably cut?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fresh Air: ‘Never Enough’ Explains The Biology Of The Addicted Brain”

The changes in behavior that happen during adolescence are so important and lasting, because the brain is forming permanent structures.
So whatever you experience as an adolescent is going to have a much more impactful influence on the rest of your life trajectory than it would, say, if you did this at another time in development when your brain wasn’t so prone to changing.
We see definitely lasting changes on the brain and behavior.
It’s a tiny, tiny molecule, and it acts all over the brain in so many different pathways.
So it’s like cocaine in that its actions are very specific, and it’s like alcohol in that those actions are all over the brain.
When we smoke marijuana the whole brain is flooded with THC, and that causes the cell-to-cell communication in cells throughout the brain to be enhanced or to be exaggerated.
What’s unfortunate is the brain does adapt to that, and it adapts by decreasing the number of sites that THC can have an effect [on].
The problem is if we reduce suffering and we produce euphoria using opiates, the brain adapts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does Drinking Coffee Affect Your Gut Health? Here’s What The Research Shows”

If you have a leaky gut, perhaps you’ve wondered if coffee affects your gut health.
“Because of coffee’s acidity, it can adversely affect the lining of your stomach and intestines. If you drink a lot of coffee over an extended period, it will worsen any existing conditions you may have. In addition, it can lead to gastritis and ulcers,” New York City-based Gastroenterologist Dr. Shawn Khodadadian said on the Manhattan Gastroenterology website.
Basically, if you already have gut problems, coffee isn’t doing you any favors.
A 2016 study found that people who regularly drink wine and coffee have more diverse gut microbiome, which is a good thing, Medical Daily reported.
So is coffee good or bad? It actually depends on your individual gut health.
While an all-coffee diet is definitely bad, if your gut is healthy and coffee is part of a diverse array of food and drink you’re putting in your body, your coffee habit is probably totally fine.
If coffee makes your gut feel bad, it’s probably best to stop drinking it.
If you’re not sure whether or not coffee is causing your gut distress, conduct a little experiment to see if you feel better going java free.

The orginal article.