Summary of “‘Los Espookys’ Shows There’s Nothing Weirder Than the Gig Economy”

“I don’t necessarily have a big passion for horror movies or anything,” Ana Fabrega told me, as we sat with her Los Espookys co-star and co-creator, Julio Torres, just ahead of the launch of their HBO series, which premiered in 2019.
While it might initially seem surprising that two of the people behind something called Los Espookys aren’t all that into horror, the truth is that, while the show might traffic in the visceral, what it invokes in viewers doesn’t include terror, but rather a sense of the surreal and the uncanny-as well as a familiar kind of angst, one that speaks to fears that are more existential than they are explicit.
Los Espookys takes place in a fictional, unnamed Latin American country and centers around a group of friends who join together to form a “Horror group,” through which they stage grotesque events as a way of pursuing their creative fantasies.
Torres plays Andrés, the blue-haired, adopted scion of a chocolate magnate; Fabrega plays Tati, who is seen performing a series of odd jobs in one of the best representations of the gig economy I’ve seen on-screen; Cassandra Ciangherotti plays Úrsula, stuck in the drudgery of her job as a dental assistant; and Bernardo Velasco is Renaldo, whose passion for all things gory served as the true inspiration for the formation of Los Espookys.
While Los Espookys isn’t really part of the horror genre, what it shares with films that are, is the way in which it reflects so much of the troubling things happening in the real world, only it does so using a kind of fun-house mirror.
All art, of course, is a reflection of the time and place in which it’s created, and it’s no coincidence that Los Espookys would grapple with issues of immigration and identity, even if the Latin American country in which it’s set is imaginary.
There’s an aspect to watching Los Espookys that feels dreamlike; this is not only because it’s set in an impossible place, but rather because of how immersive of an experience it is to watch it.
This is because, at least for me, a non-Spanish speaker, unlike those TV shows that I watch with one eye on the screen and the other on my phone, I had to pay a different kind of attention to Los Espookys; since the show is almost totally in Spanish, my eyes were glued to the subtitles, within which tons of jokes live.

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Summary of “What Advice Do You Wish You’d Gotten When You Graduated From College? 25 Ted Speakers Answer”

“If you don’t know what you want to do with the rest of your life, you’re not a failure. Give yourself time and get yourself experience to figure things out.” – Angela Duckworth.
“It’s okay to quit your first job – even if it was really hard to get it, it paid well, and everyone seemed to admire you for getting it. If you hate your job, you’ll be wasting your life acquiring skills, contacts and a reputation that you don’t want to use. The sooner you find something you love, the better.” – Tim Harford.
“The advice that I wish I’d gotten when I graduated from college is: Pay attention to the difference between the quick hits of excitement that come from that first kiss of a new relationship or job and those feelings you get when you think about your strong connections with family or friends. Don’t get fooled by shiny things – that shine fades over time, while the gold of strong relationships never tarnishes. Remember the differences between these feelings to help you make decisions as you go forward.” – Judson Brewer.
“Never stop learning. When we graduate college and start our careers, we often understand that we have a lot to learn, so we approach our jobs with a learning orientation. We ask questions; we observe others; we know we may be wrong; and we realize we’re works in progress. But once we gain competence in our jobs, too many of us stop learning and growing. The most successful people – in work and in life – never stop deliberately continuing to learn and improve.” – Eduardo Briceño.
“Give yourself more time. So many college graduates immediately start wanting to make all their dreams come true at once – this can go wrong in many ways. The first is the frustration that you’re not ‘there’ yet. It’s going to take time to find your dream career. The second is burnout. If you find your career early, you can find yourself setting all sorts of unrealistic goals with arbitrary deadlines and chase them until you drop from fatigue. You can have it all – but not all at once.” – David Burkus.
“Whenever possible, get as uncomfortable as possible. Challenge yourself to get outside of your comfort zone regularly – spend time with people you deeply disagree with, read books about experiences you will never have, travel to places where you don’t speak the language, and take jobs in industries you’ve never worked in before. And if you feel yourself resisting, try again. Those experiences will help you build deep empathy, and we could all use more of that.” – Anjali Kumar.
“You don’t have to pursue what you studied. I followed my heart, and now I’m happier and more satisfied with life than I could have ever envisioned. We kill ourselves looking for jobs in our fields of study, while there are a million other things we are able to do. I also wish somebody had told me money doesn’t equate to happiness. When you get a job and start working, don’t forget to live.” – Kasiva Mutua.
“When you finish college and begin your first job or internship, you’ll be keen to learn all you can and impress your employer so you can start on the path to promotions and raises. But the important thing that you might not see amidst all this excitement is the great idea that could someday become a great business or entrepreneurial venture. I’ve found the most interesting employment that life offers is often something of your own creation that you do full time or in addition to your main job. So, after you graduate from college, take the time to identify a venture that you’d like to do by yourself or with friends, and start building it. One day, you’ll be glad you started early.” – Washington Wachira.

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Summary of “Dwight Yoakam Has Some Stories to Tell”

Late afternoon on a Wednesday in December, and I’m in a glass-walled conference room in a Hollywood office building, waiting for an audience with Dwight Yoakam.
“Hey, Kyle?” Dwight says to Kyle, who works for him, and Kyle pops out of his office, and they sidebar about the reindeer, and by the time Dwight has finished his call, Rudolph has been disappeared.
When people come to visit, Dwight likes to sit in the swivel chair at the head of the conference table.
In the foyer of Dwight’s office there’s a cardboard cutout of Dwight circa 1987’s Hillbilly Deluxe, crossing one leg over the other at the ankle, and at one point Dwight stands across from the cutout and does the same thing with his 63-year-old legs-not on purpose; I’m pretty sure it’s just how he stands-and it’s like he’s in front of a mirror.
The show is called An Evening With Dwight Yoakam and the Bakersfield Beat, and it’s a loosely chronological survey of California country music history as shaped by waves of newcomers-Okies traveling what Dwight likes to call “That Tom Joad road” out of Steinbeckian privation, military transplants, migrating blue-collar workers, aspirant creatives chasing Hollywood light, that sort of thing.
The Vegas show tells the same story that he’s been telling since 2018 on his SiriusXM station, also called Dwight Yoakam and the Bakersfield Beat, where he opens the mic once a week to kick it with Beck or Post Malone or Bob Weir and curates selections from a playlist whose aesthetic motto is “From the Dust Bowl to the Hollywood Bowl, from Buck to the Byrds.” That’d be country legend Buck Owens, who pioneered the hard-edged “Bakersfield sound” in the mid-1960s, racked up a string of country hits at a time when Nashville was increasingly turning out gentrified countrypolitan corn syrup, and occupies a place in the personal cosmos of Dwight Yoakam as central as the sun’s.
Dwight grew up in the church, abstains from everything-the author of “This Drinkin’ Will Kill Me” has never touched a drop-but you’ve never had a conversation this digressive with someone who does not get high.
You ask a question, then he’s off, parkouring from subject to subject, and before you know it Dwight Yoakam is saying things like “I would even point to the Spanish-American War” or “And that begins, to my way of thinking, with Northern and Western Europe throwing off the yoke of theocracy, and the writings of John Calvin, and Martin Luther, going back centuries earlier, and that’s what leads us” in response to a question along the lines of “So how long have you had this office space?”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Fun Delivered: World’s Foremost Experts on Whoopee Cushions and Silly Putty Tell All”

“Novelties are so much more than goofy, silly things,” Mardi says.
“Stan got Johnson Smith & Company catalogs all during his youth and teen years,” Mardi says.
“We have the earliest Johnson Smith catalogs in the U.S., and they’re filled with all kinds of things,” Mardi says.
Despite of the grim realities of working for “The whole fun catalog,” Mardi says the senior women the Timms interviewed had nothing but positive things to say about the company culture, and its owner, Alfred Johnson Smith.
Howard Fishlove agreed to meet Mardi and Stan Timm in Chicago, at what Mardi calls a “Resort-type restaurant.” This would be the first of several interviews the couple did with Fishlove.
As a bonus, the first time Mardi and Stan took the train into Chicago to tour the Fun Inc. warehouse, they had the magical experience of seeing the top floor warehouse room where the fake vomit invented by Irving Fishlove in the late ’50s cures in the sunlight.
“During World War II, it was huge to send girlie items to the servicemen,” Mardi says.
“When I was at his house, Jerry gave me a small Coke bottle,” Mardi says, “And there was a wooden arrow going right through it. He challenged me to figure it out. I spent years trying to figure out how that stupid arrow got in there. He always said to me, ‘Mardi, if you can figure it out, call me up, then I’ll tell you if you’re right.’ Well, I called him several times, and he said ‘Noooo.’ Every time, he said ‘Noooo.’ I now know how it’s done because I have a friend who solved it. But I haven’t called Jerry to tell him.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Preparing to shelter in place for coronavirus: A printable guide to what you need at home”

Staying home means that sick people spread the virus to fewer additional people.
In general, rethink your household habits now that you’re hopefully washing more, wiping down surfaces more, and spending more time at home – what do you need to keep up your improved habits?
You will be much less happy stuck at home without them, and as things get worse a run out to the local coffee shop may not be a good idea.
So be prepared to treat everything from home: Do you have rehydration fluids? bandages? Over-the-counter meds? Antiseptic wipes? Cold packs? Things like food poisoning or stomach flu can be safely treated at home unless you’re “Unable to keep down any fluids and have symptoms of dehydration,” Dixon-Luinenburg said.
Plan what you’ll need to keep yourself and your family entertained at home.
Hobbies: Have you been considering taking up embroidery? Knitting? Miniature furniture making? Baking? It’s a good time to dive into an activity you can do at home.
Things for working-from-home: If your job is possible to do remotely, you should prepare for being encouraged or asked to work from home for the next few months.
Getting by at home means that hospital beds can be reserved for those who need them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Survive Isolation With Your Roommates, Your Partner, Your Kids”

‘Low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.
During that time, she learned several lessons applicable to anyone living with roommates.
What If It’s Just Me and the Kids? According to Joshua David Stein, editor-at-large of the parenting publication Fatherly, if you’re practicing social distancing with your kids, now is the time to readjust your rule structure.
Fatherly has compiled a list of at-home activities for bored kids, the internet abounds with kid-friendly podcasts, museum tours and educational videos, and Stein notes that it’s a good time to get outside and take advantage of local parks, too.
If your kids are worried about grandparents they’re unable to visit during the pandemic, Stein suggests: “Without lying, frame it in a way that will assuage their worries as much as possible. Like, ‘Grandma is doing fine, for her safety and our safety, we’re going to rely on FaceTime for now.'” It’s also to be expected that your patience will wear thin at times.
“It’s not the best thing in the world but it’s not the end of the world, don’t beat yourself up about it, try to do better next time.”
What If I’m Suddenly Spending a Lot More Time With My Live-In Partner? “This is a situation where you kind of know what is going to happen so you have time to come up with a gameplan,” says Erin Davidson, a couples and sex therapist.
While it may be a tricky time to date, low-risk, symptom-free partners living in relative isolation together can certainly use this time to have more sex.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”Fast Fashion” Furniture Has Given Us a World of Crappy Couches”

What happened? I got a little older, started making slightly more money, and found myself caring about furniture.
Fast-furniture manufacturers capitalize on this desire by giving shoppers an opportunity to buy trend-informed furniture at a price that doesn’t force them to pretend they’re investing in the future.
The description of Langley Street on Wayfair’s website says it “Inspires and celebrates the individual by offering mid-century furniture and home decor items perfect for small-spaces.” If that’s not really your thing, Wayfair also sells pieces by a brand called Corrigan Studio, which says its “Seamless silhouettes in chic materials bring authenticity.” Or try Mercury Row’s “Collection of inspiring, affordable furniture and décor.” Or head over to AllModern.com, “Your home for affordable modern design.”
Like big-name pieces of furniture, it is not available from Wayfair.
“The same thing is happening in furniture that you saw happen in fashion,” Hannah Martin, a senior design writer at Architectural Digest, told me.
Cheaper furniture isn’t all bad. “There’s something nice about the democracy of people having affordable options. I think it’s more about the way that we use those things,” Martin said.
Think of them as the Everlane to Wayfair’s H&M. Instagram and internet-fueled globalization partially explain how the cheap and trendy furniture market has exploded, but it’s the precarious future prospects of Millennials that complete the picture.
“Your private life is on display. You can show your cute ‘shelfie’ or whatever people call it.” Fast furniture isn’t the new fast fashion so much as a continuation of it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Quit Your Life, And Then Start It Over”

There is no manual for how to quit your life and start over.
The hardest part about quitting your life and starting over is making the decision to quit your life and start over.
For some reason, this foolish approach to life worked for me-more or less-for most of the nine years that I lived in New York.
Despite the fact that things were basically working for me in New York, they weren’t working for me in a bigger picture way.
As we stood idly on our office escalator, she laid it out for me: If you make a spreadsheet of your life-one column of good things that currently exist, another of the not so good things, and a third of things you say you want but don’t have-you’ll be able to make a conclusion, at least intellectually, about whether you should quit what you’re doing and start over.
I listened to my friend talk about the negative circumstances that filled her life in New York City, and what could be possible elsewhere.
Dating in New York felt like banging my head, over and over, against the same brick wall.
I’d been out the night before with the guy I was seeing and a close girlfriend, eating one final perfect New York meal, and ending the night with one final cocktails at my local bar, which meant that, fittingly, on my final morning in New York, I was hungover.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Surviving perimenopause: ‘I was overwhelmed and full of rage. Why was I so badly prepared?'”

Menopause, defined as a full year with no period, hits women on average around the age of 51.
Jacqueline Thielen, who works at the Women’s Health Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, said she sees many women in their 40s and 50s who tell her they’re scared of hormone therapy, but made miserable by symptoms and being swamped with responsibilities.
In a survey by the American Association of Retired Persons, 84% of participating women said that menopausal symptoms interfered with their lives.
“Women need to recognise that it’s a time of vulnerability, and there are some things that they can do to help.”
For decades, women have had to argue that they could still work and function through those messy period, pregnancy and menopause-related symptoms, and as a result we’ve minimised them, both to others and to ourselves.
So as not to call attention to ourselves as women, we pretend it’s not happening.
Boomer women arguably started this, entering the work world in shoulder-pad armour.
In 1993, as the menopause was becoming a hot topic, the Women’s Health Initiative, a national, long-term study on the possible benefits of hormone treatment for postmenopausal women, was launched in the US. But, in July 2002, the premature termination of the oestrogen-progesterone part of the study was announced.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Be Better At Being Good To Yourself”

Is there anyone you know who doesn’t have a meditation app on their phone? Group meditations and sound baths are becoming as popular as cycling classes, and, of course, athleisure is still ruling the runways and the streets.
One person may love going to the gym, but doesn’t know the first thing about meditation, while another may be a seasoned cab and subway meditator, yet despises the idea of going to a group fitness class.
How can we be mindful? How can we learn to love taking care of our physical wellbeing?
How do we remedy that? Bianca Cheah, founder of Sporteluxe.com, wants us to learn how to “Monotask,” really striving to do one thing-and only one thing-at a time.
Find the Best Form of Meditation for You.When meditation comes to mind, most of us immediately picture ourselves sitting silently in a quiet room for anywhere from ten to 45 minutes.
While many people do choose to practice that way, it’s definitely not the only form of meditation out there.
How does TaherZadeh do this? “By trying to have a portion of my day only for myself, whether it’s my fitness class or a run in the park. I have my best clarity when I’m physical. That’s my personal form of meditation.”
“You can use working out as a means of releasing anxiety and tension, and it also helps with freeing your mind and putting yourself in a better place.” So whether it means trying out one of his ass-kicking classes for yourself, doing a few sets of squats while watching TV, or adding an evening stroll to your daily rituals, just, simply, get moving!

The orginal article.