Summary of “Why I can’t stop posting my kid’s photos and sharing him with the world”

The instinct has long been there; it’s just that it used to require a lot more overhead. In the 1970s, for example, there was the post-vacation slide show, in which relatives and friends of the lucky travelers had the bad luck to be buttonholed into two hours of photos with lengthy you-had-to-be-there anecdotes.
Instagram, Facebook and Twitter are also a way of flipping open your wallet to the world and saying, “Here’s my son Thomas, the person who brings me more happiness than I could ever have imagined.”
At work, I created a channel on the messaging application Slack where all I do is share photos and videos of Thomas, splashing my love for him onto everyone around me.
No picture of Thomas with a goofy expression in the bath.
Pictures of Thomas are taken indoors or in places either so abstract as to be unidentifiable or so popular that it doesn’t matter.
Where things are tricky isn’t in how I approach sharing images of Thomas but in how others do.
We ask people not to tag a location when they are taking pictures of Thomas, but it’s harder to ask them not to post images where he looks goofy.
Thomas was born into a world where his image was already mostly out of his control.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The limits of reason: Philip Pullman on why we believe in magic”

A new exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford brings together a multitude of objects and artworks – there’s a “Poppet” or rag doll with a stiletto stuck through its face, an amulet containing a human heart, a wisp of “Ectoplasm” apparently extruded by a medium in Wales, and too many others to count – from a dark world of nonsense and superstition that we ought to have outgrown a long time ago.
In Christian countries it reached a pitch of hysterical panic between the 15th and the late 18th centuries, at a time when tensions between Protestant and Catholic powers were at their highest, and when the medieval world of faith was being challenged by the new thinking of the Enlightenment.
Everything in the exhibition testifies to a near-universal belief in the existence of an invisible, imaginary world that could affect human life and be affected in turn by those who knew how to do it; and so do millions of other objects of similar kinds collected, exhibited, studied, or uncollected, unknown, lost, throughout the world and every period of history.
Imagination is one of our highest faculties, and wherever it appears, however it “Bodies forth / The forms of things unknown”, I want to treat it with respect.
At its most intense it becomes a kind of perception, as in William Blake’s notion of “Twofold Vision”, by which he means what we see when we look “Not with but through the eye”: the state of mind in which we can “See a World in a Grain of Sand / And a Heaven in a Wild Flower”.
On the contrary, I’d rather say that there are times when we have to keep our reason in line.
Imagination can give us an empathetic understanding of the world of magic; reason reminds us that the cast of mind that persecuted witches is still alive.
The Varieties of Magical Experience still has to be written, as far as I know; and it will only be done successfully by someone who engages the subject with both reason and imagination.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Kids Want Things”

Pinsker: Can you talk a bit about what the alternative is to dwelling on physical stuff-the “Intangible resources” that kids have for making conversation, like who they are and things they’re good at?
So if kids have more things like athletic skills or activities that they can talk about or form connections with friends over those things, they can feel good about themselves through many different kinds of things.
She gives them words on paper and asks, “How important are these things to you?” And then they put the most important things on their collage.
As the kids get to middle-school age, more and more tangible things get on there and a larger percent of them are actual things, as opposed to activities or other people.
One of the most consistent findings is the association between the person’s current level of materialism and how they perceived their parents using things when they were growing up.
The helpful thing for parents here-and also the harmful-is yes, peers are really important, but our kids are watching us.
Pinsker: And from what I understand, that connects to the research you’ve done on when parents offer physical things as rewards.
So that’s another reasonably strong association: Children who recall that their parents just bought them stuff when they wanted it, or who paid them money or bought them things when they got good grades, there’s a very consistent association that when these things happen in childhood, when that person is an adult, they’re more likely to be materialistic.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Question of Your Life”

“In the day-to day trenches of adult life, there is actually no such thing as atheism. There is no such thing as not worshiping. Everybody worships. The only choice we get is what to worship.”This, I suspect, is profound even beyond the examples of day-to-day worship that he gives to prove his point.
Even people who don’t openly talk about their object of worship do worship something, and this something can be identified in their day-to-day actions.
If you formulate a question in a way that can be answered, you can temporarily come to a happy conclusion.
Every answer can be re-opened with a new question.
There is always something more, and what distinguishes people and what they worship is when they stop asking the next question.
Because many different things work depending on the context and the person, it’s worth having an open mind even if you are comfortable settling for your own personal answer to the last question.
The TakeawayIt all begins with the question of what it is we worship, a question we all answer either explicitly, by abiding to some philosophical framework, or implicitly, by how we live and what we pay attention to.
The most important question in life may well be: How do we deal with the mysterious? The best answer doesn’t try to explain the mysterious away.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why high-performers don’t use to-do lists”

At JotForm, we approach to-do lists with caution, too.
With to-do lists what happens is that we optimistically assume most of the day’s tasks will take less time than what they’ll actually take.
In addition to horrible time estimation, the reason to-do lists roll into the next day is because they place us into a mindset where everything must go on the list - regardless of the level of impact it has on our day.
In many ways, to-do lists cause us to be overly proactive in our thinking.
To-do lists also allow us to avoid the most important tasks of the day - they aren’t unlike email in that way.
While certainly not in all cases, many times people use to-do lists to avoid doing the things they don’t want to do.
He certainly didn’t have time to make to-do lists.
“Long hours spent checking off a to-do list and ending the day with a full trash can and a clean desk are not virtuous and have nothing to do with success. Instead of a to-do list, you need a success list - a list that is purposefully created around extraordinary results.”While this concept might seem a bit abstract, executing it is simple.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 3 Stages of Failure in Life and Work”

A Failure of Tactics is a failure to execute on a good plan and a clear vision.
In Centratel’s case, they had a clear vision and a good strategy, but they didn’t know how to execute their strategy and vision.
Of course, there is no requirement that says you must to develop a personal vision for your work or your life.
What do you want to accomplish? How do you want to spend your days? It is not someone else’s job to figure out the vision for your life.
Your emotions caused you to turn a Stage 1 or Stage 2 failure into a Stage 3 failure.
If you are committed to making your vision a non-negotiable factor in your life and not giving up on the first try, then you have to be willing to navigate criticism.
Failures of Tactics can occasionally create enough havoc that you mistakenly believe you have a Failure of Vision.
It would have been easy to assume that his vision of being an entrepreneur was the failure when it was merely poor tactics causing the problem.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Penn Jillette, In Conversation”

The long and successful career of Penn Jillette, the bigger half of the magic duo Penn & Teller, itself constitutes a kind of trick.
“I don’t know if magic has changed much since I’ve been doing this,” says Jillette, 63, sitting in his dressing room before a show at the Rio Hotel’s Penn & Teller theater in Vegas.
Has the popular image of magic changed in any profound way since you started?It’s hard to say because, look, you can name about 10,000 musicians off the top of your head. And you, a guy who has been researching magic and wasting your fucking time preparing for this interview, can probably only name about 15 magicians.
From a 1987 piece in the Times: “Some of the most celebrated young magicians – exemplars of ‘the new magic” or ‘avant-magic,” as it is being billed – have rejected significant elements of the magical tradition. Some are even saying they feel uncomfortable about being associated with the word magic. ‘We think of it as the M word,’ said Mr. Jillette.'” Illusionist and multiple-island-owner David Copperfield is the world’s most well-paid magician.
The Magic Castle is a Los Angeles venue, restaurant, and private club for magic where visitors must say a password to a sculpture of an owl to get in.
“When we went to commercial,” Penn has recalled, “Dave swore at us and pushed us away from him. He wouldn’t even look at us. He didn’t say goodnight to us.” Raymond Joseph Teller met Jillette in 1974, and they began their trademark show in 1981.
Teller normally does not speak in shows or in public, citing early magic shows at frat parties where bros paid closer attention when he was silent.
Penn & Teller: Fool Us presents young magicians performing in front of the pair – if Penn and Teller cannot determine the trick’s mechanics, the magician wins a trip to Vegas to open for the duo.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Did You Fail At Something? Good-Do Something Else”

“When things are going bad, there’s going to be some good that will come from it.”
Every time something goes wrong, focus on the good thing about the situation.
Instead, he says that something good could emerge out of something bad. But it requires you to focus on the good first.
How do you do that? By saying GOOD every time something goes wrong.
“Oh, the mission got canceled? Good. We can focus on another one.Didn’t get the new high-speed gear we wanted? Good. We can keep it simple.Didn’t get promoted? Good. More time to get better.Didn’t get funded? Good. We own more of the company.Didn’t get the job you wanted? Good. Go out, gain more experience, build a better resume.Got injured? Good. Needed a break from training.Got tapped out? Good. It’s better to tap out in training than tap out on the street.Got beat? Good. We learned.Unexpected problems? Good. We have an opportunity to figure out a solution”.
How do you hold up when big setbacks happen? Do you still complain? Or have you trained yourself enough to always focus on the good?
For me, it took about two years to get really good at this.
When things go wrong, I see it as a trigger for doing something else.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This is what being in love looks like”

In 2017, to find joy once more, she decided to go on a road trip across France, asking random strangers to share their most defining and life-changing love stories with her.
Yann: “Alexandre and I met on Facebook through friends. We then talked on Skype for two months and we fell in love. Alexandre was kicked out of his house and he came to live with me and my family. My parents were not aware that we were in love or that I was gay. But my mother guessed it, because we were looking at each other lovingly. One day she searched my room and found all the letters we wrote each other. In my family, we don’t speak about our feelings. She had a hard time accepting it. The day she gave me her blessing, I immediately asked Alexandre to marry me. We got married two weeks ago. We are the second gay couple to get married in Elbeuf!”.
Alexandre: “I decided to take Yann’s last name. I am completely estranged from my family except for my father, but he died in April. I was brought up in a foster family who I’ve since taken to court for mistreatment. And when I finally went back to my mother’s house, she ended up throwing me out because I was gay. Today, I am at peace. With Yann, I feel confident. I love Yann’s body and his childish side. I am always doing little things for him, like every night, I pour him a bath with candles, and I bring him breakfast in bed. We want at least four children.”
“He had the reputation of being a great charmer. All the girls wanted him. He would always go out with end-of-the-line duchesses, or dancers with long legs. I, on the other hand, was a tiny girl with no money. He made accessories for a circus company, and I was an equestrian performer. I would go naked on the horse’s back, stand on it, or ride sidesaddled. I fell in love with him because I wanted security. But it turned out to be the opposite: he harassed me mentally and physically, and denigrated me as an artist. I directed comedians and acrobats, but he would go behind my back to tell them my artistic direction was all wrong. He would break everything I did.”
“I think I’m an inveterate romantic. I could fall in love so easily. I would love to raise a second child. I have been given the green light to adopt one.”
“The problem when you are 17 and that you fall in love with an older man is that you ask yourself: do I have a psychological problem? Do I have an oedipal complex?”.
“I am with Katia now. She is from Paris. She is a good person. I met her when she was 17 and I was 25. She was my employee. She loved me, but it wasn’t reciprocal. I was with someone else at the time. And we spent 30 years without seeing each other. But we met again and we got married 10 years ago. I never got married with the others. Why? Because they didn’t ask. She just had an operation, so she is in Paris, resting. Do I love her? I don’t know. Love is a weird word. I care about Katia. That must be love. She cares about me too – a bit too much.”
“It wasn’t love at first sight with Thierry. His web profile was too perfect, and a lot of men had lied to me. He said he cooked; he doesn’t. But he does do the cleaning. He tells me he loves me, that he thinks I am pretty. We can’t live without each other. It has been two years.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Exclusive: Spotify CEO Daniel Ek on Apple, Facebook, Netflix-and the f”

FC: Some people look at Spotify as the Netflix of music.
Very few people at Spotify last more than two or three of these rounds.
They’re phenomenal people, and many times I’m their reference and help them get their next thing.
FC: Spotify has tangled with a lot of players in the music industry, but most of the people I talked to about you describe you as a good guy.
Someone once pointed out to me, the greatest people through history-you know, Gandhi, John Lennon, Jesus-what do all these people have in common? They all got murdered.
DK: A lot of people are very enamored with the Facebook model of Sheryl Sandberg coming in.
If you build something that is valuable to people, then you’re going to build a valuable company.
What I’m focused on is the long-term thing, having a billion people inspired by that creativity, creating new ways for people to express themselves.

The orginal article.