Summary of “General Magic: Oral History of the Influential Tech Company”

In other words, General Magic pulled the technological equivalent of a working iPhone out of its proverbial hat-a decade before Apple started working on the real thing.
The Macintosh wasn’t a computer-it was a program to make things move in front of Steve’s eyes, the way a real computer would move them, but it didn’t have the underpinnings of a general operating system that allocates resources and keeps track of them and things like that.
I think a big part of spinning General Magic out of Apple was this idea that it was too big even for Apple, right? Apple couldn’t deal with this thing.
AT&T became the fourth investor in General Magic on par with Sony, Motorola, and Apple.
Marc Porat: Andy and Bill demoed a Magic machine, which was in a format like an iPhone, and they said, “So this is what we are going to ship next. It is a phone, and you can see all the Magic Link icons on it, and let me show you how it works.” They go through contact the manager, the telephone, sending e-mails the works.
Amy Lindburg: General Magic was the kind of company where a guy who is going to be a billionaire in a couple years didn’t even rate a window cube.
Michael Stern: So Pierre came to me when I was the general counsel in 1994 and said, “I’ve created this little electronic community. I’m getting people to talk to each other about trading tchotchkes. We’re creating traffic on the network and getting people into a community. That’s kind of in our sweet spot, isn’t it?” That was General Magic’s thing: the whole notion of electronic community.
He was at Silicon Graphics when SGI was the most respected company in Silicon Valley, at General Magic when Magic was the company of the moment, and at Netscape during its IPO. He ran Google’s search division – the entire thing.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Repair Cafes Aim to Fix Our Throwaway Culture”

Around the room, 10 others were helping residents repair everything from tables and lamps to jewelry and clothing.
It’s that throwaway culture that former sustainability journalist Martine Postma-now the founder of the Repair Cafe Foundation-aimed to tackle in October 2009 when she created the first of such cafes in Amsterdam.
That’s why the cafes teach people how to repair their belongings, rather than doing it for them.
He had never heard of repair cafes until the day before, and generally wasn’t the kind of person to fix things himself.
Goedeke himself grew up with woodwork classes, and learned to fix things by taking objects apart and tinkering with what’s inside.
For the time being, communities are doing what they can to encourage people to fix things.
Libraries like the one in Howard County, for example, have started renting out tools and creating “Makerspaces” where members learn to both repair and create.
Similar to the Repair Cafe Foundation, a London startup called The Restart Project are encouraging communities to host “Restart parties” with the goal of “Fixing our relationship with electronics.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The simple art of not being miserable”

Living in his presence, after many more years of unrest and suffering from all the seeking, Siddhartha eventually, in a sudden moment, finds himself at peace.
“When someone seeks,” said Siddhartha, “Then it easily happens that his eyes see only the thing that he seeks, and he is able to find nothing, to take in nothing because he always thinks only about the thing he is seeking, because he has one goal, because he is obsessed with his goal. Seeking means: having a goal. But finding means: being free, being open, having no goal.”
Happiness-or more accurately, a lack of unhappiness-is a product of the relationship that exists between our subjective expectations and the objective reality.
Over the long-term, a feeling of peaceful contentment comes down to the objective reality giving us more than our subjective expectations.
Many of these things are far more negotiable than we make them.
Sure, making more money may make your life better off, and of course, winning that prize or capturing the praise of someone you admire can be life-affirming, but if there is a world of people who can live completely in peace without these things-and there almost always is, no matter what it is you desire-the chances are that you can, too.
The simple reason is that before you desire an answer, you have to first define what you are looking for.
We have to learn to let go of the incompatible subjective expectations that we rigidly anchor to reality so that we can recast new ones in a more suitable direction, slowly getting away from the seeking to the finding.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why bad technology dominates our lives, according to Don Norman”

I used it as the epigraph of my 1993 book, Things That Make Us Smart, suggesting that it be flipped to read “People Propose, Technology Conforms.” I have helped develop design principles that make technology easier to use and understand, principles that evolved into my book Design of Everyday Things, and that today are called human-centered design.
We have unwittingly accepted the paradigm that technology comes first, with people relegated to doing the actions that the machines cannot do.
As a result, we require people to do tedious, repetitive tasks, to be alert for long periods, ready to respond at a moment’s notice: all things people are bad at doing.
When the inevitable errors and accidents occur, people are blamed for “Human error.” The view is so prevalent that many times the people involved blame themselves, saying things like “I knew better” or “I should have paid more attention,” not recognizing that the demands of the technology made these errors inevitable.
Consider the words we use to describe the result: human error, distraction, lack of attention, sloppiness-all negative terms, all implying the inferiority of people.
What kind of business exploits curiosity for its own ends? Almost any business that discovers there are profits to be made by continually engaging people’s curiosity, hopes, and interests.
We should start with people’s abilities and create technology that enhances people’s capabilities: Why are we doing it backwards?
We need to return to one of the core properties of human-centered design: solve the fundamental issues in people’s lives.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Help Teens De-Stress With These ‘Getting Things Done’ Hacks”

Imagine having the same list of pressures that you had as a high school kid-school, extracurriculars, chores, a social life often filled with angst-and then adding on the constant pull of social media, alerting you to all the things you’re not doing.
Luckily their age is on their side, according to David Allen, the man behind the Getting Things Done productivity system that so many of us know and can’t function without.
He writes this in his new book Getting Things Done for Teens: Take Control of Your Life in a Distracting World, co-authored by Mike Williams and Mark Wallace.
The techniques are simple, practical and instantly applicable-reading through it, I’m finding myself jotting down productivity hacks to try on myself and wishing I had learned these tricks in school.
If your teen has a hard time falling asleep, try …. A Mind Sweep Before BedWhat to do: Before bed, grab a pen and paper and write down the things on your mind.
What it does: Helps you let go of things on your mind.
Don’t organize anything or put things away just yet.
Once you clear the space, you can take the things you see in the bucket and make decisions about them.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A More Or Less Definitive Guide To Showing Up For Friends”

Showing up for other people is hard to describe, but you know it when you see it, or when someone does it for you.
The thing about showing up is that it’s not exactly easy.
Truly showing up for others requires you to do something that can be even harder – to show up for yourself first.
Showing up for yourself is what will allow you to be a better and more present friend/partner; will prevent resentment, one-sided relationships, and burnout; and will help you figure out exactly what showing up for your people should look like in practice.
Occasionally, we’ll get to make a grand enough gesture to light up several bulbs at once, but for the most part, showing up is best done one small, quiet act by small, quiet act.
As firm believers in the power of showing up – as people who have showed up for others, and who have felt the transformative, life-saving power of having people show up for us – we’ve put together a long list of ways to show up for your loved ones.
Because the more of us who show up for each other regularly, the more strands of lights we collectively turn on, and the brighter all of our paths become.
If you know in your heart that you *haven’t* been showing up for them, be honest about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Read This If You’re Going Through Adversity”

In the midst of challenging times, we often think we’re going through the worst time ever.
So how can we get over that? How can we stay motivated during tough times? After going through a lot of adversity myself, I’ve learned a few things about staying motivated.
That’s the last thing you need during adversity.
To go through adversity successfully, we all need a support system.
I’ll tell you this: No one on earth is strong enough to go through all adversity alone.
Well, what’s the worst thing that can happen? Will those things kill you? Probably not.
My second favorite question when dealing with adversity is this: What are you going to do about it?
Keep reminding yourself of where you’re going and more importantly, WHY you’re going there.

The orginal article.

Summary of “David Lynch, In Conversation”

Since Eraserhead in 1977, David Lynch has reigned as one of our most compellingly enigmatic directors.
There are probably thousands and thousands of examples of people who had screwed-up lives and didn’t do the best things but did great work.
What makes you say that?There are people working toward it.
For some reason people have lost contact with it, but the Transcendental Meditation technique for making contact with that field is here and people are taking advantage.
It’s interesting to you hear talk about the joy of the result, because your work, I think, tends to leave people with darker, more enigmatic feelings than joy.
Lynch has been practicing Transcendental Meditation since 1973, and in 2005 founded the David Lynch Foundation, which promotes TM around the world.
If you’re interested, David Lynch: The Art Life is a great documentary about Lynch’s work as a painter.
Things were not looking rosy for Lynch after 1991’s muddled second season of Twin Peaks and the disastrous critical and popular reception to 1992’s feature film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. That same year Lynch’s sitcom On the Air, about a 1950s television network, came and went.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Science Behind Happy and Healthy Relationships”

There’s no denying it: making and keeping happy and healthy relationships is hard.
A growing field of research into relationships is increasingly providing science-based guidance into the habits of the healthiest, happiest couples – and how to make any struggling relationship better.
As we’ve learned, the science of love and relationships boils down to fundamental lessons that are simultaneously simple, obvious and difficult to master: empathy, positivity and a strong emotional connection drive the happiest and healthiest relationships.
“The most important thing we’ve learned, the thing that totally stands out in all of the developmental psychology, social psychology and our lab’s work in the last 35 years is that the secret to loving relationships and to keeping them strong and vibrant over the years, to falling in love again and again, is emotional responsiveness,” says Sue Johnson, a clinical psychologist in Ottawa and the author of several books, including Hold Me Tight: Seven Conversations for a Lifetime of Love.
According to Carrie Cole, director of research for the Gottman Institute, an organization dedicated to the research of marriage, emotional disengagement can easily happen in any relationship when couples are not doing things that create positivity.
In happy relationships, partners try to empathize with each other and understand each other’s perspectives instead of constantly trying to be right.
Ultimately, the quality of a person’s relationships dictates the quality of their life.
“Good relationships aren’t just happier and nicer,” says Johnson.

The orginal article.

Summary of “To increase your emotional intelligence, develop these 10 qualities”

Write these thoughts out, analyze them and determine how you want to treat others in the same way you’d want to be treated.
Your “Antennae” are up to things you love, to wanting to grow and learn more.
The emotionally intelligent mind is able to discern between things that they need versus things that would be “Nice to have” that classify more aptly as wants.
We do not need those things to survive, but rather we want them based on our own personal desires or what we perceive to matter to society.
Emotionally intelligent people know the difference between these two things, and always establish needs prior to fulfilling wants.
If you want to increase your opportunities, improve your relationships and think clearly and constructively, you’re best positioned to maintain a positive attitude.
Their inspired leadership and passion, combined with their optimism, drives them to want to do best for themselves and others.
In the same way that we should be focused on our self-interest, we should also maintain a spirit of desire and hope for wanting to see the people around us succeed.

The orginal article.