Summary of “Nietzsche on Truth, Lies, the Power and Peril of Metaphor, and How We Use Language to Reveal and Conceal Reality – Brain Pickings”

“Knowledge consists in the search for truth,” Karl Popper cautioned in considering truth and the dangers of relativism.
That is what Friedrich Nietzsche examined a century before Arendt and Popper in his 1873 essay “On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense,” later translated by W.A. Haussmann and included in the indispensable Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche.
The desire for knowledge, Nietzsche argues, stems from the same hubristic self-focus and is amplified by the basic human instinct for belonging – within a culture, what is designated as truth is a form of social contract and a sort of “Peace pact” among people.
A uniformly valid and binding designation is invented for things, and this legislation of language likewise establishes the first laws of truth.
Are they perhaps products of knowledge, that is, of the sense of truth? Are designations congruent with things? Is language the adequate expression of all realities?
At bottom, what the investigator of such truths is seeking is only the metamorphosis of the world into man.
How differently the stoical man who learns from experience and governs himself by concepts is affected by the same misfortunes! This man, who at other times seeks nothing but sincerity, truth, freedom from deception, and protection against ensnaring surprise attacks, now executes a masterpiece of deception: he executes his masterpiece of deception in misfortune, as the other type of man executes his in times of happiness.
Complement “On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense” with Adrienne Rich on what “Truth” really means, Toni Morrison on the power of language, and Bertrand Russell on our only effective self-defense against the manipulation of realty, then revisit Nietzsche on depression and the rehabilitation of hope, how to find yourself, what it really means to be a free spirit, and why a fulfilling life requires embracing rather than running from difficulty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here are 22 of the best day-to-day, time-saving tips to use now”

We try to squeeze as many hours in one work day, to be “Productive”, but in the end everything depends less on time, and more on your focus, motivation and overall well-being.
The 2-minute rule: if you can do something in two minutes, do it now.
The 5-minute rule: the biggest cure against procrastination is to set your goal not to finish a scary big hairy task, but to just work five minutes on it.
Seinfeld’s productivity chain: if you want to be good at something, do it every day.
You need discipline, and this means for me two things: I plan my day first thing in the morning, and I write a short daily log every day.
Don’t read your email first thing in the day, don’t read it in the evening, and try to do it only 3 times a day: at 11am, 2pm and 5pm. And your email inbox is not a todo list.
Start with the most important first thing in the morning.
The new one took two and a half days and we did it over one hackathon weekend.

The orginal article.

Summary of “My life philosophy: 49 things I’ve learned during 49 years on Earth”

You receive tickets every time you try new things and meet new people.
Again from How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World: “You are free to live your life as you wantThe demands and wishes of others don’t control your life. You do. You make the decisionsThere are thousands of people who wouldn’t demand that you bend yourself out of shape to please them. There are people who will want you to be yourself, people who see things as you do, people who want the same things you want. Why should you have to waste your life in a futile effort to please those with whom you aren’t compatible?” Be impeccable with your word.
When you take things personally, you’re allowing others to control your life and your happiness.
There are a lot of people out there who want to tell others what’s wrong with their actions, why the things they want to do can’t be done.
You’re more likely to regret the things you don’t do than the things you do.
Strip from your life the things that take time, money, and energy, but which do not bring you joy.
History is filled with examples of folks who achieve great things later in life.
This is the most important thing I’ve learned during my 49 years of life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Travel Is No Cure for the Mind”

This is what you’ve been working so hard for! Now that you have this car, the structure of your box has fundamentally changed, and your box as you know it will no longer be the same!
Then one day, your box is simply The Box of Daily Experience again, with the same mundane texture and familiar color it possessed in the past.
In a way, it’s absurdly paradoxical - churning the gears of the box is what provides us with the fiscal resources to break out of it, but the wonderful memories of our vacations are what brings us squarely back to the box once again.
It’s times like these when you begin to dream of getting out of The Box of Daily Experience for good.
Oh no! What the hell is this box doing here again?! How has it followed you all the way over here?!
Perhaps it’s time to find another place to go to?! Somewhere even further away?! A whole other continent maybe? Since The Box of Daily Experience has returned, the subsequent urge to break out of it has come back as well.
You can change your external environment all you want, but you will continue to travel with the one box that will always accompany you.
What we are left with is clarity and openness to see The Box of Daily Experience for what it really is: a reflection of life that can be eased into fluidity with the proper attention and care.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Will Our Society Look Like When Artificial Intelligence Is Everywhere?”

Hedge funds are using AI to beat the stock market, Google is utilizing it to diagnose heart disease more quickly and accurately, and American Express is deploying AI bots to serve its customers online.
This AI “Takeoff,” also known as the singularity, will likely see AI pull even with human intelligence and then blow past it in a matter of days.
“AIs will colonize and transform the entire cosmos,” says Juergen Schmidhuber, a pioneering computer scientist based at the Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Switzerland, “And they will make it intelligent.”
As a novelist, I wanted to plot out what the AI future might actually look like, using interviews with more than a dozen futurists, philosophers, scientists, cultural psychiatrists and tech innovators.
Once you made the decision to leave him, your AI negotiated with your soon-to-be ex-husband’s AI, wrote the divorce settlement, then “Toured” a dozen apartments on the cloud before finding the right one for you to begin your single life.
You read a fresh Austen work every month, then spend hours talking to your AI about your favorite characters-and the AI’s.
There will be Christian, Muslim and Orthodox Jewish districts in cities such as Lagos and Phoenix and Jerusalem, places where people live in a time before AI, where they drive their cars and allow for the occasional spurt of violence, things almost unknown in the full AI zones.
In Lagos, “Civil rights” drones fly over police pods as they race to the scene of a crime-one AI watching over another AI, for the protection of humankind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Organize Your Life, Based On Your Myers-Briggs Type”

If you don’t have that whole organized thing down, you can learn how to organize your life based on your Myers-Briggs personality type.
The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator personality assessment divides everyone into 16 distinct types based on how you perceive and judge the world, and it can be a useful tool for not only understanding your own strengths and weakness, but for understanding others as well.
Your Myers-Briggs Type can also help you take control of your life, but what works for one type might not work for another.
If you’re struggling to stay on top of things, here’s how to organize your life based on your Myers-Briggs Type.1.ISTJs Are Suckers For Spreadsheets.
They’re skilled at watching and waiting, but when a problem arises they know how to fix it ASAP. This Myers-Briggs Type loathes wasting time, so apps like Smarter Time help ISTPs make sure they’re making the most of their days and not losing time in the weeds.
ENFPs can easily get overwhelmed if they have too many tasks and ideas and no concept of how to organize or follow through.
For the busy AF ENFJ, a meditation app like Simple Habit’s For Women, By Women playlist of guided meditations can help this type clear the clutter from their mind and organize their thoughts so they can get right back out there to keep leading like the bosses they are.16.ENTJs Like Things Orderly AF. For the super logical and orderly ENTJ, an old-school organization tool like color coding can help this Myers-Briggs Type keep everything in order at all times.
While every Myers-Briggs Type is different, and getting organized is subjective, some level of organization is attainable for all 16 personality types.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Name’s Hader Bill Hader”

Mullally is the reason Bill Hader became an actor, even though he “Never wanted to be an actor.” After Mullally saw him in one of the Second City shows, she called up Lorne Michaels of Saturday Night Live.
In relaxed-fit blue jeans and a black North Face beanie, Hader doesn’t exactly fit in with the sleek, shiny, modernly deconstructivist decor of this Midtown Manhattan restaurant we’ve met at; the website for the restaurant claims it’s “Not your daddy’s steakhouse,” and Hader’s presence feels like proof of that.
“Bill got SNL super fast, and he was really good at it, but it really ate at him,” says Alec Berg, who created Barry with Hader.
The throwaway idea of forcing the awkward, skinny, 6-foot-1 Bill Hader into a role normally occupied by guys who look like cologne models turned out to be more than just a good sight gag.
Barry’s log line makes it sound like a zany comedy, but what Hader and Berg have created is a remarkably empathetic TV show.
“It’s like says: When you agree to do this, you close the door on everything else. If he quits, he dies. But he’ll also die if he keeps doing it.”The thing he’s good at is destroying him, and [acting], the thing that could save his life-he’s terrible at it,” Hader continues.
Barry, perhaps fittingly, premieres just a couple of months shy of five years to the day that Hader left the show that made him a star.
Professionally, things have changed so much that Hader has finally accomplished the goal he had when he skipped out on the SATs, dropped out of college, and moved to L.A.: With Barry, he’s now a director.

The orginal article.

Summary of “All strength comes from repetition”

The biggest mistake you can make is to ignore the basics in your profession.
What is his key to success, according to himself? Focusing on the basics.
“You don’t get to the highest levels of the sport without having the basics in order.”
Without having the basics in order, you’ll never achieve your full potential.
There’s only one way to improve the basics, by repetition.
“Long-term, we must begin to build our internal strengths. It isn’t just skills like computer technology. It’s the old-fashioned basics of self-reliance, self-motivation, self-reinforcement, self-discipline, self-command.”
Some things can be done faster, especially if you keep repeating the basics.
It’s very simple: Figure out what the basics are in your field.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Julian Casablancas, In Conversation”

Why are you disappointed in the internet?I really believed that the internet’s capacity to let people access the best of the best of music – from underground stuff to music from all over the world – would’ve been a positive influence, that music would’ve evolved like never before.
What’s the parallel?People thought that the internet would lead to more information and more truth.
My bigger point is more that there is music with quality that gets ignored.
Given how fraught both politics and culture are now – and they’re clearly even more fraught than in 2014 when Tyranny came out – do you feel more responsibility to be talking this way? It’s my own narrow-mindedness, but I’ve never thought of you as someone that eager to talk publicly about anything, let alone politics.
Honestly in a lot of ways people are more informed and less naïve than they were in 2004, so it’s easier to talk about this kind of stuff.
I’m happy to talk music more if that’s what you want.
You see all these people wearing Black Flag T-shirts now and that band probably was playing to 12 people back in the day.
The music on Tyranny and Virtue moves in so many more directions than a Strokes song would typically move.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s Next for Sam Hinkie?”

Early on a Friday morning, on his way to hear a panel discussion about optical tracking and esports analytics, Sam Hinkie was stopped a handful of times in the overcrowded hallway at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center by a host of hopeful, clammy-handed college kids clutching résumés.
If Daryl Morey-Hinkie’s friend, former boss, general manager of the Houston Rockets, and cofounder of SSAC-is Dork Elvis, then Hinkie is something approaching Nerd Timberlake, and that place is the analytics community’s Super Bowl, with all sorts of people as desperate to sidle up to Hinkie and shake his hand as that kid in Minneapolis was to snap a selfie with JT. Later that same morning, as Hinkie leaned against a windowless conference room wall-clutching a cup of coffee, wearing a sort of professional camouflage, and preparing to listen to a discussion on statistical techniques for measuring space creation in soccer-Hinkie was once again recognized and approached.
Tanner had a student tagging along and introduced him by saying, “This is the next Sam Hinkie.” The kid blushed, and Hinkie leaped in to save them both.
When a headline recently blared that “There will never be another process, or a GM job for Sam Hinkie,” Hinkie devotees were not pleased and immediately leaped to his defense.
As Evan Turner, whom Hinkie once drove to the airport after trading, recently put it: “Shout out to Sam Hinkie. I didn’t comprehend the Process, but that shit’s working now.”
He had barely introduced himself to Hinkie before blurting out, “Would you have picked Markelle Fultz?” It is probably the question he gets asked most these days, just barely ahead of, “Are you going to get back in the NBA?”-which is the very next thing the filterless, fearless lad asked Hinkie.
It’s part of why whatever comes next for Hinkie might have nothing to do with basketball at all.
On the night before the conference opened, Hinkie wrapped up dinner and his companions wanted to know where he was off to next.

The orginal article.