Summary of “To increase your emotional intelligence, develop these 10 qualities”

Write these thoughts out, analyze them and determine how you want to treat others in the same way you’d want to be treated.
Your “Antennae” are up to things you love, to wanting to grow and learn more.
The emotionally intelligent mind is able to discern between things that they need versus things that would be “Nice to have” that classify more aptly as wants.
We do not need those things to survive, but rather we want them based on our own personal desires or what we perceive to matter to society.
Emotionally intelligent people know the difference between these two things, and always establish needs prior to fulfilling wants.
If you want to increase your opportunities, improve your relationships and think clearly and constructively, you’re best positioned to maintain a positive attitude.
Their inspired leadership and passion, combined with their optimism, drives them to want to do best for themselves and others.
In the same way that we should be focused on our self-interest, we should also maintain a spirit of desire and hope for wanting to see the people around us succeed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Six Books We Could and Should All Write”

The spirit in which he wrote was like he was a mad bibliographer with a vast collection of rare and oddball books of no use to anybody but him, but which he was cataloguing just for the pleasure of having all that information in one place.
Just to refresh: I’m saying one should compose a book about oneself, a book about others, an anthology of favorites, a book about words, and now I’m adding a book of lists.
The Pillow Book is not all lists, but it’s the lists that always make the biggest impression.
Again, your book of lists won’t be as good as hers.
It can never be repeated too often: These books I’m telling you to write are not for the world.
Have you given any thought to 120 Days of Sodom lately? My philosophy professor at Penn State told us that Sade’s idea was to write a book one glance into which would entail eternal damnation for the reader.
I keep saying I want us all to write these books with no thought for publication, not even posthumous, but here, the goal would be to write a book that you dare not publish.
So there are the six books we should all write, and only the last is an idea book.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Make A Counter-Proposal?”

Whether responding using text communication or verbally, there are 3 things you always want to keep top of mind.
You want the other side to feel compelled to respond to you.
You don’t want them responding because they feel they must, just falling into the social norm of “They said something, so I should speak now.” Entering the interaction with the intention of verbalizing positives or negatives that will make them want to add their two cents is a good strategy.
One beautiful thing about silence and fundamental human nature is the power of the unspoken word.
Too much silence can be dangerous in text communication.
Weeks on end holding out to respond can be detrimental to relationship quality across the board.
Explaining how you have a better idea is a poor way to start that interaction.
Be careful not to disguise the things you hope they say yes to as a label, such as “It seems like you are interested.” If they haven’t agreed, a more appropriate verbalization is, “There seems to be something in the way that you don’t feel comfortable sharing.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The 7 Habits: Put First Things First”

Covey’s first two habits are big picture and abstract.
In Covey’s book First Things First, he fleshes out this habit even more and introduces the analogy of big rocks vs. small rocks.
Let’s say you instead first filled the jar with big rocks, and then put in the sand and small rocks; the sediment will settle in the cracks of the big rocks, allowing you to fit everything in from both piles.
So we know why it’s important to put first things first, but how do we do it? What are the best “Management” practices to help us properly order our priorities?
If you want to make sure you accomplish the most important things in your life, then you need to literally make them the first things you do each day.
Within my workday, I utilize the same principle of first things first: I tackle my most important tasks at the start of the day, knowing that if I do so, I’ll not only have ensured that the most value-creating things get done, but that I’ll be able to fit the “Urgent,” smaller rocks in later.
My morning routine sets me up for workday success, and the continued employment of the “First things first” principle ensures that the workday is productive.
So frontload what’s most important to you in the a.m. Put first things first.

The orginal article.

Summary of “When It Comes to Focus, Use It or Lose It”

“When you have remitted your attention for a short time, do not imagine this, that you will recover it when you choose; but let this thought be present to you, that in consequence of the fault committed to-day your affairs must be in a worse condition for all that follows. For first, and what causes most trouble, a habit of not attending is formed in you; then a habit of deferring your attention. And continually from time to time you drive away, by deferring it, the happiness of life, proper behavior, the being and living conformably to nature.”
To Epictetus, focus is a habit you form and maintain-but it goes both ways.
If you constantly let your mind wander and your attention change course, you’ll develop bad habits that hinder your productivity down the line.
As Epictetus puts it, if procrastinating your focus was profitable, the complete lack of focus would be even more profitable.
We all know that isn’t the case, so then why do you not maintain your focus when it’s time to get things done?
Taking on a big task is like playing an arcade game: it requires all of your focus.
Enjoy your play time as much as you like, but focus on what you’re doing.
Do things with intention, do them with focus, and you’ll develop a sharp, productive mind.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ira Glass’s Commencement Speech at the Columbia Journalism School Graduation”

I am very aware that Maggie Haberman shows us all, day after day, a rigorous demonstration of how you use the traditional tools of journalism to get inside information from suspicious sources and break news and answer the biggest questions in the most important ongoing story out there right now.
To be totally honest, most weeks I spend most of my hours at work not working on my own stories but in a scrum of people who are puzzling out how to make somebody else’s work the very best it can be.
We edit each story over and over and over, each time dragging in some new person who hasn’t heard the thing yet to bring fresh ears.
In the interest of factual accuracy I will say that the majority of the stories on the program that’ve gotten the most attention – Harper High School, the Giant Pool of Money, convicted murderers putting up a production of Hamlet in prison, Nikole Hannah Jones stories on our show and Sarah Koenig’s and Chana Jaffe Walt’s – they were not my idea or my doing.
Editing is crucial because in my experience anything you try to make – what YOU want is for the story to be AMAZING. But what the story wants to be is MEDIOCRE OR WORSE. And the entire process of making the story is convincing the story to not be what it wants to be, which is BAD. And turning it from the bad thing it’s trying to be, where the sources are inarticulate, and you don’t know how to structure it, and the structure you make doesn’t work, into the shining gleaming jewel that you have in your heart that is editing!
In some crude dumb way, those stories do the most old-fashioned thing a story is supposed to do.
There are so many other stories in this category: climate change I’d argue almost anything about the environment for most people is like that This is awful to say, but so many human rights stories – it’s so hard to get people interested no matter how important they are to document so many social justice stories, so many criminal justice stories, so many of these issues that we cover and I think are so important to cover.
Turns out perhaps you anticipated this plot turn … a couple of the alarming stories were true but MOST of the stories Ben had read were exaggerated or totally false.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Two Crucial Filmmaking Elements Causing All Your Movie Feuds”

The nuance of a performance can make us feel, and when we feel, we connect to memories of our own, but not to a memory within the movie itself.
A shot will always communicate a very specific thing to feel and these are the proverbial filmmaking ABC’s.
Let me use two weird examples from the same filmmaker in the same movie.
Maybe they’ve learned a couple of things about cinematic language and now they can “See the strings” of his work so clearly and it suddenly prevents them from “Falling into” the movie the way they used to, and others still do.
Case in point, there are some people who may like comedies, or may like horror movies, but there are people who absolutely do not like bouncing between two tones within a single movie.
There are a surprising number of moviegoers who are afraid to have a movie bounce about and make them feel different things.
There are a lot of things a movie has to do right to be good.
Maybe “Falling into” a movie should not be the end goal and we should be engaging with movies every single damn way we can, because they will always be engaging with us in equal measure.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Cannes Interview: Christopher Nolan”

Though he’s still never been invited to present one of his own films at the festival, Christopher Nolan became the center of attention during the first weekend of Cannes this year.
Timed to the 50th anniversary of the film’s original theatrical release, the new print was struck from the original camera negative of the earliest screening version of a film that later underwent panicky last-minute edits.
In a moment of renewed interest in 70mm film, thanks to Nolan’s own ambitious large format release of Dunkirk, and auteurs such as Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino also working either directly with 70mm film or authorizing blow-ups, the time might be ripe for such an unconventional, stridently analog approach.
The day after the Cannes premiere, Nolan talked to Film Comment in a quiet, well-appointed hut on the roof of the Palais, where he talked about the genius of Kubrick’s film, elaborated on the thinking behind the 2001 re-release, and advocated for filmmakers to become more involved with the theatrical presentations of their work.
Why do you think that’s valuable? As someone who cares about film history, who practically fetishizes these things, I’m very much there for it.
Choosing to work on the massive, wide-format scale of 2001, a scale you’ve been working on in your most recent films, how do you reconcile the fact that these works also need to be seen on smaller formats? How do you work in such fine detail, as Kubrick did with multiple, detailed live action inserts within the same frame in certain sequences, knowing that these can’t really be appreciated unless you’re watching it on a big screen?
You could see why, considering the state of multiplex projection, and newer habits of viewing films on smaller screens, a filmmaker might say, from the outset, “I need to make films for this reality.” Instead of downshifting to that reality, you’re saying let’s upshift to meet these big screen films.
We went out with 138 70mm presentations of the film, including IMAX, and that’s the largest 70mm release for at least 25 to 30 years.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Love Story I Never Thought to Tell”

As an only child who went to a women’s college, I learned early that female friendships are kind of everything.
Many wonderful things came from my time at school, but arguably the best was meeting the brilliant, funny, weird and wonderful sisters I never had. In the years since, I’ve written about many personal things, including dating, breakups and living alone.
Why did it never occur to me to write about friendship?
In her book Text Me When You Get Home, Kayleen Schaefer writes, “Prioritizing friendship is sometimes tricky; society often indicates to women that it’s not on the same level as the other relationships in our lives, such as the ones with our romantic partners, our children or even our jobs.”
Female friendships loom large, and a glance at popular culture might lead one to believe that female friendships have replaced the likes of Romeo and Juliet as the connection to aspire to.
“Why wasn’t friendship as good as a relationship?” writes Hanya Yanagihara in her novel A Little Life.
From my friendships, I know that true love accepts us because of, not despite, who we are.
P.S. 12 reader comments on friendship and hosting an articles club.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Flynn McGarry: Can ‘the Justin Bieber of Food’ Grow Up?”

Chef Flynn McGarry knows what he likes and what he does not like.
Being compared to Justin Bieber may feel like a dubious honor, even for Justin Bieber, but McGarry has already achieved a level of recognition that many, much older chefs will simply never realize.
“A lot of people talk but don’t walk the walk,” says Esben Holmboe Bang, the chef and owner of Restaurant Maaemo in Oslo, the three-Michelin-starred restaurant where McGarry staged when he was 16.
Critics have jumped on this: the Austin Chronicle summed up McGarry’s life as “a rich kid who played restaurant with real ingredients, and turned out to be really, really good at this cooking thing.” Slate once declared, “Want Your Kid to Be a Celebrity Chef? You Better Have a Lot of Money.” But the bedroom kitchen is not, McGarry wants me to understand, evidence of some sort of vast wealth: “The basic setup in the bedroom probably cost $200. We bought a bunch of wood and built some tables.” The equipment dribbled in on Christmases and birthdays.
“Chef is something you earn through years of being beaten and shit on and taught by some of the greats.” Had McGarry been shit on enough? It was a valid question, but the Teen Chef just kept at it.
The idea behind Gem is that a meal there is supposed to feel like a dinner party, which it kind of does, although it’s hard to shake the feeling – watching McGarry intently tweeze a 12-course tasting menu – that the chef is also being presented for the dining room to coolly ogle, like a rare panda on display at a very exclusive zoo.
McGarry could have waited to open his restaurant, obviously.
All Flynn McGarry has ever wanted was a restaurant, and now he has a restaurant, and it’s strange, isn’t it, to live through the last moment you ever imagined.

The orginal article.