Summary of “Nirvana can seem an exotic metaphysical idea until you look closer”

Here is the next link: through the condition of contact, feelings arise – which makes sense, because, in the Buddhist view, the things we perceive through our sense organs tend to come with feelings attached, however subtle the feelings.
Mindfulness involves, among other things, cultivating an awareness of your feelings that fundamentally changes your relationship to them.
A donut smells good, so we approach it; a restless hunger feels bad so we try to escape it – by, say, eating a donut; social status feels good and ridicule feels bad, so we pursue and avoid, respectively.
If you interact with such feelings via tanha – via the natural, reflexive thirst for the pleasant feelings and the natural, reflexive aversion to the unpleasant feelings – you will continue to be controlled by the world around you.
If you observe those feelings mindfully rather than just reacting to them, you can in some measure escape the control; the causes that ordinarily shape your behaviour can be defied, and you can get closer to the unconditioned.
In his foundational ‘discourse on the not-self’, the Buddha repeatedly asked whether various things we think of as parts of our self – feelings, thoughts, even our bodies – are really completely under our control.
You might say that the path of progress in a serious mindfulness-meditation regimen consists largely of becoming aware of the causes impinging on you, aware of the way that things manipulate you – and aware that a key link in that manipulation lies in the space where feelings can give rise to tanha, to a craving for pleasant feelings and an aversion to unpleasant feelings.
Making real progress in mindfulness meditation almost inevitably means becoming more aware of the mechanics by which your feelings, if left to their own devices, shape your perceptions, thoughts and behaviour – and becoming more aware of the things in your environment that activate those feelings in the first place.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Character-Building School of Parenthood”

Your capacity for dealing with disappointments and things outside your control, not just regarding parenting but with the world at large, will grow.
You’ll gain confidence over time, sure, but you’ll also almost constantly be reminded of the character traits you need to work on – be it your patience, flexibility, sense of humor, etc.
Parenting is chock-full of “Opportunities” to make quick decisions and figure things out on the fly.
Without the help of our own parents, friends, neighbors, daycare providers, teachers, random cooing and smiling strangers, us parents would be up a creek.
Hopefully in a healthy way – though it does take time to figure out the balance; one of the best pieces of advice my wife and I received as new parents was to learn how to “Pick battles that are big enough to matter, small enough to win.”
There are grumpy parents aplenty, but if they would just learn to laugh at things a bit more, they’d be much better off.
While plenty of activities will build your physical toughness more than parenting, few things build up one’s mental toughness and resilience more than being a parent.
No matter your position in life – CEO, cubicle automaton, day laborer, stay-at-home dad, entrepreneur, freelancer, trade worker, unemployed – it’s very possible, perhaps even probable, that your greatest, most important role in life will be that of parent.

The orginal article.

Summary of “10 “Notes to Self” that Will Stop You from Taking Things Personally”

This reality doesn’t justify their behavior, but it needs to be consciously acknowledged so we don’t waste too much of our mental energy positioning ourselves at the center of the situation and taking everything personally.
We can learn to silently respect them and their pain without taking their words to heart.
Again, because we see everything through a lens of how it personally relates to us and ONLY us-a lens that does a poor job of seeing the bigger picture-we tend to react to everyone else’s actions and words as if they are a personal judgment or attack.
Of course, this doesn’t come naturally-NOT taking things personally is an ongoing daily practice.
Like you, and the rest of the human race, I’m only human, and I still take things way too personally sometimes when I’m in the heat of the moment.
In a nutshell, I proactively remind myself NOT to take things personally.
If you’d like to practice along with me, I recommend stealing my notes, tweaking them as you see fit, storing them in an easily accessible location, and then reading and re-reading them whenever you catch yourself taking things personally.
Just keep forgiving yourself for the bad decisions you made, for the times you took things personally and lacked understanding, for the choices that escalated the situation and hurt others and yourself.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Heads up: the oral history of Iron Man’s original HUD – vfxblog”

It’s ten years since the world got a first taste of Robert Downey Jr. as Iron Man, and one thing that is certainly still in the mind of many audience members is the hero’s heads-up display, or HUD. The HUD is seen inside the helmet of the different ‘Marks’ of the Iron Man suits and in the Iron Monger suit worn by Jeff Bridges’ villain Obadiah Stane, and of course in subsequent Iron Man and Avengers outings.
While the creation of the original HUD in Iron Man certainly paved the way for future designs, the task would prove to be incredibly challenging for the film’s visual effects team.
On the tenth anniversary of Iron Man and with the release of Avengers: Infinity War, vfxblog asked several members of that original HUD creation group how they made a visual effect for the ages.
We did a test for the HUD, and for shots of Iron Man in the suit and actually, the moment in the film where he blows up the tank, that was actually from our test.
Jonathan Rothbart assembled a great team of artists and production personnel to work on the HUD. Shooting Robert Downey Jr. John Nelson: The live action photography for the HUD was the last thing we shot with Robert Downey Jr. The director of photography, Matthew Libatique, and I talked about whether if we shot it on a prime lens in 70mm, we would have more of an advantage than shooting it on Super 35.
For us the depth also included the movement of the HUD. Meaning, using the way the HUD graphics moved and got attention/activation were used to create depth.
Then what we did was, we built the HUD and we attached it to his head. We didn’t absolutely attach it to his head. We kind of matched it to his head. When there was times when the suit was exploding and it was under stress we actually made it lag a little bit so it wasn’t quite keeping up with his head. We added this control so that we could have it really tightly match to his head movement or so that we could loosen it up a little bit and start to have bugs in it.
In the beginning of the sequence, you see components of the armour being applied, followed by a POV of the mask coming up to his face, then the very first HUD shot of Tony as the graphics turn on.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Your success isn’t down to free will”

What if differences in intelligence are down to nurture, not nature? Again, luck: you didn’t choose your parents or most of your teachers; and in any case, you might not have been gifted with the self-discipline to learn from them.
OK, but what if you taught yourself the self-discipline? Still luck: you were gifted with the sort of character capable of cultivating self-discipline.
The troubling conclusion is that the person born in poverty, with no parental support, who scrimps to put himself or herself through college, finally achieving success through ceaseless suffering, owes their triumph no less to luck than, say, Eric Trump does.
Or, as Strawson pithily puts it: “Luck swallows everything.”
If it’s true that luck swallows everything, there is also a sense in which differing degrees of privilege are the only thing there is: your social situation is a matter of luck, but then so are your underlying skills and character.
We should fight, strenuously, to make society less sexist and racist.
The result won’t be a world in which accidents of birth matter less; it will be a less sexist and racist society, in which accidents of birth still account for everything.
It’s dizzyingly unsettling, but that’s just my tough luck.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Story About Manu”

This is a short anecdote about one of my sons, but really it’s about Manu Ginobili, but really it’s about what Manu Ginobili means, and has meant, and can mean.
There are a bunch of Basketball-Reference numbers that I can set into a paragraph or bulleted list right now to help convey the magnitude of Manu Ginobili as an impactful and influential basketball player.
Did you know that Manu has scored more points than any other left-handed player in postseason history? It’s a weird thing, but also a true thing.
Second place is Bill Russell, and he’s nearly 400 points behind Manu.
Here’s a good one: Manu has the best plus-minus per 100 possessions of anyone who’s played at least 20,000 minutes since 2000.
There’s never really been a time when someone was talking about how great Manu is and felt compelled to bring up stats.
So: Me telling my son to shout “Manu!” when he was playing on his little goal is no different from me telling him, “Hey, be like Manu when you play basketball,” and me telling him, “Hey, be like Manu when you play basketball,” is no different from me telling him, “Hey, be like Manu as a person.” It’s the highest, biggest, most intense compliment, and a parent saying it to his or her small child is the highest, biggest, most intense way to give it.
If Manu decides to come back for another season, it’ll be fine.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MySpace Tom beat Facebook in the long run”

My MySpace profile was abandoned when, at the ripe age of 18, I decided it was just a little too juvenile – the glittering GIFs affixed to every page, the garish customized designs, the pressure on maintaining your top 8.
By 2006, Facebook offered a cleaner social experience; by 2009, Twitter offered a more casual one.
Back in 2005 long before MySpace burned out, its founder, Tom Anderson – whose grinning face greeted every new user as their first “Friend” – sold the site for $580 million to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation.
While his site was becoming a punchline during the rise of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and the other social media networks we now use everyday, Anderson disappeared entirely from the tech scene.
It’s now apparent that Facebook and Zuckerberg didn’t really consider any of this when aggressively pursuing growth, and now we’re all screwed as we try to untangle the consequences.
MySpace Tom? His most recent Instagram post from seven days ago is a giveaway for a stay at an Iceland hotel.
Had Facebook not gotten too good at inserting itself between human users, there’s no way it would’ve run into their current problems at such a wide scope.
I never thought we’d declare MySpace the winner over Facebook, but then again, I never thought a lot of things about the moment we’re in.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s Why Time Off Work Actually IMPROVES Your Work and Life”

“If you love your work and life, why do you even need a break?”.
Here’s why time off actually IMPROVES your work and life.
People who never take time off to do nothing are short-term focused.
So take time off work strategically throughout the year.
They never took time off to reflect or think about their work.
When you take time off work, you have more inner-conversations.
Modern day life almost forces you to identify yourself with work.
Go Deeper If you want to hear more thoughts on why taking time off improves your life; listen to my podcast episode about it.

The orginal article.

Summary of “42 Books That Will Make You A Better Person”

The Power of No by James Altucher: Your life is defined by how good you get at saying no to the things you need to say no to.
The Black Swan by Nassim Taleb: The things you’re worried about happening are not the things you should be worried about happening.
Philosophy As a Way of Life by Pierre Hadot: If you think ancient philosophy was the academic pursuit of arcane knowledge, you’re totally missing the point.
The Memoirs of Ulysses S Grant by Ulysses S Grant: Just the idea that this man wrote this beautiful and incisive history of life and timesas he was painfully dying of cancer, trying to leave something to define his legacy and support his family after he was gone.
Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk: A guy is so unhappy with modern life that he invents an alter ego to destroy that life and himself.
How Adam Smith Can Change Your Life by Russ Roberts // The Theory of Moral Sentiments by Adam Smith: First that Adam Smith wasn’t some ruthless capitalist but and a thoughtful thinker and second, try to judge your own behavior and moral behavior using what he called the ‘indifferent spectator’.
On the Shortness of Life by Seneca: People only think life is short because they waste so damn much of it focused on things they can’t control and fears about things they refuse to question.
Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr. by Ron Chernow: Discipline and rational thought is what allows one to take advantage of opportunities and crises-and also prevent wealth from changing one’s life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to be more hopeful |”

Fortunately for your loved ones, your livelihood and your life, we’ve gathered together eight tactics from TED speakers to cut through the fog.
His entire adult life, he’d worked for others, but at the age of 66, he decided to become a first-time entrepreneur.
Solomon transformed a childhood marked by bullying and emotional torment into a life of helping others communicate their own stories of growth.
His advice: “You need to take the traumas and make them part of who you’ve come to be, and you need to fold the worst events of your life into a narrative of triumph, evincing a better self in response to things that hurt.”
How can you find your own center amid life’s sturm und drang? Identify the thing or things in this world that you love more than you love yourself, says Gilbert.
“Innovation leads to more innovation leads to more innovation,” says Rinaudo.
“There is an unfathomable amount of kindness that I have seen,” she says, “And when we put our fears aside, when we connect to strangers, when we smile at the people next to us or put away our judgments, it opens up a door into an entirely different way of life.”
As Chang says, “In our age of increasing distractions, it’s more important than ever to find ways to maintain perspective, and remember that life is brief and tender.” In this way, preparing for death – and thinking about all the things you can achieve right now – can be one of the most uplifting things you can do.

The orginal article.