Summary of “9 CEOs Share Their Favorite Productivity Hacks”

A study published in Harvard Business Review found that each week CEOs work an average of 62.5 hours and attend 37 meetings.
Moskovitz wants managers to be makers some of the time, so NMW ensures they get some flow time, too, he said.
“At the rate at which StockX is growing, it’s a 24-hour job and I spend 70 to 80 percent of my time on the road across varying time zones, which can be hard on your body. I take 11-minute naps once or twice per day and find that it makes for increased energy and efficiency.”
Katia Beauchamp, cofounder of Birchbox, says one of her best productivity tricks is something simple: She insists that her team includes a deadline in their email.
“Having fewer things to do is the best way to get things done. I’m very careful with my time and attention-it’s my most precious resource. If you don’t have that, you can’t do what you want to do. And if you can’t do what you want to do, what’s the point?”.
“The way to solve this is allow free flow of information between all levels. If, in order to get something done between depts, an individual contributor has to talk to their manager, who talks to a director, who talks to a VP, who talks to another VP, who talks to a director, who talks to a manager, who talks to someone doing the actual work, then super dumb things will happen. It must be ok for people to talk directly and just make the right thing happen.”
LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner sends fewer emails to receive fewer emails.
“If you have a list of 20 things to do, you end up realizing, ‘I don’t need to do 20 things,'” Chesky said.

The orginal article.

Summary of “On Getting Rejected a Lot”

You can be the most talented photographer, the most brilliant scientist, or the most diligent activist, and most things still won’t work out.
The more successful they are, the more rejections they’ve had-because they’re putting themselves out there, taking risks, and still moving forward.
Want a job as a trekking guide in Iceland, which would involve travel and the chance for gorgeous photos? You might as well apply, because it probably won’t work out! Want an internship with the UN or an artist’s residency in Antarctica? It probably won’t happen, but give it a go!
Spend a few hours a week looking for opportunities that would literally change your life: Jobs around the world.
Don’t spam editors or be sloppy, and respect the norms of the industry by, for example, always disclosing simultaneous submissions; you don’t want things to backfire if you do get the go-ahead. But give yourself a goal number of rejections.
If you interview for a job you’re obsessed with, figure out what it is that appeals so much.
Maybe you didn’t realize how badly you wanted to live in Montana until you got rejected from a job in Montana.
That’s how you figure out what you really want.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Being Positive and Just Cultivate Neutrality For Existential Cool”

You’ve likely been asked how you see the proverbial glass: half full or half empty? Your answer allegedly reflects your attitude about life-if you see it half full, you’re optimistic, and if you see it half empty, you’re pessimistic.
Actually, the glass isn’t half full or half empty.
Things aren’t mutually exclusive, awesome or awful.
This provides clarity and eliminates obstacles, making things neither awesome nor awful but cool.
We identify with our thoughts, and decide whether or not we like things before experience begins.
Things can go just so or totally awry once you understand that all things are fine, their upsides and downsides to be determined.
Plus, everything is relative and shifting, In an uncertain world with so many forces at play, the only thing that’s sure is that things could be different and won’t stay the same.
You may as well stay neutral in that case, rather than get attached to a temporary state in which the glass is half full or half empty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Being Positive and Just Cultivate Neutrality For Existential Cool”

You’ve likely been asked how you see the proverbial glass: half full or half empty? Your answer allegedly reflects your attitude about life-if you see it half full, you’re optimistic, and if you see it half empty, you’re pessimistic.
Actually, the glass isn’t half full or half empty.
Things aren’t mutually exclusive, awesome or awful.
This provides clarity and eliminates obstacles, making things neither awesome nor awful but cool.
We identify with our thoughts, and decide whether or not we like things before experience begins.
Things can go just so or totally awry once you understand that all things are fine, their upsides and downsides to be determined.
Plus, everything is relative and shifting, In an uncertain world with so many forces at play, the only thing that’s sure is that things could be different and won’t stay the same.
You may as well stay neutral in that case, rather than get attached to a temporary state in which the glass is half full or half empty.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Be a Better Friend in the Digital Age”

“We see our friends, and our friends see us, with a clarity that other people don’t-not even our romantic partners,” says Lauren Mechling, whose novel How Could She explores the complexities of female friendship.
Social media has turned friend into a verb, not just a thing that we are but a thing that we do-or undo, as in the Orwellian-sounding unfriend.
That’s the spirit in which we crafted our guide to being a better friend in the digital age.
If your friend is dealing with something big-divorce, a death, a troubled child, a career shift-your job is to be with her in person or at least call.
Pandora’s Email: An incendiary message that delves into all the faults of a friend you’re angry at-which you accidentally send directly to said friend.
One reason is simply that we know our friends so well: Research has shown that we’re better at describing our friends’ creative skills and intelligence levels than they are themselves.
“I had a friend in high school who was brilliant and very bossy,” says Roz Chast, illustrator of Why Don’t You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?, a collaboration with longtime friend and writer Patty Marx.
“I didn’t ask because I thought, It’s not going to be a good reason. It’s not ‘I love you so much that I can’t bring myself to talk to you.’ And eventually, she started talking to me again.The Companion Commandments.Thou shalt not post a photo in which your friend has a double chin or is holding a margarita in a foot-tall plastic cup with a crazy straw.Thou shalt not leave effusive, encouraging comments on the post of your dear friend’s enemy or ex.Thou shalt not divulge personal details on a friend’s Facebook page, no matter how badly you’re wondering,”how did Gary’s vasectomy go??”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Epictetus on Love and Loss: The Stoic Strategy for Surviving Heartbreak”

“Future love does not exist,” Tolstoy wrote in contemplating the paradoxical demands of love.
“Love is a present activity only. The man who does not manifest love in the present has not love.” It is a difficult concept to accept – we have been socialized to believe in and grasp after the happily-ever-after future of every meaningful relationship.
What happens when love, whatever its category and classification, dissolves under the interminable forces of time and change, be it by death or by some other, more deliberate demise? In the midst of what feels like an unsurvivable loss, how do we moor ourselves to the fact that even the most beautiful, most singularly gratifying things in life are merely on loan from the universe, granted us for the time being?
Two millennia ago, the great Stoic philosopher Epictetus argued that the antidote to this gutting grief is found not in hedging ourselves against prospective loss through artificial self-protections but, when loss does come, in orienting ourselves to it and to what preceded it differently – in training ourselves not only to accept but to embrace the temporality of all things, even those we most cherish and most wish would stretch into eternity, so that when love does vanish, we are left with the irrevocable gladness that it had entered our lives at all and animated them for the time that it did.
When you are delighted with anything, be delighted as with a thing which is not one of those which cannot be taken away, but as something of such a kind, as an earthen pot is, or a glass cup, that, when it has been broken, you may remember what it was and may not be troubled What you love is nothing of your own: it has been given to you for the present, not that it should not be taken from you, nor has it been given to you for all time, but as a fig is given to you or a bunch of grapes at the appointed season of the year.
At the times when you are delighted with a thing, place before yourself the contrary appearances.
When we are able to regard what we love in such a way, Epictetus argues, its inevitable loss would leave in us not paralyzing devastation but what Abraham Lincoln would later term “a sad sweet feeling in your heart.” To retain the memory of love’s sweetness without letting the pain of parting and loss embitter it is perhaps the greatest challenge for the bereaved heart, and its greatest achievement.
Complement this particular fragment of Epictetus’s abidingly insightful Discourses with computing pioneer Alan Turing on love and loss and other great artists, scientists, and writers on how to live with loss, then revisit more of the Stoics’ timeless succor for the traumas of living: Seneca on resilience in the face of loss, the antidote to anxiety, and what it means to be a generous human being, Marcus Aurelius on living through difficult times and how to motivate yourself to rise each morning and do your work.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How Two Words Can Change Your Life”

“Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for.”
Why do we always desire what we don’t have? Desiring things you don’t have is not necessarily a bad thing.
If we didn’t desire unattainable stuff, the world probably wouldn’t advance one bit.
When I read about historical figures such as Christopher Columbus, the Wright Brothers, or Nikola Tesla, they used that desire for good things.
They didn’t complain and had an innate desire to achieve things.
Or you can go with a casual “Thanks.” You can say it to people, but more importantly, you can also say it to random things.
Appreciation is an important aspect of a happy life.
“Appreciation is a wonderful thing. It makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Apologizing For Being Yourself”

Because let’s face it, you and I both know that we all have two personalities, who live two different lives.
There’s the life we want to live, and then there’s the life we’re actually living.
“Hey Darius, do you think I should stop being silly so that people take me seriously?”.
Look, you’re not going to die alone when you become yourself 24/7. It’s not only a waste of energy, but it’s also a waste of LIFE, if you’re not living it on your terms.
Because what’s the alternative? Do you want to shut down your true personality and become some robot that’s programmed by society or other people?
Over the past few years, I’ve been gradually living life on my terms.
If you’re an artist, you don’t have to be like Van Gogh.You’ll get what you want when you are yourself.
I can tell you from personal experience that being yourself is the most liberating thing in life.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ta-Nehisi Coates Talks to Jesmyn Ward About Writing Fiction, Reparations, and the Legacy of Slavery”

One of the things Coates must now do is figure out how to balance the two: how to write nonfiction and fiction, how to juggle his renown with his calling.
A few weeks after our meeting, Coates is called to testify before members of Congress for H.R. 40, a proposed bit of legislation that would study the issue of reparations.
Coates has been so persuasive in his writing about the issue that even those on the other side of the political divide, like conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks, agree with him.
Invested because Coates is one of the first to testify, directly after Senator Cory Booker.
Coates immediately does this brilliant thing where he insists our very conception of ourselves as a nation and a democratic republic is based on embracing our legacy, embracing the more honorable figures and aspects of our past.
“If I agree to pay taxes, if I agree to fealty to a government, and you give me a different level of resources out of that tax pool, if you give me a different level of protection, you have effectively stolen from me. If you deny my ability to vote, and to participate in the political process, to decide how those resources are used, you have effectively stolen from me.” Coates goes on to establish the wealth gap that Julianne Malveaux, an economist on the panel, attributes to that theft that spans almost 350 years, from 1619 to 1968-“Conservatively.” Then Coates finishes with steady assurance.
I believe The Water Dancer will not be the last novel you read by Ta-Nehisi Coates.
“I could write slavery fiction all day,” he says.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Keep Going If You Don’t Know What’s Next”

A lot of people want to start a business.
Aspiring writers start off strong and write for several days, weeks or months, and then move on to the next thing that catches their attention.
Based on my experience, and the experience of my readers, the most important thing is to keep going.
“Hi Darius, I like to read your blog. I’ve read it when I was depressed. And it changed my thoughts and perspective about my life and world. And now I want to create something for others. I started with a tiny step. It was easy at first. But after that I felt like I lacked inspiration. How do you keep going even if you don’t know what’s next?”.
Not knowing what’s next is something every person who wants to make something out of their life has to deal with.
The best thing you can do is to focus on your very next step-RIGHT NOW. What are you going to do next? Not as in, “What’s your next big move?” No, what are you going to do after you’ve read this?
That’s why you want to focus on things you control.
If people don’t want to give you their business, so what? If people don’t want to hire you, so what?

The orginal article.