Summary of “Hackers stole a casino’s database through a thermometer in the lobby fish tank”

Darktrace CEO: Hackers are increasingly targeting unprotected ‘internet of things’ devices such as air condition systems and CCTV to get into corporate networks.
In one incident, a casino was hacked through the thermometer in its lobby aquarium.
LONDON – Hackers are increasingly targeting ‘internet of things’ devices to access corporate systems – everything from CCTV cameras to air-conditioning units.
The “Internet of things” refers to devices that are hooked up to the internet to allow live streams of data to be monitored.
Nicole Eagan, the CEO of cybersecurity company Darktrace, told the WSJ CEO Council in London on Thursday: “There’s a lot of internet of things devices, everything from thermostats, refrigeration systems, HVAC systems, to people who bring in their Alexa devices into the offices. There’s just a lot of IoT. It expands the attack surface and most of this isn’t covered by traditional defenses.”
Robert Hannigan, who ran the British government’s digital spying agency GCHQ from 2014 to 2017, appeared alongside Eagan on the panel and agreed that hackers targeting internet of things devices is a growing problem for companies.
“With the internet of things producing thousands of new devices shoved onto the internet over the next few years, that’s going to be an increasing problem,” Hannigan said.
“The problem is these devices still work. The fish tank or the CCTV camera still work.”

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Summary of “Why trying to be too efficient will make us less efficient in the long run”

It’s an appealing vision, but there’s a downside to all this efficiency, says scholar and writer Edward Tenner, author of The Efficiency Paradox: What Big Data Can’t Do. “Trying to be ultimately efficient at all times will succeed in the short run,” he says.
“But in the long run, you would be damaging your efficiency.” Tenner isn’t a Luddite, and his book doesn’t suggest renouncing efficiency and Big Data.
In the long run, you would be damaging your efficiency.
Then you talk about “Continuous-process efficiency” versus “Platform efficiency.” What’s the difference between these two?
People in the Elizabethan times and even in the Middle Ages didn’t have the concept of efficiency we do today.
Platform efficiency is wonderful, and I’m not at all condemning it, but one of the unfortunate consequences is that it has tended to attract investment capital away from much harder things.
One of the interesting things about American culture is that even the subcultures that pretended to disdain efficiency – like Southern planters – ran on the principle of trying to squeeze as much profit as possible from enslaved labor and from the soil.
By removing so much trial and error and productive mistakes, platform efficiency can lock us into existing patterns.

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Summary of “6 Weird, Paranormal Things Dogs Can Sense That Most Humans Can’t”

There are some weird, paranormal things dogs might sense, and it’s pretty terrifying.
To make things less scary, know this: there’s no actual scientific evidence that dogs can sense paranormal activity, like ghosts.
Pet psychologist Marti Miller told Animal Planet that both humans and dogs have a sixth sense, saying, “But humans judge or deny what they’re feeling. Dogs don’t judge what is going on in the environment. While our own minds start to analyze what is happening, dogs don’t do that. They feel the barometric pressure change, and may react by shaking, panting, salivating and feeling anxious, or they may not react at all.”
In any case, here are a few things that dogs can sense.
According to Paw Culture, “This could be what makes dogs more likely to hear some footprint of a ghost or a parallel universe.” It’s possible that dogs are just hearing noises we don’t have the ability to hear, but it’s also possible that they’re hearing paranormal activity.
According to Animal Planet, “Dogs’ heightened sense of smell is credited with their ability to detect some cancers in humans.” There are also service dogs who help people prone to seizures – these dogs are trained to be alerted to small shifts in the person’s health, like body smells and dilated pupils.
According to Animal Planet, “Wild and domestic animals, including dogs, seemed to sense the impending Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, displaying their distress with behavior changes and vocal warnings, and either ran for cover or refused to go outside. Some experts believe they could sense vibrational changes on land from impending the earthquakes before humans could.” This probably definitely happens all the time, and is so weird.
Dogs can definitely sense things we can’t, because they’re more sensitive to emotions and changes in the atmosphere.

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Summary of “Every Yes Is Also a No”

It’s easy to see why: saying no to something unimportant gives you more time to spend on things that are.
When you say no to something, what exactly are you saying yes to?
While I originally put these photos here because they’re nice to look at, over time, they’ve turned into a reminder of what I’m saying no to when I say yes to something else.
Every time I say yes to traveling somewhere, I say no to spending time with the people in those picture frames.
These are what you say no to when you say yes to working late, watching Netflix, and using your smartphone in bed.
These are what you say no to when you say yes to unnecessary projects, checking your email superfluously, or agreeing to an unnecessary meeting.
You make more intentional decisions when you consider what you’re saying no to when you say yes to something else.
Make sure the things you say yes to are both meaningful and valuable-because every yes is also a no.

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Summary of “Can we fix it? The repair cafes waging war on throwaway culture”

Gabrille Stanley, who used to run a clothing alterations business, says she was drawn to volunteering at the repair cafe to combat the “Throwaway culture” she sees.
Repair cafe volunteer Stuart Ward says that when fixing items is actively discouraged by manufacturers, repair becomes a political act.
He is vehement about the “Right to repair”, a movement opposed to the practices of companies like the machinery company John Deere, which, under copyright laws, doesn’t allow people to fix their own equipment or take them to independent repairers.
Teaching people how to fix their own gear is at the heart of the Edinburgh Remakery, a store on the main street of Leith that is part repair shop, part secondhand store, part repair education centre.
“We do the repair in front of a customer, not out in the back, not hidden,” says Sotiris Katsimbas, the lead IT technician at the Remakery.
The Remakery is unique in that, unlike much of the repair movement, which is volunteer-led, it is a viable business, employing 11 staff and 10 freelancers.
Last year the shop had an income of £236,000 – 30% from grants, 70% generated through sales of furniture and electronics, workshops and repair appointments.
“To say, we can fix this, we can repair things, don’t give up hope.”

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Summary of “Let Your Kids Plan Family Activities”

When your kids are out of school, things can feel a little haphazard.
On the Getting Things Done podcast, a show for people who use the GTD work-life management system, coaches Meg Edwards and Mike Williams talk about a technique for getting your kids involved in the planning process.
Have your kids sit at a table and ask them: What would you like to have true by the end of spring/summer break? What are some things you want to do, see, eat or make? With his own children, Williams says he always wants to know “What kind of wild, crazy, interesting ideas are locked up between their ears.”
Getting Things Done, Ten Years In. You don’t hear a lot of people talk about the Getting Things Done productivity system anymore.
Edwards says so many adults fear writing things down because they believe that once it’s on paper, they must commit to it.
We simply write things down so we can see what’s in our heads.
On a day of break when you don’t have anything planned, have your kids choose a card off the board.
In the morning, ask them: At the end of the day, what do you want to have experienced? What does the day look like and feel like to you? After they’ve answered those questions, ask them: What do we need to do today to make this happen? Williams recommends that parents step out of the way as much as they can to let the kids figure it out.

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Summary of “The Productivity Paradox-Why Doing More Doesn’t Get More Done”

70% of employees say they spend more than 40 hours per week at work, which would be great if they were actively trying to get ahead, but almost half say they’re just trying to get caught up with tasks they weren’t able to finish in their eight-hour day.
Employees will start feeling stressed, which leads to a myriad of personal problems, but the organization also suffers in terms of productivity and worse-if things get too bad, employees will begin looking for other greener pastures.
If it’s so easy to understand that overworking ourselves and our employees is so bad, why do we do it? Because things need to get done!
As we mentioned in the introduction, technology is supposed to make office workers more productive.
According to the Boston Consulting Group, in 2014 in the US, 51% of employees reported being disengaged, while 18% said they were “Actively disengaged.” How terrifying is that-half of employees don’t care what happens at work, and nearly 20% are sabotaging or stealing from their employers.
In essence, the tools that we bought to help make employees more productive have had the opposite effect while adding stress.
Ask yourself which employees are doing those tasks, and are there any ways for them to do the tasks better or faster.
The idea of giving employees more autonomy may feel a little scary at first, but it’s likely the key to increased productivity and decreased stress levels and burnout.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Mind Meld of Bill Gates and Steven Pinker”

Bill Gates When you get married and have kids, as I did in my 30s and 40s, there’s a certain normalcy in working on multiple fronts.
PG Steven, there’s an elegant parallel between your career and Bill’s – starting with language and continuing to human well-being.
PG The motto of the foundation is: “Every life has equal value.” And in your new book, Steven, there’s the idea that we can’t want something good for ourselves without wanting it for everyone.
SP There’s a tendency in journalism and political debates to assume that it’s easy to achieve a perfect society: “Good people would do that.” The fact that we don’t means that evil people must be running the system: “Let’s throw them out and find nobler ones.” This leads to empowering charismatic despots and destroying institutions that have done a lot of good.
People who believe in man-made climate change don’t know any more about climate or science than those who deny it.
Does social media split us into tribes in a way that’s dangerous? Does it create, even in high school social circles, a channel for bullying, or a desire to look perfect in photos? Is A.I. going to proceed so quickly that work, which is something people worship, will suffer bad distributional effects, and people won’t know what to do? This is an unfortunate time for saying, “Take all your damn negative thoughts, and I’ll innovate away from them.” People are seeing difficulty with that argument.
BG Disease elimination is something that runs against people’s general pessimistic outlook.
PG Last question: Since Oprah’s near presidential announcement at the Golden Globes and speculation about Mark Zuckerberg’s political aspirations, have people asked you to consider getting involved in political public life?

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Summary of “Why humans are cruel”

The conventional explanation is that people are able to do terrible things to other people only after having dehumanized them.
Paul Bloom A lot of people blame cruelty on dehumanization.
We see other people as blameworthy, as morally responsible, as themselves cruel, as not giving us what we deserve, as taking more than they deserve.
A lot of what goes on in concentration camps is degrading and humiliating, and it’s about torturing people because you think they deserve it.
Sean Illing Are our intuitions about why people do terrible things wrong? Are we too sanguine about human nature?
They’re just failing to appreciate the humanity of other people, and if only we could clear up that mistake, if only we could sit them down and say, “Hey guys, those Jews, the blacks, the gays, the Muslims, they’re people just like you,” then evil would disappear.
That’s what you chant at people you’re really worried about, people who you think are a threat to your status and way of life.
People look at that moment of insanity and say to themselves, “I could never have participated in that.” But I don’t think it’s that simple at all.

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Summary of “Jocko Willink On the Power of Discipline”

He has a new book out and its title caught my attention: Discipline Equals Freedom.
“If you want freedom, then you need to have disciplinethe more discipline you have in your life the more you’ll be able to do what you want. That’s not true initially; initially the discipline might be things you don’t want to do at the time, but the more you do things that you don’t want to do, the more you do the right things, the better off you’ll be and the more freedom you’ll have”.
Jocko’s examples of this idea in action mainly concerned personal development.
More discipline with your finances, for example, will eventually yield more financial freedom, while more discipline with time management will allow you to do more interesting things with your time.
The front office IT revolution granted the knowledge worker an amazing amount of apparent new freedom: email made communication with anyone about anything instantaneous; the world wide web put all information at their fingertips; the mobile revolution allowed them to take these promethean gifts with them everywhere.
As I discussed in my recent post on stagnant economic productivity, this apparent freedom is yielding mixed results.
The new economy does offer exciting new opportunities, but perhaps the most effective way to unlock this freedom in the long term is to be more disciplined in the short term, especially when it comes to your time and attention: to focus relentlessly on producing the things you know how to do best at the highest possible level of quality, while ignoring the attractive digital baubles that promise you conveniences and the potential of breakthrough connections and exposure.
As Jocko put it: “Do things you don’t want to dodo the right things,” and trust this discipline now will eventually generate the freedom you seek.

The orginal article.