Summary of “Pentagon UFO disclosure: The case for taking these videos seriously”

The Pentagon recently released three videos of UFOs recorded by the Navy – one taken in 2004 and the other two in 2015.
I’m not what you would call a UFO enthusiast, but the videos are the most compelling I’ve ever seen.
Even in a pandemic, you’d think we’d have a little time for UFO talk.
So in an attempt to force a UFO conversation into the public discourse, I contacted Alexander Wendt, a professor of international relations at Ohio State University.
Wendt is about the closest thing you’ll find to a UFO expert in a world in which ufology isn’t a real science.
Alexander Wendt About five years ago, some colleagues of mine and I formed a nonprofit called UFO data.
No one, as far as I know, is seriously looking for UFOs.
What’s the Occam’s razor explanation for these UFO sightings?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Cognitive Biases Tricking Your Brain”

Present bias, by contrast, is an example of cognitive bias-the collection of faulty ways of thinking that is apparently hardwired into the human brain.
Wikipedia’s “List of cognitive biases” contains 185 entries, from actor-observer bias to the Zeigarnik effect.
Availability bias makes us think that, say, traveling by plane is more dangerous than traveling by car.
Most books and articles about cognitive bias contain a brief passage, typically toward the end, similar to this one in Thinking, Fast and Slow: “The question that is most often asked about cognitive illusions is whether they can be overcome. The message is not encouraging.”
Because of confirmation bias, many people who haven’t been trained answer.
The New York-based NeuroLeadership Institute offers organizations and individuals a variety of training sessions, webinars, and conferences that promise, among other things, to use brain science to teach participants to counter bias.
Initiated a program, Sirius, to fund the development of “Serious” video games that could combat or mitigate what were deemed to be the six most damaging biases: confirmation bias, fundamental attribution error, the bias blind spot, the anchoring effect, the representativeness heuristic, and projection bias.
Some subjects played the game, which takes about three hours to complete, while others watched a video about cognitive bias.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Six NASA Astronauts Describe the Moment in Space When “Everything Changed””

As six NASA astronauts tell Inverse, what you see isn’t necessarily what you envision.
The astronauts – Chris Hadfield, Jerry Linenger, Nicole Stott, Mae Jemison, Leland Melvin, and Mike Massimino – have all had the rare opportunity to view our home planet from space.
Some refer to that change as the “Overview Effect,” a term coined in 1987 by celebrated space writer Frank White to describe the mental shift astronauts experience when they consider the Earth as part of a larger whole.
One of the reasons we take so many pictures is we don’t have time to see what we’re looking at.
In my five months on the Russian Space Station, I had some opportunities where, for 90 minutes, I would just levitate over a window, and I’d see the sun rise, the sun set, the stars come out, and I’d just sort of block the world out.
I do remember initially looking out the window the first couple of days and wanting to see my home, wanting to see Florida from space.
From Russia, can look over to the side and see his home.
You’re floating around; you’re seeing the Earth.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Does ‘Social Distancing’ Mean?”

Cannuscio: I would recommend that people minimize social contact, and that means limiting all social engagements.
What we’re really worried about in terms of public health are these large gatherings where you have people crowded together, and you can have what we call super-spreading events.
It’s important to focus on [avoiding] large crowds and indoor activities where you have lots of people touching the same surfaces.
Disinfect places in the gym people are always touching.
Much of the transmission is person to person with people coughing, sneezing, or touching their nose and mouth and touching somebody else.
Cannuscio: If you’re going to go to the gym, try to go at a time when there are very few people there and definitely wipe down the equipment.
As the weather warms in many parts of the United States, I would instead recommend that people go outside for walks or runs or bike rides in areas where there are not other people.
Cannuscio: First of all, people who have the opportunity or the option of working at home should absolutely use that option right now.

The orginal article.

Summary of “I’m a Secret Millionaire”

Most young adults are unlikely to inherit any money from their family.
That’s about how much this woman, who asked to remain anonymous, inherited in her late 20s after her parents died.
Unlike most heirs, she hasn’t touched the money at all – or told anyone about it.
My parents always told me it was a stupid thing to do, and we lived a very middle-class lifestyle.
My parents immigrated to Vancouver from Hong Kong when I was a baby, because they wanted a better life for me.
My parents left me a seven-figure inheritance, in cash.
Some of my closest friends probably have an idea, the ones who knew about my parents’ businesses, but we don’t discuss it.
My parents had a non-flashy, stealth-wealth lifestyle, and I’m the same way.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Lazy Person’s Guide to Happiness”

So what’s the right way to think about effort and happiness? Should I be trying for “Happiness” per se-or something more magnanimous, like purpose or meaning?
I spoke with Buettner about his experiences and how his understanding of health and happiness has shifted over the years.
Dan Buettner: Right away there’s a problem because, academically speaking, happiness is a meaningless term.
We’ve run pieces in the past that touch on, for example, Viktor Frankl and others who have said that life is really about pursuing meaning, and if you pursue happiness as we Americans tend to think about it, you end up going to amusement parks and shopping malls and trying to do things that are supposed to be making you happy but are sucking life out of you.
Hamblin: Kind of like the lazy person’s approach to happiness? Or maybe just the thinking person’s approach?
Buettner: I wish I would’ve called this book The Lazy Person’s Approach to Happiness.
So that’s yet another way we can think about our environment shaping our happiness.
Who you hang out with has a huge impact on your happiness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The coronavirus: A warning from Peter Daszak, the scientist who saw it coming.”

Peter Daszak is a zoologist who works in China and runs the EcoHealth Alliance, an organization that studies the connections between human and wildlife health.
We’re going to get bigger pandemics, and they’re going to happen more often.
Mary Harris: Tens of thousands of people have been diagnosed with this disease worldwide, with more than 3,000 deaths.
You don’t see people with mild infections, or people who are pretty sick in poor communities and just don’t make it, or people in communities that have trouble traveling.
We need many more groups in many more regions doing this work.
As we think about a more sustainable approach to doing business, sustainability regarding our health and the environment should be a part of it.
What’s frustrating is telling people repeatedly that we will see more, and more frequent, pandemics and then not seeing much change to get ready for that.
As all of us eventually get to know someone who’s been infected, no matter how logical you are, you’ll start to get some fear and then think, how did I make contact? Am I at risk? What am I doing wrong? I think in some cases there are going to be significant outbreaks that are just seeded and moving forward.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Don’t Let Perfection Be the Enemy of Productivity”

You’re reluctant to designate decisions as “Unimportant.”
There’s an argument that, for unimportant decisions, you should either decide quickly or outsource the decision.
Perfectionists have a hard time designating decisions as unimportant.
If something goes wrong, perfectionists might feel explosive frustration or a niggling sense of irritation that’s hard to ignore, and they don’t want to take that risk.
Perfectionists are so accustomed to micromanaging that it doesn’t even occur to them that any decision is unimportant.
Solution: In modern life, decision fatigue can be intense.
Try using heuristics to quickly decide or delegate with the expectation that you will get much faster and pretty good decisions overall but not perfect ones.
If you’re a perfectionist, providing $1,000 of value might not seem like enough.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Creativity of ADHD”

Previous research has established that individuals with ADHD are exceptionally good at divergent thinking tasks, such as inventing creative new uses for everyday objects, and brainstorming new features for an innovative cell phone device.
In one study, college students with ADHD scored higher than non-ADHD peers on two tasks that tapped conceptual expansion and the ability to overcome knowledge constraints.
A study of college students found that, compared to non-ADHD peers, ADHD students showed a broader scope of semantic activation-which is the “Turning on” of concepts and ideas that are stored in memory-and is correlated with conceptual expansion in other research.
Given evidence that linked ADHD to higher divergent thinking and ability to overcome the constraining effect of task examples, it seemed intuitive to look more closely at the relationship between ADHD and the third element of creative thinking, conceptual expansion.
As expected, the ADHD students were less constrained by task examples on the product label invention task; compared to non-ADHD peers, ADHD students were less likely to include the example endings, yet invented labels that were equally descriptive of the product category.
On the alien fruit task, the ADHD students invented fruits that were rated as more original and less representative of Earth fruit, compared to non-ADHD students.
The ADHD students also demonstrated higher conceptual expansion by violating conventional boundaries of the fruit category-for instance by making the fruit poisonous or adding properties of nonliving things such as tools.
The innovative, original thinking style of people with ADHD may be a great fit for innovative fields where it’s an advantage to be on the cutting edge.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Really Happens When You Donate Your Clothes-And Why It’s Bad”

What actually happens to your donated clothes is a very involved process with a lot of complicated layers, each worth taking the time to understand.
These actions are taken, primarily, because, as Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost Of Fast Fashion, explains, “There are just far more unwanted clothes in the United States than there is demand.” She goes on to outline: “Charities receive far, far more unwanted clothing donation than they could ever possibly sell in their thrift stores, so they have relationships with other textile sorting and exporting companies who can find a place to sell those clothes and find another market for them to go.”
Though your clothes may not be going to someone locally, they are, usually, going to someone.
The amount of clothes that charities and thrift stores receive has doubled over the past 15 years because people are parting with their trousers and blouses way sooner and much more frequently than they used to.
“Fast fashion has helped us build up a more intense addiction to buying clothing and, at the same time, it’s helped us really elevate the throwaway culture.” In 2015, British charity Barnardo’s surveyed 1,500 women over the age of 16 and found that the majority of fashion purchases are only worn seven times.
Thirty-three percent of the women surveyed consider clothes “Old” after wearing them fewer than three times.
“Anywhere that’s actually providing a take-back solution or a place for you to drop off clothes that you don’t want anymore, that’s good because it’s keeping clothes out of landfills,” Cline says.
“I don’t think people need to be focusing on the good or bad way to donate, I think that the bigger issue is keeping unwanted clothes out of landfills and, in an ideal world, people thinking about the issue of textile waste when they’re shopping.”

The orginal article.