Summary of “The Simpsons’ Planet of the Apes Musical: An Oral History”

What I do know is when you mention anything about Planet of the Apes to a fan of the show, their mind will instantly jump to the words “Dr. Zauis, Dr. Zauis.” Others will happily sing the whole dang score for you.
The memory of the show’s fictional Planet of the Apes musical has lasted the 21 years since it aired as part of the episode “A Fish Called Selma” in season seven.
The musical, officially titled Stop the Planet of the Apes.
“But once every few months, like the time we wrote the musical version of The Planet of the Apes, we really had a blast. I cried with laughter.” The bit has so many disparate parts – ’80s Austrian-pop parody, old-school-musical homage, Planet of the Apes, break-dancing, old vaudeville-style jokes – but in the hands of The Simpsons and its writers, it works.
Josh Weinstein: I’ll tell you something – I didn’t see Planet of the Apes until like five years ago.
Between the three of us, we constantly say things like, “Thank you, Amadeus.” After we came up with the idea of a Planet of the Apes musical, I said randomly, “Thank you, Dr. Zaius.” Maybe somebody else may have said it, so I don’t want to claim full credit for it, but somebody said it like the “Rock Me, Amadeus” song, and then it clicked in and people started pitching lyrics.
Weinstein: I’m not well-versed in musicals, but say, something with a love story like Oklahoma!, you’d expect the ending to be, “I love you, Laurie!” but it’s Planet of the Apes! So that’s partially the joke.
Ledesma: To bring it all the way forward now to last year, when we did our VR couch gag, which was an extended parody of Planet of the Apes.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Before you can be with others, first learn to be alone”

Like many poets and philosophers through the ages, Poe stressed the significance of solitude.
Two decades later, the idea of solitude captured Ralph Waldo Emerson’s imagination in a slightly different way: quoting Pythagoras, he wrote: ‘In the morning, – solitude; that nature may speak to the imagination, as she does never in company.
In the 20th century, the idea of solitude formed the centre of Hannah Arendt’s thought.
What Eichmann showed Arendt was that society could function freely and democratically only if it were made up of individuals engaged in the thinking activity – an activity that required solitude.
We might ask, we become lonely in our solitude? Isn’t there some danger that we will become isolated individuals, cut off from the pleasures of friendship? Philosophers have long made a careful, and important, distinction between solitude and loneliness.
Echoing Plato, Arendt observed: ‘Thinking, existentially speaking, is a solitary but not a lonely business; solitude is that human situation in which I keep myself company.
In solitude, Arendt never longed for companionship or craved camaraderie because she was never truly alone.
Arendt reminds us, if we lose our capacity for solitude, our ability to be alone with ourselves, then we lose our very ability to think.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Full transcript: Defense Secretary James Mattis’ interview with The Islander – The MIHS Islander”

So I think once in awhile, people understand if we want to vote people into office that say “Let’s stop this, stop working on other people’s problems.” But I think eventually, as Winston Churchill put it, once the American people exhaust all the alternatives, they’ll do the right thing.
If you want to really change it in the long term, I think it comes down to doing so through education of the young people.
The short answer is, get the political end state right and then give it the full effort and explain to the American people and the American congress what you’re doing and get the whole world behind you.
TEDDY: How can the United States create an atmosphere of trust with the Arab people, especially in Iran?
Until the Iranian people can get rid of this theocracy, these guys who think they can tell the people even which candidates they get a choice of.
For so long when Russia vetoed the United Nations so they couldn’t do anything about it, the only reason that Assad is still in power and has killed hundreds of thousands of his own people and allowed the terrorists a place to set up camp and millions, literally millions of people, forced out of their homes with nothing but what they could cram into a car or put on their back, it’s all because of Iran.
Most of the Iranian people, I’ve known enough Iranian people or talked to Americans who grew up in Iran and it’s not them, it’s the regime.
I’ve sat behind then Secretary of Defense Gates who said the American people are not going to keep paying more than you for this defense.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Tim Goodman: The Post-Review, Post-Premiere, Post-Finale World of Peak TV”

Pretty much any TV critic can tell you how that went.
The allure of catching up – and all TV critics are behind and scrambling to catch up – is too much.
Most of those revolve around Peak TV and the staggering increase in the number of scripted series, but also the surge of available outlets, the ways television is consumed – when and on what device – and the overall effect this all has on the consumer and the industry at large.
In the last two years, television critics have definitively realized they can’t watch everything and there’s nobody left even willing to lie about it.
If the critic’s conundrum was adjusting to a world where it was frustratingly impossible to watch every thing after being able to do just that several seasons prior, for the average viewer it was an overwhelming sense of, well, being overwhelmed.
I’m still fascinated by what Peak TV means to the creators and writers who actually make it – this weird combination of increased opportunity, increased paychecks, decreased awareness from the public that you actually made something combined with increased awareness of a frightening new world where some platforms that paid you to make it don’t seem entirely keen on promoting it when you’re finished, or making it easy to find once they put it out into the ether.
Think about what TV has given – or, if you prefer, done to – the average viewer.
I had already expressed a desire to write less about so many premieres and more about the endings of shows, since one of the scourges of the TV critic game is that we’re compelled to write about the start of new and returning series, yet have almost no capacity to see them all through to the end.

The orginal article.

Summary of “MMQB: Cardinals RB David Johnson, Stephon Gilmore, more NFL notes”

Ninety nine percent of all NFL players are explicitly not dumb.
I asked Johnson if, growing up, he would he have believed that one day he’d be in the NFL and running a bread and butter play that hinged on the blocks he gets from, of all people, superstar wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald?
He said: “I’m definitely going to have to say I feel like I should be number one. If there’s a player in the NFL who doesn’t feel that way, they definitely should not be in the NFL. I feel like I should be number one, especially with the season I had last year, helping out the team. And I still have a lot of room to improve.”
SMARTER FOOTBALL: A series examining the cerebral side of the sport, including technology, analytics, how a brainy linebacker prepares and just what goes into a typical NFL play.
NFL players don’t grow as a film student on their own.
” Clark, who now works as an analyst for ESPN, works with a handful of NFL players, watching their tape and providing feedback, and when possible, training with the guy.
BREAKING DOWN THE NUANCES OF AN NFL PLAY: James Urban, one of the league’s most respected assistants, with a lesson in play design.
The difference? Rodgers still makes plays, even on the snaps where he misses plays.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Plan For Raising Brilliant Kids, According To Science”

A new book, Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us About Raising Successful Children, is designed to get us thinking about the magnitude of these moments.
With this book, the two are putting forward a new framework, based on the science of learning and development, to help parents think about cultivating the skills people really need to succeed.
You can’t learn anything if you haven’t learned how to understand language, or to read. Critical thinking relies on content, because you can’t navigate masses of information if you have nothing to navigate to.
If you’re going to have a kid who engages in critical thinking, you’re not going to shut them down when they ask a question.
You want them to understand how other people think.
If you see a homeless person in the street: What do you think that person is thinking? How do you think they feel about not having a home?
That’s going to help them understand critical thinking.
Hirsh-Pasek: Yes, theory of mind is important to be able to do critical thinking.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Mailbag: Will Bill Simmons ever make ESPN return?”

Like most well-known sports media people who have enjoyed success, he’s competitive and has an ego.
What do the cuts at ESPN and Fox for print journalists represent in how we consume sports media?-James Balch.
You will see some of those journalists join league or team sites but there’s not enough jobs right now in sports media to match the salaries these journalists had elsewhere, let alone the creative freedom to do such work.
Has there ever been a more depressing time in the industry? Is this just the bottom of a valley or will it get worse?-Kyle Koster We haven’t seen the bottom yet if you are a sports writer, I’m afraid.
As the recent Fox Sports layoffs showed, the written word in sports has been devalued at places that can afford to hire people at a significant wage.
There will always be a demand for sports information and analysis.
Quantify the value of world-class scoop getter to a worldwide leader in sports.
What is going on with Katie Nolan and will she be back on TV soon?-Sam Moody Here is what the president of Fox Sports National Networks told The Sporting News in March: “To use the NBA analogy, you can acquire existing superstars from other teams. Or you can build through the draft. That’s what Katie is to us. She’s the superstar that was on our team.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Players’ Tribune”

A lot has happened to me during my time here, and I honestly can’t think of any part of it that I haven’t cherished.
Man, we’re just panicking, we’ve got no ideas, we’re trying to think of something.
I think about Coach Snyder, who, our first conversation, when we met for dinner after he was hired – we didn’t even talk basketball once.
As a coach, Coach Snyder is incredible in every aspect of the game.
There’s a lot of people I have to thank for where I am today as a basketball player, but honestly none more than Coach Snyder.
I think about Johnnie Bryant, a guy who was a developmental coach when I first got here, and now he’s on the bench as an assistant.
Because seven years later, I had to make an even tougher decision – and again, Coach Stevens and I found ourselves at a crossroads together.
Of course, there was Coach Stevens: Not just for the relationship that we’ve built off the court – but also for the one that we started building on the court, all of those years ago, in Indiana.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Players’ Tribune”

A lot has happened to me during my time here, and I honestly can’t think of any part of it that I haven’t cherished.
Man, we’re just panicking, we’ve got no ideas, we’re trying to think of something.
I think about Coach Snyder, who, our first conversation, when we met for dinner after he was hired – we didn’t even talk basketball once.
As a coach, Coach Snyder is incredible in every aspect of the game.
There’s a lot of people I have to thank for where I am today as a basketball player, but honestly none more than Coach Snyder.
I think about Johnnie Bryant, a guy who was a developmental coach when I first got here, and now he’s on the bench as an assistant.
Because seven years later, I had to make an even tougher decision – and again, Coach Stevens and I found ourselves at a crossroads together.
Of course, there was Coach Stevens: Not just for the relationship that we’ve built off the court – but also for the one that we started building on the court, all of those years ago, in Indiana.

The orginal article.

Summary of “7 insights from Stoicism that will change the way you approach life”

“Were all the geniuses of history to focus on this single theme, they could never fully express their bafflement at the darkness of the human mind. No person would give up even an inch of their estate, and the slightest dispute with a neighbor can mean hell to pay; yet we easily let others encroach on our lives – worse, we often pave the way for those who will take it over. No person hands out their money to passersby, but to how many do each of us hand out our lives! We’re tight-fisted with property and money, yet think too little of wasting time, the one thing about which we should all be the toughest misers.” – Seneca.
Booker T. Washington observed that “The number of people who stand ready to consume one’s time, to no purpose, is almost countless.” A philosopher, on the other hand, knows that these intrusions prevent us from doing the thinking and work we were put here to do.
Time? Time is our most irreplaceable asset-instead of striving to make more of it, we can far more easily just stop wasting so much of it.
No one has ever escaped it – though a lot of people have spent incredible amounts of their time trying to.
“Let us prepare our minds as if we’d come to the very end of life. Let us postpone nothing. Let us balance life’s books each day … The one who puts the finishing touches on their life each day is never short of time.” – Seneca.
On the back, it has Marcus Aurelius’s quote: “You could leave life right now. Let that determine what you do and say and think.” Except I cut off the last part – as a reminder that there isn’t even time to go through the whole line.
With death constantly “On our lips” as Montaigne put it, or with, as Shakespeare said, every third thought on our grave, we have an easier time rejecting pointless trivialities and we develop a keen sense of priority and time.
How did you feel reading those? Hopefully invigorated and inspired to seize each and every day and remember how fleeting our time really is.

The orginal article.