Summary of “A Practical Way To Overcome Imposter Syndrome”

Every time you have a similar thought like that, you’re developing imposter syndrome.
“What if people call me out?” “I feel like a fake. I’m not the right person to talk about this.”
We experience imposter syndrome when we have to lead people, share our ideas, give advice, etc.
Over 70 percent of people have experienced the feeling of being a fake at one time in their life.
“I have many ideas for creating passive income around email courses, ebooks and interactive learning, but I am absolutely terrified of exposing myself and content online.I am worried that I will sound egotistical and that my content will be ridiculed. I also get performance anxiety when using social media, and when I used group chat channels on slack I end up saying things without thinking them through or over thinking them because I am so nervous that people are thinking that I’m an idiot.Darius, have you ever experienced these issues and if so how have you overcome them?”.
A lot of people think they are the center of the universe.
At the same time, I’m glad to see that people find my articles useful and that it helps them.
When I deal with imposter syndrome, I’m afraid that people think that I think know it all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Answer Interview Questions to Make Hiring Managers Like You”

After you interview for a position, you may obsess over whether you gave the interviewer the “Right” answers to the questions.
By the time you reach the interview phase, your prospective employer already knows a lot about you.
Not only does this posture convey your interest to the interviewer, it will cause your interviewer to mirror your movements.
Prepare your responses to typical interview questions so that you have vocabulary at your disposal to talk about your qualifications, interests, and goals.
Be Positive The word you want on your interviewer’s mind at the end of the conversation is “Yes.” And that means that you want to make it as easy for your interviewer to be thinking about good things rather than bad ones.
The best way to do that is to focus on positive elements throughout your interview.
If you stay focused on the positive throughout your interview, you make it easy for your interviewer to think about the positive elements of your interview than the negative ones.
Obviously, throughout your interview, you also want to actually answer the specific questions you are asked.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What to Say When Your Employee Makes a Mistake”

When Tom explains his thinking to Jeffrey, he’ll reinforce his mistake and sound defensive because his thinking was problematic and led to poor results.
What could Jeffrey have done differently? A better choice would have been to avoid talking about the past and, instead, ask Tom about the future: “How will you do it differently next time?”.
This kind of future-focused question allows Tom to acknowledge his mistake and demonstrate his learning.
It will reinforce both people’s confidence in Tom’s abilities while also giving Jeffrey the opportunity to point out any further problematic patterns in Tom’s thinking – in a way that could help Tom make better decisions in the future instead of just making him feel bad in the present.
If your answer is that you want the other person to feel bad, ask yourself why.
If you’re Tom? If you’ve made a mistake and your manager asks you Jeffrey’s ill-advised question: “What were you thinking?”.
Even though your manager is asking about the past, it’s your turn to take that breath and ask yourself what outcome you want.
Your best move is to ignore the question asked and, instead, answer the question that wasn’t asked: the future-focused one.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Going Broad-Not Narrow-is the Best Route to Lasting Success”

I get press releases about “Learning hacks” on a weekly basis, which tells me there’s obviously widespread hunger for learning how to learn.
There are a small number of learning techniques that have extremely robust evidence behind them, and that in large part apply to both physical and cognitive learning.
The people studying learning and the people training and teaching seem to be hermetically siloed from one another, so we haven’t implemented those techniques as we should.
There’s no room to go into them in detail here, but I’ll say that the single most surprising study in the book, to me, was conducted at the U.S. Air Force Academy: The Academy provided a unique environment for studying the impact of teaching quality on learning, because students have to take the same sequence of courses and the same tests, and they are randomized to professors, and then re-randomized for each subsequent course, so you can truly track the impact of teaching.
Second, one of my favorite phrases in the book is from Herminia Ibarra, who studied how people find careers that fit them: “We learn who we are in practice, not in theory.” What she means is that there is this cultural notion she calls the “True-self model,” this idea that we can simply introspect or take a personality quiz and learn who we are.
To better understand your strengths, weaknesses, and interests, you actually have to try stuff-in other words, learn who you are in practice.
We don’t take enough time to reflect on what we’ve just done, even though it is a staple habit of the best learners.
Kaggle is a really neat one, that looks for outside solvers for machine learning problems-truly cutting edge stuff where it’s fascinating to see how much outside solvers can add.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kara Swisher on Ambition, Bragging, and Having a Baby at 56”

A lot of people have told me, “You should be more humble.” And I’m like, “Why?” A lot of people have said to me, “You should be more humble.” And I’m like, “Why?” Bragging is different than saying what it is.
I’ve never worried about what people thought of me, and I think part of that had to do with being gay.
If people don’t like you for some inane reason, then why worry what they think? And if you don’t worry about what people think of you, you can do almost anything.
I was married for a long time, but then Well, I’m having a baby in November with my girlfriend, so I guess that’s ambitious.
If something goes wrong, a lot of people are like, “What are we going to do!?” And I’m like, “Something else.”
A lot of people told me it wouldn’t work and I just ignored them completely.
How do you celebrate your successes? Do you ever take a moment just to bask in it?I don’t spend a lot of time high-fiving, just like I don’t spend a lot of time agonizing when something goes wrong.
There’s sometimes reason to be worried, but most of the times people just panic instead. I’m a super calm person, both when things are going well and when things are going badly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Xkcd artist Randall Munroe on his new book How To, Wikipedia, and how to conduct an interview.”

Munroe’s new book, How to: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems, is all about taking a physicist’s approach to other fields.
Munroe says that How To comes from the same mindset that inspired What If?, the blog in which he answered reader-submitted questions about how much Force power Yoda can output, or how long it would take to slide down a fireman’s pole from the moon.
“If you describe what it is, it sounds like it was come up with by a little kid who doesn’t know how electricity works,” Munroe said.
In “How to Send a File,” he considers how many butterflies it would take to carry data chips of information to the recipient.
One making fun of words that Wikipedia uses too often briefly inspired a meta Wikipedia page for the made-up word malamanteau in 2010, which Munroe says was completely unintentional.
On the talk page for the “Randall Munroe” entry, one user speculated that Munroe pranked Wikipedia editors into putting the fact that he was raised as a Quaker in his bio to illustrate the fake-news cycle of “Citogenesis,” a concept perhaps explained best by Munroe himself.
In the spirit of How To, I decided to put Munroe’s own Wikipedia-esque knowledge to the test by asking him-off the cuff, giving him no time to prepare or look anything up-how he would approach a particular topic: “How to Conduct an Interview.” He immediately begins by identifying the basic mechanic at work: in this case, asking people questions and then the subject answering them.
Munroe isn’t sure how the signal processing would work, but he sounds excited about the possibility, and he says his next step would be to research listening equipment.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Keeping Score”

That’s why you have to train yourself to stop feeding your ego by keeping score.
I’ve had conflicts in the past about keeping score.
I’ve also seen family members destroy relationships because they kept score.
I think there’s a relationship between keeping score and self-confidence.
Keeping score is something you do to prove a point, right? There’s no other reason I can think of after reading, researching, and talking endlessly about this subject.
I don’t worry about keeping score, because I know that, over a lifetime, the score will always be equal.
It makes no sense keeping score because we all chase the same goals.
Keeping score is a nasty trait that you want to avoid at all costs.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why you should think about being a good ancestor and 3 ways to start |”

Due to the major threats facing our society and planet, we need to consider our impact on future generations, too.
For societies, it’s never been more important to think ahead to future generations.
We need to prepare for future threats – an even-warmer planet and growing inequality – and to invest in the future – to reinvigorate cities, protect the food supply and find cures for disease.
The distant future isn’t easy to predict because of how society is being remade by technology.
How can we start to practice imaginative empathy? At the personal level, we can do this by writing letters to our future selves, our children and our grandchildren to help guide our decisions as voters.
To take better account of the lives of future generations, institutions and organizations should consider using these tools in place of antiquated practices such as social discounting and simple scenario planning, which do not activate our senses and emotions sufficiently to motivate us to account for the future.
As you think about the future beyond your immediate lifespan, try to resist the urge to leave behind a vanity project, such as a bench with your name on it.
A more meaningful way to give to the future is to think bigger and leave behind something that can be stewarded – and used and adapted over time – as an heirloom.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Hugh Grant Might Be Doing the Best Work of His Career”

“My parents, I can remember, if the subject of homosexuality came up, they had that kind of 1950s, 1960s attitude. It was sort of, ‘Well, it happens, darling. And it’s a little bit disgusting. We don’t talk about it very much,'” Grant says.
Watching Grant’s Thorpe dig himself further and further into an irredeemable hole, one can’t help but feel some pity for him, despite everything.
“It’s helpful to find the tragedy of the character you’re playing,” Grant says.
Something else happened during Grant’s time away from the screen-he became a father, ultimately five times over.
Grant talks about his family life much like he talks about his political activity-the real stuff, the important counterpoint to everything else.
“I’m just speaking off the top of my head, but the acting gene seems to me to come from people who have a relatively flimsy grasp of who they are. I’m not going to name names, but if you said to me, ‘What do you think of X?’ I’ll say, ‘Well, I have no idea who that person is.’ Because they’re always performing. They perform brilliantly, but you’ve no sense of them. And I think that’s a miserable way to live.”
The brilliance of Grant’s performance in A Very English Scandal may very well be that he has portrayed Jeremy Thorpe as such an actor, a person “Cursed,” as he says, to be an empty vessel, a cultivator of surfaces.
“I’ve come to terms with the fact that I am that person,” Grant replies frankly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Does a Meaningful Job Need to Burn You Out?”

I strive for it in my life, I try to help my children figure out what kind of work would be meaningful for them, and I support my partner in developing her work the way that makes her feel most fulfilled.
Advertisement X. Meaningful work, in a sense, is where the work itself is rewarding and worth doing-regardless of pay.
To sustain a meaningful life through meaningful work, you need to be able to invest back into that resource.
We need to recognize how the 24/7 work cycle has knocked all notions of work-life balance out of whack and instead think about harmony.
Even if we could achieve balance, should we want to? If work is meaningful to you, you are bringing your authentic self to work, operating within your values, and putting effort toward creating the kind of world you want to see come to life.
Thinking about work-life harmony instead lets us think about how different aspects of our lives can best work together, rather than how we can figure out how to swap in and out of different roles.
One source of strain and burnout that can plague people driven by meaningful work is the neverending string of requests for sacrifices from the rest of our lives in order to squeeze just a bit more work in.
It means we all need to consider ways of working together regardless of job title or prestige because all work should be meaningful.

The orginal article.