Summary of “Why So Many Smart People Aren’t Happy”

What we were trying to do in that particular study is bring that focus back into people’s attention.
What people might do varies, but when there’s a reminder, what we discover is that-and these are studies conducted with Fortune 500 employees, undergraduate students-they make seemingly small, you might even call them trivial, decisions, but they add up to a happier life overall.
This simple reminder on an everyday basis is a kind of reality check, which puts things in perspective for people.
Pinsker: What do you think it is about the messages people receive about what it takes to be successful in business that runs counter to this mindset? In other words, do you think that working your way up any professional ladder requires not thinking in terms of abundance?
Raghunathan: Daniel Pink, in his book Drive, talks about how what used to be used as motivators to employees-what he calls the carrots and sticks approach-are now being replaced by what he calls “Motivation 2.0,” which is more trying to figure out what is it that people are really passionate about.
In business schools, I see that there’s a huge push towards corporate social responsibility and finding a passion, but at the same time, if you look at the kinds of people who get invited to come give keynote addresses, or what it is that we focus on to improve our Businessweek rankings, it’s things that are extrinsic.
We invite people who made a million bucks, and we look at incoming MBA students and their outgoing salaries.
Pinsker: You mentioned earlier how easily people adapt to positive changes in their lives, and I’m familiar with the research showing that lottery winners are no happier, a year later, than even people who just as recently suffered serious injuries.

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Summary of “How to Disagree with Someone More Powerful than You”

What do you say when you disagree with someone who has more power than you do? How do you decide whether it’s worth speaking up? And if you do, what exactly should you say?
Here’s how to disagree with someone more powerful than you.
Maybe “You haven’t finished thinking the problem through, the whole discussion was a surprise to you, or you want to get a clearer sense of what the group thinks,” says Weeks.
“If you think other people are going to disagree too, you might want to gather your army first. People can contribute experience or information to your thinking – all the things that would make the disagreement stronger or more valid.” It’s also a good idea to delay the conversation if you’re in a meeting or other public space.
Identify a shared goal Before you share your thoughts, think about what the powerful person cares about – it may be “The credibility of their team or getting a project done on time,” says Grenny.
Ask permission to disagree This step may sound overly deferential according to Grenny, it’s a smart way to give the powerful person “Psychological safety” and control.
“When you disagree with someone more powerful than you, you should always have a constructive reason to oppose. In my case, the reason was timing,” Victor says.
Case Study #2: Make it about the company, not you Mike McRitchie, owner of the consultancy Critical Path Action, has had reason to disagree with people more powerful than he on several occasions.

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Summary of “Don’t Compete. Create!”

If you think that you have to compete for better jobs or more market share, you’re as wrong as I was.
If a company has a certain market share, that means you have to compete with that company to “Win” a piece of their share.
When you assume that you have to compete with other businesses or people for money, jobs or attention, you’re engaged in limited thinking.
The biggest mistake that conventional business thinkers make, is that they believe supply is limited.
Similar to how I think entrepreneurs and companies should create market share, I also believe that individual people should create a career.
Here’s the thing: Traditional companies think it’s bullshit.
Here’s the thing: It doesn’t matter what others think.
If you believe in something and if you can create value, go for it.

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Summary of “Beyoncé’s Publicist”

Noel-Schure still cares about whether the stringer from the local Ohio paper makes it through the doors of that stadium, and her work is a reminder that stars like Beyoncé’s larger-than-life status is, in part, a summation of meticulously tended to details.
Without the support of a major label, Noel-Schure had to quickly learn how to bring in clients and give them 360-degree support, but she had a vote of confidence from Beyoncé and Prince, who kept their business with her after she left Sony.Today, Noel-Schure represents a host of veterans like LeAnn Rimes, as well as shining newcomers like Chloe x Halle and Ingrid.
At first, Noel-Schure struggled to pitch Destiny’s Child, a fact that rankled Matthew Knowles, Beyoncé’s father and longtime manager.
At the time, it was rare for a major-label pop group to write their own songs, and Noel-Schure knew that Beyoncé’s budding talent as a songwriter would help distinguish Destiny’s Child.
” For Noel-Schure and her biggest client, something like Beyoncé’s 2018 Coachella performance is a powerful rebuttal to the criticism: A profound, emotionally excavating body of work that stands for itself.
Noel-Schure had traveled to her beloved Grenada for a friend’s wedding, but had a few pressing work concerns to juggle.
Beyoncé’s paradigm-shifting visual album, “Lemonade,” was due to be surprise released on HBO in less than a week, and Noel-Schure was on guard in case the news leaked.
Noel-Schure practices what Beyoncé preaches-commitment to family and personal enrichment in addition to a devotion to her work.

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Summary of “Crossing Divides: The friends who are good for your brain”

Something as simple as thinking about the people we have around us can do a lot to change that and can even help us become more creative.
A season of stories about bringing people together in a fragmented world.
One is by opening ourselves up to greater social diversity – in other words, doing things like mixing with, or listening to, people who are not “Just like us”.
People tend to make friends with those who are similar to them – in terms of values, preferences, and personality traits.
When people are exposed to a more diverse group of people, their brains are forced to process complex and unexpected information.
The more people do this, the better they become at producing complex and unexpected information themselves.
It could mean making new friends through volunteering with a group that includes people of all ages, or joining a sports club that involves people from other cultures.
Opening ourselves to new experiences can seem hard to do, but it can help us cross divides and nurture new and inclusive friendships.

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Summary of “Your Speech, Their Rules: Meet the People Who Guard the Internet”

What do you think most people don’t understand about working in trust and safety at a platform with tens or hundreds of millions of users?Rob: People are quick to dismiss our policies and decisions as a product of a bunch of college students sitting around in flip-flops and not really thinking about the impact of this stuff, which could not be further from the truth.
Martin: For the most part, the people who are lifers are caring people who just want to make their sites work.
Y.X. Yang: My sense is that a lot of people who work in trust and safety are usually not part of the dominant group, which also makes for a very interesting and kind of sad dynamic when you have people reading things like, “Oh, this company just doesn’t care about women,” or, “This company just doesn’t care about gay people” like, half this team is underrepresented, and they do care.
Adam: Creators and product people want to live in optimism, in an idealized vision of how people will use the product, not the ways that people will predictably break it.
The separation of product people and trust people worries me, because in a world where product managers and engineers and visionaries cared about this stuff, it would be baked into how things get built.
What about the working conditions and pay among people doing this work?Remy: It only makes sense that whatever negative and toxic effects ordinary people get from heavy internet use will only be multiplied in people whose job is to deal with the worst of it.
How do you explain to people what you do for a living?Martin: As a joke, I say I’m an internet janitor.
My real answer is, “I work for this website. And most people use it for good, but the people who don’t use it for good, I kick them off the website.” And it’s that simple.

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Summary of “The Classicist Who Sees Donald Trump as a Tragic Hero”

Many of the books written in support of Donald Trump’s Presidency have been authored by Trump family hangers-on or charlatans looking to make a buck.
Hanson has another side, one that is well suited for the age of Trump.
A longtime contributor to the National Review, he has a history of hostility to undocumented Mexican and Central American immigrants, who he claims are undermining American culture, and to African-Americans who speak about the persistence of racism, including Barack Obama, whom he has described as a leading member of “The new segregationists.” In his new book, which will be published by Basic Books, in March, Hanson explains why he thinks Trump was elected, and why he views the President as akin to a classically tragic hero, whom America needs but will never fully appreciate.
During our conversation, which has been edited and condensed for clarity, we discussed whether Trump should be compared to heroes of Greek myth, Hanson’s view of the Charlottesville protesters, and whether the President is carefully choosing the people he attacks.
They will tell you all of that, and you are almost listening to Donald Trump in 2015, but they won’t mention the word “Trump,” because to do so would contaminate that argument.
Trump had already announced that he was not going to discriminate against Jews and Mexicans and other people.
You don’t think Trump was using it as a racially-.
No, no, I think Trump was doing what Trump does, which is trying to sensationalize it.

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Summary of “‘The Most Versatile Criminal In History'”

In his recently released book, The Mastermind, Ratliff paints a picture of a man considered by one source to be the “Most versatile criminal in history.” Throughout the mid-aughts, Le Roux, a South African computer programmer, ran an illegal online pharmaceutical scam that sold addictive painkillers to Americans at astonishing rates.
Part of that was, yes, the people that got in touch with me who read it and would say things like, “You nailed it. You got everything right except you didn’t mention me.” That’s such a gift, because at varying levels, it’s so hard to even find people that were part of an international criminal network or to get them to talk.
Then the way the reporting went, I just felt very strongly that I wanted to be transparent in how I got the information, because in this type of reporting, you’ve got people who were part of the criminal network.
At one point a police officer in the Philippines told you, “You know what you are looking into, it’s very dangerous?” Were there specific points when you feared for your safety? Your own reporting showed that Le Roux had people killed over a lot less than trying to write a book uncovering his entire criminal enterprise.
Having talked to a lot of these people, do you chalk that up to naiveté or voluntary ignorance or Le Roux’s manipulation?
Then the people who arrested him would say “Well, we got these other murderers and that’s a big deal, including U.S. ex-military people who are now going to prison for decades or life for their crimes.” They’d say that’s a good bargain-.
So in some sense, you have to wonder, once he was arrested, would any of these people have committed a crime ever again? Some of them probably would have, but all the crimes that they committed were just for Le Roux.
He told people “I’m going to be on CNN when I’m arrested.” He told people that he wanted to be the biggest criminal in the world.

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Summary of “How to Be Critical of the Things You Love”

At the heart of Go Ahead in the Rain are questions about ourselves; it asks how and why we love artists, and what we can do with that love.2.
Nawal Arjini: What made you so interested in the interpersonal dynamics of A Tribe Called Quest, and what does thinking about them this way-as a group of people instead of celebrities or icons or even artists-afford that more typical critical standpoints don’t?4.
What We’re Listening To. NA: Would you talk more about the all-or-nothing critical atmosphere you’re writing against? Where does it come from, and how does it manifest itself?8.
My hope is that there’s more space for anger in all of these things.
I really think that the political responsibility of fans is to love themselves more than they love their icons.
To love themselves even more than they love their memories, and to love the evolution of all those things in harmony: the evolution of themselves, the evolution of their memory, and the evolution of the artist-for better or worse.
I often think: How does a black artist maneuver wholly independently in a capitalist society founded on white supremacy? How does that happen? I don’t have an answer.
HA: With each passing year, the idea of “Black cool” becomes more commodified, and therefore more worthwhile to nonblack audiences, and therefore worth more money-but not always for the benefit of black creators.

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Summary of “DeepMind AI breakthrough on protein folding made scientists melancholy”

Do you think people walked away from the conference with realistic expectations for what AI can contribute to the field in the future?
How do you think machine learning advances will change the prestige economy that we’re used to?
Long pause] One version is to say, “This is going to make it such that being able to make sense of data will be more important, will increase in prestige.” I think that’s reasonable to expect.
From my perspective, if there were a shift from the data collection exercise to the analysis exercise, I think that’d be a good thing in a way.
Just recently news reports came out about how AI is writing articles – one-third of the articles at Bloomberg are written with the help of AI. People always say, don’t worry, it’ll be a good thing because that’ll free up the journalists to do deeper thinking on more nuanced issues rather than focusing on the “Who, what, where, when, why” – so there’s a funny parallel there.
In terms of whether you stay in academia or go to DeepMind or elsewhere, I think that’ll probably be driven by the person’s motivation.
Sigal Samuel I think there’s also a class dimension at work here, right? Someone who’s highly trained, who has highly specialized knowledge, can potentially retrain or adapt the focus of their work so they’re not competing directly against AI. Do you think it’s easier for you than for, say, a factory worker to override the gut-level fear about being made obsolete?
We’ll think of ways to change society to define our value and identity in different ways.

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