Summary of “Can the Cavs’ Season Be Saved?”

The Cavs might be at their best-especially against the Warriors’ Lineup of Death-with LeBron at the 5.
LeBron’s future looms over this season, and it’s quickly moving from the background to the foreground as the trade deadline approaches.
Ryan: Let’s talk about those “Cavs players.” Is it at all conceivable that this is not LeBron? Is Kevin Love the personnel chessmaster leaking stories to the press?
Under LeBron pressure, the Cavs include the Brooklyn pick-which, even though it’s depreciating, is the first good pick they will have had since they took Wiggins and traded him for Turtleneck up there-in a deal that sends Tristan Thompson to Los Angeles for DeAndre Jordan.
Once the season begins, NBA teams are notoriously short on time, but are we talking about a deeper institutional rot if the team can’t make time to get players in shape and up to date on strategy?
The organization-from the moves the front office makes to who and how they play-runs through LeBron.
LeBron’s reluctance to give definitive answers about his future is forcing the front office to “Well actually” any outcries to provide him any more immediate help.
LeBron can be a great player, great teammate, and great person, and also a detrimental force, because his agenda only aligns with his franchise’s for as long as it can provide him the necessary means to compete for a title.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jaylen Brown: ‘Sport is a mechanism of control in America'”

Jaylen Brown is one the most intelligent and interesting young athletes I’ve met in years and it seems fitting that, midway through our interview in Boston, he should retell a parable that brings together Martin Luther King and the great American writer David Foster Wallace.
We’ve already spoken about Brown’s desire to learn new languages and his interest in books and chess – while he loves playing the piano and listening to grime artists from east London.
“Racism definitely exists across America today. Of course it’s changed a lot – and my opportunities are far greater than they would have been 50 years ago. So some people think racism has dissipated or no longer exists. But it’s hidden in more strategic places. You have less people coming to your face and telling you certain things. But [Donald] Trump has made it a lot more acceptable for racists to speak their minds.”
“In his year at college, before pausing his degree to play in the NBA, Brown wrote a thesis about how institutionalised sport impacts on education.”I was super emotional reading about it,” he says of his chosen subject.
“That’s the reality because sports is a mechanism of control. If people didn’t have sports they would be a lot more disappointed with their role in society. There would be a lot more anger or stress about the injustice of poverty and hunger. Sports is a way to channel our energy into something positive. Without sports who knows what half of these kids would be doing?”.
“We’re having some of the same problems we had 50 years ago. Some things have changed a lot but other factors are deeply embedded in our society. It takes protests like Kaepernick’s to make people uncomfortable and aware of these hidden injustices. People are now a lot more aware, engaged and united in our culture. It takes a special person like Kaepernick to force these changes – because often reporters and fans say: ‘If you’re an athlete I don’t want you to say anything. You should be happy you’re making x amount of money playing sport. You should be saluting America instead of critiquing it.’ That’s our society.”
During his first year at Berkeley, in his spare time, Brown learned Spanish from scratch and became fluent.
Brown found the will to play against the NBA champions, the Golden State Warriors, the night after Steede’s death – and he inspired the Celtics to a memorable victory by scoring the most points while producing tenacious defence.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Everything is too complicated”

It’s easy to see the broad themes of the show and the tech industry at large already forming: smart assistants everywhere, sensors and radios in every device you can think of, and an eternal hope that something, anything, will be the reason people will finally upgrade their TVs. All of that is exciting – I love gadgets and am one of the few crazy people that think CES is incredibly fun! – but I want to take a half-step back before it all begins and point out something obvious: most people have no idea how any of these things work, and are already hopelessly confused by the tech they have.
Think of the tech industry as being built on an ever-increasing number of assumptions: that you know what a computer is, that saying “Enter your Wi-Fi password” means something to you, that you understand what an app is, that you have the desire to manage your Bluetooth device list, that you’ll figure out what USB-C dongles you need, and on and on.
What I’ve noticed recently is that the tech industry is starting to make these assumptions faster than anyone can reasonably be expected to keep up.
Thinking Roku itself provides certain movies and shows, not the apps and services available on the Roku platform.
“What is the App Store on the Apple TV for?” “Why does it say live in the corner when I take a photo?” “Is the Echo Show a picture frame?” “Why can’t Siri play Spotify?” This list was sort of funny when I first started making it, but over the past few days I’ve started to realize it’s a pretty damning indictment of the tech industry.
Why doesn’t all this stuff work together better? Why should anyone know why search works in some apps and not others? Why do so many people need to remember so many passwords? Why have all these smart assistants actually made things more complicated?
It’s fun to look at new products and check out far-fetched concept touchscreen refrigerators, but I think the most important questions we can ask right now are actually the simplest: how does it work? How do you set it up? What happens when people don’t understand something? Do I need to create a new username and password? Is all of that secure? Does it work well with other things I’ve already bought? What assumptions are you making?
These are all the same questions our friend Walt Mossberg started asking in 1991 when he first started reviewing personal technology, and kept asking through the end of his run with us last year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Most Important Tech Trends Of 2018, According To Top VCs”

“The thing we’re interested in at First Round is, what’s the flip side? What are the investment opportunities in human impact?Not removing people from the equation, but giving people superpowers.” She points to personal-shopping service Stitch Fix, which uses AI to help stylists make more effective fashion suggestions for customers.
“More holistic, more on mental health, more on alternative practitioners, [like] acupuncture, or mind/body connections.”
Evans is less inspired by the idea of augmenting our existing world-like digital recipes we can see when we’re at the stove-and more by wearable devices that can see and interpret, what’s going on around us.
CryptocurrencyBitcoin may get all the ink, but there are plenty of other cryptocurrencies, and more to come.
“We continue to look at things that take economic responsibility for the cost and outcomes of care, and use technology and data to make both of those better and more efficient.”
“And if you don’t sequence the abnormal ones, you don’t know about the problems. So this notion of being able to do single cells versus just the average of when they break up all the cells in the blood, is an important nuance. That’s going to become an important clinical tool in the future. Today we’re just testing average DNA sequences, so you miss stuff.”
Genetics Technologies For Healthcare”There is absolutely a trend over the next 5 to 10 more years toward more personalized, more data-based, more genetic-based, information being included in your interactions with your provider, whether on a generalized basis or in response to specific disease issues,” Roberts says.
“Cancer is one that’s very prominent but there will be other ones that come along, and over time we’ll build up those disease-specific ones into a more holistic look at clinically relevant genetics for patients to talk to their doctors about.”

The orginal article.

Summary of “Kristi Yamaguchi, Unlaced”

Twenty-six years on from her gold medal in Albertville, the Olympic and two-time World Champion has filled her post-competitive life with family, work, and causes that matter to her, quietly and purposefully continuing to blaze her own trail in the decades since she became our first – and still only – Asian American Olympic Champion in figure skating.
KY: My very first role model from skating was Dorothy Hamill, because I started skating in the late ’70s, and she was very much America’s sweetheart and doing something I was starting to love.
Shortly before the World Championships, I had a moment where I was questioning myself … I was feeling down on myself, down on skating, and I really had to reassert my passion and find it again, and bring a new perspective to skating.
You are having to mold a little more into a specific kind of skater to take advantage of the system.
There’s still so much wiggle room that you don’t know what judge is giving what to each skater – unless you go into the protocols and look at all the numbers, but who’s going to do that? It’s a little harder to connect, I think, with what’s going on.
The opportunity for professionals to reinstate for the 1994 Olympics came about, so I kind of had the best of both worlds: I could skate professionally, and if I felt like coming back to compete, I could.
Classical is still my favorite to skate to, but it was so much fun to skate to En Vogue! One of my first professional numbers was “Never Gonna Get It,” and I think people were like, oh, my God, who is this girl? [Laughs] It was great to show that side of my personality and share it with fans.
You were the first and are still the only Asian American Olympic Champion in figure skating.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Prioritize Decisions as a Team with a Questions and Assumptions Activity”

As a researcher and general curious human, I love asking questions and learning how people answer those questions.
So it’s no surprise that my favorite Design Thinking activity is aptly called Questions and Assumptions.
This activity is great to do almost anytime-when kicking off a project, mid-project to track if you’ve debunked or answered any questions you started with, or if your questions and assumptions have changed over the course of a project.
Here’s how to run a Questions and Assumptions activity to prioritize decisions as a team and discover more about your customers or audience.
Get your team together and, for 10 minutes, write down questions or assumptions you have about the prompt.
Once all of your questions and assumptions have been plotted, it’s time to discuss that upper right quadrant-the things you’re least certain about and if we got them wrong, it would be bad news bears.
Once you’re able to reach a consensus, it’s time to figure out how to answer those questions or debunk those assumptions.
Questions and Assumptions is a simple Design Thinking activity that, with as little as 30 minutes, can get your team aligned about what’s most important to address now for the most important part of your product or service-your users.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why This Type of Intelligence You Probably Haven’t Heard of Might Be the Most Important”

It used to be that cognitive intelligence was the king of the hill in terms of importance.
Now Cornell University’s professor of human development, Robert J. Sternberg, says “Successful intelligence” likely matters more than all the other intelligence types you’ve heard about.
Successful intelligence is a “New” psychological theory Sternberg actually introduced way back in 1996.
If you feel like you come up short given the description of successful intelligence, don’t fret.
Like other forms of intelligence, successful intelligence, according to Sternberg, is something you can work at and develop.
Sternberg was awarded the 2018 Grawemeyer Award in Psychology earlier this month for developing the successful intelligence concept.
His colleagues assert that his work is shifting the way we think about intelligence and forcing us to see it within a broader cultural context.
With cognitive intelligence, we might look at the person, with emotional intelligence, our relationships and interactions-successful intelligence requires us to look much more deeply at how we live, influence one another, and establish or adjust norms.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Ditch These Seven Bad Habits Before 2018 Starts”

January 1 is often a time when people set goals and make plans for the next 12 months.
“We all have a million habits. Half of them are probably not great habits, but it’s important to understand which habits are blocking you from your important goals,” says consultant Robert “Bob” O’Connor, author of Gumptionade: The Booster for Your Self-Improvement Plan.
Many professional goals are designed to achieve traditional measures of success-a higher-ranking job, more money, or other trappings that tell people we’ve “Made it.” O’Connor thinks that’s the wrong focus.
Many successful people suffer from FOMO-fear of missing out.
“I’m usually honest with people, and say, ‘In the spirit of practicing what I preach, I’m prioritizing opportunities that need A, B, and C criteria,'” she says.
“People have been really respectful of that. Also, sometimes, they will come back to you with an opportunity that’s more appropriate.”
Emotionally intelligent people assert their boundaries while keeping their cool.
Too many people give up when faced with those challenges.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Bono: U2, State of the World, What He Learned From Almost Dying”

How did you envision Songs of Experience in relation to Songs of Innocence, its companion album from 2014?I had this idea of your younger self talking to your older self for quite a while.
Can you be more precise? Like, what songs do you think came directly out of your near-death moment?It’s not so much songs as .
The full name of the song is “Señor.” Does that help explain?No, I think that is Bob putting you off the trail.
Your song asks, “Jesus, what have you got for me?” Well, what do you think he has got for you?There is an unbelievable release in letting go.
We asked Paul McCartney, “Where did you get all those incredible chords in those Beatles songs?” And he said, “Well, you know, we were a rock & roll band, but to get good gigs we had to do weddings. Like posh weddings. We had to learn Gershwin, all that stuff.” And I went, “No, I didn’t know.” And Paul says, “Oh, yeah, we got better-paying gigs.” And I went, “Ah!” It was like, “Note to self and Edge: Let’s get into musical theater. Let’s think about that.”
How will you measure success for Songs of Experience?I would like it to have famous songs, so that when we play them in our live show people don’t go, “What is that? Should we go to the bathroom now?”.
Which songs do you think will become famous?I know that “You’re the Best Thing About Me” is going to be one of them.
For example?Some people, in a very sane way, are thinking, “Why do you want to do this? Why do you want our songs on the radio?” And I say that, if we believe in our songs, we have to use any medium we can find to reach people.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Barack Obama’s Reflections on Leaving the Presidency”

In Obama’s first major interview as a private citizen, he told Prince Harry of Wales, the British royal, that he felt thankful for his spouse and unexpected serenity as his term ended; that presidents aren’t afforded the luxury of long reflection on thorny challenges; that he feels as though he is now like a coach on the sidelines rather than a player on the court; that life after leaving the White House unfolds in slow motion; and that free speech remains vital in spite of hate speech.
Wherever you were in the race, if you ran hard and you did your best, and then you were able to pass that baton off successfully, with the country or the world a little bit better off than when you got there, then you could take some pride in that, and I think that we were able to do that.
Leaving the White House “Gives you the ability to reflect and study in a way that sometimes as president you couldn’t do the way you wanted because you had to move very, very quickly,” Obama said.
“One way I’ve described it is that I think when you’re in politics directly, then you’re a player on the field, and there’s some element of that you’ll never be able to duplicate-the excitement and the thrill and sometimes the agony that goes along with being on the field. And now I’m making that transition to some degree as a coach. And that has its own demands and its own responsibilities and its own impact. Being a great coach is often times as satisfying as being a great player but it’s a different role. That’s how I’m transitioning.”
“One danger of the internet, Obama continued,”is that people can have entirely different realities.
“One of the things we want to do when we’re working with young people to build up platforms for social change is to make sure they don’t think just sending out a hashtag, in and of itself, is bringing about change You have to get on the ground and you actually have to do something.”
Obama: I’m big on education, because the notion that we are going to be able to corral, that we are going to be able to contain, what’s said and what’s not on the Internet seems unachievable-and contrary to the values of an open society that the United States and Great Britain and most of the advanced world adheres to.
If you had to choose a moment in human history in which you wanted to be born and you didn’t know at the time whether you were going to be Prince Harry or Barack Obama or a small child in rural Africa or India, you’d choose today, because the fact is the world is healthier, wealthier, better educated, more tolerant, more sophisticated, and less violent than just about any other time in human history.

The orginal article.