Summary of “How Language Shapes Our Perception of Reality”

Does an English speaker perceive reality differently from say, a Swahili speaker? Does language shape our thoughts and change the way we think? Maybe.
Some studies say that people don’t actually see color unless there is a word for it, but other studies have found that speakers of the Dani language can see the difference between yellow and red despite only having one word for them.
Because of the vocabulary, English speakers might organize things left to right, whereas a speaker of Guugu Yimithirr might orient them in a mirrored position.
The Hopi language doesn’t require past or present tense, but has validity markers, which requires speakers to think about how they came to know a piece of information.
One study conducted by Stanford researchers found that Spanish and Japanese speakers didn’t remember who is to blame for accidental events as much as those who speak English do.
English speakers get to the point in speech quicker than say, a Chinese speaker would, says Birner.
Tsedal Neeley, an associate professor at Harvard Business School, studied the company for five consecutive years after the mandate and discovered that employees who weren’t native Japanese speakers or English speakers proved to be the most effective workers in the end, even though they had it the roughest in the beginning.
If we believe that language shapes how we think, will learning a new language change the way you think? Probably not, says Birner, but if the newly acquired language is very different than the one you already speak, it might reveal a new way of looking at another culture.

The orginal article.

Summary of “9 Toxic Mental Habits That the Most Emotionally Intelligent People Avoid”

Whether you’re running a business, leading a team, reconciling a friendship or trying to be the best spouse you can be, we are all prone to irrational thinking that can hurt our professional and personal relationships, or keep us stuck.
People with emotional intelligence with a penchant for positive thinking roll a different way.
I’m going to list common examples any of us may face that lead to toxic, irrational thinking, followed by its rational, EQ) counterpart to aid you in shifting your perspective.
Irrational Thinking: To be worthy and have self-esteem, I have to be competent and successful in all respects.
EQ Counterpart: Things have happened in the past that have influenced my behavior, but I can learn to modify how I think and react if I work at it.
Irrational Thinking: It’s easier to avoid than to face this problem; hopefully it will just go away.
The problem with most irrational thinking is that it brings unwarranted anxiety and stress along for the ride.
Get rid of it by using the emotional intelligence counterparts to avoid the fallout that comes with irrationality.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Read Less News But Be More Informed, According to a Futurist”

Writer and futurist Richard Watson may teach London business students and Silicon Valley tech companies how to think about crafting tools for tomorrow, but he’s not even on Twitter.
What’s more, Watson doesn’t really follow the news in any conventional way.
Such remarkable characters are called “Tall poppies” in some companies, and Watson believes collecting these human blooms drives success.
Hit the road “Travel. But again take the path untrodden,” Watson urges.
Watson especially recommends perusing weekend editions of quality newspapers.
“The important news will find you. It will.” Watson is confident that relevant information makes its way to us, and that much of what we fuss over daily is just stuff that will soon be forgotten.
Carve out designated reading time “Have a think week every year,” Watson says.
Embrace silence “Learn how to look and listen deeply,” Watson recommends.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What’s Your Productivity Style? How 4 Personalities Can Get More Done”

If you’re struggling to get more done in a day, it might be because you’re thinking of productivity as a one-size-fits-all endeavor, says Carson Tate, author of Work Simply.
“If you’re not customizing your strategies to that style, they’re not going to work for you and you’re going to get frustrated.” She breaks down the four styles and corresponding strategies that can turn you into an efficient, to-do-list-killing machine.
How quickly can you prep lunches before work? How many minutes does it take to clear out your inbox each morning? Trying to beat your own time will spur you to stay focused, but it can also nudge you to streamline-like prepping a week’s worth of veggies at once or setting up templates for emails you send again and again.
“These are the people who turn their work in early and will add an item to their to-do list even if it’s already done, just for the satisfaction of crossing it off,” says Tate.Productivity Boost: Batching should be your new best friend, says Tate.
You do your best work with people and on teams, and you tend to understand instinctually what needs to get done to wrap up a project.
“They’re great at juggling a large variety of work, and they work very quickly.” They’re also the ones who are most likely to squeak in just seconds before the deadline, and to chafe at lengthy processes.
Productivity Boost: Stop thinking you can knock out a project in one long marathon work session.
“Visualizers crave novelty, so to keep your energy and momentum high you need to break up the boring work with more interesting work,” says Tate.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why speaking to yourself in the third person makes you wiser”

Instead, the scientific research suggests that you should adopt an ancient rhetorical method favoured by the likes of Julius Caesar and known as ‘illeism’ – or speaking about yourself in the third person.
The findings are the brainchild of the psychologist Igor Grossmann at the University of Waterloo in Canada, whose work on the psychology of wisdom was one of the inspirations for my recent book on intelligence and how we can make wiser decisions.
In a series of laboratory experiments, they found that people tend to be humbler, and readier to consider other perspectives, when they are asked to describe problems in the third person.
This earlier research involved only short-term interventions, however – meaning it was far from clear whether wiser reasoning would become a long-term habit with regular practice at illeism.
To find out, Grossmann’s latest research team asked nearly 300 participants to describe a challenging social situation, while two independent psychologists scored them on the different aspects of wise reasoning.
Clearly, politicians might use illeism for purely rhetorical purposes but, when applied to genuine reflection, it appears to be a powerful tool for wiser reasoning.
As the researchers point out, it would be exciting to see whether the benefits apply to other forms of decision making besides the more personal dilemmas examined in Grossmann’s study.
In the meantime, Grossmann’s work continues to prove that the subject of wisdom is worthy of rigorous experimental study – with potential benefits for all of us.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Political Confessional: The Man Who Thinks The U.S. Is Better Off As A Bunch Of Separate Countries”

Chris went on: “I live in heavy Trump country but know he’s an idiot, but even Trump haters wouldn’t agree to break up the U.S. And certain areas would be horrible for minorities and destroy the environment. But it’s obvious the U.S. has run its course.”
I feel like the U.S. peaked in the ’90s, and I would definitely say that 9/11 is what spurred it on, because I feel like you don’t get to Trump without 9/11. The U.S. has always been, I would say, on the right side of the bell curve when it comes to jingoism – a little bit more patriotic than most countries.
CM: So what kind of new countries do you see forming from the states?
CM: You’re basically making the argument that we should have geographically smaller countries because we’ve gotten too big to make things work?
Chris: It’s largely older people, so you sort of just shrug it off because they’re from a different generation and set in their ways.
I’m curious if you think that this would be an abdication of moral duty if some people were left worse off.
Maybe if we can control the process a little it won’t be quite as bad. CM: In how many years do you think your crazy idea for breaking the U.S. into different countries will be taken seriously as a mainstream idea?
If Democrats win and Trumpism dies off and Republicans maybe try to build a bigger tent and try to win with more votes rather than with voter suppression, I think it could be staved off.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The strange satisfaction of a sports injury – Experience Magazine”

“We’re living longer and a lot of us are staying active,” says Scott Murberry, M.D., who practices sports medicine at St. John’s Medical Center for Health and Sports Medicine in Jacksonville, Florida.
“Fifty-year-old-plus guys probably shouldn’t be on half-pipes.” He hasn’t hit the skate park since, he says, but “I did go out and buy hip pads like football players wear. So if I was to go back”.
Women athletes are susceptible, too, says Amy Baltzell, Ed.D., an Olympic rower and the coordinator of sports psychology specialization at Boston University’s Wheelock College.
A 1970s college ice hockey player and retired air traffic controller, took a nasty spill at 61 on a ski slope – ending up with two broken ribs and a concussion – she briefly considered quitting skiing for good.
When does an aging athlete decide to actually stop playing? Maybe when the injury goes beyond the sprain or the mundane.
Durant played rugby from age 18 to 59 – right up until the day he lost his focus on the field, got hit with a stray thumb, and lost his eye.
Had my own injury been worse, Durant told me, I might have given up the golf course, too.
I think about the bogey and par afterward, the proof that I could play hurt and still play well.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Randy Newman on Chance the Rapper, ‘Toy Story,’ Trump, and Mike Trout”

Randy Newman has been writing songs since the early 1960s, but he’s still playing to young audiences: His 1983 song “Same Girl” was used on Euphoria earlier this month, and he’s featured on “5 Year Plan,” a new track from Chance the Rapper’s about-to-be no.
Has getting older helped or hurt your ability to put yourself in the place of other people and write songs from their perspective?
I’ve got a song called “Real Emotional Girl,” and in my opinion, the narrator of the song is sort of a bad guy.
They told me the story and that there was a great deal of-they sort of think at Pixar, I think, that I’m a specialist in emotion, which actually is what music does, is the best thing it can do.
You know, “When She Loved Me” from Toy Story 2, that song Jessie had. That was pretty good, and they animated to it.
People who saw Toy Story as kids are taking their kids to see Toy Story 4.
It’s going to be songs that I’m going be remembered for, I think, along with maybe Toy Story also.
You said you wrote a song about Donald Trump for Dark Matter, but you didn’t release it, in part because it felt too easy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Decline of Yelling”

Online, the many horrified reactions to the clip only crystallized how younger Americans appear to feel about yelling in general-namely, that it’s no longer a signifier of dominance, power, or authority but, instead, a mortifying and old-fashioned display of toxic masculinity.
Part of this change surely has to do with a broader shift away from behavior that reinforces abusive and overtly patriarchal structures: while there’s no empirical evidence to suggest that men actually yell any more than women, a man yelling is, almost without exception, a more physically and psychically threatening experience.
In 1971, Janov told reporters, “In the future, there will be no need for a field called psychology,” because primal therapy would cure “80 per cent of all ailments.” Janov was not quite as prescient a thinker as he’d hoped, but the idea that yelling is a pretty good way of relieving tension has endured.
There’s more evidence that yelling is actually not very healthy at all.
Physically, it’s nearly impossible for a human being not to be deeply and instinctively alarmed by yelling.
I recently spoke to Drew Ramsey, a psychiatrist and assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, about how his younger patients metabolize anger instead. “We have a generation coming up where yelling is really not a very acceptable way of expressing yourself,” he said.
“It gets framed, maybe, that younger generations aren’t yelling because they’re not opinionated but it’s because they’ve figured out it’s not a very effective way of communicating,” Ramsey said.
I think of the most explosive arguments that I’ve got into with the people I’ve cared about the most-when love and its demands made me raw, nearly feral, and I knew, even as the yelling was happening, that I would never be that honest or that vulnerable again.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Rutgar Bregman’s case for UBI, open borders, and a 15-hour workweek”

At the beginning of the book, you have this great line, “This book isn’t an attempt to predict the future. It’s an attempt to unlock the future, to fling open the windows of our minds.” Why should we be working backwards from utopia?
Ezra Klein As you probably know, I’ve lived a lot with the idea of UBI because my wife Annie Lowrey wrote an amazing book on it called Give People Money.
Ezra Klein I’ve gone from being relatively negative on UBI to feeling much more positively towards it, and a lot of that is the worker power argument.
Ezra Klein When people hear that UBI doesn’t do a lot to change working patterns, it feels counter-intuitive.
Second, given people’s work ethics and their work motivations, it’s strange to imagine that some kind of basic living standard would rob people of interest in working.
The 15-hour workweek, and what Keynes got wrong Ezra Klein Talk to me about the case for 15-hour work week.
Rutger Bregman If I could write the book again, I would have a more explicit discussion of what work actually is.
If you look at the ideological history of this thing called work, often what we call work is work that contributes towards GDP. Then if you delve into the history of GDP, you find they obviously could have included unpaid work in GDP. They chose not to because mostly women were doing it.

The orginal article.