Summary of “Martha Nussbaum and Saul Levmore on the Ethics of Inheritance”

For The Atlantic’s series on philanthropy, “Who Gives?,” I spoke to Nussbaum and Levmore about these questions, and our conversation touched on why people give money to charity in the first place as well as the benefits of giving those funds to, among other places, the opera.
Levmore: It’s unsurprising when you see the Bill Gateses of the world give away a lot of money while they’re still alive, because you can watch what people do with it-you can see who’s doing and a good job and a bad job, and then give more to some places than to others, and so forth.
Nussbaum: Look, institutions need money and people need money, so it’s fine for them to have incentives for even the most selfish kind of giving.
Levmore: Nothing stops the opera from subsidizing young people if it’s a good investment.
Nussbaum: Many trained there are not the children of wealthy people.
Nussbaum: Most people don’t want their kids to do lots of things.
Nussbaum: What most people would want is to stay in their own homes, and have home-based nursing care.
Nussbaum: One thing that people actually already do as they age is take a lot of adult-education courses, particularly in literature and philosophy.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The FCC’s Democratic commissioners on net neutrality vote: ‘We have a mess on our hands'”

So I support net neutrality, and I think it is important for this commission to sustain that policy.
I think right now the record in response to our rulemaking on net neutrality has over 23 million comments, and in many ways that’s very exciting because the public is speaking out in droves on this issue.
“We have a mess on our hands.” I’m learning more every day, but I think this agency needs to halt, stop, and figure out what happened.
There’s a Republican majority right now, and I think a lot of people watching expect that the proposal will pass.
You mentioned “Legally sustainable.” I think that’s something that a lot of people are hanging their hat on now.
Surely we should not do that as a federal partner to the states, but I question – honestly, not being a lawyer – but I question not only the legality of the direction that they’re headed, because I think it’s problematic.
It’s just hurtful, and I think it’s counterproductive.
We’re moving in the wrong direction, and I think December 14th will mark a very sad day in regulatory history.

The orginal article.

Summary of “This Is the Most Important Fallacy You’ve Never Heard Of”

She’s written two books on poker strategy, and next year will release a book called Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don’t Have All the Facts.
If a well-reasoned decision leads to a negative outcome, was it the wrong decision? How do we distinguish between luck and skill? And how do we move beyond our cognitive biases?
You get into these complex situations where the outcome is the result of multiple decisions.
You can think about it as creating too tight a relationship between the quality of the outcome and the quality of the decision.
You can’t use outcome quality as a perfect signal of decision quality, not with a small sample size anyway.
If we know that outcomes infect us, we want to separate ourselves from outcomes as much as we possibly can when we’re thinking about decision quality.
Doesn’t matter to me whether you got in an accident or not-I should be able to ask you questions to decide whether your decision quality while you were driving was good, because there’s certain things that I do know go into a good decision about driving.
You should be sort of trying to think about that for yourself, but also, don’t talk about the outcome when you’re asking other people about the quality of their decisions.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Unlikely places and untangled goals”

An abbey of Cistercian Trappist monks, known for their silence, with a guest room that’s free for whoever asks.
I hung around all their various sitting rooms and balconies, writing for six silent days, speaking only one sentence a day if I ordered dinner.
It made me think about the unlikely places we can get what we want.
Some people think they need to go all the way to Thailand to meditate, or to India to learn yoga.
Some people think they need to travel to a country to learn its language.
Check out Moses McCormick learning more than a dozen languages from Ohio, or Benny Lewis learning Arabic from Brazil.
Some people think they need to pay a fortune to a university for a great education.
Some people think they need expensive equipment to start a new hobby, certain clothes to look the part, or for everything to be just right.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Buddhist teacher on what the living can learn from the dying”

Frank Ostaseski is the author of The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach the Living and helped found the Zen Hospice Project’s Guest House, the country’s first Buddhist hospice center, in San Francisco during the AIDS crisis.
One is that I assist people who are going through the dying process, helping them to find their best way of dying.
Frank Ostaseski When people are dying, they tend to be pretty honest, and there’s not so much nonsense in the room.
At the end of their life, people realize they were living in too small a story.
I’m talking about ordinary people, oftentimes people who were living on the streets of San Francisco, coming to terms with this thing that had terrified them all their lives.
Life is about relationships Sean Illing You said a minute ago that people, near the end of their lives, care more about their connections with other people than they do anything else.
Death is a mystery, and people who are dying are turning toward mystery, and mystery is this unknowable territory, the land of unanswerable questions.
Dying can teach us to appreciate that everything is always changing Sean Illing What lessons do the dying have to teach the living about how to live better and well?

The orginal article.

Summary of “The AI Guru Behind Amazon, Uber, and Unity Explains What AI Really Is”

Lange doesn’t shy away from the oft-hyped term “Artificial intelligence”- provided the machines really do learn how to respond to users’ needs.
Does the system seem to be very reasonable? Does it almost seem like there’s a human hiding behind the system, interacting with me and making me feel comfortable?
I [can’t] think of an AI system that doesn’t have machine learning at its core.
Because now we’re sort of back to human programming of the system … AI would have been giving the computer treatment data and results, start developing an ability to do the diagnosis, propose some suggestions for treatment, measure the output of the treatment, and constantly adjust and learn.
First] you have a drone [that] a machine learning system has learned to fly on its own.
What is the rewards function of a drone? Find the bad guys and eliminate them … It’s really what you define as the end goal of the system.
So that’s why these systems are highly branded experiences, which apparently people really like, and that’s fine.
FC: Anything else you think we need to know about AI? DL: The key message is, you have a learning system, and that’s the disruption … Your computer can do more than it’s told to do because it gets the data and it learns from it, and the loop makes it improve endlessly.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dan Ariely: How Understanding Money Can Help Your Career”

I spoke to Dan Ariely, the author of Dollars and Sense: How We Misthink Money and How to Spend Smarter, about why he decided to focus on money for his book, why the world of personal finance is illogical, why people make irrational financial decisions, some of the hidden motivations around money, how to improve money habits and his best career advice.
Dan Schawbel: Why decide to focus on money in this book?
This is the era for electronic money and when it comes to physical money we are kind of limited.
Money is all about opportunity but every time you buy a cup of coffee, you should be thinking ‘what can I do better with four dollars, what is the best possible use of something else?’ Money requires that we think about opportunity cost and opportunity cost is incredibly difficult to think about.
What technology is doing is that it blurs the boundaries of money so if I gave you money every day or every week for the week you will understand what is going on but if I had credit cards and mortgages and student loans now it will be incredibly complex.
Schawbel: Why do people make irrational financial decisions on what they purchase and how to invest your money?
The first thing is to take advantage of the fact that money has this amazing feature which is that there are some things which you could do with money that just stays with you and are automatic like deductions.
Money is easier because there are some things you could do like automatic deductions, maximizing 401K, automatic deductions, and things like that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘The Last Jedi’: Cover Story on the Dark New Star Wars Movie”

In late October, he’s sitting in an office suite inside Disney’s Burbank studios that he’s called home for many months, where a whiteboard declares, “We’re working on Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” Johnson is the film’s writer-director, which means he ended up with the world’s finest collection of replacement toys, including a life-size Falcon set that nearly brought him to tears when he stepped onto it.
“It’s somewhat a reflection of society,” acknowledges the saga’s new star, Daisy Ridley, who plays Rey, and who has gone from unknown London actress to full-blown movie star nearly as fast as her character went from desert scavenger to budding Jedi.
“I think it’s very funny. The trailers have been kind of dark – the movie has that, but I also made a real conscious effort for it to be a riot. I want it to have all the things tonally that I associate with Star Wars, which is not just the Wagner of it. It’s also the Flash Gordon.”
“To pick up where someone left off and carry it forward, but also introduce a vocabulary that hasn’t been seen in a Star Wars movie before, is a tall order and really hard to get right. He’s incredibly smart and doesn’t feel the need to let everyone know it.” A few weeks after we talk, Lucasfilm announces that Johnson signed on to make three more Star Wars films in the coming decade, the first that step outside of the prevailing Skywalker saga, indicating that Disney and Lucasfilm matriarch Kathleen Kennedy are more than delighted with Last Jedi.
The Last Jedi will be Fisher’s last Star Wars movie.
Overall, Johnson enjoyed what seems like an almost unfathomable level of autonomy in shaping The Last Jedi’s story.
At first, Driver wasn’t totally sure he wanted to be in a Star Wars movie.
Instead, she’s just busy in a way that only a freshly minted 25-year-old movie star could be – and she still managed to fulfill a pre-fame plan to go back to college for a semester last year.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Dan Ariely: How Understanding Money Can Help Your Career”

I spoke to Dan Ariely, the author of Dollars and Sense: How We Misthink Money and How to Spend Smarter, about why he decided to focus on money for his book, why the world of personal finance is illogical, why people make irrational financial decisions, some of the hidden motivations around money, how to improve money habits and his best career advice.
Dan Schawbel: Why decide to focus on money in this book?
This is the era for electronic money and when it comes to physical money we are kind of limited.
Money is all about opportunity but every time you buy a cup of coffee, you should be thinking ‘what can I do better with four dollars, what is the best possible use of something else?’ Money requires that we think about opportunity cost and opportunity cost is incredibly difficult to think about.
What technology is doing is that it blurs the boundaries of money so if I gave you money every day or every week for the week you will understand what is going on but if I had credit cards and mortgages and student loans now it will be incredibly complex.
Schawbel: Why do people make irrational financial decisions on what they purchase and how to invest your money?
The first thing is to take advantage of the fact that money has this amazing feature which is that there are some things which you could do with money that just stays with you and are automatic like deductions.
Money is easier because there are some things you could do like automatic deductions, maximizing 401K, automatic deductions, and things like that.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Here’s the Strategy Elite Athletes Follow to Perform at the Highest Level”

“Don’t think about winning the SEC Championship. Don’t think about the national championship. Think about what you needed to do in this drill, on this play, in this moment. That’s the process: Let’s think about what we can do today, the task at hand.”It’s this message that’s been internalized by his players and his teams - which together have four national championships in an eight-year span, one Mid-American Conference championship, have been crowned SEC champions 15 times and Saban has received multiple coaching awards.
In the chaos of sport, as in life, process provides a way.
Saban’s process is exclusively this - existing in the present, taking it one step at a time, not getting distracted by anything else.
As Heraclitus observed, “Under the comb, the tangle and the straight path are the same.” That’s what the process is.
The process is order, it keeps our perceptions in check and our actions in sync.
With our business rivals, we rack our brains to think of some mind-blowing new product that will make them irrelevant, and, in the process, we take our eye off the ball.
The process is the voice that demands we take responsibility and ownership.
The process is about doing the right things, right now.

The orginal article.