Summary of “They Inherited Wealth and Now They Want to Give It All Away”

Something inside him told him to give away his money, along with the power that money bestows, so he is sitting at the long, gray dining table in a loft on one of the loveliest streets in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in Manhattan, opening a Google doc.
Too, told him to give away his money, along with the power that money bestows, and he will be following along with Sam’s notes during the meeting.
It’s a Sunday in July, and this is the weekly status meeting of the Action Committee of the New York chapter of Resource Generation, an organization founded on the belief that young wealthy people should give away most or all of their inherited money or excess wealth.
T&C: A lot of it was like, “Oh, the poor rich people feel bad and they want to-“.
“There’s an anti-ICE event, and a lot of great organizations will attend. We want to get 100 people who will take arrests. I’ll pitch it on Wednesday,” he says.
One of Resource Generation’s missions is to get rich people to examine the visible and invisible ways they have benefited from their wealth.
“I had already ­decided to give away my money, but it was a relief to find other people in similar situations.” Back then the group, called Comfort Zone, mainly encouraged young people with wealth to donate ­their ­money.
Kind of top-of-mind is that when young people have grown up without ever having ­wanted anything, it’s very easy, I think, to be overly optimistic and not realize how much it takes to achieve the baseline things of being able to have a comfortable home and put your kids in a good school, and give them experiences that you had as a child.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Jenny Odell on why we need to learn to do nothing: ‘It’s a reminder that you’re alive'”

Nearly two years ago, the artist and academic Jenny Odell gave a keynote address on “How to do nothing”.
Odell writes of feeling compelled to seek refuge in her local rose garden in the days after Donald Trump became president, “Like a deer going to a salt lick”: “It really did feel necessary, like a survival tactic.”
“What we are left with,” Odell writes, with no small sadness, “[are] 24 potentially monetizeable hours that we can no longer justify spending on ‘nothing’.
Odell herself finds this state of mind most easily accessed in nature, losing herself in the study of a single leaf or patch of earth, or going on meandering hikes.
A keen birdwatcher, Odell recalls in great detail specific experiences in nature – happening upon a clearing full of sage plants and its “Amazing smell”, or seeing a “Really amazing warbler”.
Finding solace in nature is not a new idea, but its sense of escape is increasingly necessary for our survival, says Odell.
Odell has said How To Do Nothing is not a self-help book promising simple steps to a lasting new way of life : “You have to know that you’re going to keep getting sucked back in, and be realistic about that.”
I catch myself asking Odell what she sees as the benefit or the outcome of doing nothing – is it increased creativity? Greater empathy, improved mental health?

The orginal article.

Summary of “What is being 30 like?”

According to her mother, Wilberlyn Feria, who goes by Hazel, Rosario sounds like her dad when she laughs but looks like her mom when she smiles.
Her mother aspired to be a singer, and Rosario’s earliest memory of performing was at a talent show rehearsal when she was 4 years old.
Her mother’s performing partner, a rapper, hadn’t shown up, and she recruited Rosario to replace him.
Rosario wrote her first rap when she was 12 years old.
Still, Rosario gets respect for her lyrics when people do hear her rhyme.
Rosario recalls when her producer, now 33, turned 30 years old.
Still, Rosario says she’s not afraid to get older.
Update: Rosario recently started a new relationship with a woman she says is supportive of her music career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Decision Making Advice For Parents: How to Really, Truly Plan Ahead”

Better decision making by sticking to far-away goals is an essential skill that, as Bina Venkataraman argues in her new book, The Optimist’s Telescope: Thinking Ahead in a Reckless Age, is more necessary now than ever before.
Bina Venkataraman argues that there has never been a greater need for thinking ahead than what people on the planet are facing today.
As the planet warms, as antibiotics become less effective and give rise to superbugs, and as the economy grows more wobbly and benefits those at the top, everyone will have to decide whether they want to hoard resources for themselves or think ahead and bargain on a collective and more inclusive future.
Fatherly spoke to Venkataraman about the myth that humans aren’t good at thinking ahead and the key to making better long term decisions.
We need to change how our organizations are managed and change policy and politics to orient more towards thinking ahead and valuing the future.
People will say, “Human beings aren’t capable of thinking ahead. We’re myopic. That’s how we’re made as creatures, we’re just like hunter-gatherers on the plane.”
What we think is the curse of human nature – that we just can’t think ahead about problems like climate change – is actually a choice we’re making.
They should be done as you’re thinking about how to volunteer your time on your weekend or as you’re thinking about what’s really important for your community.

The orginal article.

Summary of “‘My Stroke of Insight’ Author Jill Bolte Taylor on Ambition”

Jill Bolte Taylor was a rising-star neuroscientist at Harvard when, at 37, she experienced a massive stroke that left her unable to walk, talk, read, or recall any of her life.
She chronicled the experience in her New York Times bestselling memoir, My Stroke of Insight, as well as a blockbuster TED Talk.
Today, Taylor divides her time between the speaking circuit, teaching about the brain’s capacity for recovery, and working on her second book.
We spoke to her about how the stroke changed her perspective on work, and what it means to be ambitious in the wake of a life-changing health crisis.
A few years after your stroke, you started teaching college courses again.
How did your ambitions change after your stroke?It was clear after the stroke that it was going to be years before I was capable of doing the work I did before.
That’s a brain-related network, so after my stroke, word spread that I was recovering and I started getting invitations to keynote about the brain and the ability of the brain to recover.
My brain was still recovering six, seven, eight years after the stroke.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The One Trait to Look For In a Partner”

A sizable portion of the dating pool is made up of people who think that all of the people they meet and date are untrustworthy, shallow, selfish, and manipulative.
You need to develop a nose for needy behavior, that is, behavior from someone who values your opinion of them more than their own.
What does needy behavior look like? Lying to impress you.
Hold yourself to a higher standard and the people around you will alter their behavior to meet that standard, or they’ll simply cease to be the people around you.3.
What’s most important to recognize is that the more manipulative behavior you have in yourself, the more manipulative behavior you will attract and encourage in everyone you date.
One Trait to Look For in a Partner Now, some people think my views towards romantic relationships are a little extreme sometimes.
The real question is, how do we deal with it? I previously pointed out how to notice emotionally manipulative behavior and how to avoid people who display it.
These are people who have problems and baggage and used them as a weapon with the people they date.

The orginal article.

Summary of “What Makes Ambition Come and Go?”

Doing the Most is a special series about ambition – how we define it, harness it, and conquer it.
I have a strange theory of ambition that involves thinking of life as a pie chart and ambition as a decorative stone dragon.
I’m not sure why I think of ambition as this lawn decoration, but I find it captures both the mysteriousness as well as the absurdity of ambition.
The Ambition Dragon has shown up in several of my life wedges so far.
Maybe with each success, ambition turns its nose in a slightly different direction.
I don’t think it’s possible to generate ambition, but I do think it’s possible to create a situation where ambition is more likely to poke its head up.
Sometimes ambition drives the work, and sometimes the work invites ambition.
In my mid-30s, the Ambition Dragon has made a comeback, both in my career and more noisily in the “Relationship” and “Family” wedges.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Let’s Hear It for the Four-Hour Working Day”

How much proper brainwork – not zoning out in meetings, or reorganising the stationery cupboard, but work that involves really thinking – should you aim to get done in one day? It sounds like a trick question.
Plus there are so many kinds of white-collar work: why assume the same answer for lawyers, academics, investment bankers and engineers? But the answer isn’t some sophisticated version of: “It depends.” The answer is four hours.
That, anyway, is the persuasive conclusion reached by Alex Pang in his book Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less.
This column has evangelised before about the truth of that subtitle, what with the nine-to-five being a relic of the industrial revolution with no relevance to modern “Knowledge work” – but what’s so striking about Pang’s argument is its specificity.
Charles Darwin worked for two 90-minute periods in the morning, then an hour later on; the mathematician Henri Poincaré from 10am till noon then 5pm till 7pm; the same approximate stretch features in the daily routines of Thomas Jefferson, Alice Munro, John le Carré and many more.
The point isn’t that the world would be a lovelier place if nobody felt forced to work long hours, though that’s true.
Adam Smith had it figured out: “The man who works so moderately as to be able to work constantly not only preserves his health the longest but, in the course of the year, executes the greatest quantity of work.” And Leonard Woolf, describing his and Virginia’s work habits, testified to the vast power of “Little and often”: “It is surprising how much one can produce in a year, whether of buns or books or pots or pictures, if one works hard and professionally for” – wait for it – “Three and a half hours every day.”
Crunching numbers from Africa and Australia, he calculated the average number of hours hunter-gatherers must work per day, to keep everyone fed.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Practical Way To Overcome Imposter Syndrome”

Every time you have a similar thought like that, you’re developing imposter syndrome.
“What if people call me out?” “I feel like a fake. I’m not the right person to talk about this.”
We experience imposter syndrome when we have to lead people, share our ideas, give advice, etc.
Over 70 percent of people have experienced the feeling of being a fake at one time in their life.
“I have many ideas for creating passive income around email courses, ebooks and interactive learning, but I am absolutely terrified of exposing myself and content online.I am worried that I will sound egotistical and that my content will be ridiculed. I also get performance anxiety when using social media, and when I used group chat channels on slack I end up saying things without thinking them through or over thinking them because I am so nervous that people are thinking that I’m an idiot.Darius, have you ever experienced these issues and if so how have you overcome them?”.
A lot of people think they are the center of the universe.
At the same time, I’m glad to see that people find my articles useful and that it helps them.
When I deal with imposter syndrome, I’m afraid that people think that I think know it all.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Answer Interview Questions to Make Hiring Managers Like You”

After you interview for a position, you may obsess over whether you gave the interviewer the “Right” answers to the questions.
By the time you reach the interview phase, your prospective employer already knows a lot about you.
Not only does this posture convey your interest to the interviewer, it will cause your interviewer to mirror your movements.
Prepare your responses to typical interview questions so that you have vocabulary at your disposal to talk about your qualifications, interests, and goals.
Be Positive The word you want on your interviewer’s mind at the end of the conversation is “Yes.” And that means that you want to make it as easy for your interviewer to be thinking about good things rather than bad ones.
The best way to do that is to focus on positive elements throughout your interview.
If you stay focused on the positive throughout your interview, you make it easy for your interviewer to think about the positive elements of your interview than the negative ones.
Obviously, throughout your interview, you also want to actually answer the specific questions you are asked.

The orginal article.