Summary of “How to Unlock Your Team’s Creativity”

If a team is creatively blocked, a first step for leadership is to examine whether the processes that surround people are holding them hostage in their thinking.
Reveal “Sticky floors.” Everyone possesses the foundation to become creative, which starts with team members believing in themselves as idea generators who have the ability to become a compelling voice for creative concepts.
As a leader, part of your role in managing teams is to use emotional intelligence to determine whether any team members are unknowingly holding themselves back from tapping into their talents and full potential.
If even one person hides their creative light under a bushel, the whole team suffers.
Take a proactive approach to address this issue: help the team member become aware of the sticky floor, and offer coaching and support around expressing innovative ideas within the team setting.
As part of coaching team members off of their sticky floors, it’s key to help them understand how to develop a growth mindset.
When encountering a sticky floor related to creativity, leaders should coach team members, explaining how the internal belief that they can become more creative helps them continue to develop their skills over time, learning from their mistakes and making improvements.
The goal of getting your team to think beyond the box is a no-brainer, but figuring out how to actually achieve greater group innovation isn’t.

The orginal article.

Summary of “The Dunning-Kruger effect, and how to fight it, explained by psychologist David Dunning”

David Dunning If there is a psychological principle that I think people should know more about, it’s the principle of naive realism.
Brian Resnick Something that I think is both funny and instructive about your work is that people often get the Dunning-Kruger effect wrong, and take away the wrong conclusions from it.
David Dunning There are some clues, I think, that come from the work of Philip Tetlock and his “Superforecasters” – which is that people who think not in terms of certainties but in terms of probabilities tend to do much better in forecasting and anticipating what is going to happen in the world than people who think in certainties.
David Dunning One of the things that really concerns me is that people really don’t make the distinction between facts and opinion.
What’s impressed me in the past few years is how much people not only author their opinions but author their factual beliefs about the world.
Brian Resnick Is there any insight at how you can get people more comfortable saying, “I don’t know?”.
David Dunning That’s an interesting question, because people seem to be uncomfortable about saying, “I don’t know.” That’s one thing we’ve never been able to get people to do.
How do you get people to say, “I don’t know”? I don’t know.

The orginal article.

Summary of “BuzzFeed Top Traffic Came From Quizzes Made by Teen for Free”

BuzzFeed Top Traffic Came From Quizzes Made by Teen for Free Rachel McMahon is a teen from Michigan you almost certainly haven’t heard of before this week.
Her name appeared in a blog post from BuzzFeed’s former head of quizzes and games, Matthew Perpetua, where he noted that McMahon was the “Second highest traffic driver worldwide” for the site’s quizzes.
McMahon has contributed hundreds of quizzes for free – BuzzFeed has for years allowed and encouraged so-called community users to submit quizzes without paying them – and says she never really had any idea how much traffic, and by extension revenue, she was bringing the company.
We had computers with us all the time and I would always get my deadlines done fast, so at free time me and my friend Katie would take quizzes.
If you go to your BuzzFeed account, there’s a dashboard and it shows you some of the viral trends and it also shows you your top posts in the last 30 days.
What really helped was when I got added to a BuzzFeed community Facebook page by BuzzFeed workers.
Like if it was near Christmas, they’d be like, “Oh it’s a Christmas challenge, make as many Christmas-related quizzes and post them in here and we’ll promote them.” The workers helped give me ideas on quizzes.
Toward the end of the year, BuzzFeed actually sent me a package with some clothes and water bottles, a recipe book, and a coffee mug – BuzzFeed swag stuff, I think you can actually buy it online.

The orginal article.

Summary of “If You Want A Dream Career, Ask Yourself These 3 Questions”

Have you ever thought about how long your career actually lasts? If you ask me, your career ends when your life ends.
You want to pick a career that gives you a good outlook.
The last thing you want to become is an unfulfilled career hopper.
A person who likes everything and picks a different career every two years.
That’s why you want to make a smart decision about what kind of career you pursue.
I’ve personally used the advice from the renowned management consultant, Peter Drucker, to create a career that’s fulfilling.
Answering these questions have helped me to create my dream career.
When you answer these three questions, I’m sure you will find your dream career.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Think You’re Special? That Just Proves You’re Normal”

Among the creepier experiences of modern life is one that happens to me, though definitely not just me, on a regular basis: I’ll meet a friend for a drink, he’ll recommend some book or film or product he thinks I’ll like, and then, within days – without searching for it online – I’ll start seeing targeted web ads for it.
There’s another reason Big Tech knows us so much better than we think, which is that each of us is far more normal than we realise.
All that’s really just a distraction from the brute statistical fact: on any given dimension, all else being equal, of course you’re probably normal.
Shorn of any value judgment, that’s all the word “Normal” means.
Your intelligence, your creativity, your tastes in culture or romantic partners, the degree to which the world has mistreated you: the chances are they’re much less quirky or extreme than you think, especially since we’ve each got strong ulterior motives to believe otherwise.
Or to put it another way: thinking you’re special is just one more way in which you’re normal.
This is the famous Lake Wobegon phenomenon known as “Illusory superiority”, which explains why most people think they’re above average at driving, at being unbiased, and various other things.
The trouble is that both the positive and negative forms of thinking you’re less normal than you are lead to misery – either by convincing you you’re unusually bad, or by turning life into an isolating, adversarial exercise in maintaining your sense of being unusually good.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey: The Rolling Stone Interview – Rolling Stone”

Co-founded Twitter in 2006, he had no idea he and his colleagues were creating what would become a universally accessible, global, seamless, 24/7 platform for tens of thousands of people to yell at him.
In two interview sessions – one over dinner at New York’s Blue Ribbon Brasserie, where he brought his own bottle of organic, low-alcohol wine; the other in a glass-doored conference room in Twitter’s bustling San Francisco headquarters – Dorsey addressed those challenges, and talked about his life, work, career and ideas.
After Dorsey was cast out of Twitter in 2008, he co-founded Square, the now-multibillion-dollar mobile-payment company – and his old company eventually pulled him back in.
It’s a sign of how the stakes have changed for you and for Twitter that no matter what you tweet, a fairly standard response is “Yeah, but get the Nazis off Twitter.”Yeah.
We built Twitter originally because we wanted to use it, and we fell in love with it.
Do you yourself have any degree of Twitter addiction? Do you compulsively check Twitter the way many of the rest of us do?In context, I do.
After you were removed as Twitter CEO in 2008, you came back in 2011, after founding another huge company, Square.
Did you come away from Twitter to Square with a newfound world-conquering ambition?No, I don’t want to conquer the world.

The orginal article.

Summary of “”When in Doubt, Play Insane”: An Interview with Catherine O’Hara”

“Schitt’s Creek,” which was created by O’Hara’s longtime collaborator Eugene Levy and his son, Daniel Levy, both of whom also star in the show, is a modern-day reverse “Beverly Hillbillies”: the Rose family, once the millionaire owners of a successful video-store chain, lose everything when their business manager commits fraud.
It’s a classic city-mouse/country-mouse story, but O’Hara’s Moira, with her vainglorious flair for the dramatic and her peacocking wardrobe, elevates the show to a new level of ecstatic eccentricity.
O’Hara played the wicked stepmother Delia Deetz in Tim Burton’s “Beetlejuice” and then spent the nineties as part of Christopher Guest’s troupe of oddballs, starring in his absurdist, unscripted mockumentaries “Waiting for Guffman,” “Best in Show,” “A Mighty Wind,” and “For Your Consideration.” During our free-wheeling conversation, we discussed Moira Rose, the origins of her collaboration with Levy, and the one idea that Christopher Guest would not let her put on film.
After we all agreed we were going to do the show, I had lunch with Daniel and Eugene Levy, and I knew we were going to talk about what I was going to look like.
The night before we shot that scene in “Best in Show,” where I would fall, and then Gerry Fleck would have to take over handling the dog, we were talking about the logistics, and I asked Chris, I said, “Do you think I could do this?” I walked away from him like that.
How did you think about show business from that standpoint, living in L.A.?
There’s such a freedom in the way Chris works, because you improvise, and you get it on film; then he can use whatever he wants, and cut whatever he wants or throw out whatever he wants, but it’s there.
Eugene said, “You might want to run that by Chris before we shoot.” I go, “Well, he can say no afterwards, he can not use it….” And Eugene said, “No, I think you might want to….”.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Before You Can Be With Others, First Learn to Be Alone”

Like many poets and philosophers through the ages, Poe stressed the significance of solitude.
Two decades later, the idea of solitude captured Ralph Waldo Emerson’s imagination in a slightly different way: quoting Pythagoras, he wrote: ‘In the morning, – solitude; that nature may speak to the imagination, as she does never in company.
In the 20th century, the idea of solitude formed the centre of Hannah Arendt’s thought.
What Eichmann showed Arendt was that society could function freely and democratically only if it were made up of individuals engaged in the thinking activity – an activity that required solitude.
We might ask, we become lonely in our solitude? Isn’t there some danger that we will become isolated individuals, cut off from the pleasures of friendship? Philosophers have long made a careful, and important, distinction between solitude and loneliness.
Echoing Plato, Arendt observed: ‘Thinking, existentially speaking, is a solitary but not a lonely business; solitude is that human situation in which I keep myself company.
In solitude, Arendt never longed for companionship or craved camaraderie because she was never truly alone.
Arendt reminds us, if we lose our capacity for solitude, our ability to be alone with ourselves, then we lose our very ability to think.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Four Books That Will Turn You Into A Practical Thinker”

One of the things that we never think about is the way we think.
Most people who meet me now think I’ve always been a practical thinker.
Practical thinking is a valuable skill that has helped me to solve complex problems in my life and career.
To learn practical thinking, you don’t have to study pragmatism because that’s boring.
Let’s get down to four books that helped me to become a practical thinker.
The reason I mention this book on this list is that life is not only about practical thinking.
From studying Steve Jobs, I learned how you can combine practical thinking with unpractical things like taste.
People without practical thinking remain starving artists.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How to Escape the Overthinking Trap: Stop Judging Yourself”

We are the only species that can really think “Offline” – wrapped up in things that haven’t yet happened or things that are long gone but can never be changed.
Critical thinking has undoubtedly advanced our cause and become one of the essential assets of being so brilliantly human, but introspective thinking – our near constant self-evaluation, who we are, where we fit, how we compare – is becoming one of the most destructive aspects of modern life.
We are in thrall to the rigid, judgmental thoughts we think about ourselves, prisoners of the sinewy web of cogitation that tells us we are strong, clever, important, unassertive, patriotic, hopeless, old, fat, hard done by, forgotten – when actually we may be many of these things rolled into one.
Our obsessive thinking about ourselves even informs the air of political revolt that made 2016 such a big turning point.
It embeds personal misery in an era in which we are tempted, even encouraged, to compare ourselves with other people: the teenager who feels low because of what her Instagram feed makes her think; the thwarted youngster, demoralised by the success of others; the employee who feels insecure because she thinks the boss blanked her on the stairwell; the hypochondriac who thinks he is dying of everything.
Too much of our behaviour is determined not by how things are, but how we think things are.
How to cultivate that sense of detachment from a poisonous, unhelpful or just plain wrong stream of thinking? Visual clues can help: a post-it on a computer screen or a screensaver on a phone.
Instead of ruining our short time alive by setting expectations of how we think everything should be, from our jobs to our love lives, our children to our prospects, let us accept that some things will not always go as we wish.

The orginal article.