Summary of “How to Escape the Overthinking Trap: Stop Judging Yourself”

We are the only species that can really think “Offline” – wrapped up in things that haven’t yet happened or things that are long gone but can never be changed.
Critical thinking has undoubtedly advanced our cause and become one of the essential assets of being so brilliantly human, but introspective thinking – our near constant self-evaluation, who we are, where we fit, how we compare – is becoming one of the most destructive aspects of modern life.
We are in thrall to the rigid, judgmental thoughts we think about ourselves, prisoners of the sinewy web of cogitation that tells us we are strong, clever, important, unassertive, patriotic, hopeless, old, fat, hard done by, forgotten – when actually we may be many of these things rolled into one.
Our obsessive thinking about ourselves even informs the air of political revolt that made 2016 such a big turning point.
It embeds personal misery in an era in which we are tempted, even encouraged, to compare ourselves with other people: the teenager who feels low because of what her Instagram feed makes her think; the thwarted youngster, demoralised by the success of others; the employee who feels insecure because she thinks the boss blanked her on the stairwell; the hypochondriac who thinks he is dying of everything.
Too much of our behaviour is determined not by how things are, but how we think things are.
How to cultivate that sense of detachment from a poisonous, unhelpful or just plain wrong stream of thinking? Visual clues can help: a post-it on a computer screen or a screensaver on a phone.
Instead of ruining our short time alive by setting expectations of how we think everything should be, from our jobs to our love lives, our children to our prospects, let us accept that some things will not always go as we wish.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Stop Overthinking Everything, According To Therapists”

“The word is derived from how cows digest their food. Cows chew, swallow, regurgitate, then chew again. This works well for cows but what humans chew over is our distressing thoughts. Ruminating therefore means to brood over upsetting thoughts by replaying them in our mind.”
While many problems are resolved by giving them careful thought and deliberation, Weherenberg explains that “Rumination is repetitive thinking – going over and over the same thought or problem without any resolution. A problem does not get solved: it intensifies by ruminating on it. It is simply repeating thoughts without mentally moving to a new perspective.”
As Winch describes it, “Ruminative thoughts are, by definition, intrusive. They pop into our minds unbidden and they tend to linger, especially when the thought is about something really upsetting or distressing.”
“Replaying distressing thoughts is like picking at emotional scabs because it brings up the distress each time we have the thought, and floods our body with stress hormones as a result,” says Winch.
“We can easily spend hours and days stewing in upsetting thoughts and by doing so putting ourselves in a state of physical stress and emotional distress. As a result, habitual rumination significantly increases our risk of developing clinical depression, impaired problem solving, eating disorders, substance abuse, and even cardiovascular disease.”
“Rumination becomes a habit of thought. It is a challenge to shift to another thought. A person who believes, ‘If I just think about it long enough I will figure it out,’ is making a mistake. The more habitual the thought, the harder it is to break it.”
Journal to get the thoughts out of your head. It might seem strange to give these thoughts more time in the spotlight, but I often tell ruminating clients to journal their thoughts.
Weherenberg recommends reclaiming order by making a blanket rule to interrupt your unneeded thoughts whenever they come up, and plan ahead for a positive thought to switch to.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Extrapolating Your Perceptions”

We often have these type of thoughts multiple times a day.
Scientists have quantified the speed of light and sound, but when it comes to thoughts, it’s not that easily measured.
Researchers that did experiments with measuring the speed of thought, found the following: Thoughts can be generated and acted upon within 150 milliseconds.
Have you ever tried measuring how many random thoughts that pop up in your mind? Just do a simple experiment.
I wouldn’t be surprised if I have 2300 more thoughts in my subconscious.
Here’s the trick: Don’t follow through on those thoughts.
You’re not a slave to your thoughts or other people’s actions.
Just stop thinking about what everything means and start looking at things for what they are.

The orginal article.

Summary of “How To Get Rid Of The Thoughts That Are Clogging Your Brain”

You’re thinking all the time, and yet, you never think about how much time you spend thinking.
I’ll tell you why it’s a mistake to assume positive thoughts are good.
Let’s talk about the difference between positive thoughts and negative thoughts.
What most self-help advice says is, scrap the negative thoughts and double down on the positive thoughts.
Positive thoughts should make our lives better, right?
The only way to stop identifying yourself with your thoughts is to stop following through on all your thoughts.
Every time you start thinking, don’t follow through, just observe how you start thinking.
It’s called THINK STRAIGHT. Check it out if you want to learn more about controlling your thoughts.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Stop Spending So Much Time In Your Head”

I bet you spend A LOT of time in your head. You know, thinking, worrying, stressing, freaking out – call it whatever you want.
“A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”
Before I learned that skill, I would spend hours and hours inside my head. Just think about how much you think.
Put your brain to use and think about how you can solve problems.
If you’re constantly thinking, it’s because you haven’t’ trained your mind yet.
You’re probably thinking so much that you’re missing out of life.
If your answer is no, you definitely need to get out of your head. Stop thinking and start feeling.
Now, you might think: “How do I train myself to stop thinking useless thoughts?” Awareness.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Suicide Survivors and How They Coped”

Some stories about suicide are hopeful: For every person who dies by suicide each year, another 280 people think seriously about suicide but do not kill themselves, according to data from the CDC and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
“People see stories all the time about those surviving breast cancer, heart disease and stroke, and we know what that recovery looks like-it helps people who are experiencing it, or someone whose mom just got diagnosed,” says Shelby Rowe, a youth suicide prevention program manager for the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services.
She often thought about how to turn ordinary scenarios, like waiting for the subway or crossing the street, into suicide attempts.
“It’s mind-bending how there’s such a gap between what works-suicide-specific treatments based on the best scientific support-and what’s actually done, which is to hospitalize and medicate,” says David Jobes, director of the Suicide Prevention Laboratory at Catholic University and a clinician for more than 30 years.
Another treatment, Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, is a 12-session talk therapy for those who attempted suicide that focuses on how they respond to stressful situations and manage their emotions.
Even though many mental health professionals would classify suicide as a public health crisis-it’s the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the CDC, and rates have risen in every single state except Nevada since 1999-studying it is not always a priority.
Last year, the National Institutes of Health spent more money researching asthma than suicide and suicide prevention.
She co-founded Prevent Suicide Pennsylvania, a statewide suicide prevention organization, and works as a suicide prevention trainer and speaker.

The orginal article.

Summary of “A Candid Conversation With Vince Gilligan on ‘Better Call Saul’ – Rolling Stone”

Perhaps the most surprising thing about Better Call Saul – other than the fact that many Breaking Bad fans have said they prefer the spinoff, and even the ones who disagree don’t find that a ludicrous notion – is how it’s become beloved for the exact opposite reason that its creators expected it to be.
Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould – and for that matter, all of us at home – assumed the fun of the prequel would be in spending more time with Bob Odenkirk in the role of Walter White’s shyster lawyer Saul Goodman; it was a way for the show to fill in blanks in the Heisenberg-verse.
The question we should’ve ask ourselves from the beginning; “Is Saul Goodman an interesting enough character to build a show around?” And the truth is, we came to the conclusion, after we already had the deal in hand [and] AMC and Sony had already put up the money, “I don’t think we have a show here, because I don’t think we have a character who could support a show.” He’s a great flavoring, he’s a wonderful saffron that you sprinkle on your Risotto.
Because the show is named Better Call Saul, we thought that we had to get to this guy quick or else people will accuse us of false advertising – a bait and switch.
The analogy holds when you get to the writer’s room with Better Call Saul.
To see the character properly arrive at a nexus point with Better Call Saul.
We’re enjoying this overlap between Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul that we’re continuing to arrive at.
I’m so glad. I never thought anyone would come up to me and say, “I like Better Call Saul better than Breaking Bad.” If you had asked me before we started, “Would that bother you if someone said that?” First of all, I would have said, “That’s never gonna happen. And yeah, it probably would bother me.” It doesn’t bother me a bit.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why Solutions to Problems Suddenly Pop into our Minds”

While not actually working on the problem at all, a possible solution would pop into his mind.
Why do solutions to problems suddenly pop into our minds?
The brain’s networks of neurons are highly interconnected, so there seems little scope for assigning different problems to different brain networks.
If the brain solves problems through the cooperation computation of vast networks of individually sluggish neurons, then any specific network of neurons can work on just one solution to one problem at a time.
Whether mathematical, musical, or of any other kind, is the very antithesis of a routine, specialized problem with a dedicated brain network: On the contrary, thinking about such problems will need to engage most of the brain.
What is special about such problems is that you can’t solve them through a routine set of steps-you have to look at the problem in the “Right way” before you can make progress.
Poincaré’s description of his particular method of solving mathematical problems suggests why he was particularly susceptible to brilliant flashes of insight.
Crucially, for Poincaré, mathematical problems were transformed into perceptual problems: and with the right perceptual intuition, the creating a proof would be relatively routine, if slow.

The orginal article.

Summary of “Why we should learn to embrace failure”

The dress took up residence like an unwanted tenant, a constant reminder of my failure.
The more I thought about it, the more I realised that the biggest, most transformative moments of my life came through crisis or failure.
Books such as Adapt: Why Success Always Starts with Failure by Tim Harford and The Art of Failing by Anthony McGowan have added grist to the notion that failure can be distilled into something more positive if the right alchemy is applied.
His attitude towards failure was that it was a matter of how one perceived it, and he felt his life thus far had been blessed rather than cursed.
He gave me three, deliberately playful examples of failure including “Once getting out [at cricket] when I had made 98 and chipped a return catch to the bowler” and the occasion on which he came second in a prestigious Italian literary prize.
Phoebe Waller-Bridge, who won a Bafta for writing and starring in the feminist sitcom Fleabag, found a certain “Glory in failure [because] fighting so hard to be so in love with someone with all that passion in your 20s and teens and then throwing everything at it and it’s not working, or there being so much pain – that is the stuff that so much creativity comes out of. So it’s out of those painful break-ups or miscommunications – or just horrible sticky one-night stands – that you grow in those moments, and so I value them all.”
If I had to list my three major failures, right up at the top would be the failure of my marriage.
My failure to have children at the time when all my contemporaries were having babies and moving closer to good schools made me reassess what I could get from the life I already had. If motherhood wasn’t going to be part of the future I had always imagined for myself, where else would I find fulfilment?

The orginal article.

Summary of “Take your time: the seven pillars of a Slow Thought manifesto”

In the tradition of the Slow Movement, I hereby declare my manifesto for ‘Slow Thought’.
Looking up momentarily from his reading, the scholar greeted his erstwhile pupil after the Holocaust, the founding of Israel and many wars: ‘Oh, Joel, I am reading Plato, would you like to join me?’ Like pilpul and the relational dialogue, Slow Thought has a life of its own.
‘ Slow Thought, like the Latin vivere vitam, has no object but, like life itself, is embodied in focal practices that allow us to live more fully in an atemporal present, freed from the burden of an imperfect past or the futile promise of a redemptive future.
Slow Thought is a porous way of thinking that is non-categorical, open to contingency, allowing people to adapt spontaneously to the exigencies and vicissitudes of life.
The ‘play’ or tolerance of Slow Thought means not only that rules will be broken but that a rupture in thought is possible.
There is a family resemblance of Slow Thought to other gestures in the history of thought.
Slow Thought is a counter-method, rather than a method, for thinking as it relaxes, releases and liberates thought from its constraints and the trauma of tradition.
In this sense, we can group Slow Thought as an edifying philosophy and as an anti-philosophy, the way that Nietzsche, Wittgenstein and Derrida examine the tools and methods of thought to clarify genealogies, to rid us of pseudo-problems, and to reveal latent, unknown and disavowed roots, meanings and traces of words.

The orginal article.